Exploring Students ’ Interprofessional Health Systems Science Experiences From a Communities of Practice Perspective: What We Learned and What’s Next?
Looking back on my training, I gained an early appreciation of what other health professionals could do. Perhaps this was because, as someone who aspired to be a geriatrician since medical school, I observed many different ways in which an interprofessional team optimized my older adult patients’ health by skillfully addressing their medical and psychosocial needs. However, many of my peers had a different experience due to only brief and sporadic opportunities for interprofessional collaboration, which was not an explicit learning objective of our medical school and residency education. Fortunately, since I finis...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective health systems science interprofessional Source Type: blogs

Why Electronic Health Records Should Be Wikified
Clinical documentation is an inescapable part of a clinician’s everyday experience. It is one of the “arts” of medicine rarely formally taught. Instead, most clinicians learn how to write a note in call rooms and side halls, usually through some hasty teaching by a harried resident. The clarity that is asked of medical students is too often replaced by the brevity insisted upon by long hours and heavy workloads. Electronic health records (EHRs) are essentially digital recreations of paper charts without leveraging how technology can be an improvement over paper.  Unfortunately, despite their advan...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective academic medical center electronic health records medical education patient care Source Type: blogs

The Echoes of Patient Safety Events: Errors in Third Year
Conclusion/Takeaways These stories are constantly shaping us; when we notice, think, and share them, how can it not be for the better? None of these stories has an end, because we remember them; they echo. There is multifaceted value in their retelling and reworking, clinically and personally. The curriculum provides students with a platform (the structured assignment), mentorship (the physician reader), and dialogue within a community of peers (the class debrief). It provides faculty with new eyes: the emotion and introspection that can blur with long practice. Together the pieces of the curriculum remind us how much st...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective medical errors medical students patient safety Source Type: blogs

Appearance-Based Discrimination in GME Resident Selection
Societal awareness of racial, gender, and ethnic bias has increased, but other stigmatized groups remain at risk for exclusion. It is important to consider lesser known forms of bias and their potential for influencing behavior. To this end, in our recent Academic Medicine article, we used the application photograph to study the impact of applicants’ physical appearance on the selection of radiology residents, and found that the applicant’s obesity and facial attractiveness strongly influenced decisions to grant residency interviews. We found this unfortunate pattern of appearance-based discrimination acros...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 24, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective appearance-based bias graduate medical education resident selection Source Type: blogs

Addressing Reviewer Comments Recap: Key Takeaways and Additional Resources
So far this week, we’ve shared tips for addressing reviewer comments that have come from the literature, longtime Academic Medicine authors, editorial board members, and the editorial staff. If you missed any of these, you can find them here. Today, we’d like to close the series by highlighting some key takeaways from the advice and tips we’ve shared this week and sharing some additional resources for authors. Key Takeaways 1. Getting a revise decision is good news! The reviewers and editors believe in your paper. 2. Acknowledge and thank the reviewers for their efforts. 3. When workin...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 13, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Addressing Reviewer Comments Series Archive Featured author resources peer review scholarship writing series Source Type: blogs

Staff Suggestions for Addressing Reviewer Comments
To complement the advice from our longtime authors and editorial board members that we shared earlier this week, today we’re sharing suggestions from the Academic Medicine editorial staff. This post is part of a series on tips for addressing reviewer comments during the revisions part of the publication process. You can read the other posts in the series here. Importance of addressing editor comments Revising your manuscript to address reviewer and editor comments can take a lot of time and effort. You may (understandably!) be tired by the time you get through the reviewer comments. But don’t forget to ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Addressing Reviewer Comments Series Featured author resources peer review scholarship writing series Source Type: blogs

Editorial Board Member Suggestions for Addressing Reviewer Comments
To complement the tips for addressing reviewer comments from longtime Academic Medicine authors that we shared yesterday, today we’re sharing suggestions from Academic Medicine editorial board members. This post is part of a series on tips for addressing reviewer comments during the revisions part of the publication process. You can read the other posts in the series here. Arno K. Kumagai, MD, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, and Wilson Centre, and Women’s College Hospital and University of Toronto 1.  Acknowledge the work and attention that the reviewers have p...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Addressing Reviewer Comments Series Featured author resources peer review scholarship writing series Source Type: blogs

Author Suggestions for Addressing Reviewer Comments
To complement the tips for addressing reviewer comments that we shared yesterday, today we’re sharing suggestions from longtime Academic Medicine authors. This post is part of a series on tips for addressing reviewer comments during the revisions part of the publication process. You can read the other posts in the series here. Daniel J. Schumacher, MD, MEd, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine It’s important to not take reviewer comments personally. They want to see the paper published or they would not have asked for revisions...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Addressing Reviewer Comments Series Featured author resources peer review scholarship writing series Source Type: blogs

Tips to Move from “Revisions Needed” to Resubmission
As an author, you may struggle when you receive a decision letter that requires revisions to your manuscript. Where do you start? How do you address everything the reviewers have asked? How do you organize your changes and convey them to the journal’s editors? This week, we’ll be sharing tips for addressing reviewer comments. Each day we’ll offer suggestions, from the literature, longtime Academic Medicine authors, editorial board members, and the editorial staff, to help you navigate this challenging (but exciting!) part of the publication process. Be sure to check back each day for new content. You ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Addressing Reviewer Comments Series Featured author resources peer review scholarship writing series Source Type: blogs

Call for Letters to the Editor From Student and Resident Authors: Firsts
Academic Medicine is seeking original submissions for our Letters to the Editor feature from medical students, residents, and fellows on the topic of “first” experiences during health professions education. “First” experiences are wide-ranging and include, for example, the first time a learner engages in taking a history, making a new diagnosis, assisting in delivering a baby, caring for a patient at the end of her life, or working on an interprofessional team. “First” experiences are central to the formation of one’s identity as a physician and often tie to larger issues w...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured call for papers trainee Source Type: blogs

Breaking the Silence Around Shame in Medical Education
As a child, I was deemed good at math. And so my fourth-grade teacher expressed surprise when I scored an 89% on a test. After passing out our grades, she called me to her desk. I remember feeling very small as I stood before her in my green and yellow plaid tunic, the uniform at my Catholic school. She looked at me sternly, pointed to my score, and asked, “What happened?” I now recognize that the emotion I experienced in that moment was shame. Whereas guilt is an emotion focused on a specific action, shame is a global feeling about oneself. Rather than thinking, “I made a mistake,” the way I fe...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: ATLAS Featured Trainee Perspective Academic Medicine podcast medical education resilience shame well-being Source Type: blogs

“ I need you to forgive yourself ” : Shame in Medicine and Medical Education
Joining the Academic Medicine Podcast to discuss shame in medicine and medical education and their research and other work in this area are Will Bynum (@WillBynumMD), Lara Varpio (@LaraVarpio), and Ashley Adams (@AshleyAdamsMD). This episode is now available through iTunes and the Apple Podcast app, Spotify, GooglePlay, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. Read more about these topics, including the articles discussed in this episode, at academicmedicine.org and theshameconvo.com. A transcript of this episode is available upon request from academicmedicine@aamc.org. Disclaimer: The views expr...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 19, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective Academic Medicine podcast medical education medical student resident resilience shame well-being Source Type: blogs

Being Lost and Found: How Being a Caregiver Shaped Me
As a palliative care physician, I often spend time with patients and families talking about their hopes, worries, and sources of strength. Part of this work involves helping people confront uncertainty in what lies ahead and be able to hold opposing truths as they face serious illness. You can feel the best you’ve felt in months and still be dying of cancer. You may not be able to get out of bed and be completely dependent on others, and still find joy in every day moments with your loved ones. I think of caregiving in the same way. It is a hard, humbling, isolating adventure that veers your life in a direction you d...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 13, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective caregiver care caregivers physician-patient relationship Source Type: blogs

Why I Spoke with the Dalai Lama About Compassion in Medicine
I distinctly recall the moment I decided to become a physician.  I was sitting on a bench in the hallway of Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn, beside my aunt and older cousin, as we waited for the physicians to complete their examination of my beloved grandmother, in her early 90s, who was seriously ill.  She doted on all of her grandchildren, particularly me, as I was the youngest.  I loved my grandmother dearly.  I recall seeing the doctors, dressed in their white uniforms, emerge from her room, holding her life in their hands.  They eagerly reported what turned out to be good news, and thankfull...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 23, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective compassion humanism in medicine medical education patient care Source Type: blogs

Learning Humanism from Surgeons
Surgeons are not necessarily known for their bedside manner. The stereotypical surgeon is arrogant and aggressive, is sometimes wrong but never in doubt, and values holding a scalpel much more than a patient’s hand. Yet both of us were drawn to the operating room by surgeon role models who were quite the opposite: caring, humble, steady, and prioritizing their patients above all else. Now well into residency, we have observed that most surgeons at our institution fit this latter description much better. And while they constantly inspire and motivate us, rarely do we have the opportunity to learn about what inspires a...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: ATLAS Featured Guest Perspective humanism in medicine professionalism qualitative research residents Source Type: blogs

How Medical Educators Can Manage Students ’ Professionalism Lapses in Three Clear Steps
When I became a medical educator, I experienced attending to medical students’ professionalism lapses as a demanding and time-consuming task. I had never been taught how to respond to these lapses, and the literature did not provide clear guidelines. To find out how colleagues in the medical education field handled this issue, my colleagues and I took up a research study, conducting in-depth interviews with faculty responsible for remediation at various U.S. medical schools. In this way, we learned that the approach these experts use consisted of three separate phases, which we developed into a road map in our recent...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective medical education medical students professionalism quality and patient safety Source Type: blogs

Advancing Trainee Leaders and Scholars (ATLAS): A New Initiative From Academic Medicine
Academic Medicine recently launched the Advancing Trainee Leaders and Scholars (ATLAS) initiative, which I will oversee as the journal’s inaugural Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement. So, you might be wondering, who am I and why ATLAS? I hope this blog post will help answer those questions! Who am I? I’m a 3rd-year internal medicine resident at NYU Langone Health in New York City, and am planning to pursue a career as an academic hospitalist. As mentioned above, I will serve as the inaugural Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement, overseeing the ATLAS initiative. My term will last until summer 2020, ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: ATLAS Featured learners Source Type: blogs

A Conversation with Darrell Kirch
Darrell Kirch, MD, president and CEO of the Association of American Medical Colleges (@AAMCtoday), joins the Academic Medicine Podcast to discuss his work at the AAMC and as part of the Coalition for Physician Accountability; important issues in medical education today including physician well-being, competency-based medical education, and GME selection and training; and the future of academic medicine. This episode is now available through iTunes and the Apple Podcast app, Spotify, GooglePlay, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. Read more about these topics, including the articles discussed in t...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective AAMC Coalition for Physician Accountability competency-based medical education Darrell Kirch physician well-being resident selection Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine Named Top Journal in Education, Scientific Disciplines Again!
Clarivate Analytics released its 2018 Journal Impact Factors (JIFs), and Academic Medicine has earned a JIF of 5.083. It places us at the top of the Education, Scientific Disciplines category for the fourth year in a row. It also places us fourth in the Health Care Sciences & Services category. In addition to having the top JIF in our category, Academic Medicine maintained its status as a highly-cited journal in the field with more than 15,000 citations in 2018 (over 1,300 more than last year). The JIF for a given year is calculated by dividing the number of citations during that year to artic...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - June 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured academic medicine journal journal impact factor Source Type: blogs

Academic Medicine Announces Next Editor-in-Chief
As we look ahead to the end of David Sklar’s term as editor-in-chief at the end of this year, we are excited to announce that Laura W. Roberts, MD, MA, has been selected as the next editor-in-chief of Academic Medicine! Dr. Roberts will begin her five-year term on January 1, 2020, becoming the second female editor-in-chief since the journal was founded in 1926. She has served as editor-in-chief for the journal Academic Psychiatry since 2002 and has been a member of the editorial board for Academic Medicine since 2013. Dr. Roberts is chairman of and the Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memo...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - June 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Academic Medicine David Sklar Editor in Chief Laura Roberts Source Type: blogs

Code Yellow: Hurricane Harvey at the Hospital
“Code Yellow.” I will never forget those words being called over the hospital intercom. In a state of disbelief, I began frantically searching through every policy and procedure handbook I could find. I knew living on the Texas coast that a hurricane was a possibility but never thought it would become a reality. So, when the trajectory and intensity of Hurricane Harvey shifted course and headed straight for Corpus Christi, I was in shock. That shock quickly turned to focus when I realized I had to formulate a plan. Our Designated Institutional Official (DIO) had not taken a vacation in over 5 years. When he...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - June 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective community engagement disaster preparedness Hurricane Harvey residency Source Type: blogs

#ThrowbackThursday: On the Journey to Achieve Health Equity: Teaching the Next Generation of Physicians
Editor’s Note: In honor of #ThrowbackThursday, we are highlighting this 2015 blog post from our archives. For more on strategies aimed at improving population health and health equity, check out “Advancing Population Health at Academic Medical Centers: A Case Study and Framework for an Emerging Field” in the June 2019 issue of Academic Medicine. I have worked on minority issues, equity, and social justice for as long as I can remember. As a kid, I grew up in Pennsylvania on a small farm, while most of my family lived in the Bronx. From an early age I could see the systemic inequities in education and o...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - May 30, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective academic health centers health disparities health equity medical students population health Source Type: blogs

Branded by Doodling: How Recognizing the Power of Brands Changed My Career
A scribble on a piece of scrap paper reoriented my academic career. Twice. The first time, I was sitting across the desk from a colleague in her office at the University of Wisconsin. I had driven up from Chicago to begin work on a simulation curriculum we were developing to help prepare trainees for the emotional challenges encountered when engaging in global health work. “It needs a name,” we thought. Something that would make it easy to talk about internally as we started a multi-institutional pilot. We began jotting down key words on the back of our notes in search for an acronym, finally coming to a swe...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - May 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective academic product branding Source Type: blogs

The Implications of the ECFMG 2023 Changes for the Physician Workforce
In 2010, the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) announced a new policy. Starting in 2023, all international medical graduates seeking ECFMG certification to complete graduate medical education training in the US must have graduated from a medical school accredited by an agency that has been formally recognized by the World Federation for Medical Education. Discussing this new policy and its workforce and other implications for physicians in the US and abroad are Sean Tackett (@stacket1) and Dale Dauphinee and Academic Medicine editor-in-chief David Sklar and senior staff editor Toni Gallo (@Aca...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 30, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective ECFMG FAIMER international medical graduates medical school accreditation workforce Source Type: blogs

#ThrowbackThursday: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Ambiguity in Professional Practice: Re-Engineering the Notion of Expertise in High-Stakes Situations
Editor’s Note: In honor of #ThrowbackThursday, we are highlighting this 2014 blog post from our archives. For more on how to navigate ambiguity, check out “A Philosophical Approach to Addressing Uncertainty in Medical Education” in the April 2019 issue of Academic Medicine. At 10 years old, I had the dream of becoming an astronaut. Not one who flies space shuttles…I wanted to be a flight surgeon. I dreamed of being in a situation where I had to take control of a health care emergency in space. At the same time, my country, Colombia, was going through the worst violence and social crisis in it...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective medical education medical students patient care quality improvement Source Type: blogs

The Academic Medicine Podcast is now available on Google Play, Spotify, and Stitcher!
Not an Apple Podcast user? Have another favorite podcast app? Or just new to podcasts? The Academic Medicine Podcast is now available on Google Play, Spotify, and Stitcher in addition to SoundCloud and iTunes. Subscribe today wherever you get your podcasts so you don’t miss an episode! Meet medical students and residents, clinicians and educators, health care thought leaders and researchers. Episodes chronicle the stories of these individuals as they experience the science and the art of medicine. Guests delve deeper into the issues shaping medical schools and teaching hospitals today. Listen as the conversat...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Audio Featured From the Editor Academic Medicine podcast Google Play iTunes SoundCloud Spotify Stitcher Source Type: blogs

The Role of Clinical Reasoning and Cognitive Bias in Diagnostic Error
Discussing clinical reasoning, cognitive bias, and diagnostic error and their implications for physicians and training programs are editor-in-chief David Sklar and senior staff editor Toni Gallo (@AcadMedJournal) and Dan Mayer, an emergency medicine physician who has taught on diagnostic errors and medical decision-making for more than 30 years. This episode is now available through iTunes and the Apple Podcast app, SoundCloud, Stitcher, and Spotify. Read more about this topic, including the report by Royce and colleagues and the article by Ely and colleagues, which are discussed in this episode, at academicmedicine...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective clinical reasoning cognitive bias diagnostic errors diagnostic reasoning medical decision-making Source Type: blogs

When DACA Recipients Seek to Match: Some Tips from the Trenches
As the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine has been something of a flagship institution for the movement to enable qualified recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program to matriculate into medical school, we are increasingly being asked for tips for DACA recipients applying to residency. We sent our first five graduates who were current DACA recipients to residency positions on July 1, 2018, and recently matched nine more on Match Day 2019. Two of us have navigated this system as DACA recipients. So, we have some success under our belts. We’ve learned that there are ma...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - April 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective Trainee Perspective DACA Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals medical student residency residency application Source Type: blogs

A New Norm: The Amplified Stress of Applying to Residency
“Promise me you’ll stay near the computer until I’m done, in case I get another invite today!” My Ob-Gyn residency interview started in 10 minutes. I should have been mentally preparing; instead, I was going over instructions with my mom (again) for watching for other residency interview invitations. My mom kept her promise, but there was still a 15-minute period during which my inbox was unwatched and an invitation arrived. By the time my mom saw it, all the interview spots had filled, and I was automatically waitlisted. I was devastated, and my mom was torn with guilt. Two months (and a lo...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - March 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective residency the Match trainee wellness Source Type: blogs

Transfer of Learning and the Pervasiveness of Context: Overcoming the Effect of Context During Debriefing
Throughout my career as a simulation educator, I noticed that students would often return to the simulation center to go through a case that was very similar to previous cases they’d managed, whether or not they’d successfully managed the previous cases. Yet, despite our best efforts at providing feedback through quality debriefing, they could not apply the previously acquired knowledge and skills into this new, similar situation (i.e., transfer of learning would not occur). This is a constant finding in the cognitive psychology and transfer literature.1–3 We looked at this literature to come up with t...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - March 19, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective debriefing learners teaching Source Type: blogs

Beyond Facilitating Communication: The Value of Designated Interpreters
A few months ago, my sign language interpreter tapped me on the shoulder. “Your colleague is giving a newcomer a tour. They’re talking about where she can find tea in the building.” Tea! Glorious Earl Greys and calming fruit herbals! I rose to say hello and, not only did I learn about an important (and free) source of caffeine, but I also bonded with my colleagues. As a physician with hearing loss, I firmly believe in the designated interpreter (DI) model described by Wyatte Hall and colleagues in their recent Academic Medicine article. Dr. Hall and I both would be lesser clinicians without our DIs, no...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - March 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Trainee Perspective deaf physicians designated interpreter health care teams inclusion medical education Source Type: blogs

Book Review: Continuing Professional Development in Medicine and Health Care: Better Education, Better Patient Outcomes
The imperative that physicians and all health care professionals must engage in lifelong learning to remain professionally competent has been a recurring theme for decades. The default has been to rely on lectures, the traditional continuing medical education (CME) format, and journals to convey needed information. Now it is recognized that the pace of change—as reflected by estimates of the doubling time of medical knowledge, which have decreased from 7 years in 1982, to 3.5 years in 2010, and is projected to be 73 days in 20201—has accentuated the difficulties of remaining competent, let alone current, and th...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - March 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective book review continuing medical education continuing professional development Maintenance of Certification Source Type: blogs

Reflexivity: Tips for Cultivating the Mind of an Anthropologist
In this study, my co-authors and I sought to explore resident and faculty perspectives on how institutional culture influences the impact of feedback, feedback seeking, and receptivity (About politeness…). Often, I learn more from the research process than the results. Setting the scene: Based on previous research, we believed that our participants would perceive institutional culture as a major influence on all aspects of feedback. The first step was to acknowledge these beliefs and revisit them as we collected, analyzed, and interpreted data. We jotted down our opinions about feedback culture in a journal and e...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 19, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective qualitative research scholarly publishing Source Type: blogs

To Pull Back the Curtain on Shame in Medical Education, I Had to Start With Myself
The moment I made the error—an unfathomable vaginal laceration caused by my hands during the vacuum-assisted delivery—it felt as if a massive floodlight, centered right over my head, descended on me. All eyes in the room, aghast at my error and its outcome, bore straight through me. A rush of anxiety and fear flushed down my body, and I felt an overwhelming urge to disappear. So, I did. I slipped out quietly and eventually hid myself on other side of the labor and delivery unit, in a corner of a room, on the floor, behind a chair. That’s when the really painful feelings hit me. With an acute, dizzying sen...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - February 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective medical students residents shame Source Type: blogs

Meet the Academic Medicine Editorial Board: What experience has had the biggest impact on your career?
We asked the members of the Academic Medicine editorial board about the experience that has had the biggest impact on their career. This is what they said. Colin P. West, MD, PhD, Mayo Clinic I don’t know that I can pick out one single experience. Instead, I think the general principle that has served me well is to ensure that every project I work on offers intentional value: I am passionate about it directly, or it is a conduit to other projects I care about deeply, or I will gain a new skill set by participating. John P. Sánchez, MD, MPH, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School The one experience that had the...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - January 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Editorial Board Q & A Featured CPD curriculum international medical education MedEdPORTAL mentoring narrative medicine professional development research teaching Source Type: blogs

Creating Family-Friendly Learning Environments: Parental Leave and Other Policies in GME
Joining editor-in-chief David Sklar and senior staff editor Toni Gallo (@AcadMedJournal) to discuss their personal experiences with parental leave and other policies that can help create more family-friendly training environments for physicians are recent and current residents Ariel Sklar, Alli Webb, and Michael Maguire. Guests also discuss the graduate medical education learning environment and the implications of these issues for trainees and their institutions. This episode is now available through iTunes, the Apple Podcast app, and SoundCloud. Read more about this topic, including the report by Blair and colleagues and...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - January 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Trainee Perspective GME learning environment medical education parental leave residency Source Type: blogs

Patients Are People to Be Helped, Not Conditions to Be Treated
When I was trying to figure out where to attend medical school, someone I sought advice from told me, “Almost nobody asks where I did my medical school training. I could have almost done the first two years in the library by myself!” It distressed me that I could, in theory, attend a top school and still spend half of my time there studying in a library. Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin, described in a recent Commentary for Academic Medicine, had a different value proposition. The school purposefully structured the curriculum so that I couldn’t be stuck in a library for the first t...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - January 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Trainee Perspective bedside manner medical education patient care physician-patient relationship Source Type: blogs

The Implications of Physicians ’ Late-Career Transitions and Retirement Decisions
How do we think about the entirety of a physician’s career? Discussing the individual, institutional, and workforce implications of physicians’ late-career transitions and retirement decisions in this new episode of the Academic Medicine Podcast are editor-in-chief David Sklar, senior staff editor Toni Gallo (@AcadMedJournal), and authors Karen Leslie, MD, MEd (@karenraven) and Joanna Cain, MD. This episode is now available through iTunes, the Apple Podcast app, and SoundCloud. Read more about this topic, including Dr. Leslie’s article and Dr. Cain’s article which were discussed in this episode, at ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - December 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective career development continuing professional development faculty development late-career transitions retirement workforce Source Type: blogs

Author Reading: n = 1
“I did not want to take for granted relationships with my loved ones—a girlfriend, a friend, a family member, a patient. For them I needed to create a new perspective, one where n = 1 and where the one in front of me matters most.” Physician Adam Weiner reflects on balancing time spent on work and time spent with those he loves. This new episode of our podcast is now available through iTunes, the Apple Podcast app, and SoundCloud. Adam’s essay was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the December issue of Academic Medicine. Further Reading Weiner AB. n = 1. Acad Med. 2018;93:1820...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - December 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Trainee Perspective medical education research residency teaching and learning moments work-life balance Source Type: blogs

Self-Proctored and Self-Developed: How a Flexible Preclinical Medical School Curriculum Enables Personal and Professional Development
“Did you drop out of school without telling us?” my dad asked with a chuckle. Throughout my preclinical years at the University of Michigan Medical School, we enjoyed this running joke because I rarely attended lectures and was often out of town on weekends visiting loved ones instead of studying in the library. Contrary to my dad’s suspicions, I successfully completed my preclinical requirements with a strong foundation of medical knowledge. I did not achieve this with a photographic memory, but rather with the support of my school’s unique preclinical curriculum that offered on-demand lecture vide...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - December 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Trainee Perspective flexible testing medical students professional identity professionalism unproctored testing Source Type: blogs

What ’s New and In the Queue for Academic Medicine
  What’s New: A Preview of the December Issue The December issue of Academic Medicine is now available! Read the entire issue online at academicmedicine.org. Highlights from the issue include: San Juan Bautista School of Medicine’s Experience in the Aftermath of Hurricane Maria Brugal and Pérez discuss San Juan Bautista School of Medicine’s actions and lessons learned in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria hitting Puerto Rico in 2017. Going Up? Tips for the Medical Educator’s “Elevator Pitch” Dzara and Kesselheim provide tips for developing an effective professional missi...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - December 4, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Issue Preview empathy faculty development medical education medical student wellness medical students professionalism social determinants of health Source Type: blogs

Author Reading: Snapback
“He was hesitant, but truths spoken truthfully can make a world of difference between not-so-different strangers. And he liked that my subjects and verbs did not match, that my r’s rolled, and that my s’s turned into lisps. This part—this sound—was familiar to him.” Physician Claudia Miranda reflects on an encounter with a patient who reminded her of her childhood, who reminded her of the connection between patients and doctors and the many ways they can be linked together. This new episode of our podcast is now available through iTunes, the Apple Podcast app, and SoundCloud. Claudia Mir...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 27, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective cultural humility doctor-patient relationship language patient care Source Type: blogs

Redesigning Residency for Connection and Resilience
Editor’s Note: For more on the topic of social connection and burnout, please see this Academic Medicine article. For even more on burnout, be sure to check out this collection. Meaningful connections matter. Meaningful connections are those relationships that nourish us, that make us feel the opposite of anonymous—from a patient’s smile, to a shared laugh with a co-resident, to an attending’s pat on the back. On a day-to-day level, these connections with the people around us sustain us, make us resilient, and prevent burnout. Having recently completed internal medicine residency, I can attest that ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Trainee Perspective burnout medical education medical student wellness residency residents Source Type: blogs

Author Reading: Lorraine
“I traced in my mind our timeline of visits every other month, as I got to know Lorraine and the rest of her family. We celebrated many triumphs and mourned countless setbacks together, relating to her health and to her kids.” Physician Emily Gordon reflects on her memories of one patient, Lorraine, who taught her about the role that family plays in healing and in health. This new episode of our podcast is now available through iTunes, the Apple Podcast app, and SoundCloud. Emily Gordon’s essay was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the November issue of Academic Medicine. Further Re...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Guest Perspective bedside learning doctor-patient relationship family patient care Source Type: blogs

Hijacking the Hallway Conversation: How Sponsorship Supports Career Development
Sponsorship, as highlighted in Gottlieb and Travis’ recent article in Academic Medicine, is all about the “hallway conversations” and having someone partake in those conversations who believes in and will vouch for you.  And it is the sponsor’s trust in you that, in turn, pushes you to believe that you actually have the capabilities they envision. Let me tell you about an unexpected hallway conversation that changed my life. The CEO of my institution’s medical group bumped into my research mentor in the hallway one day. The CEO expressed that population health and value-based payment mode...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective career development mentorship sponsorship women in medicine Source Type: blogs

What ’s New and In the Queue for Academic Medicine
What’s New: A Preview of the November Issue The November issue of Academic Medicine is now available! Read the entire issue online at academicmedicine.org. Highlights from the issue include: Addressing Student Burnout: What Medical Schools Can Learn From Business Schools Pathipati and Cassel use their business and medical school experience to outline three business school practices—fostering creative thinking, providing stress management training, and offering career counseling—that may help alleviate the problem of burnout among medical trainees. Reexamining the Call of Duty: Teaching Boundaries in ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Featured Issue Preview Uncategorized assessment medical student wellness medical students women in academic medicine Source Type: blogs

Author Reading: Et Tu?
“I wondered to myself … knowing what I now did, would I be comfortable seeing this patient again? Could I rely on myself to give careful, considerate thought to his overall well-being? Would I be willing to be his doctor?” Medical student Walter Klyce describes coming to terms with caring for a patient who made racist comments during a clinical encounter. This new episode of our podcast is now available through iTunes, the Apple Podcast app, and SoundCloud. His essay was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the October issue of Academic Medicine. Further Reading Klyce W. Et tu?. Acad ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 30, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Trainee Perspective bedside learning doctor-patient relationship patient care professionalism teaching and learning moments Source Type: blogs

Meet the Academic Medicine Editorial Board: What Was Your First Publication?
Do all medical educators start out by publishing advanced research? Or do some try their hand at something else first? We asked the members of the Academic Medicine editorial board about their first publication. This is what they said. M. Brownell Anderson, National Board of Medical Examiners Except for serving as editor of my high school newspaper, my first publication was: Soler NG, Mast TA, Anderson MB, Kienzler L. A logbook system for monitoring student skills and experiences. J Med Educ. 1981;56:775-777. My first publication as first author was: Anderson MB, Mast TA, Soler NG. A required internal medicine precept...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 23, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Journal Staff Tags: Editorial Board Q & A Featured Academic Medicine Anthony R. Artino Jr Brenessa Lindeman Bridget C. O’Brien Carrie L. Byington Christopher S. Candler Colin P. West Denice Cora-Bramble Grace Huang John P. Sánchez M. Brownell Ander Source Type: blogs

Author Reading: Birds of Prey
“We stood together, not as doctor and patient, but as lovers of the written word arrested by its enduring beauty.” Internal medicine resident Dominic Decker describes connecting with a patient, not over her diagnosis or treatment but over their shared love of poetry. This new episode of our podcast is now available through iTunes, the Apple Podcast app, and SoundCloud. His essay was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the October issue of Academic Medicine. Further Reading Decker D. Birds of prey. Acad Med. 2018;93:1453. (Source: Academic Medicine Blog)
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Audio Featured Trainee Perspective bedside learning narrative medicine patient care teaching and learning moments Source Type: blogs

The Med in Social Media: The Role Twitter Can Play in the Medical Student Toolkit
Medical school is a melting pot of passions and intellect. Therefore, I was surprised when it was here that I felt, for the first time, alone in my interests. I had fallen in love with the idea of using social media as a health care tool for both patients and providers. However, this concept is still in its infancy. With colleagues dedicated to so many different projects, it was difficult to convince them to join a movement that is still finding its place in medicine. Additionally, many of us are wary of putting our professional reputations at risk before they even have a chance to form. Statements made on social media in ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - October 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Trainee Perspective medical education social media Twitter Source Type: blogs