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The Ethics of Keeping Alfie Alive
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 21st 2018
In conclusion, the connection between DNA damage and aging is emphasized by the secretion of senescence-associated proteins during cellular senescence, a phenotype which is activated by DNA damage and is common for both human and mice. Though much progress has been achieved, full understanding of these mechanisms has still a long way to go. XPO1 as a Novel Target for Therapies to Enhance Autophagy https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/05/xpo1-as-a-novel-target-for-therapies-to-enhance-autophagy/ Autophagy is the name given to a collection of cellular housekeeping processes that recycle damaged and un...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A doctor cries therapeutic tears with her patient
He wasn’t particularly likable upon first encounter. He wasn’t apt to answer questions asked. He had a long pause and a long drawl and a tangential, winded story — and backstory — all of which he was bound and determined to tell to its detailed completion. With an irregular heart rate in the 170s and a respiratory rate in the 30s, I tried to steer him in the direction of concise answers so I could obtain as much information as possible and do my job. This is an emergency. He is an emergency. An emergency which had waited until the last possible millisecond; we did not have the luxury of time. But he...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cindy-winebrenner" rel="tag" > Cindy Winebrenner, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Cardiology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Humpback whale respiratory virome
How difficult would it be to study the virome of living whales? You might think that sampling would be the hard part, but not if you used a drone. A drone was used to collect the breath (‘blow’) from 19 humpback whales near Sydney, Australia. The video below show how a sampling chamber carried by […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 18, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology australia drone humpback whale virome viral virus viruses whale breath Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 237
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 237. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1: Who wrote a treatise on appendicitis in 1889? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1042482996'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetli...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 17, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five APGAR appendicitis Auenbrugger Cadium cataracts Charles McBurney finger prints identical twins Josef Leopold Auenbrugger von Auenbrugger percussion smoking virginia apgar Source Type: blogs

Considering Mitochondria and Neurodegeneration
Since mitochondria seem to be the dominant theme this week, today I thought I'd point out a couple of recent open access papers that focus on the role of mitochondrial function (and dysfunction) in the neurodegeneration that accompanies aging. Every cell bears a swarm of mitochondria, the descendants of ancient symbiotic bacteria. Even though mitochondria long ago evolved into integrated cellular components, they still behave very much like bacteria in many ways. They multiply through division, and can fuse together and swap component parts, pieces of the molecular machinery necessary to their function. They also contain t...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Medmastery: AC/SIMV modes
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The team at Medmastery are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses from across their website. Checking out the Mechanical Ventilation Essentials course today with a video exploring assist control (AC) and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) modes on a ventilator. Further reading: LITFL Medmastery Courses Medmastery on Facebook and Twitter Guest post: Josh Cosa, MA, RRT-ACCS, RRT-NPS, RCP. Registered respiratory therapist...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: sabrine Tags: Education Medmastery mechanical ventilation Source Type: blogs

The Roller Coaster Ride of Grief
I was talking with someone recently about grief when she said that it felt like being on a roller coaster ride. This person is facing the impending death of a loved one even as there is no definitive timeline per the treatment team. We spoke of the dynamic of anticipatory grief and the ways in which it impacts the process of letting go of this person as she plans her future in the face of his eventual absence. I have found both in my therapeutic practice and in my personal life, that anticipatory grief genuinely effects mourners, although a 2006 article published in the Counseling, Psychology, and Health Journal quest...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Aging Family Grief and Loss Health-related Interview Peer Support Personal anticipatory grief Cancer grieving Mourning widow widower Source Type: blogs

Beating the Travel Bug & Innovation in Hand Sanitation: Interview with Zoono CSO Dr. Andrew Alexander
While flu season is drawing to a close, transmission of germs can still lead to colds and serious respiratory diseases. In few places are individuals more exposed to a multitude of unique germs and germ carriers than during travel. Unlike some forms of travel, such as buses, where an individual can choose to get off the vehicle or find an alternate transit option, like carpooling, air travel is much less flexible. Based on data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, in 2010, on average 1.73 million passengers boarded domestic flights every day in the United States. On a plane, individuals are confined in a tight env...
Source: Medgadget - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Music Offers Many Cognitive, Emotional and Physical Benefits to Young and Old
“Music is therapy. Music moves people. It connects people in ways that no other medium can. It pulls heart strings. It acts as medicine.” — Macklemore Much research over the years has centered on the potential, perceived and realized benefits of music. In fact, the area of study has blossomed, growing from the preliminary findings of earlier studies to recent ones that built upon them. What’s exciting is the widespread and diverse benefits that music offers to everyone, young, old and in-between. Musical training gives babies’ brains a boost. Even before babies can walk or talk, they can benef...
Source: World of Psychology - May 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Brain and Behavior Creativity Happiness Health-related Motivation and Inspiration Research Self-Esteem Stress Coping Emotional Support Music Therapy musical therapy Source Type: blogs

Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Slows Vascular Aging in Mice
We examined multiple parameters of vascular function, histological markers, and markers of mitochondrial damage and function during normal vascular aging, and the effects of reducing or augmenting mitochondrial function on the onset and progression of vascular aging. We identify early, standardized time points and reproducible physiological parameters for vascular aging studies in mice. Vascular aging begins at far earlier time points than previously described in mice, with compliance, distensibility, stiffness, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) being the best discriminators for normal aging and manipulations. Mitochondrial DN...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

AI Predicts Which Patients Will Code, Allowing Early Intervention
I will occasionally report inLab Soft News about examples of artificial intelligence (AI) that are being introduced into healthcare because the use of such tools will radically change the way care is rendered. One such example is a recently developed algorithm that generates warnings about which patients are in imminent danger of"coding" in the hospital (see: Ochsner Health System: Preventing cardiac arrests with AI that predicts which patients will ‘code’). Such a warning enables physicians to intervene earlier for them. Below is an excerpt from the article:In modern hospitals, doctors and nurse...
Source: Lab Soft News - May 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Medical Ethics Medical Research Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Compassion & Choices Defends California ’s Legal Definition of Brain Dead as Dead (Israel Stinson)
Compassion & Choices has filed an amicus brief defending California’s legal definition of brain dead as dead. The California UDDA is under challenge because of a decision by Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles to stop artificial life support for a brain dead two-year-old boy. The deceased boy’s mother and a right-wing religious group have filed a lawsuit in a federal appeals court. A federal judge previously dismissed the lawsuit in March 2017, Jonee Fonseca et al v. Karen Smith et al, challenging the state law’s definition of death filed on behalf of Israel Stinson’s mother, Jonee Fon...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A different kind of Mother ’s Day
Multiple strokes, respiratory failure. Cardiac arrest — twice. At first glance, I thought that I was reading the medical chart of an elderly person or at least one who had some other predisposing medical conditions to explain her current state. But I was staring at the body of a 28-year-old woman. She had a youthful face and frizzy hair from being propped up on the same static-charged pillow for the last few days. The nurses had painted her fingernails with red polish and slathered Vaseline on her lips, giving them a shimmery appearance. I was standing at her bedside with her mother, a well-dressed 50-something-year-...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/melanie-mcminn" rel="tag" > Melanie McMinn, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Critical Care Source Type: blogs

E-Cigarette Opponents Still Making Up False " Facts " to Demonize Vaping
We're well into 2018 and there is now substantial research on the health effects of vaping as well as a decade of experience with large numbers of vapers, yet e-cigarette opponents are still making up false claims to buttress their demonization of vaping.In anarticle by Jia Tolentino published yesterday in theNew Yorker, a Harvard professor was quoted as claiming that: " vaping can cause something called bronchiolitis obliterans, or popcorn lung. "He also stated that Juul is " a massive public-health disaster, " likened e-cigarettes to “bioterrorism,” and " predicted that, eventually, a...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - May 8, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

MedStar Franklin Center:   The Case Against Global Capitation
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD Baltimore County, Maryland is one hour north of Washington DC, where politicians appear impotent to contain runaway healthcare expenditures.  In January 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in partnership with the state of Maryland, piloted an “All Payer Model,” where every insurer, including Medicare and Medicaid, paid a fixed annual amount irrespective of inpatient or outpatient hospital utilization.  Maryland agreed to transition hospitals from fee-for-service arrangements to this global capitation model over five years.  Capitation, in general, reimb...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 330
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 330th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Last week...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Should you carry the opioid overdose rescue drug naloxone?
The US Surgeon General, Dr. Jerome Adams, recently released an advisory on naloxone and opioid overdose. In his advisory, Dr. Adams writes: For patients currently taking high doses of opioids as prescribed for pain, individuals misusing prescription opioids, individuals using illicit opioids such as heroin or fentanyl, health care practitioners, family and friends of people who have an opioid use disorder, and community members who come into contact with people at risk for opioid overdose, knowing how to use naloxone and keeping it within reach can save a life. This was the first surgeon general advisory issued in 13 years...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Weiner, MD Tags: Addiction Health Source Type: blogs

Overview of mechanical ventilation and respiratory failure
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - May 1, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: critical care pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Everything ECMO!
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog In specialist centres, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a now a mainstay of the management of cardio/respiratory failure refractory to other measures. However, much of the clinical information required to care for ECMO patients at the bedside remains inaccessible to learners. To address this, the creation of a free-to-access educational ECMO blog post is now a requirement for completion of the Alfred ICU ECMO Accreditation Certificate. These &ld...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Education Everything ECMO extracorporeal life support Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation INTENSIVE Source Type: blogs

NEET-SS 2018 exam scheme
as published on National Board of Examinations website (Announcement dated 19th April 2018): Single day computer based test in the First week of July 2018. Candidate can choose only a maximum of two eligible superspeciality courses. 40% of questions will be from the broad speciality and 60% from the superspecialty (Parts A and B). If number of seats in a superspeciality is low, it may be clubbed with other super specialities with less seats and the 60% questions chosen accordingly, at PG exit level. Specialities are clubbed in such a way that each group has only one feeder broad speciality. The list of clubbed speci...
Source: Cardiophile MD - April 25, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 23rd 2018
In conclusion, a debate exists on whether aging is a disease in itself. Some authors suggest that physiological aging (or senescence) is not really distinguishable from pathology, while others argue that aging is different from age-related diseases and other pathologies. It is interesting to stress that the answer to this question has important theoretical and practical consequences, taking into account that various strategies capable of setting back the aging clock are emerging. The most relevant consequence is that, if we agree that aging is equal to disease, all human beings have to be considered as patients to be treat...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

ECG – anterior ST depression
ECG – anterior ST depression ECG – anterior ST depression: Findings and interpretation PR interval is grossly prolonged – 400 ms. Notched r seen in V2, possibly an incomplete right bundle branch block. AVL shows QS complex. Tall R waves in V4- V6. Gross ST segment depression with T inversion is seen throughout anterior and lateral chest leads, indicating significant myocardial injury, most likely due to Non ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI). PR interval prolongation would indicate involvement of the AV node by the ischemic process. As there is no feature to suggest inferior wall infarction, AV c...
Source: Cardiophile MD - April 22, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: ECG / Electrophysiology ECG Library Source Type: blogs

‘ Going to Extremes ’ Hall of Fame
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog In 2012, Greg Kelly suggested that LITFL collate the most extreme ‘medical extremes’. This is how things currently stand: ParameterLevelDiagnosisSubmitted by Ammonia514 umol/LTorsten Behrens Base excess (postive)40.6 mmol/LChronic Type 2 respiratory failureJakob Mathiszig-Lee Bilirubin1113 umol/lDrug-induced hepatitis (anabolic steroids)Jurij Hanžel Blood pressure345/245 mmHgDuring weightlifting (P. Palatini et al, 1989: https://www.ncb...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Emergency Medicine Intensive Care Investigation extremes hall of fame Investigations parameters Physiology Source Type: blogs

Continuing the Debate Over the Heart of the Mitochondrial Theory of Aging
Every cell contains hundreds of mitochondria, the distant descendants of ancient symbiotic bacteria. They have evolved to become cellular components, tightly integrated into many vital functions, but still replicate like bacteria, and still contain a small remnant circular genome, known as mitochondrial DNA. Of the varied tasks undertaken by mitochondria, the most important is the generation of the chemical energy store molecule ATP, used to power cellular operations. This is a necessarily energetic operation and produces oxidative molecules as a byproduct, capable of reacting with and damaging the proteins that make up ce...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 19, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Giving Voice to Teachers on World Voice Day —or Any Day
Today is World Voice Day! Occurring annually on April 16, World Voice Day is a great time to spread the word about the marvel of the human voice and the importance of taking care of it. Events held in celebration of the day include concerts, performances, educational workshops and vocal screenings. Why limit this event to just one day? As a speech-language pathologists, we can take advantage of this event to raise awareness and help prevent vocal disorders in a highly at-risk group—classroom teachers. Classroom teachers use their voices an average of 49 hours per week to perform their jobs. Add poor room ac...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - April 16, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Sue Hume Tags: Audiology Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Voice Disorders Source Type: blogs

The art of medicine is slowly being pushed out. Is that a good thing?
One late evening on pediatrics call, a frantic young couple brought in their few weeks old baby. She had spiked a fever which refused to go down and was fussier than normal. The cause of her symptoms could have been anything — at best, a mild respiratory infection, in which case we would simply watch her and manage her symptoms, but at worst, it could be meningitis, an infection attacking the membrane covering her spinal cord and brain. It’s a grave condition that would be fatal if left undiagnosed, but diagnosing it meant doing a lumbar puncture, an extremely invasive procedure for anyone, let alone a baby, in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/steven-zhang" rel="tag" > Steven Zhang < /a > Tags: Education Mobile health Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 16th 2018
This study demonstrates that small peptide domains derived from native protein amelogenin can be utilized to construct a mineral layer on damaged human enamel in vitro. Six groups were prepared to carry out remineralization on artificially created lesions on enamel: (1) no treatment, (2) Ca2+ and PO43- only, (3) 1100 ppm fluoride (F), (4) 20 000 ppm F, (5) 1100 ppm F and peptide, and (6) peptide alone. While the 1100 ppm F sample (indicative of common F content of toothpaste for homecare) did not deliver F to the thinly deposited mineral layer, high F test sample (indicative of clinical varnish treatment) formed mainly C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 15, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Giving antacids and antibiotics to babies can lead to allergies
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Allergies are on the rise, especially food allergies. While nobody knows for sure why this is happening, a leading theory is that we may be doing things that mess up our natural microbiome. Our microbiome is the trillions of organisms that live on and in our bodies, such as bacteria, archaea, fungi, and viruses. We generally think of these organisms as “germs” that can cause illness — and while they can, in some situations it turns out that the right organisms in the right balance actually help keep us healthy. Our microbiome affects how we digest foods, stay at a healthy we...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Allergies Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Mitochondrial Mutations and Stem Cell Aging
This open access review paper looks over current thinking on the role of mutations in mitochondrial DNA in the decline of stem cell activity in aging. Every cell contains a swarm of mitochondria, the evolved descendants of symbiotic bacteria now responsible for generating chemical energy store molecules. Each contains a small amount of mitochondrial DNA, the last remnant of the original bacterial genome that hasn't either been lost over time or moved to the cell nucleus. Mutational damage in this DNA can produce significant cellular dysfunction, and unfortunately it is a good deal less robust and protected than the DNA of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 007 Mega Malaria Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 007 When you think tropical medicine, malaria has to be near the top. It can be fairly complex and fortunately treatment has become a lot simpler. This post is designed to walk you through the basic principals with links to more in depth teaching if your niche is travel medicine, laboratory diagnostics or management of severe or cerebral malaria. If you stubbled on this post while drinking a cup of tea or sitting on the throne and want a fe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine malaria Plasmodium plasmodium falciparum plasmodium knowles plasmodium malariae plasmodium ovale plasmodium vivax Source Type: blogs

Mastering Intensive Care 028 with John Santamaria
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog John Santamaria – Genuine care for patients both during and after the ICU stay How well do you understand what happens to your patients after they leave the ICU? Do you find out how they go and feed this back to your ICU team? Most of you give excellent care to your patients whilst they are in the intensive care unit. No doubt this will be compassionate, appropriate, diligent, information-driven, holistic, team-based and communicative care. But when they leave...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrew Davies Tags: Intensive Care Mastering Intensive Care Andrew Davies ex-ICU genuine care John Santamaria Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 232
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 232. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1: This week’s tropical case was on cholera. John Snow, the godfather of epidemiological medicine, showed that the pump on Broad Street in London was responsible f...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Bellevue Stratford Hotel black fever Broad Street cholera Dum-Dum fever Dumdum Henry Whitehead john snow Joseph McDade Kala-azar Killer fever Legionnaries disease Leishmania donovani leishmania infantum Source Type: blogs

LexaGene ’s New LX6 Rapid Pathogen Detection System: Interview with CEO Dr. Jack Regan
With the ever-growing list of potentially harmful pathogens being discovered, the systems needed to detect different strains need to become more sophisticated as well. Enter LexaGene, a biotechnology company developing automated and sensitive solutions for efficient pathogen detection. LexaGene’s unique microfluidics approach to pathogen detection uses disposable cartridges to analyse the molecular signature of large volumes of samples. While LexaGene is initially targeting the food safety and vet diagnostics industry in the coming years, their technology is transferrable to the clinical diagnostics market. We recent...
Source: Medgadget - March 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Rukmani Sridharan Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Pathology Public Health Source Type: blogs

ETCO2 monitoring in ICU – capnography
ETCO2 monitoring in ICU – capnography ETCO2 monitoring in ICU – capnography ETCO2 monitoring in ICU – capnography: End tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) is the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (CO2) in exhaled air at the end of expiration. Normal values are in the range of 35 –  45 mm Hg. Carbon dioxide monitoring is also known as capnography. The graphical representation of CO2 is known as capnogram. In the monitor screenshot shown above, shown the capnogram at the bottom. Here the ETCO2 is shown as 28 mm Hg. It is below the lower limit and could be due to hyperventilation in a spontaneously brea...
Source: Cardiophile MD - March 28, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Learn typical community acquired pneumonia with a Medcomic
Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute infection of the lung parenchyma acquired outside of the hospital or less than 48 hours after hospital admission. CAP is classified into typical and atypical subtypes, differentiated by their presentation and causative pathogens. This illustration focuses on the classic features of typical CAP. The most common cause of typical CAP is Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is an encapsulated, gram-positive, lancet-shaped diplococcus bacterium. Other common causative pathogens include Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, gram-negative bacilli (e.g., Klebsiella), a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jorge-muniz" rel="tag" > Jorge Muniz, PA-C < /a > Tags: Conditions Infectious Disease Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

VitalConnect Introduces an Integrated Patient-Monitoring Platform: Interview with CCO, Bill Brodie
In a world of big data analytics and quantified-selfers, wearable technology companies are uniquely positioned to bring about measurable differences in our everyday lives. While Fitbits and Apple Watches are common on wrists around the U.S., some industry leaders have called their true utility into question. VitalConnect’s unique approach to wearable technology, on the other hand, uses a cutting-edge wearable biosensor, VitalPatch, that is unquestionably making a difference in patient care. We got a chance to sit down with Bill Brodie, CCO of VitalConnect, to chat about their unique solution to patient monitorin...
Source: Medgadget - March 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Geriatrics Medicine Source Type: blogs

You have two hours to save this patient's life
Written by Pendell Meyers, edits by Steve SmithA female in her 60s with history of CAD s/p PCI and CABG, alcohol abuse, and recurrent pancreatitis presented at 14:55 complaining of sudden onset epigastric pain. Initial vital signs were heart rate 44 bpm, respiratory rate 16, BP 143/67, SpO2 96% on room air. On initial exam she was in mild distress and complaining of severe nausea.Here is her initial ECG:What do you think?There is decreased ECG quality due to baseline movement. Despite this, there are clearly hyperacute T-waves in lead III with reciprocal negative hyperacute T-waves in aVL (and lead I) with likely a small a...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - March 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 005 RUQ Pain and Jaundice
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 005 Guest Post: Dr Branden Skarpiak – Global Health Fellow, Department of Emergency Medicine. UT Health San Antonio A 35 year old male presents to your emergency room for right upper quadrant pain that has gotten worse over the last 2-3 days. He also describes associated nausea, vomiting, and fevers. He denies other abdominal pain, or change in his bowel or bladder habits. His wife notes that he has started to “look more yellow...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine amebic amoeba amoebiasis amoebic dysentery amoebic liver abscess bloody diarrhoea e.dispar e.histolytica entamoeba histolytica Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 19th 2018
In this study, we did not observe significant age-dependent upregulation of the prominent SASP cytokine Il6 in any tissue, although an upward trend was observed that was consistent in magnitude with previous observations in the heart and kidney. This modest age-related upward trend could be explained by a previous report which demonstrated that senescent cell-secreted IL-6 acts in an autocrine manner, reinforcing the senescent state, rather than inducing senescence or promoting dysfunction in neighboring cells. The decreased expression of Il6 with age we observed in the hypothalamus could be indicative of a lack or ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 18, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

110 Years of Mortality Rates by Category
It is sometimes helpful to look back at recent history in order to see just how far we have come in terms of progress in medicine, wealth, and health. Ours is an era of rapid, profound change in technology and its capabilities, and that is very apparent in mortality statistics, such as the charts provided in the article noted here. The numbers change dramatically every few decades, the result of the scientific and medical communities turning their attention to the most pressing issues of their time, generation after generation. The past century is a story of success due to advancing medical technology on the one han...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Hypoxia as a Complicated Path to the Induction of a Beneficial Stress Response
The present dominant approach to the development of therapies to treat aging is not, sadly, the SENS rejuvenation research agenda, but instead efforts to persistently activate evolved responses to cellular stress. These mechanisms normally start up in response to exercise, calorie restriction, raised temperature, and the topic here, hypoxia, among other sources of stress. The responses generally lead to some period of more aggressive cellular maintenance, particularly autophagy, responsible for identifying and recycling damaged molecules and structures within the cell. There is comprehensive evidence to support the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

CMS Updates Physician Compare to Include 2016 Data and Star Ratings
CMS announced that it has updated its Physician Compare website to include 2016 data and new star ratings related to clinical quality. The first quality measures were added to Physician Compare in February 2014. Since then, CMS has continued a phased approach to public reporting. 2016 Performance Information on Physician Compare Beginning in December of 2017, CMS started to publicly report certain 2016 performance information on Physician Compare. The information was designated as available for public reporting in the 2016 Physician Fee Schedule final rule. According to CMS, the primary audience for profile pages is pati...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 003 Stiff in the Mouth
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 003 A 65 yr old woman from Ethiopia is visiting her grandchild for the first time in Europe. She is normally fit and well, physically active with a small-holding in Ethiopia. She does not take any medication and cannot remember the last time she saw a doctor. She presents to you with difficulty chewing 3 days after arriving in the UK. She describes it as being “stiff in the mouth” Questions: Q1. What is the differential diagno...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine tetanus Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 321
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 321st LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Are you an average doctor? Sounds harsh, but most of us are. Ross Fisher tells us wh...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

The Agony of Withdrawal
​Part 3 in a Four-Part Series​A 26-year-old man presented with fatigue. He complained of body aches, diarrhea, and nausea. His history was significant for chronic back pain, for which he had been prescribed oxycodone that he has taken daily for three years. He reported that he had stopped taking it two days before his visit.He denied other medication or drug use. He was alert but restless and diaphoretic. His ECG showed sinus tachycardia. His labs included a WBC of 12, Hgb of 12, glucose of 89 mg/dL, creatinine of 1.0 mg/dL, sodium of 140 mEq/L, potassium of 3.8 mEq/L, and CK of 140 U/L. He was experiencing opioid with...
Source: The Tox Cave - February 28, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

ST-Elevation in aVR with diffuse ST-Depression: An ECG pattern that you must know and understand!
This case comes from Sam Ghali  (@EM_RESUS). A 60-year-old man calls 911 after experiencing sudden onset chest pain, palpitations, and shortness of breath. Here are his vital signs:HR: 130-160, BP: 140/75, RR:22, Temp: 98.5 F, SaO2: 98%This is his 12-Lead ECG:He is in atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response at a rate of around 140 bpm. There are several abberantly conducted beats. There is ST-Elevation in aVR of several millimeters and diffuse ST-Depression with the maximal depression vector towards Lead II in the limb leads and towards V5 in the precordial leads.ECG reading is all ab...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - February 28, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

New Study Concludes that Vaping Causes Heart Attacks
This study is a perfect demonstration of that phenomenon.Because this is a cross-sectional study, and because respondents were asked whether they hadever had a heart attack, one cannot determine whether the heart attacks followed e-cigarette use or preceded it. In other words, we do not know that vaping preceded the heart attack for any of the subjects. It is entirely possible that in most of these cases, the smokers suffered a heart attack and then started vaping in an attempt to quit smoking. In fact, I believe that is the most likely explanation for the observed study findings.It is not even biologically plausible that ...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - February 27, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Arterial tracing in sinus rhythm
Arterial tracing in sinus rhythm is seen the third row as red tracing. The display shows a systolic pressure of 133 mm Hg and diastolic pressure of 63 mm Hg. This type of multiparameter monitoring is now commonplace in any high level intensive care unit. Usually a small arterial cannula is placed in the radial artery and connected to the transducer system kept at the bedside using a fluid filled system. Sometimes when a radial artery is not accessible, femoral or even dorsalis pedis arterial cannula can be used. ECG tracing shows regular P waves followed by QRS complexes indicating sinus rhythm. The QRS complex is wide, ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - February 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: General Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 26th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs