Australian ship discovered off Victoria 77 years after Japanese submarine attack
The second world war ship SS Iron Crown sank after it was torpedoed, killing 38 of its 43 crewAn Australian second world war freighter has been discovered 77 years after it was sunk in a deadly Japanese submarine attack.The SS Iron Crown was carrying a cargo of manganese ore through Bass Strait when torpedoed and sunk within 60 seconds, killing 38 of its 43 crew on 4 June 1942.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Archaeology CSIRO Australia news Science Second world war Source Type: news

There ’s a Real-Life Inspiration for Game of Thrones’ Valyrian Steel. Here’s How Its Long-Lost Secrets Were Revealed
Warning: This post contains spoilers for Game of Thrones. As the Game of Thrones saga winds down, Valyrian steel has never been more important. It’s one of the few substances known to kill White Walkers, but only about a half-dozen known characters currently wield weapons made from the magical material — and it’s not possible to make more. That’s because, according to the lore of the show and A Song of Ice and Fire books, the secret for forging the metal was lost long before the Game of Thrones story starts. Valyrian steel is also one more way in which Game of Thrones, fantastical though it is, has ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lily Rothman Tags: Uncategorized onetime Television Source Type: news

Egypt ’s Food Challenge: a Good Effort but Not Enough
A bakery shop in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian flatbread, known as Aish baladi or country bread is on the table of all Egyptians, even the poorest, thanks to a smartcard system that assigns certain quantities to each family to avoid unnecessary waste. By Maged SrourCAIRO, Apr 18 2019 (IPS) “Unfortunately the overall nutritional panorama of Egypt does not look well,” says Dr. Sara Diana Garduno Diaz, an expert concentrating on nutrition and biology at the American University of the Middle East. Diaz’s research focuses on dietary patterns and ethnic-associated risk factors for metabolic syndrome. “While tra...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Maged Srour Tags: Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Food & Agriculture Food Sustainability Headlines Health Middle East & North Africa Population Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation (B Source Type: news

Weatherwatch: the science behind lightning's crackle
Brontophonic sounds can give lightning a unique hiss, separate from the deep rumble of thunderWhat does lightning sound like? The obvious answer is in theboom of thunder: an explosion of expanding, superheated air. But there are more subtle and less understood noises associated with lightning, known as brontophonic sounds, which are heard far less frequently.Two features make these sounds distinguishable from thunder. One is that in contrast to the deep reverberation of thunder, brontophonic sounds sound like the hissing of a red-hot iron in water or the tearing of fabric.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Hambling Tags: Extreme weather World news Science Meteorology Source Type: news

Patch Offers a New Approach for Treating Iron Deficiency
Patch-like wearables are becoming increasingly popular in medtech. The latest device to employ such a design and make medtech headlines is transdermal patch being developed by Fe3 Medical. San Antonio, TX-based Fe3 said its biphasic iontophoretic transdermal technology is for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The firm announced results from its first human study of the patch-like device. The human study focused on the safety and tolerability of Fe3's iontophoretic transdermal technology designed to bypass ionic resistance build up in the skin. The human study follows a series of successful preclinical studies demons...
Source: MDDI - April 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Adhesives Source Type: news

Do you get enough of these 4 nutrients: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute
Vitamin D and potassium are among the nutrients that will be required on?the updated nutrition facts label?for packaged foods. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says that's because Americans don't always get the recommended amounts of these nutrients. Calcium and iron information will continue to be required on the labels. In this Mayo Clinic Radio [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 15, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Game of Thrones: Your Last Chance to Bleed #ForTheThrone and Win
The day we’ve been anxiously waiting for over the last year is finally here. In a matter of hours, the season 8 premiere of Game of Thrones will air on ... The post Game of Thrones: Your Last Chance... {This is a content summary only. Click the blog post title to continue reading this post, share your comments, browse the blog and more!} (Source: Red Cross Chat)
Source: Red Cross Chat - April 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: American Red Cross Tags: Blood #FortheThrone blood donation blood donor game of thrones got HBO Iron Throne Playol Playol Shippey III poster Season 8 Premiere Source Type: news

Who will win the Game of Thrones?
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Shortly before the curtain drops on the hit HBO show Game of Thrones (GoT), students attending a computer science seminar at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) embarked on an unusual scientific mission: predicting which character has the best chance to sit the coveted Iron Throne. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

study looks to iron from microbes for climate help
(Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences) Distributing iron particles produced by bacteria could 'fertilize' microscopic ocean plants and ultimately lower atmospheric carbon levels, according to a new paper in Frontiers. The paper proposes a novel way to provide iron to large areas of the ocean, 30 percent of which is poor in the essential element. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Does the Liver Do?
Discussion The liver is one of the largest organs in the body, weighing just over 3 pounds in an adult. It is found in the upper right abdomen, under the right dome of the diaphragm. Grossly, it has asymmetric lobes with the right being larger than the left. The lobes are separated by a fibrous connective tissue band that also anchors the liver in the abdominal cavity. The gallbladder is located on the inferior surface of the liver and stores bile, which is then released into the duodenum. Microscopically, the liver cells are arranged in lobules with canals carrying blood vessels and bile ducts. At any moment about 10-13% ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 1, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Southern Africa: Now Comes the Cholera - Mozambique's Waters of Death
[Daily Maverick] Two weeks after Cyclone Idai ripped through Beira, Mozambique, it continues to kill. Now comes cholera. They are some of the unluckiest, saddest, and grisliest stories of death you'll ever have to hear: the father killed by a flying plate; the husband decapitated by corrugated iron roofing; the daughter killed by a tree hurtling across the water. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 29, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

FDA clears first molybdenum rhenium pedicle screw
The FDA today cleared Mirus‘s Europea pedicle screw system, which is composed of its MoRe proprietary molybdenum rhenium superalloy, making it the first such device approved with the new class of implant material. The Atlanta-based medical device company said that the MoRe proprietary alloy is intended to provide improved strength, ductility, durability and biological safety. “Spine deformity surgery in adults remains plagued by the poor performance of current implants with rod failure occurring in 18%-20% of patients. The MoRe alloy shows great promise in improving the durability of adult spine deformity const...
Source: Mass Device - March 27, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Orthopedics Regulatory/Compliance mirus Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: UNFPA Supports Sexual and Reproductive Health After Floods Cut Off Zimbabwe Districts
[UNFPA] Harare -Displaced women, among them pregnant women, have lost critical health supplies including ante-natal care records, iron supplements and ARVs, which have been washed away with their belongings in flooding across two provinces. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 25, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

SIR: Stroke treatment training program improves outcomes
Interventional radiologists at Johns Hopkins University have developed an innovative...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI measurements of iron content show impact of stroke CT matches MRI for late-window stroke evaluation Machine learning can predict stroke treatment outcomes Study reveals steep cost of delaying stroke treatment MRI links lifestyle factors to stroke, dementia risk (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 25, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

IRON MOM: How an app is helping women have the healthiest pregnancy possible
(Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media)
Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media - March 21, 2019 Category: Hospital Management Tags: Hospital News Source Type: news

Younger Female Blood Donors Vulnerable to Iron Deficiency
In teens and women younger than 50, absent iron stores and anemia more common in blood donors (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Oncology, Pediatrics, Journal, Source Type: news

Younger Female Blood Donors Vulnerable to Iron Deficiency
THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 -- Blood donation is associated with iron deficiency among both adolescent girls and younger adult women in the United States, according to a study recently published in Transfusion. Eshan U. Patel, M.P.H., from the Johns... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 21, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Determination of the cut-off level of ingested iron that causes serious toxicity in children - Halil H, Tuygun N, Polat E, Karacan CD.
BACKGROUND: Iron intoxication can occur accidentally by curious children or intentionally by adolescents for suicidal attempts. They usually present with various symptoms including vomiting and diarrhea. Clinical studies in this field has been reported dif... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Eggs May Be Bad for the Heart, a New Study Says —But There’s More to the Story
Conclusions about eggs based on available scientific evidence vary widely — in part because nutrition research is notoriously hard to conduct accurately. Despite the entrenched belief that eggs raise cholesterol, some studies have suggested that dietary cholesterol intake doesn’t necessarily translate to higher blood cholesterol. One study from last year found that people who ate an egg per day had lower rates of heart disease and bleeding stroke than people who did not eat them, and research from 2016 found that eggs didn’t have a strong effect on risk of coronary artery disease. Some researchers have su...
Source: TIME: Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Scientists Threw a Smartphone in a Blender to Reveal the Contents
The latest results in scientific research have come from an unlikely machine: the blender. Scientists at the University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom wanted to investigate what materials were used to create an iPhone, so they turned to the friendly kitchen tool to blend a phone to dust. Then, the researchers added sodium peroxide, an oxidizer, and mixed the combination at nearly 500 degrees celsius — that’s more than 900 degrees fahrenheit. The brainchild of two geologists at the university, the project sought “to demonstrate why we should all take a keener interest in what is contained within everyda...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rachel E. Greenspan Tags: Uncategorized Bizarre onetime Science viral Source Type: news

Iron's new Best Friend
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Terminal coordination of diatomic boron monofluoride to iron
Boron monofluoride (BF) is a diatomic molecule with 10 valence electrons, isoelectronic to carbon monoxide (CO). Unlike CO, which is a stable molecule at room temperature and readily serves as both a bridging and terminal ligand to transition metals, BF is unstable below 1800°C in the gas phase, and its coordination chemistry is substantially limited. Here, we report the isolation of the iron complex Fe(BF)(CO)2(CNArTripp2)2 [ArTripp2, 2,6-(2,4,6-(i-Pr)3C6H2]2C6H3; i-Pr, iso-propyl], featuring a terminal BF ligand. Single-crystal x-ray diffraction as well as nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and Mössbauer spectro...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Drance, M. J., Sears, J. D., Mrse, A. M., Moore, C. E., Rheingold, A. L., Neidig, M. L., Figueroa, J. S. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula over the past 8000 years
We assembled genome-wide data from 271 ancient Iberians, of whom 176 are from the largely unsampled period after 2000 BCE, thereby providing a high-resolution time transect of the Iberian Peninsula. We document high genetic substructure between northwestern and southeastern hunter-gatherers before the spread of farming. We reveal sporadic contacts between Iberia and North Africa by ~2500 BCE and, by ~2000 BCE, the replacement of 40% of Iberia’s ancestry and nearly 100% of its Y-chromosomes by people with Steppe ancestry. We show that, in the Iron Age, Steppe ancestry had spread not only into Indo-European–speak...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Olalde, I., Mallick, S., Patterson, N., Rohland, N., Villalba-Mouco, V., Silva, M., Dulias, K., Edwards, C. J., Gandini, F., Pala, M., Soares, P., Ferrando-Bernal, M., Adamski, N., Broomandkhoshbacht, N., Cheronet, O., Culleton, B. J., Fernandes, D., Laws Tags: Anthropology, Genetics reports Source Type: news

Do Gummy Vitamins Work? Here ’s What Experts Say
Gummy vitamins are increasingly popular—and not just for kids. By some estimates, adults now comprise up to 80% of the gummy vitamin market. “Pill fatigue” is one factor driving grownups toward gummies. If you have to take multiple supplements every day—and especially if you have problems swallowing capsules or tablets—gummies can make that chore easier (and tastier), finds a 2017 report from the AARP. But do gummy vitamins work the same as ordinary supplements? “It’s a lot harder to make a good gummy than it is to make a tablet or capsule,” says Dr. Tod Cooperman, president ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

MRI measurements of iron content show impact of stroke
French researchers have taken a basic MR imaging technique to break new ground...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Deep-learning MRI algorithm aids in neurological diagnoses CT matches MRI for late-window stroke evaluation Women less likely to receive poststroke imaging Is CCTA, MRI, or transthoracic echo best for predicting stroke? Study reveals steep cost of delaying stroke treatment (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Contrast not needed for follow-up MRI on MS patients
Clinicians should be able to avoid the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Deep-learning MRI algorithm aids in neurological diagnoses MRI shows drug slows brain atrophy in MS patients MRI links iron in the brain to multiple sclerosis MS group expands MRI assistance program MRI shows potentially better indicator for MS progression (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

MRI Method That Measures Iron in Brain Shows Impact of Stroke
TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 -- Higher values of R2* (the magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate) found in the substantia nigra (SN) likely reflect greater iron content and are associated with worse long-term outcomes after stroke, according to a... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

A lawn is better than fertilizer for growing healthy blueberries
(Frontiers) A new study shows that growing grasses alongside blueberry plants corrects signs of iron deficiency, with associated improvements in berry quantity and quality. The effects are comparable to those seen following standard chemical treatment -- providing a simpler, safer, cheaper and more sustainable strategy for blueberry farming on sub-optimal soils. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Important New Trial With Oral FERACCRU(R) Shows Comparable Efficacy to IV Iron (Ferric Carboxymaltose), Offering a Real Alternative to Hospital Administration for Many Patients[4]
FERACCRU® (Ferric Maltol) met primary endpoint against Ferinject® (IV Ferric Carboxymaltose (FCM)) and shows clear benefits to Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA) patients with inactive Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)4 FERACCRU® delivered a haemo... Biopharmaceuticals Norgine, Shield Therapeutics, FERACCRU, Ferric Maltol, Iron Deficiency Anaemia (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Pumping iron could save your life
(Osaka University) Researchers from Osaka University have found that sarcopenia, a condition characterized by decreased skeletal muscle mass, is strongly associated with poor treatment outcomes in lung cancer patients in response to programed death-1 (PD-1)-inhibitor therapy. However, as well as being useful for identifying patients likely to benefit from this type of therapy, early identification and treatment of sarcopenia may improve the long-term survival rates of a larger group of patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study: Taking Prenatal Vitamins Early In Pregnancy Associated With Lower Autism Risk
(CNN) — Taking prenatal vitamins during the first month of pregnancy is associated with a lower risk of developing autism in children who are at high risk for the disorder, according to a new study. Researchers followed 241 children whose older siblings had a diagnosis of autism and who therefore had an increased risk of being diagnosed with the disorder. The researchers evaluated the children’s development starting at 6 months through 3 years of age. At the same time, the moms were asked through phone interviews and mailed questionnaires about prenatal vitamin use. Approximately 1 in every 4 children enrolled ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Autism CNN Pregnancy Source Type: news

A water-splitting catalyst unlike any other
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL chemists have developed a new iron-nickel oxide catalyst for water splitting, the reaction that produces hydrogen fuel. The patent-pending catalyst shows significantly higher activity in the oxygen-evolution part of reaction than conventional nickel iron oxide catalysts. The work is now published in ACS Central Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Iron deficiency symptoms: Five cravings that could indicate you need more of the mineral
IRON deficiency is a condition which develops when you body lacks the essential minerals. Left untreated it can lead to a number of health complications, including heart problems. A potential sign to watch out for is a craving for five items. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood Donation by Teen Girls May Raise Anemia Risk
MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 -- Giving blood can be a way to help your community, but teenaged girls face special risks when donating, a new study shows. Specifically, they face a higher chance of developing iron deficiency and anemia, so they require... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How to cultivate watercress at home
(Natural News) Watercress is easily one of the most nutritious greens in the plant kingdom. This green, leafy salad staple is an excellent source of carotenoids, manganese, and vitamins B1, B2, and B6 as well as vitamins C and E. Watercress is also packed with fiber, iron, copper, and iron. The vegetable is known to have anticancer... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are Raisins Healthy? Here ’s What Experts Say
Nutrition experts tend to favor a “less is more” approach when it comes to deciding what to eat: choosing whole, minimally processed foods over those with long, unpronounceable ingredient lists. Raisins, otherwise known as dried grapes, fit the bill. “They’re a whole food that’s minimally processed with no added ingredients or preservatives,” says Jenny Friedman, a Philadelphia-based dietitian. But raisins are also relatively high in sugar and calories. So are raisins healthy? Here’s what you need to know about the nutritional profile of raisins. What are the health benefits of r...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Lawyer whose cough was dismissed as 'bad flu' for TWO YEARS has blood cancer
Karla Lora-Cabán, 24, of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, was just 16 when she lost one-and-a-half stone (21lbs) and developed asthma. Doctors prescribed syrups and iron tablets. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-dose supplementation of iron in non-anemic pregnant women can cause oxidative stress and affect birth outcomes
(Natural News) Researchers from India and the U.S. have found that high-dose supplementation of iron in non-anemic pregnant women can cause oxidative stress and eventually affect birth outcomes. They aimed to measure oxidative stress in pregnant women with low, normal, or high hemoglobin status in the first trimester and to relate these to birth weight.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Adolescent female blood donors at risk for iron deficiency and associated anemia
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Female adolescent blood donors are more likely to have low iron stores and iron deficiency anemia than adult female blood donors and nondonors, which could have significant negative consequences on their developing brains, a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Just like Iron Man': Calgary surgeon undergoes experimental spinal surgery
Dr. Richi Gill, who helped develop Calgary's bariatric surgery program, was involved in a freak accident on a boogie board during a family vacation in Hawaii one year ago. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Calgary Source Type: news

Iron deficiency symptoms: Six signs you need to eat more foods with the mineral
IRON deficiency can occur when your body is lacking the essential mineral. Without treatment complications such as heart problems can develop. Here are six symptoms you need to watch out for. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

i-DEF Trial Keeps Hope Alive for Deferoxamine in Brain Bleeds i-DEF Trial Keeps Hope Alive for Deferoxamine in Brain Bleeds
The iron chelator was promising enough in a phase 2 futility design trial to have investigators looking ahead to further trials in intracranial hemorrhage.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - February 11, 2019 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Morning Break: Breast Implant Ban in France; Praluent Price Cut; Lego Iron Teen
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - February 11, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Iron Chelation: Not a Quick Fix for Brain Bleed Recovery
(MedPage Today) -- Iron chelator deferoxamine no better than placebo at 90 days; 180 days is another matter (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - February 11, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the symptoms of an iron deficiency?
Iron deficiency symptoms include fatigue, dizziness, and cold extremities. In this article, learn about other symptoms and getting an iron deficiency diagnosis. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Earth ’s North Pole Shifts About 34 Miles Per Year, Report Finds
(WASHINGTON) — True north isn’t quite where it used to be. Earth’s north magnetic pole has been drifting so fast in the last few decades that scientists that past estimates are no longer accurate enough for precise navigation. On Monday, they released an update of where true north really was, nearly a year ahead of schedule. The magnetic north pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year. It crossed the international date line in 2017, and is leaving the Canadian Arctic on its way to Siberia. The constant shift is a problem for compasses in smartphones and some consumer electronics. Airplanes a...
Source: TIME: Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

10 Tips for How to Repair Damaged Hair
A little TLC will restore health and shine to your fried, dyed and chemically treated locks ... So, let ’s cut to the chase. ... You’ve been merrily using a blow-dryer or flat or heat-curling iron o... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - February 2, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

How plants cope with iron deficiency
(University of M ü nster) Research groups from Heinrich Heine University D ü sseldorf (HHU) and the University of M ü nster (WWU) have discovered a new switch that plants use to control their responses to iron deficiency. The findings from their research on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is published today in the journal Developmental Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Boosting Plants' Uptake of Vitamins and Minerals
With genetic tweaks, researchers can coax corn and other cereals to take in more iron, but sometimes the plants rebel. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Notebook Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Bacteria Use Plants' Trick to Take Their Iron
Pathogens appear to steal the metal from plants using the erratic motion of microscopic particles. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Literature Magazine Issue Source Type: news