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This Caribbean Island Was Evacuated After Irma. Now, the Pets Left Behind Are Going Feral
A fleet of hurricane-battered pickup trucks drives through a desolate, waterlogged street of the Caribbean island of Barbuda. Startled by the noise, dogs emerge from a roofless bungalow and begin to snarl as Zifforah ‘Ziffy’ Tyrell, 29, jumps out of a truck and throws a bucket-full of dog food at the aggressive-looking pack. “Don’t shoot,” Tyrell says. In a second car, an army officer who is accompanying this rag-tag team of Barbudan animal activists and volunteers had raised his rifle. The soldier nods and Tyrell slowly moves back to the passenger seat of the truck, shouting: “Let&rsquo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John / Barbuda Tags: Uncategorized antigua and barbuda hurricane irma Source Type: news

Tattoo ink particles can spread into lymph nodes
Conclusion If you already have a tattoo, there's nothing in this study that should alarm you. It doesn't show that people with tattoos are more likely to get cancer, despite the scaremongering headlines. The researchers explain how tattoo pigments are picked up as "foreign bodies" by the body's immune system and are then stored in the skin and lymph nodes. But they can't tell us what effects this process has on our health. The researchers weren't told any medical information about the donor samples, such as any diseases they had (including cancer) or the cause of donors' deaths. The study also has other limitatio...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

The future of EU workers is ‘ a fight that ’ s too important to lose ’
As hundreds of EU migrants, including UNISON members, rallied in Trafalgar Square last night in defence of their rights, London Mayor Sadiq Khan told them: “This is a fight that’s too important to lose.” The rally followed a Westminster lobby, during which dozens of MPs and peers signed a pledge to guarantee the rights of both EU citizens in the UK and British citizens in the EU. It was the second lobby of Parliament this year, with UNISON members from all over the country and from all walks of the public sector again urging their MPs to end the uncertainty of EU citizens over whether they will be able to...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 14, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Demetrios Matheou Tags: Article News BREXIT eu migrant migrant workers NHS NHS staff Source Type: news

This Girl Tr òn: The Forgotten Subject of Vietnam War Photographer Larry Burrows
Larry Burrows was a seasoned veteran of the Vietnam War when, in early 1968, he met 12-year-old Nguyễn Thị Tròn. Operating out of Saigon, the southern Republic of Vietnam’s capital, the photographer had been covering the conflict for LIFE magazine since 1962. He shadowed American troops, documenting ferocious firefights, surviving hours in the air with helicopter-gunship crews, and freeze-framing harrowing moments of bravery and despair, exhaustion, and appalling violence in combat zones. Though much of his best work had been shot in the thick of the action, he had come to be haunted by the trauma visited ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gary Jones/ Suối Đá Tags: Uncategorized Larry Burrows LIFE Magazine photography Vietnam Vietnam War Source Type: news

Iron deficiency warning: Could YOU spot symptoms of these three RARE diseases?
IRON deficiency is one of the possible causes of a rare disease called pica syndrome where sufferers eat everything from paint to faeces. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Structure of a symmetric photosynthetic reaction center-photosystem
Reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that drive photosynthesis by converting light into chemical energy. It is believed that they arose once from a homodimeric protein. The symmetry of a homodimer is broken in heterodimeric reaction-center structures, such as those reported previously. The 2.2-angstrom resolution x-ray structure of the homodimeric reaction center–photosystem from the phototroph Heliobacterium modesticaldum exhibits perfect C2 symmetry. The core polypeptide dimer and two small subunits coordinate 54 bacteriochlorophylls and 2 carotenoids that capture and transfer energy to the electron trans...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gisriel, C., Sarrou, I., Ferlez, B., Golbeck, J. H., Redding, K. E., Fromme, R. Tags: Biochemistry, Evolution r-articles Source Type: news

Dementia news: Alzheimer's and Parkinson's sufferers have more of THESE nutrients in brain
DEMENTIA types include Alzhiemer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and scientists have found sufferers of both have higher levels of iron and zinc in their brains. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: High meat intake increases diabetes risk, study shows
A Singaporean study shows that red meat and poultry can increase diabetes risk, but fish and shellfish can reduce that risk. Heme iron also plays a role. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Zinc transporter key to fighting pancreatic cancer and more
(Michigan State University) Patients suffering from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease harbor significantly higher levels of zinc and iron in their brains than healthy patients. Those with pancreatic cancer have an unusually high amount of a specific zinc transporter. So, controlling those levels could be an effective plan of attack against these diseases and others, said Jian Hu, Michigan State University biochemist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Teleflex Bagged a $1.1 Billion Hidden Treasure
Teleflex CEO Benson Smith expected some investors to be surprised by yet another billion-dollar acquisition, but sometimes businesses simply must strike while the iron is hot. The Wayne, PA-based company said it will buy NeoTract for up to $1.1 billion. The deal comes just seven months after Teleflex completed its $1 billion acquisition of Vascular Solutions. "I'm sure that at least some of you may be a bit surprised that Teleflex is once again active in M&A so quickly after announcing the acquisition of Vascular Solutions. Well, we are not," Smith said Tuesday during a conference call. Smith said Teleflex ha...
Source: MDDI - September 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

NJIT graduate student wins kudos for her research on a potent counterterrorism tool
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) At a meeting held by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency to review ongoing research on materials capable of defeating or disabling weapons such as anthrax, Chintersingh-Dinnall won the poster competition for her work in the lab adding iron to boron by a method called ball-milling to accelerate its combustion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Eating meat linked to higher risk of diabetes
(Duke-NUS Medical School) A new Duke-NUS Medical School study has found that higher intake of red meat and poultry is associated with significantly increased risk of developing diabetes, which is partially attributed to their higher content of heme iron in these meats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MRI elastograms better than biopsy to assess kidney scarring
Researchers from Canada have discovered that MRI measurements of stiffness...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3D-printed kidneys change preop surgical planning Contrast use doesn't change acute kidney injury rate Image-guided liver biopsy is safe, but not risk-free MRI tops liver biopsy in measuring iron in sick kids Mayo Clinic develops MR elastography for liver patients (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 31, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Prevent vitamin A and iron deficiency - multivitamins ARE better than diet alone
MULTIVITAMINS are better than diet alone in preventing vitamin and mineral deficiency - a new study has found. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Board Meeting Minutes July 25, 2017
Participants: Kyra Bobinet, Mandy Bishop, Judy Danielson, Dave deBronkart, Peter Elias, Nancy Finn, John Grohol, Sarah Krug, Bruno Nardone Tyson Ortiz, Danny Sands, Joe Ternullo, Jon Wald, Sue Woods, Announcement, Joe Ternullo,   Tracy Zervakis has resigned from the board due to personal reason. Minutes: Approved SPM Connect We had a discussion about communicating using SPM Connect. The Higher Logic program is still be worked on to iron out all of the kinks. Conference Update, Joe Ternullo Two keynote speakers have been confirmed, Tom Delbanco, MD, Founder and CEO, Open Notes, Rushika Fernandopulle, Co-Founder and CEO...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - August 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nancy Finn Tags: General Source Type: news

Indian boy's shoulder was pierced by a 12-inch-rod
Lalit Kumar, 12, from Greater Noida, northern India, was swinging on the iron rod of a window canopy when it suddenly collapsed, causing the rod to pierce his shoulder, leaving him unconscious. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Penile shaft strangulation with wrought iron metallic pipe - Qureshi AU, Farooq MS, Qureshi SS, Bilal T, Ali AA.
Penile strangulation due to any solid encircling ornament or metal is rarely reported. Venous outflow obstruction due to any constricting item around the shaft leads to venous congestion, urinary obstruction, and rarely gangrene of the penile shaft skin. W... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

U.S. Bioservices to resolve kickback claims for $13.4 million: filing
(Reuters) - Specialty pharmacy firm US Bioservices Corp has agreed to pay $13.4 million to settle U.S. government claims that it pushed patients to refill prescriptions of Novartis AG's iron overload drug Exjade in exchange for referrals from the Swiss drugmaker. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Robot arm could revolutionise routine surgery
Laparoscopic, colorectal, prostate and ENT procedures could be simplified and made faster Related items fromOnMedica Six-month-plus surgery waits triple in four years Sharp rise in year-long waits for elective surgery Consultant-led assessments could cut unnecessary surgery Set up protocols to iron out differences in emergency surgery, hospitals told (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 21, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Treasure and intrigue: scientists unravel story of 1740 Kent shipwreck
Excavation has brought up silver dollars, pewter jugs and a mystery chest from Rooswijk wreck in Goodwin SandsCovered with seaweed, bits of shell and pebbles concreted into lumps of corroded iron, the wooden seaman ’s chest from the Dutch East India ship Rooswijk remains tantalisingly locked after almost 300 years. It will take months of conservation work before the archaeologists discover whether it holds some of the silver treasure the ship was carrying, or a long dead sailor’s old socks.A joint excavation by divers and scientists from Historic England and the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands is un...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Science UK news Netherlands Europe World news Heritage Culture Source Type: news

Children who skip breakfast miss out on crucial nutrients
A new study published by the British Journal of Nutrition found that significant numbers of kids who skip breakfast do not receive proper amounts of calcium, iodine, iron and folate. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Young Breakfast Skippers Lack Vital Nutrients
Calcium, iron and folate may be shortchanged when morning meal is missedSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Child Nutrition (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Methanogenic heterodisulfide reductase (HdrABC-MvhAGD) uses two noncubane [4Fe-4S] clusters for reduction
In methanogenic archaea, the carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation and methane-forming steps are linked through the heterodisulfide reductase (HdrABC)–[NiFe]-hydrogenase (MvhAGD) complex that uses flavin-based electron bifurcation to reduce ferredoxin and the heterodisulfide of coenzymes M and B. Here, we present the structure of the native heterododecameric HdrABC-MvhAGD complex at 2.15-angstrom resolution. HdrB contains two noncubane [4Fe-4S] clusters composed of fused [3Fe-4S]-[2Fe-2S] units sharing 1 iron (Fe) and 1 sulfur (S), which were coordinated at the CCG motifs. Soaking experiments showed that the heterodisulfide ...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wagner, T., Koch, J., Ermler, U., Shima, S. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Iron poisoning: What you need to know
Iron poisoning is a medical emergency and can be especially dangerous in children. What causes it, what are the symptoms, and how is it treated? (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

What Solar Eclipses Have Taught Us About the Universe
Total solar eclipses like the one that will cross the U.S. on Aug. 21 have captured the attention of astronomers throughout history — and have often led to advances in our understanding of how the universe works. Astronomers have been studying solar eclipses for centuries. In the late 16th and early 17th centuries, Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe and his apprentice German astronomer Johannes Kepler studied eclipses to try to arrive at a rough estimate of the moon’s diameter. In the 19th century, eclipse observations got even more interesting, thanks in large part to advances in scientific instruments like telesco...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Shira Teitel Tags: Uncategorized eclipse Science space space 2017 time original time video universe vintage space Source Type: news

Fire safety of grounded corrugating stainless steel tubing in a structure energized by lightning - Haslam B, Galler D, Eagar TW.
Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) has been used for more than 20 years as a replacement for conventional black iron gas piping. CSST has a thinner tubing wall and is susceptible to damage from lightning activity when discharges enter a structure, po... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Is an iron deficiency making you tired all the time?
The latest Diet and Nutrition Survey which assesses the dietary habits of the UK annually found women are eating an average of just 47 grams of red meat a day (stock image). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

IV Iron Shows Promise for Treating Anemia in Pregnancy IV Iron Shows Promise for Treating Anemia in Pregnancy
Intravenous (IV) iron is safe and effective for treating anemia in pregnancy, according to a small study, the first US prospective study of this treatment.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape ObGyn and Womens Health Headlines)
Source: Medscape ObGyn and Womens Health Headlines - August 7, 2017 Category: OBGYN Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Iron infusion: Uses, benefits, and what to expect
Who needs an iron infusion and what should be expected during an iron infusion? What happens after the infusion, and what are the benefits and risks? (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Direct atomic-level insight into the active sites of a high-performance PGM-free ORR catalyst
Platinum group metal–free (PGM-free) metal-nitrogen-carbon catalysts have emerged as a promising alternative to their costly platinum (Pt)–based counterparts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) but still face some major challenges, including (i) the identification of the most relevant catalytic site for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and (ii) demonstration of competitive PEFC performance under automotive-application conditions in the hydrogen (H2)–air fuel cell. Herein, we demonstrate H2-air performance gains achieved with an iron-nitrogen-carbon catalyst synthesized with two nitrogen precursor...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Chung, H. T., Cullen, D. A., Higgins, D., Sneed, B. T., Holby, E. F., More, K. L., Zelenay, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Carbon Dioxide May Rob Crops Of Nutrition, Leaving Millions At Risk
Two new studies suggest that changing atmospheric conditions could reduce protein and iron in food, leading to more health problems for people in countries where malnutrition is already a problem.(Image credit: Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Courtney Columbus Source Type: news

Does spinach cause Alzheimer's?
Researchers from the University of Melbourne found that iron may damage the brain similar to how the element causes metal to rust. Such 'rust' may accelerate cognitive decline. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alzheimer’s disease breakthrough: Symptoms may be driven by this unlikely nutrient
ALZHEIMER ’S disease - a type of dementia - affects 850,000 people in the UK, and while its cause remains unknown, new research has revealed it may be driven by a key nutrient - iron. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New MRI contrast agent tested on big animals
(Institute for Basic Science) Experiments in dogs, rabbits and monkeys show the efficacy and biocompatibility of a new MRI/MRA contrast agent in detecting stroke. This T1 MRI contrast agent based on ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles could become a possible alternative to clinically used gadolinium-based agents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 31, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Supplement warning: Overdosing on this essential mineral can leave you in a coma
SUPPLEMENTS are a way to help achieve a healthy diet, and taking extra iron is particularly popular. However, consuming too high a dose can be dangerous. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Synthesis of FeH5: A layered structure with atomic hydrogen slabs
High pressure promotes the formation of polyhydrides with unusually high hydrogen-to-metal ratios. These polyhydrides have complex hydrogenic sublattices. We synthesized iron pentahydride (FeH5) by a direct reaction between iron and H2 above 130 gigapascals in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. FeH5 exhibits a structure built of atomic hydrogen only. It consists of intercalated layers of quasicubic FeH3 units and four-plane slabs of thin atomic hydrogen. The distribution of the valence electron density indicates a bonding between hydrogen and iron atoms but none between hydrogen atoms, presenting a two-dimensional metallic...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Pepin, C. M., Geneste, G., Dewaele, A., Mezouar, M., Loubeyre, P. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Atomic hydrogen with an iron assist
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Grocholski, B. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

French emergency services learn from terror attacks
Battlefield medical training, better equipment and procedures introduced since Bataclan and Nice attacks Related items fromOnMedica Nothing to fear for ‘good samaritan’ doctors giving emergency care Health chiefs praise ‘brave’ NHS staff following London attack RCN issues guidance following recent spate of terrorist attacks Hospitals and GP surgeries may be targets for terrorists Set up protocols to iron out differences in emergency surgery, hospitals told (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 26, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Saving Vanessa, part 1: A mystery rash, a stroke and an epic rescue
Vanessa’s rash first appeared on her arms and legs when she 3 or 4 months old. It was red and bumpy and went away when she was sick with a virus, which happened often. Then it would come back. The dermatology team she saw at Boston Children’s Hospital was puzzled. “I was expecting they were going to think it was nothing, but they took it very seriously,” says Katherine Bell, one of Vanessa’s mothers. “They took a biopsy and very quickly realized they had no idea what it was.” Vanessa’s case was even featured at a regional dermatology conference where doctors take up mystery p...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 25, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Carolyn Rogers Dr. Pui Lee Dr. Robert Sundel Dr. Scellig Stone Dr. Todd Lyons stroke Source Type: news

An Iron Rod Through The Head Shows Us What's Important In Life
We have a say in how we respond to our emotions. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Investigating the relationship between iron and depression - Mills NT, Maier R, Whitfield JB, Wright MJ, Colodro-Conde L, Byrne EM, Scott JG, Byrne GJ, Hansell NK, Vinkhuyzen AAE, CouvyDuchesne B, Montgomery GW, Henders AK, Martin NG, Wray NR, Benyamin B.
Lower levels of circulating iron have been associated with depression. Our objective was to investigate the phenotypic and genetic relationship between measures of circulating levels of iron (serum iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation, and ferritin) a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

A genetic variation may increase tuberculosis susceptibility
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) -Researchers have shown that a single nucleotide change in a gene that affects production of hepcidin--a peptide involved in inflammation, immunity, and control of iron levels--is associated with greater susceptibility to extrapulmonary tuberculosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Comment on "The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport"
O’Brien et al. (Research Article, 24 February 2017, eaag1789) report that the iron-sulfur cluster of primase has a redox role in enzyme activity. Their analysis is based on a partially misfolded structure of the iron-sulfur cluster domain of primase. In the correctly folded structure, two of the three tyrosines putatively involved in electron transfer, Y345 and Y347, contact the RNA/DNA helix, providing an alternative explanation for the data of O’Brien et al. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Pellegrini, L. Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only t-comment Source Type: news

Comment on "The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport"
O’Brien et al. (Research Article, 24 February 2017, eaag1789) proposed a novel mechanism of primase function based on redox activity of the iron-sulfur cluster buried inside the C-terminal domain of the large primase subunit (p58C). Serious problems in the experimental design and data interpretation raise concerns about the validity of the conclusions. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Baranovskiy, A. G., Babayeva, N. D., Zhang, Y., Blanco, L., Pavlov, Y. I., Tahirov, T. H. Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only t-comment Source Type: news

Separating food facts from fiction
UCLA Broadcast Studio As a nutritional epidemiologist devoted to prevention, Karin Michels has spent much of her career studying how health can be optimized through a proper diet.“People think it all comes down to their genes, but there is so much we can control by not smoking or being overweight, eating right and exercising at least moderately,” says Michels, professor and chair of the epidemiology department in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.What constitutes healthy eating? Michels, who frequently gives public talks on the topic, has found there are many widely held misconceptions that le...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical News Today: The top 10 foods high in iron
There are many ways to meet your daily iron requirements without eating the same foods all the time; here we explore some of the options. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Vifor Pharma studies Ferinject in three trials for heart failure and iron deficiency
Swiss-based Vifor Pharma has initiated three clinical trials known as AFFIRM-AHF, FAIR-HF2 and HEART-FID, to assess the efficacy of Ferinject on morbidity and mortality outcomes in systolic heart failure and iron deficiency patients. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - July 12, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Iron deficiency may raise heart disease risk
New research examines the link between iron levels in the body and the risk of developing coronary artery disease. Iron may have a protective effect. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Low-iron levels increase the risk of heart disease  
Researchers from Imperial College London and University College London found that people with high levels of the vital nutrient have a lower risk of developing coronary artery disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DR MARTIN SCURR answers readers' health questions
A 54-year-old reader has lost all the hair on their head and body. They have been sent for blood tests to check thyroid and iron levels - but nothing is unusual. Steroid cream has also not helped. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news