Maternal Immunization for RSV
By Gertrud U. Rey Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of respiratory illness, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia, in the young, elderly, and immunocompromised. RSV poses a substantial public health threat due to its association with severe morbidity and mortality in infants and premature babies. An RSV vaccine is needed but none has yet […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 20, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information F protein maternal immunization respiratory syncytial virus rsv vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Physical Activity Correlates with a Reduced Impact of Aging in Later Life
The open access study noted here is one of many to show that greater levels of physical activity correlate well with a reduced risk of age-related disease. It isn't possibly to reliably live to extreme old age on the back of a good exercise program, but that physical activity does reliably improve the odds of experiencing better rather than worse health in later life. Even small benefits can be worth chasing when they cost little and are reliably obtained, so long as that pursuit doesn't distract from far more important initiatives. Exercise is beneficial, but it is no substitute for the rejuvenation therapies presently un...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 19, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Trial of mTORC1 Inhibition Improves Immune Function in Older Individuals
Inhibitors of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) are arguably the most reliable of the current crop of compounds that slow aging by targeting stress response mechanisms, improving cellular health and resilience to some degree. The observed gain in life span in mice and lower species is likely to be much larger than the outcome achieved in longer-lived species such as our own, as that is unfortunately just the way things work for this class of approach to aging. Short-lived species evolved to have far greater plasticity of longevity in response to environmental circumstances. The health benefits in old humans tha...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 17, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Why is trauma activation so expensive?
An 8-month-old baby fell 3 feet and hit his head on a carpeted floor in a San Francisco hotel room. He was crying and the parents, who were from South Korea, called an ambulance. By the time the child arrived at the hospital he was obviously fine. After a bottle, a nap, and a few hours in the hospital, he was discharged. The hospital sent a bill two years later, which included a charge of $15,666 for a trauma activation. A trauma activation involves paging a number of hospital staff to go to the emergency department as quickly as possible. Those paged may include an attending surgeon, two or three surgical residents, an an...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/skeptical-scalpel" rel="tag" > Skeptical Scalpel, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

If Facebook knows me better than my spouse, why does my doctor know so little?
A few months ago, I was on call and admitted a 65-year-old man to the intensive care unit for a flare of his chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although he had only gotten to the point of being unable to speak full sentences between gasps for breath for only a few days, his story started two months earlier when he had gradually started retaining water and getting more short of breath. He became unable to cook for himself and spent most of his time in bed, propped up with pillows. To feed himself, he spent the next six or so weeks ordering pizza delivery and eating it in bed, until his shortness of breath got so ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/denitza-blagev" rel="tag" > Denitza Blagev, MD < /a > Tags: Tech Hospital-Based Medicine Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 009 Humongous HIV Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs

Medical Futility, Nonbeneficial Treatment, and Inappropriate Care at ASBH 2018
Medical futility remains a leading topic of relevance and interest in bioethics. Be sure to calendar these two sessions at ASBH 2018 in Los Angeles.   Clinical Ethics and Inappropriate CareOct. 21, 2018, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM  Inappropriate ICU Admissions: One Step Closer to Addressing Inappropriate ICU Care for PatientsKatherine E. Kruse , Ruth Marks , Stephanie M. Harman , David Magnus . Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Children's Respiratory and Critical Care Specialists, Minneapolis, MN; Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA; Stanford University, Stanford,...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 5, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

TWiV 500: Keep virology weird
The entire TWiV team visits The University of Texas in Austin to record episode #500 with guests Jinny Suh, Jason McLellan, and Jon Huibregtse. &lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&amp;lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”&amp;gt;&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;amp;lt;span […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 2, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology cryo-electron microscopy human papillomavirus immunize Texas interferon ISG15 longhorns p53 respiratory syncytial virus science podcast ubiquitin vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Porcine Viruses
Hovakim Zakaryan presents a new book on Porcine Viruses: From Pathogenesis to Strategies for Control This book provides a comprehensive review of the current knowledge of the most important porcine viruses written by prominent scientists who have made great contributions in their respective fields of expertise. Topics include: African swine fever virus, classical swine fever virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, porcine circovirus, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, porcine parvovirus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and swine vesicular disease virus. Each chapter covers the current knowledge on epidemiol...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - July 2, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Trump Administration Opposes Public Reporting of Hospital Infection Rates
A recent news article highlighted the news that CMS is proposing a new rule whereby hospitals are not longer required to publicly report their infection rates (see:Trump administration rule could stop public reporting of hospital infections despite death toll). Below is an excerpt from the article:Federal health regulators will have to stop releasing data on hospital infections — which affect one in 25 hospital patients every day — under a proposal set to take effect in November, according to an analysis by patient safety advocates. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) plan, part of ac...
Source: Lab Soft News - June 28, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Hospital Financial Medical Consumerism Public Health Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 337
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 337th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week EM Cases ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Wearable Vital Signs Monitor for Newborns: Interview with Neopenda Co-founders Sona Shah and Teresa Cauvel
Neopenda, a medical device startup based in Chicago, is developing medical solutions for low-resource settings, and has recently unveiled its first product, a wearable vital signs monitor for newborns. The company has reported that almost 3 million babies die within the first month of life. Up to 98% of these deaths occur in developing countries, and in many cases these deaths are preventable. A lack of resources in many developing countries can result in understaffing and insufficient healthcare equipment. This can mean that it is difficult or impossible for healthcare staff to adequately monitor ill newborns to assess if...
Source: Medgadget - June 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Medicine Pediatrics Public Health Source Type: blogs

TWiV 499: Good virologists go to Halifax
Vincent and Alan travel to the Canadian Society for Virology meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia to speak with Nathalie and Craig about their vision for the society, and with Kate and Ryan about their careers and their research. &lt;span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 24, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology Canadian Society for Virology CSV genome synthesis horsepox virus PERCH pneumonia respiratory syncytial virus synthetic virology viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 242
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 242. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1 Is stuttering more common in boys or girls? Reveal Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet85544164'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink85544164')) Boys. W...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Corden Tags: Frivolous Friday Five ASS Austin flint austin flint murmur botulism botulus breath sounds broncho-vesicular King George VI sausage stuttering TLA TOF tonsil guillotine Source Type: blogs

Button Battery Update
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Button battery ingestion is one of the leading causes of death in paediatric poisoning and this has sharply risen from 2016 despite manufacturing warnings and the addition of tape to cover the negative side (not very useful once you’ve removed that to place it in your device). See Poison.org for more statistics. What makes button battery ingestion more frightening is the fact that the ingestion may go unwitnessed, the child may have vague symptoms like &lsq...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 20, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Toxicology and Toxinology button battery tox library toxicology library Source Type: blogs

A Balancing Act: Diet Selection for Older Adults
This study highlights that, beyond the detrimental effects of tube feeding on quality of life, there could be detrimental effects from non-oral feeding on the health of our patients. This is obviously not the case for all patients, so each individual case needs to be considered, but these studies comparing outcomes are important to consider. Participant: When using the IDDSI (International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative), are there at least two numbers included in a diet order: one for foods and one for liquids? Are dietary departments fully onboard? Rogus-Pulia: My understanding of IDDSI is that, yes,...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - June 18, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Jillian Kornak Tags: Academia & Research Health Care Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia Feeding Disorders nutrition Speech Disorders Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs

The EBM Wars: When Evidence has a Price – The ECMO Trials (Part 2)
By ANISH KOKA   The year was 1965, the place was Boston Children’s and a surgery resident named Robert Bartlett took his turn at the bedside of a just born baby unable to breathe.  This particular baby couldn’t breathe because of a hole in the diaphragm that had allowed the intestines to travel up into the thoracic cage, and prevent normal development of the lungs.  In 1965, Robert Bartlett was engaged in the cutting edge treatment of the time – squeeze a bag that forced oxygenated air into tiny lungs and hope there was enough functioning lung tissue to participate in gas exchange to allow ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Might Depression Be Linked to One of These Popular Medications?
If you’re taking beta blockers, certain kinds of anxiety drugs, certain types of painkillers (including ibuprofen), proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (used to treat acid reflux), ACE inhibitors (used to treat high blood pressure), or anti-convulsant drugs, you may be at greater risk for depression. That’s according to a new, large-scale study published earlier this week in JAMA. However, this was a correlational study, so it can’t say that these medications actually cause depression or not. It may be that people with greater health problems are more likely to take one of these medications and be depressed abo...
Source: World of Psychology - June 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression General Medications Psychiatry Research Drugs cause depression popular medications Source Type: blogs

EarlySense Live, an Under Mattress Sleep and Health Tracker: Medgadget Review
Conclusion Overall, we found EarlySense Live to be a convenient, accurate, and easy to use sleep and health tracker. We believe the SmartShare add-on is a particularly appealing option that may offer peace of mind to both users and their loved ones if overnight safety is a concern. EarlySense Live retails for $177 on Amazon,$199 on EarlySense’s official website  which appears to be slightly above the price point of other comparable products. Nevertheless, EarlySense Live utilizes clinically proven technology. Flashbacks: Medgadget Interview: EarlySense CEO on Company’s Non-Contact Patient Monitoring&...
Source: Medgadget - June 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs

You can't breathe. You cannot breathe.
That's Orange Julius,as quoted by David Cutler and Francesca Dominici, referring to environmental regulations which he claims are " destroying us. " And professional thief Scott Pruitt has indeed proposed eliminating a whole lot of them.That's very popular with owners and executives of regulated industries, such as, oh for example the Koch brothers, who are known to make campaign contributions, and others who pay bribes directly to Mr. Pruitt.Anyway, Cutler and Dominici run down some of the ways America will be Great Again once this all happens. For example, repeal of the Clean Power Plan will result  in par...
Source: Stayin' Alive - June 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Johns Hopkins Public Health Researchers Claim that Smoking May Be No More Hazardous than Vaping
In anarticle published in the Summer 2018 issue of theHopkins Bloomberg Public Health Magazine, two researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health are denying that smoking is known to be any more hazardous than vaping.According to the article, Dr. Ana Maria Rule, an assistant professor in the the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, argued that: " Even if vaping proves safer than smoking, that's still a long way from a gold stamp for their safety. " This of course implies that we don't currently know that vaping is any safer than smoking. In turn, this means the professor's clai...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - June 10, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Patient with Paced Rhythm in Severe Cardiomyopathy Presents with SOB due to Acute Decompensated Heart Failure
This is a middle-aged male with h/o with a history ofheart failure with severely reducedejection fraction due to dilated ischemic cardiomyopathy (EF 5-10%), probably with some component of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, with h/o CABG, who is status post ICD placement (and previous appropriate shocks for VT) and biventricular pacer ( " cardiac resynchronization therapy " ), who is on amiodarone for VT suppression, and has h/o LV thrombus and is on chronicanticoagulation with warfarin.He presented forparoxysmal nocturnal dyspnea that didn't resolve with use of his home prn diuretics.  He...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 9, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Blocking rhinovirus infection by inhibiting a cell enzyme
The common cold is a infection of the upper respiratory tract that may be caused by many different viruses, but most frequently by rhinoviruses. A compound that inhibits a cell enzyme and blocks rhinovirus replication has the potential to be developed into an antiviral drug (link to paper). The common cold is an annoying but […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - June 8, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information antiviral drug assembly common cold myristic acid rhinovirus viruses Source Type: blogs

Medmastery: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS)
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The team at Medmastery are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses from across their website. Looking at acute respiratory distress syndrome today with a video from the Mechanical Ventilation Essentials course exploring the most common oxygenation and ventilation complications associated with ARDS.   Further reading: LITFL Medmastery Courses Medmastery on Facebook and Twitter Guest post: Josh Cosa, MA, RRT-ACCS, RRT-NPS, RCP...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: sabrine Tags: Education Medmastery acute respiratory distress syndrome ARDS josh cosa Source Type: blogs

Secondhand marijuana smoke and kids
For years, we’ve talked about the danger to children of secondhand tobacco smoke. It makes asthma worse, increases the risk of respiratory and ear infections — and even increases the risk of sudden death in infants. We’ve had all sorts of educational campaigns for parents and caregivers, and have made some progress: between 2002 and 2015, smoking among parents of children less than 18 years old dropped from 27.6% to 20.2%. But now there is a new problem: secondhand marijuana smoke. Studies show that when you are around someone who is smoking marijuana, the smoke gets into your system too. How much of...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

Internet Challenges Sending Kids to EDs
​Social media influences nearly every part of our lives—how we communicate, teach, and protest. It is powerful because it allows people around the world to connect instantaneously. One of those ways is the social media phenomenon popular since the early 2000s: internet challenges. These challenges range from funny, like the mannequin challenge, to charitable, such as the ice-water bucket challenge, to dangerous, like the blue whale challenge. Several of these can cause injury by ingestion or topical application.​The Tide Pod ChallengeConcerns of safety arose shortly after laundry pods were introduced in 2012 when...
Source: The Tox Cave - June 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Inspiratory Stridor and Diaphoresis Spell Emergency
​My relief had arrived, and we were just starting sign-outs. The resident broke in, "This guy with the sore throat. I think he's sick!" Glancing up from the computer, she continued. "He's barely talking. He has inspiratory stridor. And he is sweaty."​The resident had me at inspiratory stridor. Diaphoresis on a chilly morning in our ED was just icing on the cake. Intrigued and concerned (we did not have ENT or an open OR at that time in our shop), I followed my oncoming colleague to the bedside. The experience was just as sphincter-tightening as the description. The 20ish-year-old man sitting bolt up...
Source: Lions and Tigers and Bears - June 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Medmastery: Alveolar disease
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The team at Medmastery are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses from across their website. Today we’re again looking at the Mechanical Ventilation Essentials course with a video offering key observations related to managing ventilated patients with airway disease and/or alveolar disease. Further reading: LITFL Medmastery Courses Medmastery on Facebook and Twitter Guest post: Josh Cosa, MA, RRT-ACCS, RRT-NPS, RCP. Registered respirat...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: sabrine Tags: Medmastery alveolar josh cosa mechanical ventilation Source Type: blogs

Contour Drawing Helps Students Learn Anatomy | TAPP Episode 18
TAPP APP now available!(2 min)Introduction toPaul Krieger(2 min)Contour drawing for anatomy with Paul Krieger(19 min)Change to abiweekly podcast schedule(1 min) If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! Jean Fernel once wrote, "Anatomy is to physiology as geography is to history. It describes the theater of events."  (0:44) This episode announces the availability of the dedicated app for this podcast--the TAPPradio app or TAPP APP. Kevin mentions the Android version, but after production, the App...
Source: The A and P Professor - May 26, 2018 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Medmastery: Volume vs Pressure Control
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The team at Medmastery are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses from across their website. Today we explore the Mechanical Ventilation Essentials course with a video explaining why volume control is the preferred initial type of ventilation. Further reading: LITFL Medmastery Courses Medmastery on Facebook and Twitter Guest post: Josh Cosa, MA, RRT-ACCS, RRT-NPS, RCP. Registered respiratory therapist and respiratory care practitioner, Cl...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 23, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: sabrine Tags: Education josh cosa mechanical ventilation Source Type: blogs

The Ethics of Keeping Alfie Alive
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 21st 2018
In conclusion, the connection between DNA damage and aging is emphasized by the secretion of senescence-associated proteins during cellular senescence, a phenotype which is activated by DNA damage and is common for both human and mice. Though much progress has been achieved, full understanding of these mechanisms has still a long way to go. XPO1 as a Novel Target for Therapies to Enhance Autophagy https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/05/xpo1-as-a-novel-target-for-therapies-to-enhance-autophagy/ Autophagy is the name given to a collection of cellular housekeeping processes that recycle damaged and un...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A doctor cries therapeutic tears with her patient
He wasn’t particularly likable upon first encounter. He wasn’t apt to answer questions asked. He had a long pause and a long drawl and a tangential, winded story — and backstory — all of which he was bound and determined to tell to its detailed completion. With an irregular heart rate in the 170s and a respiratory rate in the 30s, I tried to steer him in the direction of concise answers so I could obtain as much information as possible and do my job. This is an emergency. He is an emergency. An emergency which had waited until the last possible millisecond; we did not have the luxury of time. But he...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cindy-winebrenner" rel="tag" > Cindy Winebrenner, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Cardiology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Humpback whale respiratory virome
How difficult would it be to study the virome of living whales? You might think that sampling would be the hard part, but not if you used a drone. A drone was used to collect the breath (‘blow’) from 19 humpback whales near Sydney, Australia. The video below show how a sampling chamber carried by […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - May 18, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology australia drone humpback whale virome viral virus viruses whale breath Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 237
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 237. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1: Who wrote a treatise on appendicitis in 1889? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1042482996'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetli...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 17, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five APGAR appendicitis Auenbrugger Cadium cataracts Charles McBurney finger prints identical twins Josef Leopold Auenbrugger von Auenbrugger percussion smoking virginia apgar Source Type: blogs

Considering Mitochondria and Neurodegeneration
Since mitochondria seem to be the dominant theme this week, today I thought I'd point out a couple of recent open access papers that focus on the role of mitochondrial function (and dysfunction) in the neurodegeneration that accompanies aging. Every cell bears a swarm of mitochondria, the descendants of ancient symbiotic bacteria. Even though mitochondria long ago evolved into integrated cellular components, they still behave very much like bacteria in many ways. They multiply through division, and can fuse together and swap component parts, pieces of the molecular machinery necessary to their function. They also contain t...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Medmastery: AC/SIMV modes
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog The team at Medmastery are providing LITFL readers with a series of FOAMed courses from across their website. Checking out the Mechanical Ventilation Essentials course today with a video exploring assist control (AC) and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) modes on a ventilator. Further reading: LITFL Medmastery Courses Medmastery on Facebook and Twitter Guest post: Josh Cosa, MA, RRT-ACCS, RRT-NPS, RCP. Registered respiratory therapist...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: sabrine Tags: Education Medmastery mechanical ventilation Source Type: blogs

The Roller Coaster Ride of Grief
I was talking with someone recently about grief when she said that it felt like being on a roller coaster ride. This person is facing the impending death of a loved one even as there is no definitive timeline per the treatment team. We spoke of the dynamic of anticipatory grief and the ways in which it impacts the process of letting go of this person as she plans her future in the face of his eventual absence. I have found both in my therapeutic practice and in my personal life, that anticipatory grief genuinely effects mourners, although a 2006 article published in the Counseling, Psychology, and Health Journal quest...
Source: World of Psychology - May 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Aging Family Grief and Loss Health-related Interview Peer Support Personal anticipatory grief Cancer grieving Mourning widow widower Source Type: blogs

Beating the Travel Bug & Innovation in Hand Sanitation: Interview with Zoono CSO Dr. Andrew Alexander
While flu season is drawing to a close, transmission of germs can still lead to colds and serious respiratory diseases. In few places are individuals more exposed to a multitude of unique germs and germ carriers than during travel. Unlike some forms of travel, such as buses, where an individual can choose to get off the vehicle or find an alternate transit option, like carpooling, air travel is much less flexible. Based on data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, in 2010, on average 1.73 million passengers boarded domestic flights every day in the United States. On a plane, individuals are confined in a tight env...
Source: Medgadget - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Music Offers Many Cognitive, Emotional and Physical Benefits to Young and Old
“Music is therapy. Music moves people. It connects people in ways that no other medium can. It pulls heart strings. It acts as medicine.” — Macklemore Much research over the years has centered on the potential, perceived and realized benefits of music. In fact, the area of study has blossomed, growing from the preliminary findings of earlier studies to recent ones that built upon them. What’s exciting is the widespread and diverse benefits that music offers to everyone, young, old and in-between. Musical training gives babies’ brains a boost. Even before babies can walk or talk, they can benef...
Source: World of Psychology - May 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Brain and Behavior Creativity Happiness Health-related Motivation and Inspiration Research Self-Esteem Stress Coping Emotional Support Music Therapy musical therapy Source Type: blogs

Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Slows Vascular Aging in Mice
We examined multiple parameters of vascular function, histological markers, and markers of mitochondrial damage and function during normal vascular aging, and the effects of reducing or augmenting mitochondrial function on the onset and progression of vascular aging. We identify early, standardized time points and reproducible physiological parameters for vascular aging studies in mice. Vascular aging begins at far earlier time points than previously described in mice, with compliance, distensibility, stiffness, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) being the best discriminators for normal aging and manipulations. Mitochondrial DN...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

AI Predicts Which Patients Will Code, Allowing Early Intervention
I will occasionally report inLab Soft News about examples of artificial intelligence (AI) that are being introduced into healthcare because the use of such tools will radically change the way care is rendered. One such example is a recently developed algorithm that generates warnings about which patients are in imminent danger of"coding" in the hospital (see: Ochsner Health System: Preventing cardiac arrests with AI that predicts which patients will ‘code’). Such a warning enables physicians to intervene earlier for them. Below is an excerpt from the article:In modern hospitals, doctors and nurse...
Source: Lab Soft News - May 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Medical Ethics Medical Research Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Compassion & Choices Defends California ’s Legal Definition of Brain Dead as Dead (Israel Stinson)
Compassion & Choices has filed an amicus brief defending California’s legal definition of brain dead as dead. The California UDDA is under challenge because of a decision by Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles to stop artificial life support for a brain dead two-year-old boy. The deceased boy’s mother and a right-wing religious group have filed a lawsuit in a federal appeals court. A federal judge previously dismissed the lawsuit in March 2017, Jonee Fonseca et al v. Karen Smith et al, challenging the state law’s definition of death filed on behalf of Israel Stinson’s mother, Jonee Fon...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A different kind of Mother ’s Day
Multiple strokes, respiratory failure. Cardiac arrest — twice. At first glance, I thought that I was reading the medical chart of an elderly person or at least one who had some other predisposing medical conditions to explain her current state. But I was staring at the body of a 28-year-old woman. She had a youthful face and frizzy hair from being propped up on the same static-charged pillow for the last few days. The nurses had painted her fingernails with red polish and slathered Vaseline on her lips, giving them a shimmery appearance. I was standing at her bedside with her mother, a well-dressed 50-something-year-...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/melanie-mcminn" rel="tag" > Melanie McMinn, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Critical Care Source Type: blogs

E-Cigarette Opponents Still Making Up False " Facts " to Demonize Vaping
We're well into 2018 and there is now substantial research on the health effects of vaping as well as a decade of experience with large numbers of vapers, yet e-cigarette opponents are still making up false claims to buttress their demonization of vaping.In anarticle by Jia Tolentino published yesterday in theNew Yorker, a Harvard professor was quoted as claiming that: " vaping can cause something called bronchiolitis obliterans, or popcorn lung. "He also stated that Juul is " a massive public-health disaster, " likened e-cigarettes to “bioterrorism,” and " predicted that, eventually, a...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - May 8, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

MedStar Franklin Center:   The Case Against Global Capitation
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD Baltimore County, Maryland is one hour north of Washington DC, where politicians appear impotent to contain runaway healthcare expenditures.  In January 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in partnership with the state of Maryland, piloted an “All Payer Model,” where every insurer, including Medicare and Medicaid, paid a fixed annual amount irrespective of inpatient or outpatient hospital utilization.  Maryland agreed to transition hospitals from fee-for-service arrangements to this global capitation model over five years.  Capitation, in general, reimb...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 330
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 330th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. Readers can subscribe to LITFL review RSS or LITFL review EMAIL subscription The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Last week...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Should you carry the opioid overdose rescue drug naloxone?
The US Surgeon General, Dr. Jerome Adams, recently released an advisory on naloxone and opioid overdose. In his advisory, Dr. Adams writes: For patients currently taking high doses of opioids as prescribed for pain, individuals misusing prescription opioids, individuals using illicit opioids such as heroin or fentanyl, health care practitioners, family and friends of people who have an opioid use disorder, and community members who come into contact with people at risk for opioid overdose, knowing how to use naloxone and keeping it within reach can save a life. This was the first surgeon general advisory issued in 13 years...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Weiner, MD Tags: Addiction Health Source Type: blogs

Overview of mechanical ventilation and respiratory failure
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - May 1, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: critical care pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Everything ECMO!
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog In specialist centres, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a now a mainstay of the management of cardio/respiratory failure refractory to other measures. However, much of the clinical information required to care for ECMO patients at the bedside remains inaccessible to learners. To address this, the creation of a free-to-access educational ECMO blog post is now a requirement for completion of the Alfred ICU ECMO Accreditation Certificate. These &ld...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Education Everything ECMO extracorporeal life support Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation INTENSIVE Source Type: blogs