Artificial sweeteners enable delivery of carbon monoxide to treat organ injury
(Georgia State University) An oral prodrug developed by a team of scientists led by Binghe Wang, Regents' Professor of Chemistry at Georgia State University, delivers carbon monoxide to protect against acute kidney injury, according to a new paper published in Chemical Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows potential dangers of sweeteners
(Anglia Ruskin University) New research has discovered that common artificial sweeteners can cause previously healthy gut bacteria to become diseased and invade the gut wall, potentially leading to serious health issues. The study, published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, is the first to show the pathogenic effects of some of the most widely used artificial sweeteners - saccharin, sucralose, and aspartame - on two types of gut bacteria, E. coli (Escherichia coli) and E. faecalis (Enterococcus faecalis). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The sweet taste of success for a supported nickel phosphide nanoalloy catalyst
(Osaka University) Osaka University researchers produced a nickel phosphide nanoalloy catalyst (nano-Ni2P) on a hydrotalcite support for the hydrogenation of maltose to the in-demand sweetener maltitol. The catalyst is selective, highly active, air stable, effective under mild conditions and reusable. The hydrotalcite support and nano-Ni2P worked cooperatively, with the support increasing the turnover number by more than 300 times. The catalyst is expected to contribute to green and sustainable maltitol production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why a 'healthy' sweetener may be bad for your gut
Research suggests one of the most popular sweetner - stevia - may not be good for our gut bacteria, which play a key role in a host of functions including immunity and mood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Consumer Health: What do you know about sugar substitutes?
March is National Nutrition Month, which makes this a good time to learn more about sugar substitutes. Sugar substitutes are sweeteners that can be used instead of regular table sugar. Types of sugar substitutes include: Natural sweeteners, such as fruit juices, honey, molasses and maple syrup, which often are promoted as healthier options than sugar [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 12, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Can diet soda kill you? Studies show that some people can't digest aspartame
(Natural News) Diet soda, despite the name, is not better for you than regular soda. In fact, it can even be deadly for certain people. Diet soda contains aspartame, an artificial sweetener that’s 200 times sweeter than table sugar. While both table sugar (or sucrose) and aspartame have the same amount of calories, manufacturers need only a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brief High-Dose Saccharin Seems Safe, but Jury Out on Long-Term Use Brief High-Dose Saccharin Seems Safe, but Jury Out on Long-Term Use
' Artificial sweeteners used on a conservative basis may not be as harmful as supposed, but we just don't know,'says one scientist. Another urges'caution and healthy skepticism. 'Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Artificial sweetener magnate Donald Tober dies from apparent suicide
(Natural News) Donald Tober, the 89-year-old magnate responsible for marketing and popularizing the artificial sweetener brand Sweet’N Low, died on Friday, Jan. 15, in what the police described as an apparent suicide. Tober was the CEO and co-owner of New York City-based Sugar Foods Corporation, which employs around 1,400 people. According to the New York Police Department (NYPD), his body... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High doses of saccharin don't lead to diabetes in healthy adults, study finds
(MediaSource) For those trying to live a healthy lifestyle, the choice between sugar and artificial sweeteners such as saccharin can be confusing. A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found the sugar substitute saccharin doesn't lead to the development of diabetes in healthy adults as previous studies have suggested. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sugary Drinks May Be Bad for Aging
Consumption of both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened drinks was tied to an increased risk for frailty in women over 60. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nicholas Bakalar Tags: Women and Girls Sugar Artificial Sweeteners Beverages Longevity Medicine and Health PLoS Medicine (Journal) Source Type: news

Experts question idea Christmas lockdown would fuel rule-breaking
UK politicians concerned that cancelling current plans could lead to reduced compliance in the futureCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBehavioural experts and government advisers have challenged the idea that tightening rules at Christmas would reduce compliance and fuel rule-breaking.Provided the government explained the rationale for any change in the rules, and didn ’t punish anyone who failed to comply, most people would adjust their Christmas plans, experts said – particularly if they were offered a sweetener, such as an additional bank holiday next summer, which they could ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Politics UK news Science Source Type: news

Ariana Grande Announces New Sweetener Concert Film for Netflix
excuse me, i love you will arrive on December 21 (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Food supply 101: How to buy and store honey, the ultimate survival food
(Natural News) Honey is essential survival food. It’s an excellent natural sweetener and antibacterial dressing, and a good source of phenols and other antioxidant compounds. Honey also has various medicinal uses, such as for treating wounds, soothing coughs and nausea and improving sleep quality. An excellent natural preservative, it was even used by the Ancient Egyptians for embalming. Before... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Company fined half a million dollars for importing stevia sweetener products from Chinese company that uses forced labor camps for manufacturing
(Natural News) American company Pure Circle is being fined $575,000 by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for importing powdered sweetener products that were made using forced prison labor in Communist China. Back in June 2016, a shipment of stevia, a low-calorie sweetener, from China to Pure Circle was impounded by the CBP because of a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Pesco-Mediterranean Diet May Be Ideal For Heart Health
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Eczema treatment: The natural sweetener that could help ease sore and irritated skin
CZEMA can be an unsightly and unpleasant skin disorder. Usual daily activities, such as taking a shower, could leave the epidermis dry, sore and itchy. One natural remedy could help. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Artificial Sweeteners Keep Us From Gaining Weight?
Sugar substitutes may help stave off weight gain, but they have metabolic effects that some experts find concerning. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anahad O ’Connor Tags: Artificial Sweeteners Beverages Weight Obesity Diet and Nutrition Sugar Calories Insulin Sucralose (Artificial Sweetener) Aspartame Children and Childhood Source Type: news

Decrease Seen in Products Purchased Containing Caloric Sweeteners
WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2020 -- From 2002 to 2018, there was a decrease in the volume of products purchased containing caloric sweeteners (CS) and an increase in purchases of products containing both CS and nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS), according to a... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 29, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

More Americans Turning to Artificial Sweeteners, But Is That a Healthy Move?
WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2020 -- Americans may be heeding expert advice to reduce sugar intake. But instead of giving up sweets altogether, they're turning to certain sugar substitutes. A new study found that between 2002 and 2018, purchases of packaged... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 29, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Americans are consuming less sugar but more nonnutritive sweeteners
(Elsevier) A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that between 2002 and 2018 purchases by US households of foods and beverages containing caloric sweetener (CS, i.e., sugar) declined while purchases of products containing both caloric sugars and nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS, i.e., sugar substitutes) increased. Beverages accounted for most of the products purchased containing NNS only or combined with CS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health Warning Labels Could Cut Soda Sales
MONDAY, June 1, 2020 -- Warning labels on sugary drinks may help people make healthier choices, a new study finds. Sugary drinks are those with added sugar or sweeteners, including soda, sports drinks and fruit-flavored drinks. " Our findings... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 1, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Plant Extract Blend Might Reduce Hangover Symptoms Plant Extract Blend Might Reduce Hangover Symptoms
A supplement that blends plant extracts with vitamins, minerals and sweeteners may help relieve hangover symptoms, a small study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Non-caloric sweetener reduces signs of fatty liver disease in preclinical research study
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Children's Hospital Los Angeles investigator shows that non-caloric sweetener stevia decreases signs of fatty liver disease in a pre-clinical model. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial sweetener could worsen symptoms of Crohn's disease
(Natural News) “Sugar-free” artificial sweeteners might not be a healthier alternative to sugar after all. On the contrary, it can trigger inflammation and worsen symptoms of Crohn’s disease, a recent animal study showed. Published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, it revealed that Splenda, a type of zero-calorie artificial sweetener, exacerbated gut inflammation in mice with Crohn’s disease.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Oral Science Expands to the U.S. Market
Dental Health Company Oral Science Brings Its Best-Selling Oral Hygiene Products to the United StatesFORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., March 31, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Canadian dental health company, Oral Science is expanding its reach to the United States market. Known for producing high-quality oral hygiene products, Oral Science partners with dental professionals to supply a variety of rinses, toothpastes, and specialty items.Founded in 2004, Oral Science is known for its innovation in the field of dental health, making waves as a leader in both treatment and prevention of oral health conditions. Oral Scienc...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - April 7, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Yale study may help resolve bitter debate over low-cal sweeteners
Enjoy diet soda, but want to avoid artificial sweeteners ’ undesirable metabolic side effects? Think twice before you add fries to that, a Yale study suggests. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 3, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

At least 13% of wastewater treated by Southern Ontario septic systems ends up in streams
(University of Waterloo) The presence of artificial sweeteners has revealed that at least 13 percent of septic system wastewater from rural Southern Ontario homes eventually makes its way into local streams. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Tasting no-calorie sweetener may affect insulin response on glucose tolerance test
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) New research led by University of Illinois professor of food science and human nutrition M. Yanina Pepino, left, suggests that just tasting something sweet, such as the artificial sweetener sucralose, may affect individuals' responses on glucose tolerance tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Low-calorie sweeteners do not mean low risk for infants
(University of Calgary) Researchers discovered consuming low-calorie sweeteners like aspartame and stevia while pregnant increased body fat in their offspring and disrupted their gut microbiota. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Low/no calorie sweeteners can make a useful contribution to public health strategies
(International Sweeteners Association (ISA)) A new scientific report, published in Nutrition Research Reviews, gathers the consensus of 17 experts who reviewed during a dedicated workshop the scientific evidence around low/no calorie sweeteners, including in the context of public health recommendations. The experts agreed these have a beneficial role to play in helping reducing sugar and calorie intake, and on the need for evidence-based communication to ensure more informed public health decisions and public attitudes towards low/no calorie sweeteners. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Middle age healthy habits may stave off old age disease
Healthy habits can add 10 extra years of disease-free life Related items fromOnMedica Less than half of patients accept NHS Health Check Fat children have high cardiovascular risks as teens Doubt over health benefits of non-sugar sweeteners UK research reveals racial inequalities in diabetes care Five modifiable risk factors found to help reach healthy old age (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 8, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Avoid foods that contain high-fructose corn syrup to prevent negative side effects like tooth decay and obesity
(Natural News) Most processed food products and drinks today contain either sugar or high fructose corn syrup (HFSC) as sweeteners. According to researchers, the increased consumption of such food products and beverages could be linked to the widespread development of health conditions such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes. While most researchers would agree that consuming... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nearly All U.S. Kids Eating Added Sugars Before Age 2 Nearly All U.S. Kids Eating Added Sugars Before Age 2
Nearly 85% of toddlers and infants in the United States eat foods containing added sugars and artificial sweeteners on any given day, researchers say.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Nearly all U.S. kids eating added sugars before age two
(Reuters Health) - Nearly 85% of toddlers and infants in the United States eat foods containing added sugars and artificial sweeteners on any given day, researchers say. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Stevia remains the most discussed low/zero-calorie sweetener
(Kellen Communications - NY) The International Stevia Council recently unveiled data from its 2019 Online Conversation& Trends Analysis to identify and better understand the attitudes and perceptions around the sweetener stevia in English- and Spanish-speaking countries. The results: the online social conversation doubled. The association worked with Kellen, a professional services firm, to conduct the ISC Conversation& Trends Analysis, using their researchers and Crimson Hexagon, an AI-powered consumer insights company, to analyze data from 2017 to 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Saccharin derivatives give cancer cells a not-so-sweet surprise
(American Chemical Society) Saccharin received a bad rap after studies in the 1970s linked consumption of large amounts of the artificial sweetener to bladder cancer in laboratory rats. Later, research revealed that these findings were not relevant to people. And in a complete turnabout, recent studies indicate that saccharin can actually kill human cancer cells. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry have made artificial sweetener derivatives that show improved activity against two tumor-associated enzymes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here's a bitter pill to swallow: Artificial sweeteners may be doing more harm than good
(University of South Australia) A $2.2 billion industry to help people lose weight through artificial sweeteners may be contributing to type 2 diabetes, according to researchers from the University of South Australia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stevia leaves can potentially be used for improving Type 2 diabetes
(Natural News) Stevia rebaudiana, a member of the Asteraceae family, is widely known as a natural sweetener. Also called candyleaf, sweet leaf or sugarleaf due to its sweet-tasting leaves, the stevia plant has been used as an herbal medicine in many Eastern countries. According to studies, S. rebaudiana is bursting with medicinal properties, which include antibacterial, anti-hypertensive, anti-fungal, and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Infants and Toddlers Eat Too Much Sugar, Researchers Say
Using C.D.C. data, researchers found that 98 percent of toddlers and 60 percent of infants consumed added sugar in sweetened drinks, baked goods and snacks. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura M. Holson Tags: Sugar Diet and Nutrition Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Baby Foods Artificial Sweeteners Obesity Corn Syrup and Sweeteners Source Type: news

98 Percent Of Toddlers Eat Too Much Added Sugar, Report Finds
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — A new analysis of national data published Wednesday finds 98% of toddlers and two-thirds of infants consume added sugars in their diets each day. The American Heart Association recommends children less than two years of age not have access to any added sugars, which includes any sweeteners that don’t naturally occur in food. “The consumption of added sugars among children has been associated with negative health conditions such as cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure, and altered lipid profiles,” said lead investigator Kirsten Herrick, a program dire...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Parenting Source Type: news

Are Low-Calorie Sweeteners Good or Bad for You?
There is evidence to suggest that frequent use of the sweeteners, especially in diet sodas, raises the risk of several chronic diseases, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Long-term Safety of Artificial Sweeteners in Kids Unclear Long-term Safety of Artificial Sweeteners in Kids Unclear
A policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics says studies are lacking about the long-term safety of artificial sweeteners in children, as are recommendations to healthcare providers.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines)
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - November 6, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

AAP: Long-term Safety of Artificial Sweeteners on Kids Unclear AAP: Long-term Safety of Artificial Sweeteners on Kids Unclear
A policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics says studies are lacking about the long-term safety of artificial sweeteners in children, as are recommendations to healthcare providers.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines)
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - November 5, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Research Needed on Kids and Artificial Sweeteners
There are many unanswered questions about the long-term safety and impacts of artificial sweeteners in children, a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement says. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why you don't know how much artificial sweetener you're feeding your child
Parents don't want to give their children foods with artificial sweeteners, surveys show. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - October 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AAP: Info Sparse for Nonnutritive Sweetener Use in Children
MONDAY, Oct. 28, 2019 -- Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) are increasingly being consumed by children, although more information is needed on their safety and long-term impact, according to a policy statement published online Oct. 28 in Pediatrics to... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 28, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Pediatricians' Group Calls for More Research on Artificial Sweeteners
MONDAY, Oct. 28, 2019 -- There are many unanswered questions about the long-term safety and impacts of artificial sweeteners in children, a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement says. The AAP statement also recommends that the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 28, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Pediatricians' Group Calls for More Research on Artificial Sweeteners
Title: Pediatricians' Group Calls for More Research on Artificial SweetenersCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/28/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/28/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - October 28, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

How Children Get Hooked on Sugary Drinks
Misleading marketing and labeling may confuse parents about the health value of many juices, a new report finds. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew Jacobs Tags: your-feed-science Children and Childhood Beverages Sugar Juices Artificial Sweeteners Advertising and Marketing Diet and Nutrition Labeling and Labels (Product) American Academy of Pediatrics Coca-Cola Company Kraft Heinz Company U Source Type: news

Who Drank the Kool-Aid? How Children Get Hooked on Sugary Drinks
Misleading marketing and labeling may confuse parents about the health value of many juices, a new report finds. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew Jacobs Tags: your-feed-science Children and Childhood Beverages Sugar Juices Artificial Sweeteners Advertising and Marketing Diet and Nutrition Labeling and Labels (Product) American Academy of Pediatrics Coca-Cola Company Kraft Heinz Company U Source Type: news