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What Causes Hyperphosphatemia?

Discussion Constipation is a common problem in general pediatrics and its causes are numerous. It can cause acute and recurrent abdominal pain and is a cause of abdominal distention. Patients who are young, whose presentations are other than routine or who had complications should be invested for underlying causes of their constipation. This patient had undergone some evaluations in the past for constipation but because of the presentation of sepsis a more rigorous evaluation was undertaken. The differential diagnoses of the following can be found here: constipation, acute abdominal pain, recurrent abdominal pain, and abdominal distention. Hyperphosphatemia caused by retention of oral phosphate containing medications and hypertonic sodium phosphate enemas are known causes of hyperphosphatemia. Phosphate-containing medications are used because the hyperosmolarity draws fluid into the intestinal lumen which stimulates peristalsis. Usually the phosphate and fluid are then evacuated. However, the phosphate can be absorbed, particularly if there is lack of bowel integrity, with resulting hyperphosphatemia. With rising concentrations of phosphate, calcium is bound causing hypocalcemia both extracellualrly and intracellularly. Hyperphosphatemia also inhibits Vitamin D hydroxylation and inhibits reabsorption of calcium in the bone. While hypocalcemia is the most common secondary problem due to hyperphosphatemia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypoglycemia can also occur. Phosphate ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

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Source: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Poster Session - TMJ Source Type: research
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