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TWiV 455: Pork and genes
Erin Garcia joins the TWiVirions to discuss a computer exploit encoded in DNA, creation of pigs free of endogenous retroviruses, and mutations in the gene encoding an innate sensor of RNA in children with severe viral respiratory disease.   Click arrow to play Download TWiV 455 (64 MB .mp3, 105 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Show notes at microbe.tv/twiv (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 20, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology computer security CRISPR/Cas9 DNA based exploit IFIH1 loss of function MDA5 organ transplant PERV PERV free pig porcine endogenous retrovirus remote code execution respiratory syncytial virus rhinovirus se Source Type: blogs

Is the “full course of antibiotics” full of baloney?
Follow me on Twitter @JohnRossMD Antibiotic resistance is an emerging threat to public health. If the arsenal of effective antibiotics dwindles, treating infection becomes more difficult. Conventional wisdom has long held that stopping a course of antibiotics early may be a major cause of antibiotic resistance. But is this really supported by the evidence? According to a new study in the BMJ, the answer is no. The notion that a longer course of antibiotics prevents resistance started early in the antibiotic era, when doctors found that patients with staphylococcal blood infections and tuberculosis relapsed after short anti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

American Heart Association Still Clings to Alternative Facts: Claims that Smoking is No Safer than Vaping
Scientists like myself are often frustrated by " denialists " who refuse to acknowledge global warming, disseminate false information about adverse effects of vaccines, or - historically - failed to acknowledge the severe health effects of cigarette smoking. But I never expected this denialism to be coming from within my own movement in public health.Today, it appears that the American Heart Association is still taking a public denialist stance with regards to the health benefits of quitting smoking by switching to vaping. Despite overwhelming scientific evidence that vaping is much safer than smoking and that qu...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - August 15, 2017 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Who is alive: man or machine?
He had cardiomyopathy and CHF for over 20 years. At the time, doctors told him he could die at any time. That was 20 years ago. His EF was 10 percent — barely livable. Two decades later, this admit kept him on a see-saw with respiratory distress, a bad heart, bad lungs, atrial fibrillation with RVR and heart rate in the 140s all day long. He progressed from nasal cannula to Optiflow to 100-percent BiPAP. A Cardizem drip was added to no avail. His next step would be intubation. I pulled his wife outside of her husband’s room. And I told her that he wasn’t doing well and we may have to progress to a ventila...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 27, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/debbie-moore-black" rel="tag" > Debbie Moore-Black, RN < /a > Tags: Conditions Palliative care Source Type: blogs

Systematic review of non invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) in acute exacerbation of COPD with hypercapnic respiratory failure
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 27, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: critical care pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 24th 2017
In this study, we asked how POD is influenced by different experimental practices and how likely it is that underpowered experiments lead to scientific disputes between two groups conducting identical experiments. To address these questions, we generated a parametric model based on the Gompertz equation using lifespan data of 5,026 C. elegans. We then used this model to simulate lifespan experiments with different conditions to determine how experimental parameters affect the ability to detect lifespan increases of certain sizes. We considered two important experimental features that contribute to the workload of lifespan ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 23, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Signs of the Spreading Interest in Cellular Senescence as a Cause of Aging
In just a few short years, the study of cellular senescence has grown enormously. It has become an area of intense interest and funding in comparison to its prior status as a thin sideline of cancer research and a yet another of the backwaters of aging research. Sadly, aging research considered as a whole is still a neglected, poorly funded field of medical science in comparison to its importance to all of our futures, but this will hopefully change soon. The 2011 demonstration of a slowing of degeneration in an accelerated aging lineage of mice via removal of senescent cells opened a great many eyes. A growing number of s...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 21, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Vitamin D: Finding a balance
Over the July 4th weekend, my non-physician husband with a history of skin cancer tried to justify not wearing sunscreen in order to get some vitamin D. My husband, of course, has no idea how much vitamin D he needs or why, and I suspect he is not alone. Why do we need vitamin D? The easy answer is for bones. Vitamin D facilitates absorption of calcium and phosphate, which are needed for bone growth. Without sufficient vitamin D, bones become brittle (in children this is called rickets and in adults it is called osteomalacia) and break more easily. Vitamin D is likely beneficial for other parts of the body as well; studies...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily S. Ruiz, MD, MPH Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Prevention Source Type: blogs

A biker ’s heartbreaking story
A lone figure stood at the entrance to bed 14, intensive care unit 2, floor 15-North. Though it was 2:30 a.m., he stood with rapt attention. He looked out over the hallway, eyes scanning. He looked like a gargoyle brooding over his castle, protecting it. He looked unlike anyone I’d ever seen in an ICU. He was a slightly pudgy yet wholly muscular 5′ 10” or so, with a few days worth of stubble, a handlebar mustache and a tight buzzcut. He looked to be in his early forties. He wore a thick black leather jacket emblazoned with a large “ORIENT: HIGH PERFORMANCE” patch on the back in bright yellow. ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/ben-gold" rel="tag" > Ben Gold, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Intensive care Source Type: blogs

When the Nurse Becomes the Patient
While nurses have a great deal of experience treating and caring for patients, unforeseen circumstances will occasionally cause the tables to turn, giving the nurse the chance to be a patient. This became my personal reality just last week. Friday, Bloody FridayOn a recent Friday afternoon, I was doing my usual workout at a local gym where I can be found pretty much every other day most weeks of the year. Cardio, weightlifting, various machines, balance exercises, and resistance training all figure in my personalized routine. Early in my workout, I was using thick rubber tubes for resistance training. These bunge...
Source: Digital Doorway - July 17, 2017 Category: Nursing Tags: nurse nurses nursing Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 17th 2017
This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD). This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 years (baseline 2006-2010) for 8.3 years (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Ignoring WHR, the risk of mortality for overweight subjects was similar to that for normal-weight subjects. However, among normal-weight subjects...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 16, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Innovation for End-of-Life Communication in the ICU
A recent article in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine offers great advice on communication in the ICU. This is important, because "once the family has expressed a choice, it is much harder to talk them out of it an the process becomes contentious rather than shared." Small tweaks to the words we use can make a big difference. "Family meetings in the ICU aim to facilitate preference sensitive treatment decisions through shared decision making. To elicit information about patient preferences the Society of Critical Care Medicine endorses questions like 'what would she want?'&q...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Recent Epidemiological Research Relevant to the Understanding of Aging
This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD). This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 years (baseline 2006-2010) for 8.3 years (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Ignoring WHR, the risk of mortality for overweight subjects was similar to that for normal-weight subjects. However, among normal-weight subjects...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 14, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Most Important Questions About the GOP ’ s Health Plan Go Beyond Insurance and Deficits
By ROSS KOPPEL and JASMINE MARTINEZ Ending healthcare for those who need it will not make them or their problems disappear. On the contrary, the GOP plan will shatter American families and the economy. Nothing magical happens if we stop caring for the elderly, the ones who need vaccinations, the small infections that can be treated for $2 worth of antibiotics, the uncontrolled diabetics, and those with contagious diseases who clean our schools’ offices and homes. They don’t just get healthy. As George Orwell said in Down and Out in Paris and London, “the more one pays for food, the more sweat and spittle...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Acute Respiratory Distress and Pulmonary Edema
A 60-something called 911 for respiratory distress of acute onset. Medics found him hypoxic with wet sounding lungs. He was put on CPAP with improvement. BP was 250/140 by manual measurement.He was brought to the ED. There was vomitus in his CPAP mask, and he began vomiting again.He was intubated before he could even be placed on a cardiac monitor.A bedside echo was performed.There is an irregularly irregular rhythm with rapid response.The myocardium is very thick (concentric ventricular hypertrophy)There is very little ventricular filling, and thus very little cardiac output.There is good LV functionTh...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - July 7, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

An Explanatory Framework for Comparing Health Care Messaging Systems
Comparing features and capabilities between various health care messaging solutions requires an understanding of how messaging systems do what they do and a common vocabulary so you can talk about it with others. And because health care messaging is a growth market with first or second time adopters, there is not yet a widely accepted or understood framework or terminology for describing how various messaging systems work, let alone comparing them. In the absence of an accepted organizing principle, vendors and providers both tend to come up with their own unique way of talking about things. When every manufacturer’s...
Source: Medical Connectivity Consulting - July 5, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Tim Gee Tags: Messaging Middleware Source Type: blogs

A 60-something dialysis patient with complete heart block: ultrasound before and after treatment
A 60-something dialysis patient complained of weakness. He was hypoxic and in some respiratory distress.He had these prehospital ECGs:Rhythm Strip only, with very slow rate. There appear to be some P-waves that are dissociated from the QRS. This appears to be complete heart block with ventricular escape.More of the same, but with some narrow complex beats, perhaps junctional, or perhaps with some conduction.The exact ECG diagnosis is not as important as the management.A 12-lead was recorded:P-waves are difficult to consistently identify, but there is a wide complex ventricular escape, with a RBBB and LAFB mo...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - July 5, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

A Buggy Case
​A 35-year-old man with a history of asthma presented with an exposure after spraying his garage with an insecticide he bought at the hardware store. Shortly after spraying the insecticide, he noticed eye itchiness, tingling, pruritus over his arms and legs, and shortness of breath. His blood pressure was 130/85 mm Hg, heart rate 70 bpm, respiratory rate 14 bpm, temperature 98.7°F, and SpO2 96% on room air.​He was alert and anxious, his skin was warm with mild erythema, and he had urticaria over his forearms and ankles. His lung exam revealed diffuse wheezing bilaterally. His eyes were watery, and his pupils were 4...
Source: The Tox Cave - July 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's and Anesthesia
Alzheimer's and anesthesia don't mix well. Some physicians are advising their patients that are already diagnosed with Alzheimer ’s to avoid surgery unless absolutely necessary.By Sydney S. Farrier, LCSWHow often have you heard the comment about an older person who recently underwent a major surgery, "She was fine until she had that (hip surgery, knee replacement, cardiac surgery, etc) but now she seems confused."Learn More -What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaThis week I was visiting with an attractive woman in her 80's who had a knee surgery under a general anesthesia a couple of...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - June 26, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's alzheimer's anesthesia Alzheimers Dementia anesthesia dementia care of dementia patients dementia care dementia made worse by anesthesia dementia news health Source Type: blogs

Outbreaks of Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Infection in the United States
To date, 114 known outbreaks of human infection by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been associated with medical / other invasive procedures.  37 of these (32%) have reported from the United States.  The following chronology is abstracted from the Gideon e-book series. [1]   Primary references are available from the author.  1987     17 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae otitis media in Louisiana caused by contaminated water used by an ENT practice  1988    8 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection associated with a contaminated jet injector used in a Podiatry of...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: General Source Type: blogs

What Parents Need to Know About Dry Drowning
Dr. Christian Wright is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and specializes in pediatric emergency medicine at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. Below he answers everything parents need to know about “dry drowning.” What is dry drowning? “Dry drowning” is actually an outdated term. These days, research and health organizations prefer to simply define drowning as a process where being submerged or immersed in liquid leads to respiratory impairment—that is, difficulty breathing. Drowning can be fatal or nonfatal. Sometimes a p...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health Health Tips Kids dry drowning emergency medicine kids water safety Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 449
Answer: rat-tailed maggot, family SyrphidaeAs nicely described by one of my readers, David Bruce Conn, " This is a rat-tailed maggot, larva of a hover fly belonging to the family Syrphidae. This one may be of the common genusEristalis.They are not parasitic, but typically live in stagnant water and feed on organic material before pupating. They may incidentally live in toilets and latrines. "The larvae are very recognizable, a long " tail " that contains a breathing tube (respiratory siphon) that connects to the tracheal system and allows the larva to breath oxygen from the water surface. You can also m...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 19, 2017 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Advance Care Planning and End of Life (ACPEL) Conference
Discussions: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Video Intervention - Maureen Douglas, University of Alberta  4. Identification of indicators to monitor successful implementation of Advance Care Planning policies: a modified Delphi study - Patricia Biondo, University of Calgary5. The economics of advance care planning, Konrad Fassbender, University of Alberta; Covenant HealthSession 2: Health Care Consent, Advance Care Planning, and Goals of Care: The Challenge to Get It Right in OntarioHealth Care Consent, Advance Care Planning, and Goals of Care: The Challenge to Get It Right in Ontario - Tara Walton, Ontario Pal...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 15, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Don ’ t Let Weak Research Influence Policies with Life and Death Consequences
This study wrongly creates the impression that advanced ambulances cause more deaths. In fact, they transport patients who are already more likely to die. One large study shows that advanced ambulance teams are twice as likely as basic ambulances to pick up people with respiratory distress, serious breathing conditions, resulting in more deaths. In other words, people who are barely breathing are 100% more likely to get more advanced ambulances, making it appear that advanced ambulances “cause” more deaths when it is the opposite. People who can’t breathe and are more likely to die, are sent advanced ambu...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The last patient of the day gets the least care
He entered the hospital on Monday morning with a list of patients running through his mind. From the time he received a sign out of 22 patients from his colleague on Sunday evening, he was planning his workday. It was a ritual of his to pray and sleep early on Sunday night to prepare him for what lie ahead. What lied ahead was a busy week of inpatient medicine — also known as hospital medicine. He was a hospitalist. He loved what he did. He worked hard to understand his patients as individuals and did his best to understand the diseases that ruthlessly and mercilessly afflicted them. With time, effort and dedication,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anonymous" rel="tag" > Anonymous < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Medical Associations Non-Pulsed by Trump ’ s Withdrawal From the Paris Accord
By DAVID INTROCASO Climate change, or changes in weather extremes, are having an increasingly harmful effect on human health. Last year, the 20th consecutive year in which the US experienced above average annual temperatures, saw increasing instances of heat related ailments and deaths and increases in related exacerbations of chronic, including cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, respiratory and mental health, conditions as well as the spread of climate change-related food pathogens and vector borne diseases, most recently Zika. One study estimated that absent any adaptation to climate change or disruption we will see an in...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Cimate Change Introcaso Paris Accord Tillerson Trump Source Type: blogs

The NHS Ransomware Attack, Data Privacy & Security in the Era of Digital Health – Part II.
The recent WannaCry ransomware attack impaired the smooth operation of several NHS hospitals in the UK. The connectivity of corporate networks with file-sharing systems and printers let the virus travel around quicker than the flue. While in the first part of our article series, I looked at the IT vulnerabilities of healthcare in general; here, I show the dangers that could be associated with the internet of health things. The Internet of Health Things (IoHT) According to a survey created by Accenture Consulting, the Internet of Health Things (IoHT) is the integration of the physical and digital worlds through objects with...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 13, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Future of Medicine big data cybercrime cybersecurity data breach data privacy data security gc4 health data health IT Healthcare Innovation internet of health things internet of things IoHT IoT Source Type: blogs

Third Pole ’s On-Demand Portable iNO: Interview with Dr. Warren Zapol
Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) relaxes blood vessels in the lungs and is an important and life-saving treatment for pulmonary hypertension. Current iNO delivery solutions are estimated to cost $2,800 per day and rely on compressed gas delivery which limits accessibility and applicability of this technology worldwide. Dr. Warren Zapol and team, led by his son David Zapol, have launched the company Third Pole with technology licensed from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) with the goal of developing next generation life-­saving therapies capable of serving new cardio-pulmonary markets. Their initi...
Source: Medgadget - June 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: William Kethman Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs

Your Nursing Career Report Card
Remember the days when you'd run home with your report card to show your parents how you did in school? Or were you the kid who hid it at the bottom of your bag so they wouldn't see it? Well, your nursing career deserves a report card, too. How've you been doing and what grade do you think you deserve?Report cards can be a measurement of performance, communication, talent, intelligence, diligence, attention to detail, time management, relationships, and many other categories. In some schools, letter grades are the norm, while in some alternative schools, there aren't any grades at all. Sometimes, our report cards are pass\...
Source: Digital Doorway - June 6, 2017 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management careers healthcare careers nurse nurse careers nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

Safe injection sites and reducing the stigma of addiction
Imagine a chronic medical condition in which the treatment itself has serious side effects. Examples of this are plentiful in medicine. For example, in diabetes, giving too much insulin can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), a dangerous and potentially life-threatening condition. That doesn’t happen very often, but imagine that it was a common complication of treating diabetes because doctors couldn’t really tell how powerful a given dose of insulin actually was. And suppose that doctors and patient safety experts advocated for places where patients with diabetes could be carefully monitored when taking thei...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Weiner, MD Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Brain and cognitive health Mental Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Lethal Poison Used in Syria
​The Syrian government recently used what is believed to be sarin on civilians, killing 80 people and injuring many more. (CNN. April 20, 2017; http://cnn.it/2oXX47G.) The use of a nerve agent was confirmed by the Turkish government after examining several bodies during autopsy.Sarin was first developed by the Germans as a pesticide in 1938, and is one of the G-series nerve agents that includes tabun, soman, and cyclosarin. Sarin was also used in a terrorist attack in the Tokyo subway in 1995, killing 12 people. (TIME. March 20, 2015; http://ti.me/2oY3F1Y.) Sarin is an organophosphorus compound similar to what is found i...
Source: The Tox Cave - June 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

MD vs. DNP: Why 20,000 Hours of Training and Experience Matters
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD As southern states entertain legislation granting nurse practitioners independent practice rights, there are some finer details which deserve careful deliberation. While nurse practitioners are intelligent, capable, and contribute much to our healthcare system, they are not physicians and lack the same training and knowledge base. They should not identify themselves as “doctors” despite having a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. It is misleading to patients, as most do not realize the difference in education necessary for an MD or DO compared to a DNP. Furthermore, until they are req...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Urgent Care Follies
What is it with antibiotics and steroids for upper respiratory infections at Urgent Care these days? Over-prescribing of antibiotics has been a problem ever since the recognition that uncomplicated upper respiratory infections were almost always viral and would resolve on their own. I like to call the Z-pak (a pre-packaged 5-day course of azithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic) a “Placebo Antibiotic.” It doesn’t help a viral infection, but has relatively few side effects, and the accomplishment of making the patient feel like he’s gotten something for his handsome $15.00 co-pay. Not optimal treatment ...
Source: Musings of a Dinosaur - May 26, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: notdeaddinosaur Tags: Medical Source Type: blogs

Rating Portable Diagnostic Devices That Make Patients the Point-of-Care
Although the medical tricorder will remain a dream to be chased by digital health innovators for the years to come, I collected the portable, digital health diagnostic devices currently on the market in case anyone is thinking about purchasing an effective gadget making the patient the point of care. Chasing the dream of the medical tricorder Dr. McCoy’s medical tricorder from the Star Trek series, which could scan a patient and immediately tell the diagnosis, basic vital signs and health parameters is the dream of many doctors. In 2012, Qualcomm announced the Tricorder XPRIZE competition offering millions of dollars...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 23, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Mobile Health Portable Diagnostics blood pressure digital health GC1 Healthcare heart rate Innovation Personalized medicine technology trackers wearables Source Type: blogs

Nitrite Sensor to Help Asthmatics Detect Onset of Airway Inflammation
The presence of relatively high concentrations of nitrite (NO2−) in exhaled breath may be indicative of the presence of inflammatory processes within the airways, and so measuring it may be an effective way of performing early detection of the onset of the symptoms of asthma and other respiratory conditions. Devices that are able to measure nitrite are bulky and impractical for everyday use, but Rutgers University scientists have now developed a graphene-based sensor for measuring the concentration of nitrite in exhaled breath that they believe will result in a new approach to monitoring and managing asthma and ...
Source: Medgadget - May 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 22nd 2017
In this study, researchers analysed data of millions of British patients between 1995 and 2015 to see if this claim held true. They tracked people who were obese at the start of the study, defined as people with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, who had no evidence of heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes at this point. They found these people who were obese but "metabolically healthy" were at higher risk of developing heart disease, strokes and heart failure than people of normal weight. No such thing as 'fat but fit', major study finds Several studies in the pas...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 21, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Non-Contact Respiratory Rate Sensor Built Into a Cotton T-Shirt
At the Université Laval in Quebec City, Canada, researchers have developed a respiration sensor built into a t-shirt that can be sampled by a nearby radio device. The idea is that patients in a hospital would wear a lightweight, comfortable shirt that doesn’t have any wires, while their breathing rate would be discreetly monitored in real-time. The sensor itself is simply a spiral antenna made out of multi-material fibers. It’s embedded into the fabric of a common cotton t-shirt so that the expansion of the chest on every breath causes the antenna to bend slightly. This change in the geometry o...
Source: Medgadget - May 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Diagnostics Medicine Pediatrics Surgery Source Type: blogs

Suggesting Mitochondrial Dysfunction Contributes to Age-Related Hair Loss
Researchers here investigate declining mitochondrial function in the context of hair growth, suggesting that age-related mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the causes of loss of hair in later life. Lower levels of - and less efficient - mitochondrial activity is implicated in a number of age-related diseases, especially those of the brain, where correct function requires large amounts of the energy store molecules produced by mitochondria. There appear to be several processes at work, ranging from mitochondrial DNA damage thought important in the SENS view of aging to a general and broader mitochondrial malaise that might...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 18, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Researchers Generate Improved Lung Tissue Organoids
In tissue engineering this is the age of organoids: while the challenge of generating a blood vessel network sufficient to grow large tissue sections is not yet solved, researchers are nonetheless establishing the diverse set of methodologies needed to grow functional organ tissue from a cell sample. The recipe is different for every tissue type, and there are many forms of tissue in the body. The resulting small tissue sections are known as organoids. At this time organoids are largely used to speed up further research, but for some tissue types there is the potential to produce therapies based on transplantation of multi...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 16, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Do not consume the flesh of tetrapods
Well, maybe birds are okay, it isn't entirely clear. The horrific harm to the planet from human meat consumption doesn't seem to be motivating very many people to stop it,but maybe the risk of death will.With a total of more than 7.5 million person years of observation, further analyses by Etemadi and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.j1957) now show an association between high intakes of red and processed meat and elevated total mortality and mortality from most major causes: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and hepatic, renal, and respiratory diseases.As the BMJ editorialist goes on to remind you of what you already k...
Source: Stayin' Alive - May 15, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Repetition and the basics – #meded
Discussing a new patient recently, two important teaching points crystallized once again.  The patient was relatively young without any past medical problems.  He had dyspnea, first on exertion, and then at rest.  On exam he was tachypneic with crackles, wheezes and rales throughout his lungs.  After receiving nasal oxygen he “looked comfortable”. His electrolyte panel: 135 90 8 103 4.8 30 0.6 So I asked why his bicarbonate was 30. A fairly long discussion ensued.  The major point of the discussion was that an elevated bicarbonate here might be a danger sign.  I belie...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - May 14, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 181
LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the  181st edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains  5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Justin Morgenst...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Emergency Medicine Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE Toxicology and Toxinology critical care EBM literature recommendations research and reviews Resuscitation Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 181
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the  181st edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains  5 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Jus...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Emergency Medicine Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE Toxicology and Toxinology critical care EBM literature recommendations research and reviews Resuscitation Source Type: blogs

Electronic Medical Records 2017: Science Ignored, Opportunity Lost
By KENNETH BARTHOLOMEW, MD My big brother Bill, may he rest in peace, taught me a valuable lesson four decades ago. We were gearing up for an extended Alaskan wilderness trip and were having trouble with a piece of equipment. When we finally rigged up a solution, I said “that was harder than it should have been” and he quipped in his wry monotone delivery, “There are no hard jobs, only the wrong tools.” That lesson has stuck in my mind all these years because, as simple as it seems, it carries a large truth. It rings of Archimedes when he was speaking about the simple tool known as the lever: &ldquo...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized EHR EMR Knowledge Coupler Number Needed to Kill POMR value-based care Source Type: blogs

Even short term use of oral steroids (less than 30 days) linked to increased risk of severe infection (sepsis), blood clots and fracture
One in five American adults in a commercially insured plan were given prescriptions for short term use of oral corticosteroids during a three year period, with an associated increased risk of adverse events. Of 1.5 million adults, 21% received at least 1 prescription for oral corticosteroids over 3 period.The most commonindications for use were:- upper respiratory tract infections- spinal conditions- allergies.Within 30 days of drug initiation, there wasan increase in rates of:- sepsis- venous thromboembolism- fractureRisk over the subsequent 31 –90 days.The increased risk persisted at prednisone equivalent doses of ...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - May 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Allergy Infectious Diseases Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Transitioning from Hospital to Nursing Home Most Practical Move for Some
Dear Carol: My 83-year-old mother has lived with my family for two years, but her Type 1 diabetes and lung problems have been worsening. She also has severe pain from arthritis. Mom was recently hospitalized with a respiratory infection and took a long time to respond to treatment. They finally got the bacteria under control but she’s very weak and her breathing needs monitoring. The doctor insisted that she should only be released to a nursing home. I asked if this was just a time for recovery but he was strong in recommending that she move there permanently. He said that she needs more nursing care than she ca...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 7, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Oxidative Stress Caused by Immune Cells Contributes to the Age-Related Decline in Liver Regenerative Capacity
Researchers here provide evidence for the age-related decline in regenerative capacity of the liver to be caused in part by oxidative stress produced by innate immune cells. This makes the adult stem cells responsible for tissue maintenance less likely to activate, but when removed from the tissue environment the cells appear more or less as capable as those of younger individuals. In some other tissues, such as muscle, where stem cell biology is better studied, it is also thought that changes in the surrounding environment rather than internal damage drives the majority of the decline in stem cell activity with aging. Thi...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 5, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Introducing Loop Vital Signs Wearable Monitor from SpryHealth
SpryHealth, previously Echo Labs, is announcing the launch of Loop, a clinical-grade wearable designed to enable improved health outcomes through continuous vital sign monitoring and early detection of clinical deterioration. SpryHealth was founded by Pierre-Jean “PJ” Cobut and Elad Ferber out of the Stanford Graduate School of Business and StartX, a Stanford accelerator. They started the company to enable proactive care and reduce the nearly 28M hospital admissions attributed to chronic conditions. Little is known for now on the technology behind Loop, however, SpryHealth indicates&nbs...
Source: Medgadget - May 4, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: William Kethman Tags: Diagnostics Telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Mitochondria-Derived Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns in Aging
Mitochondria-derived damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are a proposed link between age-related mitochondrial damage and age-related inflammation, and this open access paper outlines present thinking on the topic. Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, are strongly implicated in the progression of aging in a number of ways, the SENS view of damage to mitochondrial DNA producing dysfunctional cells being one, and a more general decline in mitochondrial energy generation for other reasons, yet to be fully mapped, being another. DAMPs are more in line with the first view rather than the second, in which broken ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 4, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs