From 5 Questions to 5 Reflections: A Residency Leadership “Sign-Out” During COVID-19—Part 1
Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part blog post. Check back next week for the second-part of this blog post with the final 2 reflections.  As a chief resident and program director in our internal medicine residency program, we set out at the end of academic year 2019–2020 to prepare the annual sign-out for the incoming chief medical residents and launch a new academic year. This exercise is typically straightforward, a practice refined over years of repetition. However, this academic year had been defined by the sentinel crisis of the entire medical enterprise: the COVID-19 pandemic. In this tw...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 10, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective COVID-19 leadership residency Source Type: blogs

Supporting and Advancing Women in Medicine: Advice from the Academic Medicine Editorial Team
The October issue includes a collection of articles on women in medicine, including one with advice from Dr. Cathy DeAngelis derived from her 5 decades in academic medicine. In a new episode of the Academic Medicine Podcast out now, women members of the journal’s editorial team share their own advice for supporting and advancing women in the field today.   This episode is now available through the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read the article that inspired this episode, “A Long, Adventurous Journey: Reflecting on 50 Years as a Woman in Academic Medicine,&...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 27, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Guest Perspective Academic Medicine podcast gender pay gap mentorship scholarly writing scholarship scientific collaboration setting goals storytelling women in medicine Source Type: blogs

Supporting and Advancing Women in Medicine: Advice from the Academic Medicine Editorial Team
The October issue includes a collection of articles on women in medicine, including one with advice from Dr. Cathy DeAngelis derived from her 5 decades in academic medicine. In a new episode of the Academic Medicine Podcast out now, women members of the journal’s editorial team share their own advice for supporting and advancing women in the field today.   This episode is now available through the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read the article that inspired this episode, “A Long, Adventurous Journey: Reflecting on 50 Years as a Woman in Academic Medicine,&...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 27, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Guest Perspective Academic Medicine podcast gender pay gap mentorship scholarly writing scholarship scientific collaboration setting goals storytelling women in medicine Source Type: blogs

Ensuring Equal Access and Appropriate Remediation: Evaluating Struggling Students With Disabilities
Author’s Note: This blog post uses person-first (students with a disability) and identity-first (disabled student) language to honor and acknowledge the contrasted preferences of persons with disabilities. As enthusiastic supporters of disability inclusion in medicine, it can be disheartening when we witness disabled students struggle. Regrettably, faculty are almost never taught how to appropriately approach remediation for students with disabilities. Traditional methods of remediation alone are insufficient, leading to inappropriate student failure, potential dismissal, or failure to fail for fear of legal reper...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 20, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective disabilities equity evaluation remediation Source Type: blogs

Voter Mobilization: A Powerful Tool for Health Equity
As voiced by the late Congressman John Lewis, “The vote is the most powerful nonviolent tool we have to make change in a democratic society.” For health care professionals, it is also a powerful tool for helping our patients and their families make change in their communities. Together, we must empower our colleagues and patients to vote. Voting and health are inherently linked, as discussed by Gordon in his 2016 Academic Medicine article, “How Can Physicians Educate Patients About Health Care Policy Issues?” In this article, Gordon notes how voting is our primary means of selecting the governmen...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective health equity patients voter moblization Source Type: blogs

Hold the Phone: The Importance of Telehealth Curricula in Medical Education
Re-entering clinical rotations amidst the COVID pandemic introduces a host of uncertainties for medical students. Chief among them, navigating the unknown frontier of telemedicine. Medical education prepares medical students extremely well for taking a history, observing the patient, and completing a physical exam when the patient is present. However, after a COVID-related hiatus, I learned that my first rotation back would be a combination of in-person and telemedicine pediatric encounters. As a medical student, I have been taught the importance of a complete and thorough physical exam to test my diagnoses. When I thou...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 29, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective COVID-19 curriculum telehealth telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Addressing Race and Racism in Medical Education
On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and assistant editor Dr. Dorene Balmer (@dorenebalmer) and guests medical students Bri Christophers (@BriChristophers) and Naomi Nkinsi (@NNkinsi) discuss how race is portrayed in medical education and what individuals and institutions should do to address racism in the curriculum and learning environment.  This episode is now available through the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read the article discussed in this episode, “Changing How Race Is Portrayed in Medical Education: Recommendations From Medical Students,...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 15, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Trainee Perspective Academic Medicine podcast curriculum learning environment medical school race portrayal racism Source Type: blogs

Addressing Race and Racism in Medical Education
On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and assistant editor Dr. Dorene Balmer (@dorenebalmer) and guests medical students Bri Christophers (@BriChristophers) and Naomi Nkinsi (@NNkinsi) discuss how race is portrayed in medical education and what individuals and institutions should do to address racism in the curriculum and learning environment.  This episode is now available through the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read the article discussed in this episode, “Changing How Race Is Portrayed in Medical Education: Recommendations From Medical Students,...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 15, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Trainee Perspective Academic Medicine podcast curriculum learning environment medical school race portrayal racism Source Type: blogs

New Collection of Articles on Addressing Race and Racism in Medical Education
Academic Medicine is committed to assisting medical schools and teaching hospitals, their faculty and trainees, and the public in learning more about complex issues and strategies to acknowledge, repair, and transcend racism to make academic medicine not only more inclusive and diverse but also more focused on a vision of human mutuality. To this end, a collection of previously published Academic Medicine articles has been posted on the journal’s website. The collection was curated by us: assistant editors, Dr. Dorene Balmer and Dr. Irene Alexandraki, with the assistance of Toni Gallo (staff editor) and Dr. Kristin M...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 1, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Academic Medicine medical education race racism Source Type: blogs

Gender Segregation by Specialty in Medicine
In 2017, for the first time, more than half of medical school matriculants in the U.S. were women. And in 2019, nearly half of new faculty hires across academic medicine were women. At the same time, some specialties have a much higher or lower proportion of women faculty and residents. On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and associate editor Dr. John Coverdale and guests Drs. Elaine Pelley (@ElainePelley) and Molly Carnes (@Molly_Carnes) discuss gender segregation by specialty in medicine, what it looks like, how it came about, and the implications for women and the field of medicine.  This episo...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective Academic Medicine podcast specialty women in medicine workforce Source Type: blogs

Gender Segregation by Specialty in Medicine
In 2017, for the first time, more than half of medical school matriculants in the U.S. were women. And in 2019, nearly half of new faculty hires across academic medicine were women. At the same time, some specialties have a much higher or lower proportion of women faculty and residents. On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and associate editor Dr. John Coverdale and guests Drs. Elaine Pelley (@ElainePelley) and Molly Carnes (@Molly_Carnes) discuss gender segregation by specialty in medicine, what it looks like, how it came about, and the implications for women and the field of medicine.  This episo...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective Academic Medicine podcast specialty women in medicine workforce Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine Call for an Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement
Academic Medicine is seeking trainee applicants for the role of Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement (AETE). Created as part of the Advancing Trainees as Leaders and Scholars (ATLAS) initiative, the AETE works closely with the journal’s editor-in-chief and editorial staff to develop resources and complementary content for and by trainees. Key Duties The AETE will lead the ATLAS initiative, working with the editorial staff on projects and events to foster trainee engagement (e.g., annual call for trainee-authored letters to the editor, Twitter chats, author and reviewer resources). In addition, the AETE will ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 10, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Academic Medicine ATLAS call for editors new position trainee engagement Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine Call for an Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement
Academic Medicine is seeking trainee applicants for the role of Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement (AETE). Created as part of the Advancing Trainees as Leaders and Scholars (ATLAS) initiative, the AETE works closely with the journal’s editor-in-chief and editorial staff to develop resources and complementary content for and by trainees. Key Duties The AETE will lead the ATLAS initiative, working with the editorial staff on projects and events to foster trainee engagement (e.g., annual call for trainee-authored letters to the editor, Twitter chats, author and reviewer resources). In addition, the AETE will ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 10, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Academic Medicine ATLAS call for editors new position trainee engagement Source Type: blogs

The Management Script in Action: Putting a Practical Tool to Work
In our recent Academic Medicine Perspective, we proposed the term “management script” as a concept for teaching management reasoning. Analogous to the illness script, an essential component of diagnostic reasoning, management scripts are high-level, precompiled, conceptual knowledge structures of the courses of action that a clinician might undertake to address a patient’s health care problem(s). Not to be confused with a checklist, where specific interventions are mandated in a sequence, management scripts are more like a menu: a collection of options in various categories (e.g., appetizers, courses, des...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured care management decisions clinical decision making residency training residents Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine Cover Art Feature Undergoes Refresh, Temporarily Closes New Submissions
Academic Medicine is excited to announce that our Cover Art feature is getting a refresh! In preparation, the feature is now temporarily closed for new submissions. Please stay tuned for a relaunch of Cover Art through an organized call for new submissions in spring 2021. Thank you for helping for us make the Cover Art feature such an integral part of the journal since the feature launched in 2008. We have enjoyed all of your art over the years and are eager to share more details of the relaunch when available. We can’t wait to see your new submissions when we issue the call! (Source: Academic Medicine Blog)
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured humanities in medicine medical education Source Type: blogs

One Medical Student ’ s COVID-19 Journey
Hosts Toni Gallo and editor-in-chief Dr. Laura Roberts (@_Roberts_Laura) and guest Caurice Wynter (@md_wynter) discuss COVID-19. Caurice, a fourth-year medical student, shares her COVID-19 story, the health inequities she and her family faced try to get care, and the insight she gained from navigating the health care system as a patient, a family member, and a medical student. This episode is now available through the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read the complete collection of COVID-19 articles published in Academic Medicine on our website. New content is added ever...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 14, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Trainee Perspective bedside manner COVID-19 health disparities medical student Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine Earns Impact Factor of 5.354, Highest Ever!
Clarivate Analytics released its 2019 Journal Impact Factors (JIFs), and Academic Medicine earned a JIF of 5.354. It places us at the top of the Education, Scientific Disciplines category for the fifth year in a row. It also places us third in the Health Care Sciences & Services category. In addition to having the top JIF in our category, Academic Medicine maintained its status as a highly-cited journal with more than 17,600 citations in 2019 (about 2,000 more than the previous year). The JIF for a given year is calculated by dividing the number of citations during that year to articles that w...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 1, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured academic medicine journal journal impact factor Source Type: blogs

I Joined Twitter to Teach
I joined Twitter to teach. In May 2016, I started tweeting “questions of the day” for my inpatient hospital medicine team at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital from @RJmdphilly. #GreenQOD (“Green” is our teaching service, and “QOD” for question of the day) was born in the days of only 140 characters per tweet (now expanded to 280), which placed a potentially daunting onus on brevity in phrasing—and answering—clinical questions. My inaugural question? “What’s the real story with beta blockers in reactive airway disease? If increase risk is real, how do yo...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - June 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective social media teaching Twitter Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine Call for an Associate Editor
Academic Medicine is seeking applications for an associate editor to join the editorial team of the journal. The new associate editor will work closely with the editor-in-chief, associate editors, and the editorial staff in evaluating manuscripts, making publication decisions, engaging with authors, and participating in the processes of the journal as it continues to evolve to better serve academic medicine and the health professions. The associate editor will also have opportunities to contribute to the Academic Medicine Podcast, curate special collections, and plan ways to expand the journal’s r...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - June 29, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Academic Medicine call for editors new position Source Type: blogs

Clinician Well-Being During COVID-19
On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and associate editor Dr. Colin West (@ColinWestMDPhD) and guest Dr. Jonathan Ripp discuss the state of clinician well-being during COVID-19 and how it’s similar or different to what we’ve seen before. Dr. Ripp talks about what he and his colleagues at Mount Sinai are doing to identify and mitigate stressors for clinicians and support their workforce. And the group looks to the future and what well-being issues we might see as a result of the pandemic. This episode is now available through the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - June 9, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective Academic Medicine podcast COVID-19 well-being workforce Source Type: blogs

Reflections on the Penn State-Jefferson Program
I was a member of the third class of the Penn State University-Jefferson University 5-year accelerated BS-MD program and graduated in 1970. I feel very fortunate to have participated in this program. Missing 3 years of formal schooling and the resulting financial savings were extremely worthwhile. There were no special activities at Penn State for participants of the program, though we did get first choice of classes because we needed to fit in all of our science classes. I found the coursework and instruction to be of a high quality. Socially, most of my friends were regular Penn State students. This was different at Jeff...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - June 2, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective accelerated program BS/MD program medical school Source Type: blogs

Well-Being and the Learning Environment: Systems-Level Changes to Reduce Burnout and Depression in Learners
On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and assistant editor for trainee engagement Dr. Jesse Burk Rafel (@jbrafel) and guest Dr. Lotte Dyrbye (@dyrbye) discuss burnout in medical students and residents, including new recommendations from the National Academies about systems-level changes to foster well-being in learners.  This episode is now available through iTunes and the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read Dr. Dyrbye’s commentary, “Redesigning the Learning Environment to Promote Learner Well-Being and Professional Development,” discussed in ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - May 19, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective burnout learning environment medical students residents well-being Source Type: blogs

The Premedical-Medical Program Prepares the MD Well and Faster, but Motivation Remains Key
I graduated from the Penn State University/Thomas Jefferson University premedical-medical program (i.e., their accelerated BS-MD program) in 2004, as a 6-year programmer (colloquially known as a Prog). I matched at Jefferson for my emergency medicine residency, serving as chief resident in my senior year. July 2020 will mark the start of my fourteenth year as a Jefferson attending physician. I read the recent Academic Medicine article by Gonnella and colleagues with great interest. Since 2004, I have often thought of my time as a Prog. One of the most meaningful experiences of my life, the program substantially impacted...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - May 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective accelerated program BS/MD program medical school Source Type: blogs

It Is Time to Radically Shift Our Perspective About Nonadherence
The End of Nonadherence Improving patient adherence has been a decades-long priority for nearly every health care stakeholder1—except for patients. It is well known that poor medication adherence is responsible for both avoidable spending and avoidable poor health outcomes—yet there have not been adherence marches in the streets demanding that people take their medication as prescribed. Whether or not we as providers choose to hear them, patients are telling us: Nonadherence is a system failure, not a patient problem. In a recent article for Academic Medicine, we introduce the IDEAS framework for optimal tea...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - May 5, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective adherence health care health system patient centered care Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine ’s Response to COVID-19
When the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in the United States just 3 short months ago, perhaps few would have predicted the profound effects we are now experiencing throughout our society. One thing, however, was always certain: those who care for patients, teach, learn, and conduct research at academic health centers would find themselves on the front lines of this nation’s response to the global pandemic and soon would have knowledge and insight about their experiences to share. Between the end of February and mid-April, Academic Medicine has already received nearly 80 submissions from authors around the wo...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Academic Medicine COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

The Generosity of Health Professionals Across Academic Medicine in Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic
On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and editor-in-chief Dr. Laura Roberts (@_Roberts_Laura) and guest Dr. Alison Whelan (@AlisonWhelanMD) discuss how academic medicine is responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact the crisis has had on the many mission areas of the field. They also discuss how the pandemic is affecting health professionals at all levels as well as the lasting changes to medicine and medical education that we might see, including how society views and values health professionals. This episode is now available through iTunes and the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective Academic Medicine podcast coronavirus COVID-19 health professions medical education pandemic Source Type: blogs

Call for Letters to the Editor From Trainees: Courage, Connection, and COVID-19
Academic Medicine is seeking original submissions for our Letters to the Editor feature from medical students, residents, and fellows on the topic of courage, connection, and COVID-19. The global pandemic of COVID-19 reached the United States in January 2020, and people throughout the world have been affected by this virus in some way.  Education of health professionals has shifted quickly and dramatically, and academic health centers where we all learn, discover, and serve patients and society are on the front line of the fight against COVID-19.  In this unprecedented time, we want to hear how COVID...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 9, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured call for papers fellows medical students residents Source Type: blogs

The Art of Education Research: Reflections on the Philosophy of Science Series
I think each of us, sometime in our life, has wanted to paint a picture. –Bob Ross1 I’m a former arts teacher who ended up working in health professions education (HPE) research. I absolutely love my job, but I never could have imagined I’d end up working in this field. And what a pleasure it is to be part of this community—it’s a wonderful world, full of generous, thoughtful people. I love that HPE research allows me to combine my interest in thinking critically about education with my drive to do creative work. Planning a research project—taking an idea from concept to publication (...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 7, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective Uncategorized health professions education philosophy of science research Source Type: blogs

A Little Bit Country, A Little Bit Rock ‘N Roll: Using Different Paradigms to Conduct Your HPE Work
On the Academic Medicine Podcast, hosts Toni Gallo and associate editor Dr. Bridget O’Brien (@bobrien_15) and guests Drs. Lara Varpio (@LaraVarpio) and Anna MacLeod (@ammacleod) discuss the recently published Philosophy of Science series. This collection of articles has something for everyone. It includes primers on 7 different paradigms (or collections of ideas about how we see the world) to help readers think about their HPE work in new ways. This episode is now available through iTunes and the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read the articles discussed in this episode, ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - March 26, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective HPE philosophy of science research Source Type: blogs

My Infertility Journey as a Woman in Medicine
Editor’s Note: For more on the challenges as well as strategies to address physician infertility, please read this Academic Medicine Invited Commentary, cowritten by the author of this blog post. Most of us in medicine pride ourselves on being organized, detail-oriented, conscientious and able to achieve excellent results with enough hard work—and are not used to failure and loss of control. My experience with infertility has been the first time that I truly experienced failure and complete loss of control, realizing that fertility is not a merit-based system. No matter how hard I try, how many do...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - March 11, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective infertility physician well-being women in academic medicine Source Type: blogs

Book Review: Elderhood: Redefining Aging, Transforming Medicine, Reimagining Life
The age demographics of the world’s population are changing. In 2015, 9% (617.1 million people) of the globe’s estimated 7.3 billion people were aged 65 years and older.1 That number is projected to increase to 12% (1 billion people) by 2030 and to 17% (1.6 billion people) by 2050.1 Within the United States, a rise in the percent of the population aged 65 and older, from 13.7% in 2012 to a projected 20.3% by 2030,2 will inevitably impact the makeup of the patient population throughout the American health care system. According to a recent New York Times article, a federal model estimates 30% of those over 65 wo...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 25, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective book review elderhood geriatrics late-career transitions Source Type: blogs

Here ’s How We Did It: Eliminating Barriers of Early Medical Education Scholarship
Although a randomized, controlled education study may be the ultimate goal in medical education research, a new attending physician may not possess the confidence, experience, or skills to do so in year one. In our Academic Medicine Last Page “Hit the Ground Running: Engaging Early-Career Medical Educators in Scholarly Activity,” we encourage our physician colleagues to broaden the scope of what counts as medical education scholarly work by presenting four tips for learning the landscape, four types of presentation-based work, and four types of publication-based work in order of complexity. To supplement this g...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective faculty development medical education scholarship mentorship scholarly publishing Source Type: blogs

Tips for the Medical Educator ’s “Elevator Pitch”
Ever wonder what to say when you’re standing next to a senior colleague who could help further your work? Cue your elevator pitch! In this video, David Acosta, MD, and Daniel Hashimoto, MD, MS, demonstrate what to do (and what not to do) to successfully deliver your med ed elevator pitch. The tips in this video are adapted from Dzara K, Kesselheim J. Going up? Tips for the medical educator’s “elevator pitch.” Acad Med. 2018;93:1884. (Source: Academic Medicine Blog)
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Multimedia Video elevator pitch medical educator professional development Source Type: blogs

How to Empower Medical Residents to Speak Up and Share Their Suggestions for Change
Medical residents are experts on work “how it’s done,” as they work at the frontline of health care delivery day in day out. This means that they are valuable sources of information to improve the quality of health care. However, my colleagues’ and my research, presented in a recent Academic Medicine article, suggests that residents tend to remain silent when they have ideas for change. In short, they feel that it is not safe to speak up or that it would not make a difference. In this blog post, I offer suggestions for how to empower medical residents in your training program or organization to shar...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - January 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective quality improvement quality of care residents speaking up Source Type: blogs

What Should Academics Know About Lobbying Law?
Academics sometimes get a bad rap for being stuck in their ivory towers. But many academics realize that their expertise can be useful to policymakers and aim to make it widely available through a variety of avenues. We write op-eds, publish in policy-oriented journals, send letters to elected officials, write amicus briefs, submit comments on proposed regulations, serve on advisory committees, and offer testimony. At the current political moment, these types of public engagement and advocacy activities are particularly salient for academics doing work relevant to health and science policy, topics at the top of the nationa...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - January 14, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective academic advocacy faculty health policy law lobbying Source Type: blogs

Illness Scripts 101: The Medical Student ’s Guide to Quickly Creating a Differential Diagnosis
When I started medical school three years ago, I did not know that I was entering a profession in which I would constantly race the clock. However, in the era of expanding patient volumes, it has become imperative for health professionals to use their time efficiently. So, what is a young, energetic, and eager medical student to do when the attending physician assigns 20 minutes to see a patient and present a differential diagnosis with a plan? Use illness scripts! Illness scripts are mental cue cards that health professionals use to represent a certain disease, like they’re described in a recent Academic Medicin...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - December 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Trainee Perspective clerkship diagnostic reasoning medical education medical students Source Type: blogs

#Shemergency Reflections: An Inside Look at an Innovative Professional Development Group to Promote the Recruitment and Retention of Female Residents
Conclusion R.G. and E.T.: We are proud to be a part of the #Shemergency movement and hope it continues to grow in the future. We are both looking forward to future events, including an upcoming simulation session focusing on code leadership skills. By: Rachel Gartland, MD, and Erica Tabakin, MD Further Reading Khatri UG, Love J, Zeidan A, Hsu CH, Mills AM. #Shemergency: Use of a professional development group to promote female resident recruitment and retention [published online ahead of print August 27, 2019.] Acad Med. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002969 (Source: Academic Medicine Blog)
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - December 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective gender inequities professional development women in medicine Source Type: blogs

Why Does the Harvard Case on Asian American Discrimination in Admissions Matter for Academic Medicine?
In 2014, Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA), led by activist Edward Blum, filed a suit against Harvard University, contending that the Harvard admissions process unfairly discriminates against Asian American applicants. The SFFA further argued that to remedy this outcome, Harvard must remove considerations of race and ethnicity in its holistic admissions approach. In a recent Academic Medicine Perspective, we summarized the arguments made by both the SFFA and Harvard in the case and discussed the implications for medical education admissions. We clarified the difference between claims of anti-Asian American discrimina...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - December 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective diversity and inclusion Harvard case holistic admissions Source Type: blogs

The Role of Podcasts as Educational Tools in Medical Education
Joining the Academic Medicine Podcast to discuss the current role of podcasts as educational tools in medical education, new research on the topic, and why podcasts are here to stay are guest host and assistant editor for trainee engagement Dr. Jesse Burk-Rafel (@jbrafel), podcasters Drs. Shreya Trivedi (@ShreyaTrivediMD) and Jess Mason (@JessMasonMD), and researcher Dr. Jeff Riddell (@Jeff__Riddell). This episode is now available through iTunes and the Apple Podcasts app and wherever else you get your podcasts. Read more about this topic, including the article discussed in this episode, at academicmedici...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 18, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective communities of practice GME medical education personalized learning podcasts Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine Call for Volunteer Assistant Editors
Academic Medicine is seeking applications for volunteer assistant editors. The assistant editor role is characterized by Working closely with the editor-in-chief, associate editors, and editorial staff on matters related to manuscript review and decision-makingParticipating in regular teleconferences with the editorial teamStrengthening experience and skills related to writing, reviewing, and editing content for scholarly publicationAttending annual Academic Medicine editorial board meetings Successful candidates will demonstrate a strong interest in medical education and scholarly publishing. Priority will be given...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured call for editors medical education scholarly publishing Source Type: blogs

Attending Learn Serve Lead 2019: The AAMC Annual Meeting?
Stop by Booth #518 in the Phoenix Convention Center North Building: Hall BCD!  You can pick up a copy of recent issues of Academic Medicine and chat with our editorial staff. Participate in one or both of our sessions on writing, scholarship, and the medical education literature! Friday, November 8 11:00 am – 12:30 pm, Convention Center West: 101 Writing Effective Titles and Abstracts: Making Your Scholarship Stand Out  Sunday, November 10 10:30 am – 11:45 am, Convention Center North: 127 A Conversation Among Readers, Editors, and Authors About the Medical Education L...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured academic medicine journal Learn Serve Lead Source Type: blogs

Exploring Students ’ Interprofessional Health Systems Science Experiences From a Communities of Practice Perspective: What We Learned and What’s Next?
Looking back on my training, I gained an early appreciation of what other health professionals could do. Perhaps this was because, as someone who aspired to be a geriatrician since medical school, I observed many different ways in which an interprofessional team optimized my older adult patients’ health by skillfully addressing their medical and psychosocial needs. However, many of my peers had a different experience due to only brief and sporadic opportunities for interprofessional collaboration, which was not an explicit learning objective of our medical school and residency education. Fortunately, since I finis...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective health systems science interprofessional Source Type: blogs

Why Electronic Health Records Should Be Wikified
Clinical documentation is an inescapable part of a clinician’s everyday experience. It is one of the “arts” of medicine rarely formally taught. Instead, most clinicians learn how to write a note in call rooms and side halls, usually through some hasty teaching by a harried resident. The clarity that is asked of medical students is too often replaced by the brevity insisted upon by long hours and heavy workloads. Electronic health records (EHRs) are essentially digital recreations of paper charts without leveraging how technology can be an improvement over paper.  Unfortunately, despite their advan...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective academic medical center electronic health records medical education patient care Source Type: blogs

The Echoes of Patient Safety Events: Errors in Third Year
Conclusion/Takeaways These stories are constantly shaping us; when we notice, think, and share them, how can it not be for the better? None of these stories has an end, because we remember them; they echo. There is multifaceted value in their retelling and reworking, clinically and personally. The curriculum provides students with a platform (the structured assignment), mentorship (the physician reader), and dialogue within a community of peers (the class debrief). It provides faculty with new eyes: the emotion and introspection that can blur with long practice. Together the pieces of the curriculum remind us how much st...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective medical errors medical students patient safety Source Type: blogs