95% Of Baby Foods Tested Contain Lead, Arsenic, Or Other Toxic Metal

By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Toxic heavy metals damaging to your baby’s brain development are likely in the baby food you are feeding your infant, according to a new investigation published Thursday. Tests of 168 baby foods from major manufacturers in the US found 95% contained lead, 73% contained arsenic, 75% contained cadmium and 32% contained mercury. One fourth of the foods contained all four heavy metals. One in five baby foods tested had over 10 times the 1-ppb limit of lead endorsed by public health advocates, although experts agree that no level of lead is safe. The results mimicked a previous study by the Food and Drug Organization that found one or more of the same metals in 33 of 39 types of baby food tested. Foods with the highest risk for neurotoxic harm were rice-based products, sweet potatoes and fruit juices, the analysis found. “Even in the trace amounts found in food, these contaminants can alter the developing brain and erode a child’s IQ. The impacts add up with each meal or snack a baby eats,” the report said. The tests were commissioned by Healthy Babies Bright Futures, which calls itself an alliance of scientists, nonprofit organizations and donors trying to reduce exposures to neurotoxic chemicals during the first months of life. Rice-based foods Infant rice cereal, rice dishes and rice-based snacks topped the list of most toxic foods for babies. “These popular baby foods are not only high in inorgan...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Consumer Featured Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news

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