How a tiny portable hand held device can help patients with chronic breathlessness  
A study of 111 patients with breathlessness, published in the European Respiratory Journal last year, found 82 per cent perceived some benefit when using a fan. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Finding Lung Cancer Outside the Airways Just Got Easier
Diagnosing solitary lung tumors located outside of a patient's main airways has long been a challenge, but evidence is building around a technology designed to improve access to such tumors. According to data unveiled this week at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in Paris, Broncus Medical's Archimedes virtual bronchoscopy navigation system helped to more than double the diagnostic yield for nodules with negative bronchus sign or an airway leading to the nodule. The six-year-old, San Jose, CA-based company said the Archimedes System is the only system of its kind offering real-...
Source: MDDI - September 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Model Estimates Mortality in Patients Waiting for Hearts
Neurologic events, new requirement for dialysis, respiratory complications yield updated estimates (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 17, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Nephrology, Neurology, Pulmonology, Surgery, Journal, Source Type: news

Vygon leads French investors in funding Canadian startup OxyNov
Single-use medical device maker Vygon said today that it has acquired a 20% stake in OxyNov, a Canadian startup specializing in oxygen therapy and respiratory assistance medical devices. The financial terms of the transaction, in which Desjardins-Innovatech and other private investors in Quebec also participated, were not disclosed. Founded in 2009, OxyNov (Quebec) launched FreeO2, a medical device CE marked in May 2017. FreeO2 automatically and continuously adjusts the flow of oxygen delivered to the patient based on a clinician-defined target for oxygen saturation and patient needs. The French group decided to invest in ...
Source: Mass Device - September 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Source Type: news

Add-On Sildenafil Disappoints in IPF With Impaired Gas Exchange
(MedPage Today) -- Trial likely'underpowered'to show benefit, says investigator (Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary)
Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary - September 17, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Gala Presents Positive Results from First-In-Human Clinical Trial of RheOx(TM) in Chronic Bronchitis at the European Respiratory Society
Favorable safety profile RheOx treatment resulted in clinical improvement as measured by Quality of Life scores, with treatment effect maintained at 12-month follow-up Improvement in airway biopsies and imaging MENLO PARK, Calif., Sept. 17, 2018 -... Biopharmaceuticals Gala Therapeutics, RheOx, chronic bronchitis, Bronchial Rheoplasty (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Lancet Respiratory Medicine publishes first Phase III trial for PT010 triple combination therapy in moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
AstraZeneca today announced publication of results from the KRONOS Phase III trial which evaluated the efficacy and safety of triple combination therapy PT010 (budesonide/ glycopyrronium/formoterol fumarate) versus dual combination therapies Bevespi Aerosphere (glycopyrronium/formoterol fumarate), Symbicort Turbuhaler (budesonide/formoterol fumarate) and PT009 (budesonide/formoterol fumarate) in patients with (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured AstraZeneca Business and Industry Source Type: news

Anesthesia drugs: Muscle relaxants increase risk of respiratory complications
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Muscle relaxants are a necessary part of anesthesia during certain major operations. Studies have, however, hinted at respiratory risks connected with these drugs. POPULAR, a major prospective observational European study supported by the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) and led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has confirmed the association between use of muscle relaxants and respiratory complications and assessed the chances of the current avoidance strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New guideline recommends weight loss strategies for sleep apnea patients
(American Thoracic Society) A new guideline focused on the role of weight management in treating adult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been published online by the American Thoracic Society in the Sept. 15 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Real-world study reports effects of Spiolto Respimat
Large European real-world study reports effects of Spiolto ® Respimat® for people living with COPD in daily clinical practice1OTIVACTO study reported improvements in both physical functioning and general condition in people living with COPD receiving Spiolto ®(tiotropium/olodaterol) Respimat® therapy14 out of 5 patients reported high satisfaction with their Respimat ® inhaler and tiotropium/olodaterol treatment overall1Data presented at European Respiratory Society International Congress 20181 (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Paracetamol use in infancy is linked to increased risk of asthma in some teenagers
(European Lung Foundation) Children who take paracetamol during their first two years of life may be at a higher risk of developing asthma by the age of 18, especially if they have a particular genetic makeup, according to new research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Quick and easy test for viral infections reduces hospital admissions and antibiotic use
(European Lung Foundation) A quick and easy test for viral infections can reduce unnecessary antibiotic use and hospital admissions, according to new research presented to the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The test, which takes just 50 minutes to obtain results, could save hospitals around € 2,500 per patient not admitted to hospital, would help to relieve winter pressures on available beds, and may help to reduce the development of antibiotic resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

First evidence that soot from polluted air is reaching placenta
(European Lung Foundation) Evidence of tiny particles of carbon, typically created by burning fossil fuels, has been found in placentas for the first time, in new research presented today at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

INPULSIS-ON shows ofev slows progression of IPF
New study results provide evidence that Ofev ® (nintedanib) slows progression of IPF beyond four years with consistent safetyINPULSIS ®-ON study indicates safety and efficacy of Ofev®(nintedanib) are maintained over the long term and consistent with prior findings from INPULSIS® trials1Results from INPULSIS ®-ON, the open-label extension from the two INPULSIS® Phase III trials, published in Lancet Respiratory Medicine1  (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Children with asthma are less likely to finish school and to work in non-manual occupations
(European Lung Foundation) People who suffer with persistent asthma from a young age are more likely to leave school at 16 years old and those who make it to university are more likely to drop out early, according to new research presented today (Sunday) at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The research also suggests that when this group of children grow up, they are less likely to work in certain non-manual occupations such as police officer, clerk or foreman. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cord blood clue to respiratory diseases
(La Trobe University) New research has found children born during high pollen months may have a greater risk of developing respiratory diseases such as asthma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Asthma-Obesity Link May Cut Both Ways
The researchers analyzed data on more than 8,600  people from 12  countries included in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey.  None of the participants was obese when the survey began. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Situation Framing, Language Can Influence Decision - Making
Docs should provide risks of both having treatment and not having treatment to minimize loss aversion (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 14, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

Small Reduction in Lung Function With Tx De - Escalation in COPD
No difference in exacerbations with indacaterol/glycopyrronium for non - frequently exacerbating COPD (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 14, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Critical Care, Journal, Source Type: news

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is delayed with testosterone replacement therapy
Testosterone replacement therapy is linked to delayed progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to research published in Chronic Respiratory Disease. News Medical (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 14, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Bacteria passed on in the womb is linked to premature birth and breathing difficulties
(European Lung Foundation) Babies born very prematurely are more likely to harbor Ureaplasma bacteria, according to new research to be presented on Sunday at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Testosterone replacement therapy may slow the progression of COPD
(SAGE) GALVESTON, Texas -- Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that testosterone replacement therapy may slow disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The paper is currently available in Chronic Respiratory Disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study concludes that air pollution is bad for birds as well – evidence points to decreased lung function among avians
(Natural News) Most people understand, for the most part, that long-term exposure to air pollution can be detrimental to their health. However, a study in the Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences reported that birds are also at risk, with some developing severe conditions such as anthracosis (a chronic respiratory disease caused by inhaling too much... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No $$ for Vaccines; Yellow Fever in the Other Congo; Intranasal Flu Vax Promising
(MedPage Today) -- News and commentary from the world of infectious diseases (Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary)
Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary - September 12, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Six - Step Analysis Can Help Improve Practice Logistics
Method showed unfavorable traits related to match between supply, demand, access at outpatient clinic (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 12, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

FDA clears Masimo ’ s Rainbow acoustic monitors for infants, neonates
Masimo (NSDQ:MASI) said today it won FDA clearance for its RAS-45 acoustic respiration sensor as part of its Rainbow Acoustic Monitoring system, cleared for use with infants and neonatal patients. With the clearance, the Rainbow Acoustic Monitoring system is now cleared for use with patients of all sizes, the Irvine, Calif.-based company said. Previously, the system was only cleared for use with adult and pediatric patietns weighing greater than 10 kg, Masimo added. The Rainbow Acoustic Monitoring system is designed to noninvasively and continuously measure respiration rates using an adhesive sensor with an integrated...
Source: Mass Device - September 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Masimo Source Type: news

High-Touch Surfaces at Airports Often Covered in Pathogens
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 -- Many frequently touched surfaces at airports are contaminated with respiratory virus pathogens, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in BMC Infectious Diseases. Niina Ikonen, from the National Institute for... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Low-cost monitor uses AI to diagnose heart problems
(University of Cambridge) A Cambridge start-up has developed a low-cost next-generation wearable heart and cardiovascular function monitor which uses AI to diagnose heart rhythm and respiratory problems in real time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection – Republic of Korea
On 8 September 2018, the International Health Regulations (IHR 2005) National Focal Point (NFP) of the Republic of Korea notified WHO of a laboratory-confirmed case of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - September 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Vasopressors May Contribute to ICU-Related Weakness
(MedPage Today) -- Association was independent of other known risk factors (Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary)
Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary - September 11, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Antibiotics for children's cough don't reduce hospitalization risk, study says
If a child is prescribed antibiotics to treat coughs and respiratory infections, the chances of being hospitalized are not reduced, according to a British study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fighting the cold virus and other threats, body makes trade-off, says study
According to new Yale research, when respiratory cells protect against oxidative stress like cigarette smoke or pollen, antiviral responses can suffer. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Surgery for Mesothelioma No Longer Recommended in UK
Aggressive surgery for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) — unless part of a clinical trial — is no longer being recommended in the United Kingdom. The British Thoracic Society recently published its Mesothelioma Management Guidelines for 2018 and removed surgery from its recommendations. The belief was that potential harm was not worth the risk. The backtrack on surgery included the extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP), the extended pleurectomy and decortication (P/D) and the partial pleurectomy (PP) — all of which are being done at cancer centers in the United States. “Surgery is a ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 11, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Juuls Pack Same Nicotine Punch as Cigarettes
Title: Juuls Pack Same Nicotine Punch as CigarettesCategory: Health NewsCreated: 9/11/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/11/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - September 11, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Carbon nanodots do an ultrafine job with in vitro lung tissue
(American Institute of Physics) Epidemiological studies have established a strong correlation between inhaling ultrafine particles from incomplete combustion and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Still, relatively little is known about the mechanisms behind how air particulates affect human health. New work seeks to provide the first model of how ultrafine carbon-based particles interact with the lung tissues. Researchers created a 3D lung cell model system to investigate how carbon-based combustion byproducts behave as they interact with human epithelial tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Industry-certified masks offer better protection from volcanic ash exposure
(Durham University) Industry-certified particle masks are most effective at protecting people from volcanic ash, whilst commonly used surgical masks offer less protection. A first of its kind study, led by Dr Claire Horwell of the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience at Durham University, UK, has measured the effectiveness of different types of respiratory protection against volcanic ash. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prescribing antibiotics for children with cough in general practice does not reduce hospitalisation risk
Doctors and nurses often prescribe antibiotics for children with cough and respiratory infection to avoid return visits, symptoms getting worse or hospitalisation. In a study published in the British Journal of General Practice today [Tuesday 11 September], researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Southampton, Oxford and Kings College London found little evidence that antibiotics reduce the risk of children with cough ending up in hospital, suggesting that this is an area in which unnecessary antibiotic prescribing could be reduced. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - September 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Population Health Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

9/11 Cancer Deaths Continue to Rise
John Feal believes more people will die from illnesses related to 9/11 than from the terrorist attack at the World Trade Center. He should know. He’s a first responder who witnesses it every day. And he is not alone in his belief. Feal, a longtime advocate for Sept. 11 survivors and those dying from diseases related to the terrorist attacks, will again host the annual naming ceremony at the 9/11 Responders Remembered Park in Smithtown, Long Island. Each year he reads the names of those who have died within the past year. And each year, the list is longer than the last. On the 17th anniversary of the terrorist attack...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 10, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Health Effects of Pollution in the Air at ERS 2018 Health Effects of Pollution in the Air at ERS 2018
At the European Respiratory Society Congress, the effects of pollution exposure on sick leave taken years later will be presented, as will new idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis guidelines.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

Docs, Consumers Agree on Benefits of Virtual Care
But physician adoption of virtual care technologies is low; few plan to add video visit capability (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 10, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

New Bronchoscopic Option Used for Severe Emphysema
First bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using endobronchial valve performed at Temple University (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 10, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Pulmonology, Surgery, Institutional, Source Type: news

Significant amount of cancer-causing chemicals stays in lungs during e-cigarette use
(Desert Research Institute) E-cigarettes have become increasingly popular as a smoke-free alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes, but the health effects of 'vaping' on humans have been debated in the scientific and tobacco manufacturing communities. A recently published pilot study by a team of researchers from the Desert Research Institute (DRI) and the University of Nevada, Reno shows that significant amounts of cancer-causing chemicals such as formaldehyde are absorbed by the respiratory tract during a typical vaping session, underscoring the potential health risks posed by vaping. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

South Korean man infected by MERS virus, first case in 3 years
A South Korean man, 61, was diagnosed with the potentially deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and is being treated at a hospital in Seoul, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said on Saturday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Inhalation injury and toxic industrial chemical exposure - Saeed O, Boyer NL, Pamplin JC, Driscoll IR, DellaVolpe J, Cannon J, Cancio LC.
Toxic industrial chemicals include chlorine, phosgene, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia have variable effects on the respiratory tract, and maybe seen alone or in combination, secondary to inhalation injury. Other considerations include the effects of cyanide... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

South Korean man infected by MERS virus, first case in three years
A South Korean man, 61, was diagnosed with the potentially deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and is being treated at a hospital in Seoul, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said on Saturday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Two Airplane Health Scares Last Week Were Linked to People Returning From the Hajj in Mecca
A pair of airline health scares last week were related to the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, officials say. Eleven people were treated at a New York City hospital after reports of sick passengers and crew on an Emirates flight from Dubai on Wednesday. The next day, a total of 12 passengers on two flights into Philadelphia International Airport showed flu-like symptoms. “Overall, the common thread is influenza A cases in returning Hajj pilgrims,” Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) spokesman Benjamin Haynes told TIME. The hajj, an annual pilgrimage for practicing Muslims, this year reportedly drew more than 2 milli...
Source: TIME: Health - September 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Travel Source Type: news

Two Airplane Health Scares This Week Were Linked to People Returning From the Hajj in Mecca
A pair of airline health scares this week were related to the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, officials say. Eleven people were treated at a New York City hospital after reports of sick passengers and crew on an Emirates flight from Dubai on Wednesday. The next day, a total of 12 passengers on two flights into Philadelphia International Airport showed flu-like symptoms. “Overall, the common thread is influenza A cases in returning Hajj pilgrims,” Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) spokesman Benjamin Haynes told TIME. The hajj, an annual pilgrimage for practicing Muslims, this year reportedly drew more than 2 milli...
Source: TIME: Health - September 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Travel Source Type: news

Metabolite Analysis IDs Pathways Associated With WTC - Lung Injury
Findings in small study of firefighters with World Trade Center Lung Injury (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 7, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Pathology, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Fremanezumab Still Effective in Chronic Migraine At One Year
(MedPage Today) -- But concerns emerge about upper respiratory infections (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - September 7, 2018 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Intuitive Surgical seeks FDA approval for lung biopsy robotic platform tools
Intuitive Surgical (NSDQ:ISRG) said yesterday it submitted a premarket notification application to the FDA seeking clearance for its new flexible, robotic-assisted cahteter-based platform intended for use in the lungs. The new platform is designed for navigation through very small lung airways to reach peripheral nodules for biopsies, the Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company said in a press release. Intuitive Surgical did not release any other details of the tools. In July, Intuitive Surgical saw shares rise in after-hours trading after the robotic surgical platform maker beat expectations on Wall Street with its second qu...
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Respiratory Robotics Surgical Intuitive Surgical Source Type: news