How To Go Beyond The Airline Medical Kit To Keep Passengers Healthy In The Future?
Humanity has come a long way from treating patients who have fallen off cliffs after having tried to fly, dressed like birds: parallel to the development of flying, the practice of how to keep people alive during flights has also greatly evolved. How can digital health add to the practice of aviation medicine in the future and make sure that passengers step off the plane as healthy as they got in? From Icarus through hot air balloons to mid-air meditation The human desire to conquer the sky is a thousand-year-old story, with tales such as the Greek myth about Daedalus and Icarus. The duo wanted to escape from Crete,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 21, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers aero aeronautics aviation emergency emergency medicine flight flight medicine Healthcare portable portable diagnostics predictive prevention technology wearables Source Type: blogs

When Should You Hold Your Breath During an Abdominal MRI?
Holding one ’s breath at the end of the exhale instead of at the end of the inhale during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the liver can reduce respiratory motion artifacts, according to a studyrecently published in theAmerican Journal of Roentgenology.For the study, researchers from Stanford University collected both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images of end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-holding techniques from 47 participants undergoing axial T1-weighted liver MRI. Three radiologists evaluated the quality of the images based on a rubric of one point for motion artifact-obscured to five po...
Source: radRounds - March 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

6 Good Reasons to Laugh More
It’s been 40 years since Norman Cousins published his classic An Anatomy of an Illness, in which he documents curing himself with a high dose of vitamin C and a continuous stream of humorous films. Since then research has further established the medicinal benefits of laughter, helping everything from Alzheimer’s disease and allergies to backaches and muscle cramping. Following one of his studies on the benefits of laughter, Dr. Michael Miller said he envisioned a time when physicians might recommend that everyone get 15 to 20 minutes of laughter in a day much like physicians recommend regular exercise. Not...
Source: World of Psychology - March 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: General Happiness Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research Stress Fun Humor Laughter Source Type: blogs

Iowa House Passes Extreme Simon ’ s Law
This week, the Iowa House of Representatives passed H.F. 594. This bill adds a new section to the Iowa Code (144F.1) that provides: "A court of law or equity shall not have the authority to require the withdrawal of life-sustaining procedures from a minor child over the objection of the minor child’s parent or guardian, unless there is conclusive medical evidence that the minor child has died and any electronic brain, heart, or respiratory monitoring activity exhibited to the contrary is a false artifact. For the purposes of this section, “life-sustaining procedure” means the same as defined in ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Empower Your Inner Peacekeeper
Inner peace is the centerpiece of your soul. Stress is a constant, a fact of life, a silent killer. These catchphrases grab our attention because, yep, they sound pretty stressful  —  as though we’d better put on our protective gear, grab our weapons, and prepare for combat… or else. No doubt, our daily exposure to the stress factor can make us feel like we’re in the trenches and quickly losing the war. And when stress eventually retreats, there we stand  –  bloodied and bruised, dragged down and worn out. And ready to surrender. But wait. Let’s not wave the white flag...
Source: World of Psychology - March 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Joshua Garrin, Ph.D., CPT, CHC Tags: Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Stress Breathing Exercise Inner Peace Overstimulation Peace Of Mind Qigong Tai Chi Source Type: blogs

The Heart of The Matter: Technology In The Future of Cardiology
Sound, rhythm, rate, structure, function – countless features of the heart are measured to keep it healthy for as long as possible. Recently, an army of digital health technologies joined the forces of traditional preventive tools in cardiology to counter stroke, heart attack, heart failure or any other cardiovascular risks. In the future, minuscule sensors, digital twins, and artificial intelligence could strengthen their ranks. Let’s see what the future of cardiology might look like! Fitness trackers, chatbots and A.I. against heart disease Let’s say 36-year-old Maria living in Sao Paulo in 2033 d...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 12, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics cardiology cardiovascular cardiovascular diseases digital digital twin health trackers heart heart health heart rate heart soun Source Type: blogs

A Patient with Respiratory Failure and a Computer " Normal " ECG
This ECG was presented in a conference.The patient had presented many times for SOB.  On this occasion he was intubated for respiratory failure due to presumed asthma.I was asked to interpret his ECG in the conference.  I had never seen it before.ECG-1:What do you think I said?Here is the computer interpretation:This is what I said: " This is diagnostic of an acute inferior MI.  There is upsloping ST elevation in III, with reciprocal ST depression in aVL.  You do NOT see this in normal variant STE, nor in pericarditis.  The only time you see this without ischemia is when there is an abnor...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - March 11, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Itchy Eyes: Allergies are Crying Out for Attention
In many ways, the eyes are the windows of the body. When children have itchy eyes, it can disrupt their days – and nights. Itchy eyes often distract kids and decrease their ability to learn new material. If this weren’t bad enough, they can cause kids to sleep less well. For some kids, the difference in sleep can make them moody and hungry. Hangry is not what any parent, teacher or child wants. Why Do Kids Get Itchy Eyes? The human body is armed with an amazing immune system that includes an array of protection devices. The respiratory system tightens up when foreign particles are introduced. The nose secretes ...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - March 10, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Allergies Hay fever Pollen Allergies Remedies Source Type: blogs

8 Health Risks of Untreated Depression
Medication side-effects can seem unbearable at times: dry mouth, nausea, dizziness, constipation. Certain prescriptions can also increase our risks for developing chronic conditions like thyroid disease and diabetes. Three years ago, I decided that the pills’ side-effects weren’t worth the relief they brought, so I slowly weaned off all my medication. I then plummeted into a severe depression that ended up taking a far greater toll on my health than the nuisance of my drugs. You may be justifiably concerned about how your mood stabilizer and antidepressant are altering your biochemistry, but also consider the g...
Source: World of Psychology - March 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression General Medications Antidepressant Cognitive Decline Diabetes Mood Stabilizer Source Type: blogs

“ Myocardial intelligence ” and ability to survive Ischemia !
One popular definition of Intelligence goes something like this  “It’s a global capacity  of a living organism  to deal effectively with environment and live peacefully” When myocytes are confronted with acute ischemia , they  don’t always  jitter . It expresses many behavioral pattern.The damage inflicted is variable as  the molecular mechanism of ischemic tolerance appears to be a virtue ! This might make  much revered time window of myocyte ischemia irrelevant .Each cell has got a unique capacity to survive or die . In chronic ischemia this myocyte intelligence ...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - March 1, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: cardiac physiology acc aha stemi guidelines ischemic post condtioning ischemic post condtionining ischemic precondtioning myocardial intelligence no reflow Source Type: blogs

AI in Healthcare: Interview with Chris Gough, GM Health and Life Sciences, Intel Corporation
Intel has developed a suite of AI technologies and has been collaborating with numerous medtech providers to create new healthcare solutions based on data-driven strategies. AI has come on in leaps and bounds, and is beginning to make an impact in various healthcare fields. Intel aims to be at the forefront of this AI revolution. For instance, Intel has collaborated with Novartis to perform high content drug screening. The company uses Intel neural network technology to analyze thousands of images of cells to identify promising drug candidates. Previously, technicians analyzed these images manually, which was tedious and ...
Source: Medgadget - February 27, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Mauna Kea ’s Cellvizio AQ-Flex 19 Miniprobe FDA Cleared for Analyzing Lung Nodules
Mauna Kea Technologies, based in Paris, France, won clearance from the FDA for its Cellvizio needle-based AQ-Flex 19 confocal miniprobe for use in sampling and imaging of peripheral lung nodules. The product allows physicians to image lung nodules directly through existing bronchoscopes and accompanying accessories. Additionally, in some markets, it can be used to analyze other internal tissues such as within the GI tract. “Our pioneering team has demonstrated that real-time imaging and identification of benign and malignant cellular structures inside pulmonary nodules and lymph nodes with needle-based Confocal ...
Source: Medgadget - February 27, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: GI Medicine Pathology Radiology Surgery Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Case 079
Presentation A previously well 49 year old man presents with chest pain. He is tachycardic, tachypneoic and hypoxic with blood pressure 110/65. He is 2 weeks… Read more → (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 25, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr James Rippey Tags: Respiratory TOP 100 Ultrasound D-shaped septum McConnell's sign Pulmonary Embolism Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Case 079
Presentation A previously well 49 year old man presents with chest pain. He is tachycardic, tachypneoic and hypoxic with blood pressure 110/65. He is 2 weeks post ankle surgery. Describe and interpret these scans The post Ultrasound Case 079 appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane • LITFL • Medical Blog. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 25, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr James Rippey Tags: Respiratory TOP 100 Ultrasound D-shaped septum McConnell's sign Pulmonary Embolism Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 25th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Pennsylvania Department of Health Urges Parents to Lie to their Kids About the Dangers of E-Cigarettes
A basic principle of public health ethics is that we don't lie to people. Telling the truth is a critical component of the public health code of ethics. It is important not only because it is unethical to lie, but also because we greatly risk losing credibility and the public's trust if we are found to be lying. And once that public trust is lost, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to gain back.Therefore, it pains me today to have to report that the Pennsylvania Department of Health is urging parents to lie to their kids about e-cigarettes in order to dissuade them from vaping. In addition, the Pennsylvania Depa...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - February 24, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Mitochondrial Antioxidants as a Contributing Cause of Naked Mole-Rat Longevity
Naked mole-rats exhibit exceptional longevity in comparison to other rodent species. They can live nine times longer than similarly sized mice, for example. There are no doubt a sizable number of distinct mechanisms that contribute to this difference in species life span, and the existence of mammals with widely divergent life spans acts as a natural laboratory for researchers interested in better understanding aging. If one species lives a much longer life than another, then using their differences in order to identify the more important aspects of cellular metabolism in the matter of aging may well be a faster approach t...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Overheard: Using Respiratory Muscle Strength Training in Dysphagia
The objective data comes from what you measure as an outcome. The device is the trainer. Again, use pressure threshold and then set out to measure the outcomes, a scale, a swallow exam, a cough flow rate, a voice quality, etc. Participant: How do you establish goals? There are norms for peak cough, is this what you use? Kiourkas: Respiratory uses cough peak flow to qualify for noninvasive ventilation for ALS and neuromuscular patients. The norms are different for each person. Suggested ranges are used as a guide to assist in determining if the patient is getting worse at subsequent visits. We also use a SNIP (sniffing pres...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - February 22, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Renee Kiourkas Tags: Academia & Research Health Care Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia dyspnea muscle strength skilled nursing facility Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs

Manes Kartagener
Biography Born 7 January 1897, Przemyśl (part of Austria since 1772. Returned to Poland following WW1) 1915 – Graduated from a science orientated gymnasium (g… Read more → (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 21, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Gary Zhang Tags: Eponym Respiratory Source Type: blogs

CVS Expands Its Healthcare Presence with Its New HealthHUB Stores
CVS, Walgreens, and Walmart are all experimenting with new and innovative ways to capture a larger share of the primary healthcare business. In my opinion, they are generally succeeding whereas the health systems seem to be unable or unwilling to compete for this same business. The latest news about this topic is that CVS is prototyping their so-calledHealthHUBs in Houston (see:CVS Health shows off new HealthHUB store design. Makeover includes dietitians, wellness rooms for yoga). Below are details excerpted from the article:CVS Health has unveiled its new health-focused concept store that's designed to help the p...
Source: Lab Soft News - February 19, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Testing Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Innovations Healthcare Insurance Lab Industry Trends Medical Consumerism Point-of-Care Testing Source Type: blogs

Vapotherm Releases Latest Precision Flow Hi-VNI Mask-Free Ventilation System
Vapotherm, a company based in New Hampshire, has released the latest version of its Precision Flow Hi-VNI system. The system is used to deliver non-invasive ventilation to spontaneously breathing patients using the company’s Mask-Free NIV technology. The latest version of the system features updated hardware and software, which purportedly improves on reliability and “to comply with the EMC 4th Edition requirements for medical devices, IEC 60601-1-2:2014,” according to a Vapotherm press release. Precision Flow Hi-VNI uses a nasal cannula, instead of a face mask, to deliver warm, humidified ...
Source: Medgadget - February 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Critical Care Medicine Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Will US Drug Policymakers Blow It Again —This Time With Benzodiazepines?
In a recent  column, Maia Szalavitz reports on the rise in overdose deaths related to benzodiazepines (a class of tranquilizers including Xanax, Valium, and Ativan). According to a recent  study in JAMA, the number benzodiazepine prescriptions doubled in the US   from 2003 to 2015. And benzodiazepines are found in the bloodstream of almost a third of all opioid overdose victims—a nearly ten-fold increase since the beginning of this century. Szalavitz reminds us that the US is not the only developed country with an overdose problem from the nonmedical use of prescription drugs: ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 14, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Manes Kartagener
(1897 - 1975) was an Austrian-Swiss physician. First to report the triad of situs inversus, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis in 1933 – Kartagener syndrome. The post Manes Kartagener appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane • LITFL • Medical Blog. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 14, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Gary Zhang Tags: Eponym Respiratory Kartagener disease Kartagener syndrome Manes Kartagener Source Type: blogs

ST Depression and T-wave inversion in V2 and V3.
A middle aged male dialysis patient was found disorganized and paranoid.  He had no chest pain or dyspnea.An ECG was recorded.  The clinician was worried about his ECG and showed it to me:What do you think?When I saw this ECG, I immediately recognized right ventricular hypertrophy as the cause of the ST depression and T-wave inversion in leads V2 and V3.  In other words, I was certain that this was achronicfinding on the ECG.  The worried clinician stated there are no old ECGs to compare with, and no records.  I remained certain that this was RVH as the findings are classic: Large R-wave in V1...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - February 12, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Researchers Tell Public that Vaping Causes COPD as Scientific Rigor in Tobacco Control Drops to an All-Time Low
Based on the results of a cross-sectionalstudy showing an association between using e-cigarettes and reporting that one has ever been told they have COPD (chronic obstructive lung disease), a number of researchers have essentially concluded that vaping causes COPD, and one researcher is telling the public that use of e-cigarettes increases one's risk of COPDjust like cigarettes.The paper, published inDrug and Alcohol Dependence, reports the results of a cross-sectional study based on the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey in Hawaii. The outcome variable was reporting ever having been told that o...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - February 9, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Miniaturized Inhaled Nitric Oxide Delivery Units for Use in a Doctor ’s Office
Nu-Med Plus, a medtech firm based in Utah, has developed a range of smart delivery devices for inhaled nitric oxide delivery, including a miniaturized unit that can operate in a doctor’s office. The innovation has been possible as parts of the drug patent for nitric oxide have been invalidated, meaning that the cost of the treatment could come down. Nitric oxide is a vasodilator naturally produced by the endothelium. Inhaled nitric oxide is used to treat a variety of conditions, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, high blood pressure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and erectile dysfunction. However...
Source: Medgadget - February 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Medicine Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Iowa Considers Dropping Best Interest Standard for Parental Medical Decision-Making
Going a step further than Simon's Law legislation being considered in several states, Iowa has introduced H.F. 233.  "A court of law or equity shall not have the authority to require the withdrawal of life-sustaining procedures from a minor child over the objection of the minor child’s parent or guardian, unless there is conclusive medical evidence that the minor child has died and any electronic brain, heart, or respiratory monitoring activity exhibited to the contrary is a false artifact." Representative Jon Jacobsen (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Innovation Amidst the Crisis: Health IT and the Opioid Abuse Epidemic | Part 3 – Clinical Decision Support
By COLIN KONSCHAK, FACHE and DAVE LEVIN, MD Dave Levin Colin Konschak The opioid crisis in the United States is having a devastating impact on individuals, their families, and the health care industry. This multi-part series will focus on the role technology can play in addressing this crisis. Part one of the series proposed a strategic framework for evaluating and pursuing technical solutions. A Framework for Innovation As noted in part one of our series, we believe the opioid crisis is an “All Hands-On Deck” moment and health IT (HIT) has a lot to offer. Given the many different possibilities, having a method...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Data Tech THCB APIs clinical support Colin Konschak Dave Levin Opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs

Where there ’s Fire, there’s Smoke: Poor air quality and asthma treatment
When the wildfires hit Northern California, I knew it would be only a matter of time before the smoke drifted into the Bay Area and the air quality worsened. Predictably, children with asthma would be showing up in emergency rooms and urgent care centers to get breathing treatments for their increased wheezing. And three weeks later there would be an increase in cases of pneumonia and lower respiratory tract infections*. Smoke and Asthma Treatment Let’s address why humans wheeze in the first place. Wheezing is an adaptive, protective mechanism. It’s a cool feature of the human body. When we encounter something ...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - February 4, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Air Quality Asthma Source Type: blogs

ECG Quiz 45
Discussion Negative P, QRS and T in I and aVL with progressive decrease in QRS amplitude from V1-V6 is suggestive of dextrocardia with situs inversus. Along with bronchiectasis, it becomes Kartagener syndrome (also called immotile ciliary syndrome) an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. The ciliary motility of respiratory tract, paranasal sinuses, middle ear, Eustachian tube and Fallopian tube can be affected. Sperm motility can also be affected by involvement of the flagellum. Rather than being fully immotile it is inefficient or asynchronous movement of the cilia. Infertility, sinusitis and bronchiectasis are the ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - February 4, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: ECG / Electrophysiology ECG Library Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 4th 2019
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Goal of Symbiotic Microbes in Tissues, Generating Additional Oxygen as Required
We live in an era of biotechnology, of tremendous year by year increases in the capacity to engineer the fundamental mechanisms of life and disease. The research community and funding institutions should aim high, aim at the new and the amazing, rather than slouching forward in the service of crafting yet more marginal, incremental improvements to existing forms of therapy. Sadly, mediocrity rules when it comes to all too much of the research community. Vision is lacking, and far too few people are willing to tread the roads yet untraveled. Why is it necessary to spend so much time and effort to convince people to f...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 31, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

MediPines Gas Exchange Monitor Cleared by FDA for Comprehensive Lung Function Analysis
MediPines, a company based in California’s Orange County, obtained FDA clearance for its MediPines Gas Exchange Monitor. The device is used to measure and monitor a variety of respiratory parameters and indices of patients presenting with lung conditions. It can help to quickly triage patients and make decision making easier by providing parameters such as PIO2, PETCO2, and Oxygen Deficit. Even the pulse rate and oxygen saturation of blood (SpO2) can be obtained by the patient simply breathing into a mouthpiece. A comprehensive test takes only a few minutes and it is non-invasive and can be performed a...
Source: Medgadget - January 31, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Hypertension May Accelerate Neurodegeneration by Reducing Clearance of Metabolic Waste via Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage
I missed the open access paper noted here when it appeared last year. It is an interesting addition to the growing body of evidence that shows drainage of cerebrospinal fluid from the brain to be an important mechanism for clearance of metabolic waste. That the drainage paths become impaired with age contributes to the aggregation of proteins such as amyloid-β, involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Thus approaches to restore drainage in one way or another should prove quite effective for a range of neurodegenerative conditions. We will find out whether or not this is the case over the next few years as g...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 31, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

MightySat Rx Cleared by FDA to Measure Breathing Rate from Fingertip
Masimo won FDA clearance for its MightySat Rx fingertip pulse oximeter to be used to spot check the respiration rate. A similar clearance was issued by the European Union regulatory authorities in 2017. These days the breathing rate is still counted manually more often than not. Though there are devices in existence, even contact-free ones, that can measure the breathing rate, they tend to be pricey, designed for bedridden patients, and they can’t be properly used in a variety of settings. The MightySat Rx uses the company’s Respiration Rate from the Pleth (RRp) technology to measure a patient’s brea...
Source: Medgadget - January 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Medicine Source Type: blogs

Hyperthermia and ST Elevation
DiscussionBrugada Type 1 ECG changes are associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD) and the occurrence of ventricular dysrhythmias. Patients that develop a Type 1 pattern without any precipitating or provoking factors have a risk of SCD of 0.5-0.8% per year. In patients that only have this pattern induced by a sodium channel blocking agent have a lower rate of SCD (0 - 0.35% per year)[1]. Drugs that have been associated with Brugada ECG patterns include tricyclic antidepressants, anesthetics,cocaine, methadone, antihistamines, electrolyte derangements, and even tramadol. [2]. Our patient had a Brugada Type 1 patt...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 30, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

A Digitally Caring Environment: The Internet of Things in Hospitals
What do hospital beds tell about patients? How does an „indoor GPS”-system work? How could sensors and connected devices enhance both patient experience and medical resource efficiency? Here, we tell you everything about IoT within the walls of health facilities. Emergency drones, Fitbits, and chatty hospital-beds In April 2045, Paul was walking down the street with her 4-year-old daughter, Lily, in downtown Boston. They were heading to the ice cream & deli at the corner of the square two minutes from their home. Suddenly, the man experienced chest pain, started to breathe heavily and collapsed. Lily looked...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 24, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design AI connected digital digital health digital health sensors doctor future of hospital IoT patient smart smart algorithm Source Type: blogs

A Digitally Caring Environment: The Internet of Things in Hospitals
What do hospital beds tell about patients? How does an „indoor GPS”-system work? How could sensors and connected devices enhance both patient experience and medical resource efficiency? Here, we tell you everything about IoT within the walls of health facilities. Emergency drones, Fitbits, and chatty hospital-beds In April 2045, Paul was walking down the street with her 4-year-old daughter, Lily, in downtown Boston. They were heading to the ice cream & deli at the corner of the square two minutes from their home. Suddenly, the man experienced chest pain, started to breathe heavily and collapsed. Lily looked...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 24, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design AI connected digital digital health digital health sensors doctor future of hospital IoT patient smart smart algorithm Source Type: blogs

Bad breath: What causes it and what to do about it
Almost everyone experiences bad breath once in a while. But for some people, bad breath is a daily problem, and they struggle to find a solution. Approximately 30% of the population complains of some sort of bad breath. Halitosis (Latin for “bad breath”) often occurs after a garlicky meal or in the morning after waking. Other causes of temporary halitosis include some beverages (including alcoholic drinks or coffee) and tobacco smoking. Some people may not be aware of their own halitosis and learn about it from a relative, friend, or coworker, causing some degree of discomfort and distress. In severe cases, bad...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alessandro Villa DDS, PhD, MPH Tags: Dental Health Source Type: blogs

A physician ’s New Year’s resolutions
2019 is here. I started my year by doing an urgent care shift on New Year’s day.  It was not quite as busy as I expected; most of the shifts I’ve done around the holidays were high-volume, with lots of flu, other respiratory infections, and lacerations sustained while cooking holiday meals.  New Year’s day was […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/rosalind-kaplan" rel="tag" > Rosalind Kaplan, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 14th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Commissioning Healthcare Policy: Hospital Readmission and Its Price Tag
By ANISH KOKA MD  The message comes in over the office slack line at 1:05 pm. There are four patients in rooms, one new, 3 patients in the waiting room. Really, not an ideal time to deal with this particular message. “Kathy the home care nurse for Mrs. C called and said her weight yesterday was 185, today it is 194, she has +4 pitting edema, heart rate 120, BP 140/70 standing, 120/64 sitting” I know Mrs. C well. She has severe COPD from smoking for 45 of the last 55 years. Every breath looks like an effort because it is. The worst part of it all is that Mrs. C just returned home from the hospital just days...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Policy Hospitals Medicare Anish Koka hospital readmissions HRRP MedPAC Source Type: blogs

Results from a Pilot Human Trial of Senolytics versus Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Researchers here report on results from an initial pilot trial of the use of a senolytic therapy to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The data is perhaps much as expected for a first pass at removing senescent cells associated with a specific condition, using the tools available today: a starting point, benefits observed, but definitely room for improvement. The particular senolytic combination used here is cheap and readily available and can remove as much as half of senescent cells in some tissues in mice, but the degree of clearance varies widely by tissue type, and the optimal human dose is yet to be determined. Typ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 7th 2019
This study suggests that advantages and disadvantages vary by environment and diet, however, which might explain why evolution has selected for multiple haplogroups rather than one dominant haplogroup. This is all interesting, but none of it stops the research community from engineering a globally better-than-natural human mitochondrial genome, and then copying it into the cell nucleus as a backup to prevent the well-known contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage to aging. Further, nothing stops us from keeping the haplogroups we have and rendering the effects of variants small and irrelevant through the development...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Fentanyl Crisis and What You Need to Know
What is Fentanyl? According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine, but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a schedule II prescription drug, and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain, for side effects surrounding aggressive cancer treatments or to manage pain after major surgery. It can be administered as an injection, a transdermal patch or as a lozenge. Under the medical supervision of a professional, there is little risk for addiction. However, that is not to be overlooked, as any exposure to Fentanyl at all will run the ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 3, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Medical Substance Abuse Synthetic drug abuse drug abuse epidemic fentanyl opioid Source Type: blogs

Baloxavir (Xofluza): A new antiviral drug for the flu
A new drug for the treatment of influenza was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in October 2018, just in time for the 2018–19 flu season. Baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza) works against the two types of influenza virus that cause disease in humans, influenza A and B. This new drug works differently than currently available drugs, including oseltamivir (Tamiflu), zanamivir (Relenza), and peramivir (Rapivab). These older drugs inhibit the virus by blocking a viral enzyme called neuraminidase. In contrast, baloxavir inhibits a subunit of the viral polymerase, the enzyme responsible for influenza virus rep...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Daniel Kuritzkes, MD Tags: Cold and Flu Health Source Type: blogs