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MRI, radiomics help diagnose, discern ADHD subtypes
Researchers have developed a unique combination of radiomics, machine learning,...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI links brain volume to ADHD DTI shows how music could help kids with autism, ADHD MRI shows kids may not outgrow ADHD MRI technique and iron level could help diagnose ADHD Functional MRI finds abnormal brain regions in ADHD youth (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 22, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

AAAS announces animal and avian sciences professor Iqbal Hamza as a 2017 Fellow
(University of Maryland) Dr. Iqbal Hamza of the University of Maryland has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. Dr. Hamza was elected for groundbreaking discoveries and distinguished contributions on the biochemical and cell biology mechanisms underlying heme and iron trafficking and their regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Encouraging oxygen's assault on iron may offer new way to kill lung cancer cells
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) Blocking the action of a key protein frees oxygen to damage iron-dependent proteins in lung and breast cancer cells, making them easier to kill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

' Unique' Menstrual Migraine Tied to Low Iron'Unique' Menstrual Migraine Tied to Low Iron
Menstrual migraines that occur in the days following menstrual bleeding may be related to low ferritin levels caused by blood loss rather than estrogen fluctuations.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Manage the menopause naturally without HRT
This article helps you identify some simple changes you can make almost immediately which will help you manage the menopause naturally. Hot flushes and night sweats are common symptoms. Eighty percent of menopausal women experience them. Many women feel embarrassed about hot flushes, but it’s not as obvious to everyone else as it may seem to you! Symptoms can be reduced by eating lots of plant foods, especially those rich in phytoestrogens, which help to rebalance your hormones naturally. Phytoestrogens are found in abundance in soya products, legumes, and in brassica vegetables, such as cauliflower, broccoli, Brusse...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - November 20, 2017 Category: OBGYN Authors: Susie Kearley Tags: Alternatives to HRT healthy diet menopause Source Type: news

Scientists Predict 2018 Will Be a Bad Year for Earthquakes. Here ’s Why
There is no natural disaster sneakier than an earthquake. Hurricanes can be predicted and tracked weeks in advance, and even tornados, monsoons and blizzards at least have seasons. But earthquakes strike entirely without warning. Now, however, a new study suggests that we may want to brace for a surge of quakes in the year ahead, and the reason for the danger is an unlikely one: the rotation of the Earth has slowed slightly. While accurately forecasting earthquakes is impossible, a backward look through the seismic record allows geologists to detect some distinct patterns. In the new study — which was presented at th...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Earth's rotation earthquakes geology Physics Richter scale Science Source Type: news

Hemochromatosis (Iron Overload)
Hemochromatosis (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Pulling iron out of waste printer toner
(American Chemical Society) Someday, left-over toner in discarded printer cartridges could have a second life as bridge or building components instead of as trash, wasting away in landfills and potentially harming the environment. One group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry& Engineering that they have devised a method to recycle the residual powder in 'empty' cartridges into iron using temperatures that are compatible with existing industrial processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zambia:Meet The Country's First Female Urologist
[This is Africa] Dr. Mumba Chalwe Zambia's first woman in urology wants her accomplishments to inspire other women and girls, "Like I always say "iron sharpens iron" if women and girls can see fellow women as achievers outside the domestic sphere they can aim higher." (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 10, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Real-Life Iron Man Sets Record For Fastest Time In Jet Suit
Richard Browning, a pilot and inventor, admits it will be a while before anyone goes to Walmart in the suit. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Weights over cardio for longevity: New study finds pumping iron at least twice a week reduces cancer risk doing both increases life expectancy by 30%
(Natural News) Strength training may improve longevity and significantly reduce the risk of developing cancer, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Epidemiology. According to the researchers, this is because strength training exercises — which include weight lifting, push-ups, and squats — are more strenuous and demanding compared with the seemingly more attractive... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Expands Auryxia Indication to CKD Patients Not on Dialysis FDA Expands Auryxia Indication to CKD Patients Not on Dialysis
With the expanded indication, Auryxia is now the first and only oral treatment available to treat iron deficiency anemia in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, the company said.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology News Alert Source Type: news

FDA Approves Auryxia (ferric Citrate) Tablets as a Treatment for People with Iron Deficiency Anemia and Chronic Kidney Disease, Not on Dialysis
BOSTON, Nov. 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq:KERX), a company focused on bringing innovative medicines to people with kidney disease, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - November 7, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Tri-Vit with Fluoride and Iron Drops (New - Discontinuation)
Drug Shortage (Source: FDA Drug Shortages)
Source: FDA Drug Shortages - November 6, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Cleaner water with nanoparticles: Toxic metals such as cadmium can be removed from freshwater safely with this innovative application
(Natural News) Nanotechnology has a multitude of environmental uses, and researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara have discovered another one. They found that sulfurized nano-zero-valent iron (FeSSi) could be used to remove cadmium toxicity from freshwater. According to ScienceDaily.com, the researchers came to this conclusion after simulating a rain event that washed toxic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Southern African ancient genomes estimate modern human divergence to 350,000 to 260,000 years ago
We present genome sequences, up to 13x coverage, from seven ancient individuals from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The remains of three Stone Age hunter-gatherers (about 2000 years old) were genetically similar to current-day southern San groups, and those of four Iron Age farmers (300 to 500 years old) were genetically similar to present-day Bantu-language speakers. We estimate that all modern-day Khoe-San groups have been influenced by 9 to 30% genetic admixture from East Africans/Eurasians. Using traditional and new approaches, we estimate the first modern human population divergence time to between 350,000 and 260,000 y...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Schlebusch, C. M., Malmström, H., Günther, T., Sjödin, P., Coutinho, A., Edlund, H., Munters, A. R., Vicente, M., Steyn, M., Soodyall, H., Lombard, M., Jakobsson, M. Tags: Anthropology reports Source Type: news

Lose fat, preserve muscle: Weight training beats cardio for older adults
(Wake Forest University) Weight training or cardio? For older adults trying to slim down, pumping iron might be the way to go. A new study by researchers at Wake Forest University suggests combining weight training with a low-calorie diet preserves much needed lean muscle mass that can be lost through aerobic workouts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A nutrient mix makes phytoplankton thrive
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) Unicellular photosynthetic microbes -- phytoplankton -- play a fundamental role in the global carbon cycle and fuel marine food webs. Globally, phytoplankton productivity is regulated by the availability of essential nutrients, such as nitrogen and iron. Researchers at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now been able to show that the growth of phytoplankton over large extents of the ocean are not limited by a single nutrient, but by multiple nutrients simultaneously. The study has been published today in the top scientific journal Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Adolescent Health Congress Skirts Issue of Abuse, Trafficking
Attendees at the 11th Congress on Adolescent Health in New Delhi, Oct. 27-29, 2017. Credit: Stella Paul/IPSBy Stella PaulNEW DELHI, Oct 30 2017 (IPS)Twenty-year-old Gogontlejang Phaladi of Mahalapye, Botswana is grateful she was never sent to a so-called “hyena” like scores of girls in neighboring Malawi were.In a ritual approved by the community, a solo man (the hyena) would have sex with the adolescent girls of an entire village to “sexually cleanse” them so they would be considered fit for marriage."It makes sense to bring village and religious leaders in this conversation on violent crimes....
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Stella Paul Tags: Active Citizens Asia-Pacific Crime & Justice Education Featured Gender Violence Global Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees Population Poverty & SDGs Women's Health adolescent girls adolescent health child mar Source Type: news

Two Princeton astrophysicists receive funding to study merging neutron stars
(Princeton University) The TEAMS consortium (Towards Exascale Astrophysics of Mergers and Supernovae), including Princeton University's Adam Burrows and David Radice, will investigate how stellar explosions create elements. " Merging neutron stars produce the heaviest elements, " Burrows said, " but the oxygen we breathe, the iron in our hemoglobin, the calcium in our bones, the fluorine in our toothpaste -- these sorts of things are unambiguously products of supernova explosions: the death of a massive star. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antenatal Nutrition and Autism Spectrum Disorders Antenatal Nutrition and Autism Spectrum Disorders
Might maternal nutritional supplementation with multivitamins, iron, and folic acid reduce the risk of autism spectrum disorders in offspring?The BMJ (formerly known as the British Medical Journal) (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics Journal Article Source Type: news

Toughening elastomers using mussel-inspired iron-catechol complexes
Materials often exhibit a trade-off between stiffness and extensibility; for example, strengthening elastomers by increasing their cross-link density leads to embrittlement and decreased toughness. Inspired by cuticles of marine mussel byssi, we circumvent this inherent trade-off by incorporating sacrificial, reversible iron-catechol cross-links into a dry, loosely cross-linked epoxy network. The iron-containing network exhibits two to three orders of magnitude increases in stiffness, tensile strength, and tensile toughness compared to its iron-free precursor while gaining recoverable hysteretic energy dissipation and main...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Filippidi, E., Cristiani, T. R., Eisenbach, C. D., Waite, J. H., Israelachvili, J. N., Ahn, B. K., Valentine, M. T. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Migraine cure: Could BOTOX injections bring surprise relief?
BOTOX injections best known to iron out wrinkles could help relieve migraine headaches in children and teenagers, a new study found. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dexferrum (Iron Dextran Injection, USP) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - October 20, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Iron Absorption Better With Alternate-day Dosing Iron Absorption Better With Alternate-day Dosing
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - October 19, 2017 Category: Pathology Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

Destruction and reformation of an iron-sulfur cluster during catalysis by lipoyl synthase
Lipoyl synthase (LipA) catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of the lipoyl cofactor, which is the attachment of two sulfhydryl groups to C6 and C8 of a pendant octanoyl chain. The appended sulfur atoms derive from an auxiliary [4Fe-4S] cluster on the protein that is degraded during turnover, limiting LipA to one turnover in vitro. We found that the Escherichia coli iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster carrier protein NfuA efficiently reconstitutes the auxiliary cluster during LipA catalysis in a step that is not rate-limiting. We also found evidence for a second pathway for cluster regeneration involving the E. coli protein Is...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: McCarthy, E. L., Booker, S. J. Tags: Biochemistry reports Source Type: news

Why one doctor came to Memphis after 30 years in Boston
"People who need to get transfusions every month for a number of blood diseases end up getting poisoned by the iron, and I've been working on how to fix that for many years." (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 18, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elle Perry Source Type: news

Why one doctor came to Memphis after 30 years in Boston
"People who need to get transfusions every month for a number of blood diseases end up getting poisoned by the iron, and I've been working on how to fix that for many years." (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 18, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Elle Perry Source Type: news

Gestational diabetes raises long-term CVD risk
But absolute risk remains low among young women, and is lessened by healthy lifestyle Related items fromOnMedica Early menstruation linked to gestational diabetes Real risks identified for babies of mothers with gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes Higher iron levels linked to gestational diabetes No clear threshold to diagnose gestational diabetes (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 17, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

4 Surprising Facts About the Universe We Just Discovered in a Cosmic Breakthrough
News from space always arrives late — and in a discovery announced Monday, that meant 130 million years late. It was that long ago that two neutron stars in Galaxy NGC 4993, in the Hydra constellation, spiraled in toward one another and collided in a titanic eruption, sending out waves of energy that literally shook our world. The shaking happened on Aug. 17 at 8:41 a.m. E.T., as gravitational waves released by the event — ripples in spacetime that Albert Einstein first predicted in 1915 but weren’t confirmed until a full century later — at last reached and passed through the Earth. While the first...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Black Holes Cosmology Einstein gamma rays gravitational waves NASA neutron stars onetime Science space telescopes Source Type: news

A Groundbreaking Astronomy Discovery Gave Scientists Their Best Look Ever at How Gold Was Created
(WASHINGTON) — It was a faint signal, but it told of one of the most violent acts in the universe, and it would soon reveal secrets of the cosmos, including how gold was created. Astronomers around the world reacted to the signal quickly, focusing telescopes located on every continent and even in orbit to a distant spot in the sky. What they witnessed in mid-August and revealed Monday was the long-ago collision of two neutron stars — a phenomenon California Institute of Technology’s David H. Reitze called “the most spectacular fireworks in the universe.” “When these things collide, all h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime Source Type: news

Taking Iron Every Other Day Linked to Better Absorption in Iron-Deficient Women (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM Taking iron supplements every other day instead of daily is associated with increased iron absorption in women with low iron levels, suggests a small study … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - October 12, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Subtleties of growing iron sulfides
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Six signs of zinc deficiency: Are YOU getting enough?
(Natural News) Next to iron, zinc is the most abundant mineral found in the human body. This mineral is essential in cellular metabolism, immune function, protein synthesis, wound healing, DNA synthesis, and cell division. Moreover, zinc enhances better growth and development during pregnancy, childhood, and adolescence. Zinc is also essential for proper functioning of the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Temperature-activated ion channels in neural crest cells confer maternal fever-associated birth defects
We report that two heat-activated transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, TRPV1 and TRPV4, were present in neural crest cells during critical windows of heart and face development. TRPV1 antagonists protected against the development of hyperthermia-induced defects in chick embryos. Treatment with chemical agonists of TRPV1 or TRPV4 replicated hyperthermia-induced birth defects in chick and zebrafish embryos. To test whether transient TRPV channel permeability in neural crest cells was sufficient to induce these defects, we engineered iron-binding modifications to TRPV1 and TRPV4 that enabled remote and noninvasive...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - October 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hutson, M. R., Keyte, A. L., Hernandez-Morales, M., Gibbs, E., Kupchinsky, Z. A., Argyridis, I., Erwin, K. N., Pegram, K., Kneifel, M., Rosenberg, P. B., Matak, P., Xie, L., Grandl, J., Davis, E. E., Katsanis, N., Liu, C., Benner, E. J. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Iron supplements found to improve neurological development and behavior issues in kids who were born small
(Natural News) One of the risks of delivering a pre-term or low-weight baby is neurological impairment. Often, these two conditions go hand-in-hand with children born before the desired 40-week mark having a low birth weight. Doctors note that children who weigh less than 2,500 grams, or 5.5 lbs. have an increased likelihood of developing an... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vegan diet warning: Ditching meat could lead to EARLY hair loss in men
VEGAN and vegetarian diets could accelerate hair loss in men, according to an expert, since meat contains vital iron that helps locks grow. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Maternal Multivitamin Use Tied to Lower Risk of Child ASD
Lower odds of offspring autism spectrum disorder with or without additional iron or folic acid (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - October 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Neurology, Nursing, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

This diet advice could kill you
The American Heart Association says sodium in salt raises blood pressure. They say it increases the risk for heart disease and stroke.  But the latest science says otherwise… A British review of 34 clinical trials showed that cutting down on salt reduced blood pressure only slightly for people with hypertension.1  And a new study in The Lancet found that some low-salt diets could put you at GREATER risk of heart disease and death.2 Researchers analyzed data from 133,118 people. They wanted to see if there was a link between high sodium and heart attack, stroke and death The results were startling. People...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Health Heart Health Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Source Type: news

Study links vegetarian diet in pregnancy to substance abuse in offspring
Conclusion While having too little vitamin B12 in your diet during pregnancy can affect a baby's development, it remains to be proven whether a vegetarian diet in pregnancy can cause substance abuse problems in teenage offspring. The findings do not mean that vegetarian pregnant women need to start eating meat. It is already recommended that vegetarian and vegan mums-to-be take special care to ensure they get enough of certain nutrients that are found in meat and fish, such as vitamin B12, vitamin D and iron. The study identifies a possible link between having little or no meat consumption in pregnancy (which may have led ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

There Are Better Ways to Mourn
On a crisp fall day in Vienna, Austria, I received a private tour of the crypt below Michaelerkirche (St. Michael’s Church). Bernard, the young Austrian man who led me down the steep stone staircase, had perfect English delivered in an inexplicably deep Southern accent. “Aye’ve been told my ax-sent is straynge be-fore,” he drawled, like a Confederate general. Bernard explained that during the Middle Ages, when the members of the Hapsburg court attended St. Michael’s, there was a cemetery located directly outside, in the courtyard. But, as so often happened in larger European cities, the cemete...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Caitlin Doughty Tags: Uncategorized Books Source Type: news

Iron deficiency increases risk of heart disease, but so does the wrong type of iron
(Natural News) Our bodies are finely balanced machines, but for many of us, this only becomes evident when we suffer a lack of a vital nutrient or mineral and start feeling the effects. Extra exam or other stress, for example, has left many of us depleted of vitamin B, and as women get older, they... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rex Tillerson: U.S. Has Direct ‘Lines of Communication’ With North Korea
(BEIJING) — U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson acknowledged on Saturday that the United States is maintaining direct channels of communications with North Korea even as tensions rise over the North’s nuclear and missile programs and the countries’ leaders spar through bellicose name-calling. Tillerson said the U.S. was probing North Korea’s willingness to talk, and called for a calming of the situation on the Korean Peninsula, adding it was incumbent on the North to halt the missile launches. “We have lines of communication to Pyongyang. We’re not in a dark situation, a blackout,&rdqu...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Bodeen, Matthew Pennington / AP Tags: Uncategorized North Korea onetime Source Type: news

Rex Tillerson on North Korea: We Need to ‘Calm Things Down’
(BEIJING) — U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called Saturday for a calming of the situation on the Korean Peninsula, but said it was incumbent on North Korea to halt its missile launches. Following meetings with Chinese President Xi Jinping and other officials in Beijing, Tillerson said he believes China has become deeply concerned about the North’s missile and nuclear programs and is working hard to convince Pyongyang to re-enter talks, but did not say specifically what form those talks should take. “I think the most immediate action that we need is to calm things down,” Tillerson told reporte...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Bodeen / AP Tags: Uncategorized North Korea onetime Source Type: news

Severe bronchial injury due to the aspiration of an iron pill - Okamoto S, Takamori M, Murata K, Wada A.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Iron Bow: This Herndon company is working to improve telehealth
What started as an effort to improve veteran medical care has evolved into a potentially pioneering device in the burgeoning telehealth industry for Iron Bow Technologies. Despite the advanced level of technology behind the company's Clinical Care Device, its purpose is rather simple: to increase access between patients and doctors, saving time and money in an increasingly bloated health care system. “The solution is, it provides efficiencies on both sides, for t he patient and the health care… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - September 28, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Joseph Coombs Source Type: news

Iron Bow: This Herndon company is working to improve telehealth
What started as an effort to improve veteran medical care has evolved into a potentially pioneering device in the burgeoning telehealth industry for Iron Bow Technologies. Despite the advanced level of technology behind the company's Clinical Care Device, its purpose is rather simple: to increase access between patients and doctors, saving time and money in an increasingly bloated health care system. “The solution is, it provides efficiencies on both sides, for t he patient and the health care… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 28, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Joseph Coombs Source Type: news

Low birth-weight babies benefit from long-term iron supplements
A recent study from Umea University in Sweden found that low birth-weight babies at risk of iron deficiency can benefit greatly from iron supplements. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Iron supplements have long-term benefits for low birth-weight babies
(Springer) Babies classified as low birth weight (under 2,500 grams) are at risk of iron deficiency, which is linked to impaired neurological development. A long-term randomized study now shows that providing such babies with iron supplements can prevent behavioral problems at school age. The study, led by Staffan Berglund of Ume å University in Sweden, is published in the journal Pediatric Research, which is published by Springer Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here ’s What’s Coming to Netflix in October
October means it’s time for things to get spooky — and that is just what will happen on Netflix next month. The eagerly anticipated series Stranger Things will turn things upside down in its return for a second season. Season 2 of the hit show will come out on Oct. 27 and promises a scarier storyline than the first season. If that’s too creepy for you, Netflix is also adding a couple new stand-up comedy specials to its already healthy collection — check out the streaming service for new material from Patton Oswalt and Judah Friedlander. Here are all the movies, TV shows and more coming to Netflix in...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime Television Source Type: news