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Assembling Cells and Scaffolds into a Suitable Trachea Replacement
Researchers here report on their efforts to build a suitable structure to replace a trachea, starting with patient cells and artificial scaffolds. Since the trachea is a thin-walled pipe, engineered tissue can be constructed in this way without the need for complex blood vessel networks, as at no point is the tissue so thick as to prevent direct perfusion of nutrients and oxygen to the inner cells. Unfortunately, it remains the case that decellularized donor tissue is the only reliable solution for the production of capillaries to support thicker tissues, scores of such vessels passing through every square millimeter. This...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 319
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 319th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week A “proper” set of posts: Rory Spiegel investigates whether we have achieved...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Does Vitamin D Deficiency Contribute to Brain Disorders?
In this study published in July 2017, researchers looked at the vitamin D levels and cognitive function in patients who experienced psychosis. They found an association between low levels of vitamin D and decreased processing speed and verbal fluency. The authors suggested the next step should be randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation in those with psychosis and vitamin D deficiency. Another study, published in Psychiatry Research in August 2017, looked at whether vitamin B12, homocysteine folic acid, and vitamin D might be connected to childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifty-two children an...
Source: World of Psychology - February 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Brain and Behavior Health-related Memory and Perception Mental Health and Wellness Brain Disorder Mental Illness Vitamin D Vitamin Deficiency Source Type: blogs

A kiss changed this doctor ’s life
As a boy growing up in a small town in Pennsylvania, I never gave much thought to the concept of a kiss. My family gave and received kisses without hesitation. I continue to give and receive kisses from my wife and kids in the same nonchalant manner. Until one night — on shift. I work in the ER of a medium-sized town in southern Oregon. It was late into my shift. The call came in: “Helicopter en route, 32-year-old male, gunshot wound to the head, self-inflicted, airway is a nightmare, ETA 3 minutes.” The usual prep ensues. Respiratory therapists arrive to help set up. Nurses pull the trauma packet and pre...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lee-david-milligan" rel="tag" > Lee David Milligan, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 12th 2018
In conclusion, most experimental data on immune changes with aging show a decline in many immune parameters when compared to young healthy subjects. The bulk of these changes is termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence has been considered for some time as detrimental because it often leads to subclinical accumulation of pro-inflammatory factors and inflammaging. Together, immunosenescence and inflammaging are suggested to stand at the origin of most of the diseases of the elderly, such as infections, cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, an increasing number of gerontologists have chall...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Few Recent Advances in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
The tissue engineering and regenerative medicine communities are too large and energetic to do more than sample their output, or note the most interesting advances that stand out from the pack. The publicity materials I'll point out here are a recent selection of items that caught my eye as they went past. Dozens more, each of which would have merited worldwide attention ten or fifteen years ago, drift by with little comment every year. The state of the art is progressing rapidly towards both the ability to build complex tissues from a cell sample, such as patient-matched organs for transplantation, and the ability to cont...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 5th 2018
In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Gbp1 plays a role in regulating immunometabolism and senescence of macrophages. We found that Gbp1 was mainly expressed in macrophages, but not adipocytes in response to IFNγ/LPS stimulation; Gbp1 expression was significantly decreased in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed and aged mice. We also observed that downregulation of Gbp1 in macrophages resulted in M1 polarization and impairment of mitochondrial respiratory function possibly via disrupting mitophagy activity. Moreover, macrophages with downregulated Gbp1 displayed dampened glycolysis ...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 4, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A human rhinovirus in chimpanzees
An outbreak of respiratory disease in Ugandan chimpanzees provides insight into how virus infection can shape the genome and lead to differences in the cell receptor gene that regulate susceptibility to infection. Severe respiratory disease was noted in the Kanyawara community of chimpanzees in western Uganda from February to August of 2013. During this outbreak, […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - February 2, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information cadherin-related family member 3 CDHR3 chimpanzee genome respiratory infection rhinovirus c single nucleotide polymorphism viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Telomerase Gene Therapy Used to Cure Fibrosis in a Mouse Model
Maria Blasco's research group has been working on telomerase gene therapy to lengthen telomeres for some years now; they are quite enthusiastic about this approach as a means to treat aging. One can't argue with the data showing extension of mouse life span, nor the results announced today in which induced telomerase activity is shown to reverse fibrosis. We can argue about what is going on under the hood, and whether or not addressing telomere length is in fact tackling the root causes of aging. Perhaps the most important difference between the views of aging outlined in the SENS rejuvenation research proposals and the la...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 30, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Gbp1 Levels Fall with Age, Making Macrophages Less Helpful and More Harmful
In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Gbp1 plays a role in regulating immunometabolism and senescence of macrophages. We found that Gbp1 was mainly expressed in macrophages, but not adipocytes in response to IFNγ/LPS stimulation; Gbp1 expression was significantly decreased in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) of high-fat diet (HFD)-fed and aged mice. We also observed that downregulation of Gbp1 in macrophages resulted in M1 polarization and impairment of mitochondrial respiratory function possibly via disrupting mitophagy activity. Moreover, macrophages with downregulated Gbp1 displayed dampened glycolysis ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 30, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

AbStats, VR & the Future of Digital Health : A Conversation with Brennan Spiegel
By JASON CHUNG Just before the holiday break, in my new capacity as the Law and Technology Editor for The Health Care Blog, I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Brennan Spiegel, the Director of Cedars-Sinai Health Services Research, about his new digital health innovations as well as his views on the medtech and data privacy landscapes. Dr. Spiegel leads an interdisciplinary team which investigates how digital health technologies such as wearable sensors, smartphone applications and virtual reality can strengthen trust among patients and doctors, improve outcomes and cut costs. Below is a transcript of selected moments o...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

National Academy of Sciences Report on Electronic Cigarettes Confirms that Vaping is Much Safer than Smoking and Has No Known Long-Term Health Effects
My commentary on the conclusions and implications of the National Academy of Sciences report on electronic cigarettes was just accepted as an op-ed piece in U.S. News& World Report. I expect it to be published tomorrow. For this reason, I have had to take down the original commentary. However, below I have posted the parts of the original blog post that had to be cut from the op-ed because of length concerns. Also, I will post a link to the op-ed as soon as it appears.The key findings of the report are:1. " There is substantial evidence that except for nicotine, under typical conditions of use, exposure to potenti...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - January 24, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

National Academy of Sciences Report on E-Cigarettes Confirms that Vaping is Much Safer than Smoking and Has No Known Long-Term Health Effects
Areport released this morning by the National Academy of Sciences confirms that despite the demonization of vaping by many anti-tobacco groups and health departments, use of these products is much safer than smoking, and there are no known long-term health effects associated with vaping.This does not mean, of course, that vaping is safe. It just means that we don't know what the long-term effects may be. But it is important to stress that at this time, we don't know of any long-term adverse health effects.The report also concludes that the " second-hand " aerosol produced by vaping is safer than secondhand tobacc...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - January 23, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

The Quest for Safer Opioid Drugs | The Scientist Magazine
Opioid drugs are well-established double-edged swords. Extremely effective at analgesia, they cause an array of harmful side effects throughout the body, including itching, constipation, and respiratory depression —the slowed breathing that ultimately causes death in overdose cases. What's more, the body's interaction with opioids is dynamic: our receptors for these compounds become desensitized to the drugs' activity over time, requiring ever larger doses to suppress pain and eventually provoking severe dependence and protracted withdrawal.In the past few years, these side effects have plagued growing nu...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 22, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

High Tech Solution to Inhaler Compliance: Interview with Arik Anderson, CEO of Adherium
Patients taking inhaled medications, particularly those with asthma, have to comply with the prescribed regimen in order to achieve optimal results. As anyone in medical practice knows, medication compliance among patients can be remarkably low. Adherium, a company based in Auckland, New Zealand, has come up with technology to tackle this issue for patients using inhalers. We spoke with Arik Anderson, CEO of Adherium, about the company’s gadgets, how they help patients, and what potential the technology has in the future. Medgadget: Please give us a short introduction to your technology from a clinician’s and p...
Source: Medgadget - January 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Chest pain, sinus tachycardia, and ST Elevation
I was reading through ECGs on the system when I saw this one:Sinus tachycardia, rate 120Computerized QTc = 380 msWhat do you think? I was immediately worried about a proximal LAD occlusion.  Although sinus tachycardia generally argues against ACS, a large anterior MI may result in such poor stroke volume that there is compensatory tachycardia and possibly impending cardiogenic shock. I looked to see if there was an ED cardiac ultrasound, and there was:Parasternal Long Axis:Poor image, but one can see that there is poor apical functionParasternal short axis:This shows poor contractility of the anterior wall.C...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 22, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 315
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 315th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Rob Macsweeney of Critical Care Reviews posts the 2 hour livestream of the ADRENAL...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 22nd 2018
In conclusion, death is a natural part of human existence, but human progress is essentially a story of overcoming undesirable natural limits. In the near future, technological progress might make it possible to stop natural biological death. Should humankind embrace such technology? Yes: Even though such technology would not be without risks, the risks are almost certainly manageable. The benefits of ending natural death, on the other hand, are immense. Death is an obstacle that is slowing down human progress. If we remove that obstacle, humankind could increase the speed of both its moral and its epistemic progress. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Biodegradable Pressure Sensor Doesn ’t Need to be Removed After Implantation
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have developed a biodegradable pressure sensor that can be implanted in the body and help clinicians to monitor a variety of conditions over extended periods of time. What makes this sensor different from existing ones is that it doesn’t need to be removed and will eventually dissolve in the body, eliminating the risk of infection and the longer recovery associated with an invasive surgical procedure to remove a sensor. Clinicians can use implantable pressure sensors to monitor a variety of health conditions, including brain swelling as in hydrocephalus, chronic lung disea...
Source: Medgadget - January 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Source Type: blogs

Recent Papers on the Mitochondrial Contribution to Aging
Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, a herd of self-replicating structures evolved from ancient symbiotic bacteria, now fully integrated into the cell. Their primary task is the production of chemical energy stores, an energetic process that produces damaging reactive molecules as a side-effect. Much of the original bacterial DNA of the distant ancestors of today's mitochondia has migrated to the cell nucleus, leaving only a tiny remnant genome in the mitochondria themselves. When looking across species with widely divergent life spans, researchers have found good correlations between species life span and some c...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 477
Answer: ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. These are a common parasite mimic, especially when seen in unfixed wet preparations, since the cilia remain motility for quite some time after being exfoliated from the respiratory mucosa. It is important to note that these are NOT parasites. Unfortunately there are several reports where these are misidentified as Lophomonas blattarum; however,L blattarumis a parasite found in various arthropods and is NOT thought to be a human parasite. You can easily identify ciliated epithelial cells by their small size and characteristic shape. Note that the cilia are present in ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 15, 2018 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 191
This article has spawned a lot of controversy. It is worth reading to understand why. Recommended by: Justin Morgenstern Emergency Medicine Samuels EA, et al. “Sometimes You Feel Like the Freak Show”: A Qualitative Assessment of Emergency Care Experiences Among Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Patients. Annals of emergency medicine. 2017. PMID: 28712604 This is a qualitative study of transgender patients who visited an ED in the US. This article is a must read as providers often lack insight into the complexities of caring for transgender patients and systemic barriers to conscientious care. T...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 10, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Justin Morgenstern Tags: Emergency Medicine Gastroenterology R&R in the FASTLANE Respiratory Resuscitation EBM Education recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Key Articles in Health IT from 2017 (Part 2 of 2)
The first part of this article set a general context for health IT in 2017 and started through the year with a review of interesting articles and studies. We’ll finish the review here. A thoughtful article suggests a positive approach toward health care quality. The author stresses the value of organic change, although using data for accountability has value too. An article extolling digital payments actually said more about the out-of-control complexity of the US reimbursement system. It may or not be coincidental that her article appeared one day after the CommonWell Health Alliance announced an API whose main purp...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 4, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: 3D Printing ACO Apple Connected Health Digital Health Gadgets Genomics Google Healthcare AI Healthcare Analytics Healthcare API Healthcare Devices Healthcare IT Security Healthcare Reimbursement HIE Meaningful Use Medical D Source Type: blogs

Is “man flu” really a thing?
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This one got by me. I’d never heard of “man flu” but according to a new study of the topic, the term is “so ubiquitous that it has been included in the Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries. Oxford defines it as ‘a cold or similar minor ailment as experienced by a man who is regarded as exaggerating the severity of the symptoms.’” Another reference called it “wimpy man” syndrome. Wow. I’d heard it said (mostly in jest) that if men had to carry and deliver babies, humankind would have long ago gone extinct. But wimpy man syndrome? I j...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cold and Flu Health Infectious diseases Men's Health Source Type: blogs

Narcan or Narcan’t?
​Part 2 in a Four-part Series​A 57-year-old man presented with acute onset altered mental status. His family said he had been behaving normally. Prior to dinner, however, he became difficult to arouse, and was speaking gibberish. He was somnolent but arousable to physical stimuli on arrival in the ED.He answered questions inappropriately and would then go back to sleep. His past medical history was consistent with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and spinal fusion a month ago. His medications included lisinopril, atorvastatin, and hydrocodone. His vital signs were a blood pressure of 110/65 mm Hg, heart rate of 90 b...
Source: The Tox Cave - January 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Weird and Wild: Piercing Problems, Tongue Rings, and TXA
​Some of our patients are total daredevils. This unique population keeps us on our toes. Our weird and wild series recently discussed laceration repair involving tattoos, but problematic piercings also present to the ED.​Traditional through-and-through piercing of the tongue body without complication. Photo: Creative Commons.An 18-year-old otherwise healthy woman presented to the emergency department with tongue swelling and mouth pain. Your first thought may be that this is an allergic reaction, but you quickly realize this is not the patient you expected. This patient just had her tongue pierced, and something has go...
Source: The Procedural Pause - January 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 313
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 313rd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Hard to be skeptical about the Skeptic’s Guide to Emergency Medicine (SGEM) ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 31, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Respiratory Care: A Journey Through Time (AARC Virtual Museum)
The American Association for Respiratory Care’s Virtual Museum allows you to see the history of a science and profession that helps millions breathe. Step into a gallery and see how today’s complex mechanical ventilators started as a coffee can; how physics, anatomy, and chemistry have come together to deliver life-saving aerosolized medications; how people produced progress.  (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 31, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 312
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 312nd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week SGEM often posts thoughtful “skeptical” reviews on logical-sounding pr...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 25th 2017
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 24, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Reviewing the Mitochondrial Contribution to Aging and Age-Related Disease
Today I'll point out a fairly readable review paper that walks through the high points of what is known of the mitochondrial contribution to degenerative aging and the common, well-studied age-related diseases that cause the greatest amounts of suffering and death. Every cell has a few hundred mitochondria swarming inside it, evolved descendants of ancient symbiotic bacteria that are now fully integrated components of the cell. They are highly active components: they replicate and fuse, pass molecular machinery between one another, are destroyed by cellular quality control mechanisms when they become damaged, and can even ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 22, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 219, Christmas Edition. Question 1 On average, how many calories will the British consume on Christmas day? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1969721043'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1969721043')) 6000 c...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five babies born on christmas day calories christmas lunch christmas tree dermatitis colophonium dermatitis contact dermatitis father christmas graham speed of father christmas Source Type: blogs

Using Journaling and Meditation to Reclaim Joy
Moving along the treadmill of life, many of us succumb to the ever-present pressures to be faster, stronger, more efficient, and smarter. Perspective on what is happening in our lives is lost. We focus on failure and lacking within ourselves, rather than the abundance and opportunities for growth that surround us. We stop taking the time to appreciate the simple pleasures of our lives as we spiral our way into a depleted existence — physically, emotionally, and mentally. Now more than ever, there is a global need to circumvent this pattern of being. We need to learn to unconditionally love and appreciate ourselves ju...
Source: World of Psychology - December 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Creativity Happiness Inspiration & Hope Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Publishers Journaling Meditation Mindfulness Meditation Perspective Self-reflection well-being Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 218
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 218, all about colours. Question 1 What colour are you if you are suffering from ‘argryia’? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1414906888'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1414906888')) Purple or Purpl...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Corden Tags: Frivolous Friday Five amphotericin B argryia black lung blue bloater ciprofloxacin coal workers pneumoconiosis COPD emphysema infantile acrodynia mercury pink disease pink puffer Red man syndrome rifampicin silver skin teic Source Type: blogs

2018: The Near Future of Flu
The influenza virus continues to be wildly successful at growing and spreading in people around the world because it slightly changes its structure from time to time to avoid our body’s detection systems. In particular, influenza periodically changes some of the proteins in the outer envelope of the virus to mislead our immune systems. We get fooled again and again. When someone with the flu coughs or sneezes, huge amounts of virus are spewed out in droplets that travel up to about 6 feet. Inhaling these droplets is the surest way for the virus to enter our bodies. It can also enter through landing on the eye. Beyond...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - December 14, 2017 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Colds & Flu Cough Source Type: blogs

Chronic Disease in Rural America
Rural areas face higher rates of chronic disease and higher related mortality rates. In some rural regions of the country and for some rural population groups, the disparity is even worse. The Rural Health Information Hub announces a new guide which discusses the impact of chronic disease on rural America, how providers and communities can help patients with chronic diseases, and where to look for funding to establish programs to address chronic conditions. The guide provides an overview of chronic disease generally as well as specific conditions, including heart disease and stroke, cancer, diabetes, chronic...
Source: BHIC - December 14, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Patricia Devine Tags: Chronic Disease Rural Source Type: blogs

Best Post of September 2017 -- Guest Post from Dr. PJ Cimino: Blue discoloration of the gray matter in a patient who received methylene blue for respiratory distress prior to death
The next in our " Best Post of the Month " series is from Monday, September 11, 2017:Dr. PJ Cimino, whom we profiled when he was a fellow back in November of 2013, is a now faculty member at the University of Washington. I was delighted to receive this email from him today:" I had an autopsy case with interesting gross pathology findings, which made for some nice clinical images (below). The patient received therapeutic methylene blue in the setting of respiratory distress prior to death. The gross pathology showed striking widespread green-blue gray matter discoloration. I thought these images mig...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 14, 2017 Category: Radiology Tags: anatomy Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

GO2SLEEP Wearable Sleep Tracker Capable of Detecting Sleep Apnea
A new startup company called SLEEPON has recently launched their crowdfunding campaign for their first product, GO2SLEEP, “the world’s smallest sleep apnea detection ring.” Sleep apnea is a condition where an individual’s breathing is interrupted during sleep, and this can lead to excessive daytime sleepiness, irritability, and morning headaches. Left untreated, sleep apnea increases the risk of numerous serious health issues, including high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, and stroke. Sleep apnea affects around 25 million Americans, but many more people likely remain undiagnosed. Given these hi...
Source: Medgadget - December 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Cardiology Medicine Net News Source Type: blogs

Out in the cold: lung disease, the hidden driver of NHS winter pressure
This report identifies a seasonal trend in respiratory admissions over the last seven years and argues that a failure to address this annual fluctuation is contributing to winter A&E pressures. It argues that community care and support outside of hospital needs to be strengthened and that service planning for a rise in respiratory admissions is needed to manage this seasonal variation.ReportSummary (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 11, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: NHS finances and productivity NHS measurement and performance Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 310
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blogWelcome to the 310th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the WeekThe UK Intensive Care Society State of the Art meeting has just concluded. Multiple summ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Protect Yourself from Wildfire Smoke
From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), dry conditions in parts of the United States increase the potential for wildfires in or near wilderness areas. Stay alert for wildfire warnings and take action to protect yourself and your family from wildfire smoke. When wildfires burn in your area, they produce smoke that may reach your community. Wildfire smoke is a mixture of gases and fine particles from burning trees and other plant materials. This smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your respiratory system, and worsen chronic heart and lung diseases. The CDC page includes Who is at greatest risk from wildfire...
Source: BHIC - December 8, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kay Deeney Tags: Emergency Preparedness Environmental Health Source Type: blogs

Accurate Health Monitoring On The Go: Interview with Dr. Shourjya Sanyal, CEO of Think Biosolution
Think Biosolution is an Irish-based wearable technology company that was co-founded by Dr. Shourjya Sanyal and Koushik Kumar Nundy in March 2016. Their first product, the QuasaR, can measure heart rate, heart rate variability, respiratory rate, and blood oxygen saturation more accurately than any other photodiode-based sensor technology available on the market. The company’s vision is to combine this technology with custom-built algorithms derived from artificial intelligence to help just about anyone to achieve their fitness goals and for patients suffering from chronic conditions to better manage their health and w...
Source: Medgadget - November 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Rukmani Sridharan Tags: Exclusive Medicine Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 27th 2017
We examined associations between mortality and accelerometer-measured PA using age-relevant intensity cutpoints in older women of various ethnicities. The results support the hypothesis that higher levels of accelerometer-measured PA, even when below the moderate-intensity threshold recommended in current guidelines, are associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality in women aged 63 to 99. Our findings expand on previous studies showing that higher self-reported PA reduces mortality in adults aged 60 and older, specifically in older women, and at less than recommended amounts. Moreover, our findings challenge th...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 26, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Failing Mitochondria and Cellular Senescence in the Aging Lung
Mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular senescence are two of the root causes of aging targeted by the SENS rejuvenation research programs. They overlap at least a little, in that one might cause the other, but it is unclear as to whether this is significant for the specific types of mitochondrial damage considered important in the SENS view of aging. The open access paper here walks through this territory in the case of the aging lung; in recent years, it has become clear that senescent cells are important in the development of fibrosis in lungs and other organs, as well as in other aspects of aging in lung tissue. The pre...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 21, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 308
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 308th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week This week’s ERCast chats with Ashley Liebig about 3 things we can do to impro...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 19, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Puts The Place Of Technology In Health Care In A Larger Perspective.
This appeared last week:How The Rise Of Medical Technology Is Worsening DeathJessica Nutik Zitter November 6, 2017 10.1377/hblog20171101.612681 Our aging population is at risk from a most benign-appearing source —the medical technologies we trust to keep us healthy.When they were first widely used in the 1930s and 1940s, breathing machines did what humans could never have imagined a generation earlier: They kept young polio victims alive until their bodies cleared the virus that had temporarily weakened t heir respiratory system. Thanks to these miraculous machines, tens of thousands of these patients recovered and ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - November 15, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Data Driven Predictive Medical Devices: An Interview
In 1987, James Gleick wrote the book Chaos which was a layman’s description of different instances where chaotic behavior was displayed in systems. In one of the last chapters titled Inner Rhythms, he described the then latest research regarding physiological system characteristics and the seemingly oxymoronic idea that variable response of the system indicated health versus illness, specifically with regard to heart rate variability, and that these systems exhibited characteristics of nonlinear dynamics in which physiologists ‘began to see chaos as health.’ That book, which I read in 1988, and in particu...
Source: Medical Connectivity Consulting - November 13, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Tim Gee Tags: Clinical Decision Support Interviews Source Type: blogs