What's new in midwifery - 17th October 2018
Some recent things you might need to know about.News – a lot of things this weekBeyonc é and Chrissy Teigen are cool but they are still ads for the ultimate mum lifeFolic acid to be added to UK flour in effort to reduce birth defectsInfant mortality in England and Wales could soar without action, study warnsReport aboutChild Health 2030, a RCPCH report.Use of caesarean sections growing at'alarming'rateReport ofLancet article.Why I share my breast milk with other mothersNICE ConsultationsSpecialist neonatal respiratory care for babies born preterm:draft guidance consultation.  Closing date for comments: 23...
Source: Browsing - October 17, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

A young man with back spasms
Written by Pendell MeyersFirst see this ECG without clinical context:What do you see? Do you agree with the computer's read of " nonspecific ST abnormality? "The ECG is diagnostic of hypokalemia. There is diffuse minimal STD, with prolonged QT interval and characteristic " up-down " T-wave morphology in the precordial leads which is being caused by U-waves. V2 has an especially pronounced U-wave, but there is also a slightly wandering baseline. This morphology is very unlikely to be due to ischemia, and to an experienced electrocardiographer is nearly pathognomonic of hypokalemia +/- other concomitant f...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - October 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

RNA Interference of ATP Synthase Subunits Slows Aging in Nematodes
Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, responsible for generating adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a chemical energy store molecule used to power cellular operations. The inner workings of each mitochondrion are energetic and complicated, consisting of a number of interacting protein complexes that collectively perform the work needed to manufacture ATP molecules. Mitochondrial function occupies a central position in the interaction between metabolism and aging for a number of reasons. Firstly, they generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a side effect of ATP production, and the flux of ROS is both damaging and a si...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

TWiV 515: When virus is in retrograde
The TWiV team notes the passing of Tom Steitz, an outbreak of acute flaccid myelitis in the US, a continuing Ebola virus outbreak in DRC, respiratory vaccinia due to inhalation of ground up rabbit skin, and how a human papillomavirus capsid protein directs virus-containing endosomes towards the nucleus. 
Source: virology blog - October 14, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology capsid protein L2 cell penetrating peptide DRC ebola virus HPV human papillomavirus outbreak rabbit skin respiratory vaccinia retrograde transport retromer Tom Steitz trans-Golgi network vaccine vaccinia Source Type: blogs

The Top Sleep Sensors For Expert Level Tracking
Sleep sensors are accurate tools on the digital health technology market to offer insights into our snooze, and reliable companions to improve bedtime. If you want to go beyond sleep apps, we collected the top sleep sensors out there to make your choice easier. Sleep like a boss The amount of sleep was often a great concern for world leaders. Margaret Thatcher said that she only needed four hours of sleep at night. When Napoleon Bonaparte was asked how many hours of sleep people need, he is said to have replied: “Six for a man, seven for a woman, eight for a fool.” However, research shows enough sleep is vital ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 11, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Medical Professionals Patients Researchers digital health future health trackers Innovation personalized personalized health sleep sleep sensor sleep tracking technology wearables Source Type: blogs

Aptar Pharma Releases New Portable Ready-to-Go Upper Respiratory Inhaler
Aptar Pharma, a company based outside of Chicago, is releasing a new portable and easy to use inhaler for upper respiratory conditions. The PureHale device comes ready to use, and the tank can take saline or other solutions designed to clean, soothe, and moisturize the upper respiratory tract. The inhaler creates an even and mist from the fluid in the tank, helping patients to inhale the medication. There are no batteries or medication tanks to change, since the device uses a mix of compressed air and pure nitrogen to power the drug delivery. It really comes ready to go and it’s disposed of once empty. “PureHal...
Source: Medgadget - October 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 8th 2018
This article, unfortunately paywalled, is interesting to note as a mark of the now increasingly energetic expansion of commercial efforts in longevity science. David Sinclair has been building a private equity company to work in many areas relevant to this present generation of commercial longevity science; while I'm not sold on his primary research interests as the basis for meaningful treatments for aging, he is diversifying considerably here, including into senolytics, the clearance of senescent cells demonstrated to produce rejuvenation in animal studies. This sort of approach to business mixes aspects of investing and...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 7, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

SleepScore Lab ’s Non-Contact, No Hardware Sleep Monitoring System: Product Review and Interview with CEO
It has been less than a year since Medgadget tried out SleepScore Lab’s SleepScore Max, the company’s second generation of sleep monitoring devices, following the S+ system. Today, we’re onto their third offering: the SleepScore App. While both S+ and SleepScore Max systems paired hardware and software in a combined offering, the latest release from SleepScore Labs is an app-only product that does not require the use of any hardware peripherals to monitor a user’s sleep. Previously, the company’s hardware scanned the user while sleeping. Now, this functionality comes directly from smartphone s...
Source: Medgadget - October 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs

Futuristic, Forward-looking and Fun – The Curiscope Virtuali-tee Review
Futuristic, forward-looking and fun. Whenever these three attributes characterize a technology, we know it’s a jackpot. The Virtuali-tee Human Body T-shirt created by Curiscope has all three qualifiers – and one more. It’s our secret weapon for blowing people’s minds with augmented reality. The T-shirt and the accompanying app shows colorful human organs, animations, and the entire 3D image looks so real that physicians often ask Dr. Meskó if these are really his insides. No, they are not. Read our Virtuali-tee review to understand why. Turning abstract biological concepts into magic The UK-b...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 4, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Medical Augmented Reality Medical Education Medical Professionals Patients Anatomy AR digital future Health Healthcare MedEd Medicine review STEM Source Type: blogs

Commentary on Recent Research into Mitochondrial DNA and Aging
Today I'll point out a commentary on recent research in which a method of degrading mitochondrial function was shown to produce aspects of accelerated aging in mice. The commentary is somewhat more approachable than the paper it comments on. The challenge here is the same as in any form of research in which something vital is broken in animal biochemistry, and wherein the result looks a lot like a faster pace of aging. These forms of artificial breakage are almost never relevant to the understanding of normal aging; they create an entirely different state of metabolism and decline. It is true that normal aging is a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Nursing Jobs, Cost of Living, & Where to Hang Your Hat
In my work as a career coach for nurses and healthcare professionals, I frequently witness those who work in nursing struggling with decisions related to finding work and the relative cost of living in terms of where they live or where they might move.Making decisions about your workstyle and lifestyle can be fraught with anxiety and concern about the future -- let's unpack that conundrum.Photo by Joey Csunyo on UnsplashWorkstyle and LifestyleFiguring out where to live and work can be a difficult choice. On the one hand, you want to earn up to your potential and receive the highest possible wage according to...
Source: Digital Doorway - October 1, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: advanced practice nurses career career development career management careers healthcare careers job search nurse careers nurse practitioners nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

Dia de los Muertos
​A 27-year-old man presented by EMS was agitated, confused, and combative. EMS said they had received a call for a patient who was minimally responsive lying on the sidewalk. They noted the patient with pinpoint pupils and decreased respirations. The concern was that he had been using heroin, so he was given 2 mg intranasal naloxone. This caused the patient to become acutely confused and combative. He was awake and alert but oriented x 0. His vital signs included a temperature of 99.1°F, a heart rate of 122 bpm, a respiratory rate of 26 bpm, and pulse oximetry of 97% on room air.At least 160 people were admitted to P...
Source: The Tox Cave - September 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Clinical Ethics and Inappropriate Care at ASBH 2018
In conclusion. patients assessed as receiving inappropriate critical care receive much burdensome and resource-intensive medical care, largely while non-alert, demonstrating the effects of mismatch between treatment and prognosis. Creeping Noninterference-Focused Autonomy in Modern Medicine: How We Created and Continue to Feed the Problem of FutilityCatherine S. Heith, MD The intersection of autonomy with modern-technologized and patient-satisfaction-driven medicine has had unexpected consequences. Although autonomy sprung from informed consent and the "right to die" movement, modern medicine, when paired with &l...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

European Robin – Erithacus rubecula
UPDATE: It occurs to me occasionally and I forget to mention it, that this is probably the bird most Brits think of when they hear the song “Rockin’ Robin”… But…I suspect the guy who wrote the song, Leon René, was actually thinking of the American Robin (Turdus migratorius), which is like a British Blackbird but with a redbreast, like a European Robin (I say red, it’s orange in both Robins). Moreover, the American’ Robin’s song is much closer to the refrain Tweet, tweedle-lee-dee in hit, than the song of the European Robin. One more thing, check out the cover ar...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - September 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Day Shift vs. Night Shift: A Consistent Nursing Dilemma
As a career coach for nurses, I receive a lot of questions and complaints about nursing careers, and one of the most contentious and confusing issues for many nurses is whether to work days or nights. Perhaps you, dear Reader, have experienced such confusion yourself.Days vs. nights is an old nursing puzzle that so many nurses face:Do I work nights and get the differential while ruining my social life, or do I work days and run my tail off when the residents, surgeons, NPs, and doctors are on hand all day to send me running with new orders and admissions?When I was decided to go to nursing school, my wife was very supporti...
Source: Digital Doorway - September 24, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management healthcare careers nurse nurse career nurse careers nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

How Autocracies Could Misuse Digital Health Innovations
How long do you think it will take for authoritarian governments, dictatorships or tyrannies until they realize the vast potential in digital health technologies and until they learn how to harness their powers? Twenty years? Ten years? We have to warn you, the era of 24/7 surveillance and intrusion into the innermost secrets of human life is even closer than that. Watch out! Dystopic worst case scenario-alert! Digital technologies are double-edged swords: they promised social change… On 17 December 2010, a Tunisian vegetable vendor set up his cart on the street in Sidi Bouzid to sell goods that he obtained the day ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Future of Medicine Security & Privacy AR artificial intelligence big data biotechnology black mirror dystopia genes genetics genomics Health health sensors Healthcare insurance MR Personalized medicine scifi Source Type: blogs

Does the Air We Breathe Affect Our Brains?
Many of us are aware that pollution can have detrimental effects on our health, specifically in relation to respiratory and cardiovascular issues. Studies have shown that living in an area of bad air quality significantly raises our risk of developing heart disease, having a stroke, and being affected by breathing problems. In fact, when the World Health Organization delved into the issue of air pollution in 2016, they found that 92% of the world’s population breathes unhealthy air — a definite sign that air pollution is quite a significant threat to global public health. Their comprehensive analysis also foun...
Source: World of Psychology - September 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Brain and Behavior Health-related Policy and Advocacy Research American Lung Association Asthma breathing Neuroscience Pollution Toxins Source Type: blogs

I ’m sorry about what happened to your son under anesthesia
It was a sunny morning in July, and I was scheduled at the outpatient center with the oral and maxillofacial surgeons for teeth extractions. One of my patients was your son, an athletic teenager, whose only medical history was asthma. According to you and him, he had not experienced any recent asthma attacks and had never been hospitalized or intubated. In terms of breathing, he said he felt “perfectly fine” for many years. The last time he took his inhaler was yesterday prior to exercising. He had not experienced any upper respiratory infections recently and was not having any difficulty breathing today. I pla...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/the-traveling-resident" rel="tag" > The Traveling Resident, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Everything ECMO
In specialist centres, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a now a mainstay of the management of cardio/respiratory failure refractory to other measures. However, much of the clinical information required to care for ECMO patients at the bedside remains inaccessible to learners. To address this, the creation of a free-to-access educational ECMO blog post is now ... The post Everything ECMO appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 4, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Intensive Care Procedure Alfred ICU ECMO extracorporeal life support Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation Source Type: blogs

An Ischemic ECG and Bedside Echo shows diffuse dysfunction but with Apical Sparing
An approximately 40 y.o. male was in jail when he reported dyspnea.  He was brought to a small local ED where a chest x-ray showed pulmonary infiltrates.  He was hypotensive and hypoxic, and a provisional diagnosis of sepsis from pneumonia was made.  He had CT pulmonary angiogram which was read as " no PE. "  His lactate was 4.6 mEq/L and WBC count 20,000.  He was given levofloxacin, thentransferred to a tertiary care center.Upon arrival, his vitals were HR 115, BP 87/53, RR 30, T 37.3, and O2 sat 91% on room air. Breathing was labored, tachypneic.  He had cool extremi...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - September 4, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Double Trouble: Both-Bone Fractures
​Both-bone forearm fractures may make you feel a little nervous. A completely crooked forearm is definitely a disturbing sight. Both-bone forearm fractures (especially of the midshaft) typically require surgical intervention, but relocation of bony injuries, regardless of site or complexity, is an important and necessary skill you need to know. Plus, you will be required to assist with sedation, reduction, and splinting when the orthopedic team is involved.​Correcting and stabilizing two bones (instead of one) may seem tricky, but we are going to help you do it right. This complex procedure should be done with orthoped...
Source: The Procedural Pause - August 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Bayer of a Case
​A 30-year-old woman was brought in by EMS tearful and reluctant to answer questions initially. Her mother was with her and stated that the patient had been depressed and may have taken some pills in a suicide attempt. Her initial vitals on presentation were a temperature of 99.1°F, heart rate of 128 bpm, blood pressure of132/92 mm Hg, and a respiratory rate of 26 bpm. She had clear lungs and sinus tachycardia on cardiac monitoring. She admitted to having taken "a lot" of aspirin.Initial LabsCBC: WBC of 14, hemoglobin of 14 g/dL, hematocrit of 42%, platelet count of 250,000BMP: Sodium of 132 mEq/L, potassiu...
Source: The Tox Cave - August 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 096 with Nik Kumar
Big data. It’s very big. There’s a lot of it. Sometimes you just have to look a bit closer to find the best stuff. Matt Mac Partlin strikes gold in Wollongong. Moment to moment information on heart rate, respiratory rate, how much urine has come out, how much fluid has gone in, the sodium, the ... The post Jellybean 096 with Nik Kumar appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 31, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean ANZICS Datathon Big Data Nik Kumar RCT Source Type: blogs

Why Cochrane is Wrong About Hypertension. Very Wrong.
By SWAPNIL HIREMATH, MD Archie Cochrane and the Cochrane Collaboration Archie Cochrane was born in Scotland, educated in London (King’s College, University College and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and worked in Cardiff, Wales. His work as a doctor during the Spanish Civil War and World War II, especially in a prisoner of war camp in Salonica, is credited with his push towards generating higher quality evidence. In his description of the clinical trial he conducted, he mentions James Lind as his hero. Ironically, that clinical trial – with weak randomization, open allocation, non-blindin...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: EBM Cochrane patient population risks Source Type: blogs

Rwanda and the Dreamers of Digital Health in Africa: Wakanda Is Real
Rwandans in remote villages are using an artificial intelligence-based algorithm on their mobile phones to get a diagnosis for their health problems, doctors in Kigali consult their colleagues in the Western Province about radiology cases through telemedicine, blood is delivered by Zipline’s medical drones, and a central electronic health records system ensures data is collected about health activities. Rwanda is a pioneer in digital health in Africa – a real Afrofuturistic embodiment of Black Panther‘s Wakanda. Let’s see how and why that happened. Wakanda gets real in Rwanda Black Panther&rsq...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 29, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Africa AI artificial intelligence chatbot development digital health drones government medical drone mobile app mobile health regulation rwanda smartphone telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Rwanda and the Dreamers of Digital Health in Africa: Wakanda Is Real
Rwandans in remote villages are using an artificial intelligence-based algorithm on their mobile phones to get a diagnosis for their health problems, doctors in Kigali consult their colleagues in the Western Province about radiology cases through telemedicine, blood is delivered by Zipline’s medical drones, and a central electronic health records system ensures data is collected about health activities. Rwanda is a pioneer in digital health in Africa – a real Afrofuturistic embodiment of Black Panther‘s Wakanda. Let’s see how and why that happened. Wakanda gets real in Rwanda Black Panther&rsq...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 29, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Africa AI artificial intelligence chatbot development digital health drones government medical drone mobile app mobile health regulation rwanda smartphone telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Why Cochrane is Wrong About Hypertension. Very Wrong.
By SWAPNIL HIREMATH MD Archie Cochrane and the Cochrane Collaboration Archie Cochrane was born in Scotland, educated in London (King’s College, University College and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and worked in Cardiff, Wales. His work as a doctor during the Spanish Civil War and World War II, especially in a prisoner of war camp in Salonica, is credited with his push towards generating higher quality evidence. In his description of the clinical trial he conducted, he mentions James Lind as his hero. Ironically, that clinical trial – with weak randomization, open allocation, non-blinding...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: EBM Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 25-year-old man with dark-colored urine
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 25-year-old man is evaluated for dark-colored urine for 2 days, swelling of the face and hands for 1 day, and severe headaches this morning. He reports having an upper respiratory tract infection 1 week ago with fever, sore throat, and swollen glands, but had otherwise felt well. Medical history is otherwise unremarkable, and he takes no medications. On physical examination, temperature is 37.2 °C (99.0 °F), blood pressure is 180/90 mm Hg, pulse rate is 88/min, and respiration rate is 14/min. C...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Infectious Disease Nephrology Source Type: blogs

VistaTablet for Monitoring Patients ’ Eight Vital Signs from Anywhere
VitalConnect, a Silicon Valley firm, is releasing its brand new patient-monitoring handheld interface for its VitalPatch vitals monitor. The VistaTablet and and VitalPatch are both part of the company’s Vista Solution, which allows clinicians to keep an eye on their patients ECG, heart rate, heart rate variability, respiratory rate, skin temperature, body posture, and activity levels, all at the same time and regardless of patient location. Patients can be discharged from the hospital with the VitalPatch already stuck to the skin, and their status will be continuously updated on the VistaTablet in real-time. Just lik...
Source: Medgadget - August 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Surgery Telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Myths about exposure therapy
Exposure therapy is an effective approach for pain-related anxiety, fear and avoidance, but exposure therapy is used less often than other evidence-based treatments, there is a great deal of confusion about graded exposure, and when it is used, it is not always well-conducted. It’s not a treatment to be used by every therapist – some of us need to challenge our own beliefs about pain, and whether it’s OK to go “into” the pain a little, or even slightly increase pain temporarily! Below are some common misconceptions and suggestions for how to overcome them: Misconception: Exposure therapy cause...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - August 19, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Assessment Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice acceptance biopsychosocial function graded exposure Occupational therapy pain management rehabilitation Therapeutic app Source Type: blogs

Drowning in Drugs: An Interview with Carnegie Mellon ’s Diane Nelson
One of the most engaging areas of research these days is improving drug delivery. Here at Medgadget, we often share news about technological advances in nanomedicine that promise improved delivery to tumor sites, or newly designed gadgets that increase drug delivering efficacy. Rarely do we hear about attempts to improve drug delivery in the lungs. Recent reports suggest that almost 7% of all US deaths are due to chronic respiratory diseases, making them the fifth leading cause of death. Thankfully, a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon has recently taken on the challenging task of improving drug delivery in the ...
Source: Medgadget - August 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Critical Care Exclusive Materials Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Drowning in Drugs: Interview with Carnegie Mellon ’s Diane Nelson
One of the most engaging areas of research these days is improving drug delivery. Here at Medgadget, we often share news about technological advances in nanomedicine that promise improved delivery to tumor sites, or newly designed gadgets that increase drug delivering efficacy. Rarely do we hear about attempts to improve drug delivery in the lungs. Recent reports suggest that almost 7% of all US deaths are due to chronic respiratory diseases, making them the fifth leading cause of death. Thankfully, a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon has recently taken on the challenging task of improving drug delivery in the ...
Source: Medgadget - August 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Critical Care Exclusive Materials Medicine Surgery Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 13th 2018
We report that the disruption of excitation-contraction coupling contributes to impaired force generation in the mouse model of Sod1 deficiency. Briefly, we found a significant reduction in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) activity as well as reduced expression of proteins involved in calcium release and force generation. Another potential factor involved in EC uncoupling in Sod1-/- mice is oxidative damage to proteins involved in the contractile response. In summary, this study provides strong support for the coupling between increased oxidative stress and disruption of cellular excitation contraction mac...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 12, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Make Asbestos Great Again? - Trump Once Claimed " Movement Against by Asbestos was Led by the Mob, " Now is EPA Wants to Relax Asbestos Regulation
Introduction:  An Old Public Health MenaceThis is somewhat personal.  In the early 1980s, as a general internal medicine fellow, I gave a series of talks about important medical problems that generalist physicians often missed.  One was asbestos related disease.  Although asbestos had been heavily regulated since 1973, there were stilll large numbers of people exposed to it alive in the 1980s.  One of my primitive slides, seemingly a picture of type writing, stated that around then, 2 to 4 million people who had histories of significant asbestos exposure were likely alive.  Asbestos is known t...
Source: Health Care Renewal - August 10, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: asbestos cancer conflicts of interest Donald Trump public health Source Type: blogs

Papers Drawn from the Ongoing Investigation of Naked Mole-Rat Biochemistry
A sizable amount of effort is devoted to the comparative biology of aging, and in particular mapping the noteworthy differences between naked mole-rats and other similar-sized rodent species. Naked mole-rats live nearly ten times longer than mice and are near immune to cancer. It is possible that a sufficiently comprehensive understanding of why this is the case could result in therapies for humans, though I believe the odds of this coming to pass in the near future of the next couple of decades are much larger for cancer than aging. Research into calorie restriction mimetic drugs has demonstrated that safely inducing even...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 7, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Working in the ER on holidays
As I prepare to go into work for another string of night shifts, I become aware that this is just another holiday that I will be working. It’s the Fourth of July, not a major holiday as is designated by any scheduler, so no credit will be given to those of us who work today. Some previous employers have given extra pay for said days, as little as $200 to as much a $1,000 for working such shifts. My current employer offers none, no enticement to spend the day away from family while caring for others. Many people work on such holidays, from gas stations to grocery stores, so why should we in health care feel entitled t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/maria-perez-johnson" rel="tag" > Maria Perez-Johnson, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Attempts Continue to Link Blood Group to Natural Variations in Longevity
If we are to judge from the findings of genetic association studies, natural variation in human longevity occurs due to countless distinct factors, each of which provides a small contribution, is highly dependent on environmental circumstances, and is highly linked to other factors. Scientists have struggled to replicate more than a few known associations across different study populations, and those that have been replicated between study groups have small effects. Blood group is genetically determined, and data on patient blood group is included in many of the data sets that report on disease incidence and mortali...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 505
Answer:Dermatobia hominis,the human botflyThere are several helpful features in this case that allow for an identification to be made:Overall " robust " and somewhat pear-shaped body with a narrow posterior. Large spines on all but the terminal 3 body segmentsSupportive travel history (Bolivia)We unfortunately don't have a view of the posterior respiratory spiracles which would have sealed the diagnosis, but the rest of the features are sufficient to call thisD. hominis.You can look at a previous case to see what the spiracles would have looked like:Case of the Week 347. There is also a link there to an old,...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 5, 2018 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

The secret life of a nurse
This is based on a true story. The name and some details of the events have been changed.  She was the smarter nurse who floated to ICU, to CVRU, to CCU. She could handle any crisis: balloon pumps, CRRT, open-heart patients, respiratory distress, code blues — anything. Sandy was quiet. She didn’t really have any nurse friends. She was a loner. But we could depend on her to take the most difficult assignments. She was our brightest star. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/debbie-moore-black" rel="tag" > Debbie Moore-Black, RN < /a > Tags: Conditions Hospital-Based Medicine Nursing Source Type: blogs

Urgent care centers prescribe more antibiotics. Why is that?
Urgent care centers are way ahead in prescribing unnecessary, potentially harmful antibiotics that are doing no one any good – at least no patients any good. The owners of the urgent care centers are the ones who are benefitting. And you and your family are being bilked, misled, and harmed. A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine looked at the proportion of antibiotic prescriptions that were made for viral respiratory infections – things like the common cold and bronchitis. These are viral infections, caused by viruses (sorry if I’m hammering that too much – but obviously i...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/roy-benaroch" rel="tag" > Roy Benaroch, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Infectious Disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Where Is the Boundary to Augment Life?
Cloning, CRISPR and gene editing, synthetic life forms, and longevity. The latest scientific discoveries are able to offset the natural order of human existence and meddle with sacred questions of life and death. Even so, does gaining insight into the secrets of being mean it should also be put into practice? Are we aware of the consequences? Where are the boundaries to augment life? Life, death and the coin for Charon the Ferryman In Japanese folklore, the Shinigami, gods or spirits of death came to the persons who were destined to die and invited them over the threshold of life and death. In ancient Egypt, Anubis, having...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 28, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Cyborgization artificial intelligence augmentation bioethical cloning CRISPR death future gene editing Health Healthcare life longevity research synthetic life Source Type: blogs

When you hear these words from an experienced clinician, believe them
Anyone who has worked in medicine for a long time well understands the power of the statement coming from an experienced person: “This kid looks sick.” That person could be a physician or nurse. Years of experience does tend to give one a sort of sixth sense for when to worry something serious is going on that just hasn’t shown itself fully yet. Seasoned parents can often provide the same perspective. A fascinating recent article pertaining to this appeared in Critical Care Medicine, the journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, entitled “What faces reveal: a novel method to i...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christopher-johnson" rel="tag" > Christopher Johnson, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Critical Care Hospital-Based Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

No one ever knows how to grieve.
I think I've grieved every loss in a different way. My dad passed away 26 years ago. That was the first, the hardest, the longest. Mom died 6 years ago. I lost my best friend, my counsel, my support. And I grieved harder than when dad went.Last fall my son died. I honestly thought I would die. But then my other son got so upset that I had to snap out of it and "be here" for him.And now hubby. How do I grieve his passing? There have been many wonderful moments in our life. I posted the bad ones here. I posted the reality of diabetes. I truly want to just ...
Source: Wife of a Diabetic - July 27, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

CPR: A neglected but important part of fighting the opioid crisis
Opioid overdose is a frightening and potentially life-threatening event. Rescue drugs like naloxone are lifesaving, but the value of CPR doesn’t get as much attention. And it should. How does opioid overdose lead to death? Opioids (like oxycodone, heroin, and fentanyl) bind to special receptors in the brain called mu receptors. These receptors are responsible for a variety of functions, most importantly breathing. When the mu receptor is stimulated by an opioid, it releases chemicals that work downstream on parts of the brain that tell the body to slow down breathing, or even stop it altogether. This respiratory depr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephen P. Wood, MS, ACNP-BC Tags: Addiction First Aid Health Source Type: blogs

Is There a Kind of Severe Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease?
Hand-foot-mouth disease can be caused by any of several related viruses, most commonly by one called coxsackievirus A-16. In 2008, an epidemic of one type of severe hand-foot-mouth disease (also known as HFMD) in China appeared in news reports around the world as the child-killing virus. More than forty people died in that outbreak; all of them children. The culprit was enterovirus 71, or EV-71. In 2011 another new cause of HFMD hit the United States, coxsackievirus A-6. People feel sicker with this one than typical HFMD; the rash is worse; it lasts longer; and they may temporarily lose their nails. One clue to t...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - July 27, 2018 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Diseases & Conditions Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

RBBB. Is there ST Elevation in III and aVR, with reciprocal ST depression in I and aVL?
I received this ECG from someone who wishes to remain anonymous.Case" Last night we had a Stage 4 Lymphoma Cancer Patient presenting with this ECG above. Wife advised that he just woke up from a nap and was being assisted on a walk when he became dizzy and had a syncopal episode. Patient was A&O when EMS arrived. Patient seemed confused. Patient had shortness of breath when EMS got to him. Initial vitals as follows: "" Patient was cool to touch and dry, Lung sounds clear. "BP: 141/70HR: 139RR: 31SpO2: 79%ETCO2: 18" Patient denied any other complaint other than SOB. SpO2 improved to 97% on 15lpm...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - July 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Tonsillitis and the Bull
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Peer Reviewers: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia and Dr Mark Little, ED physician QLD, Australia. You are working in far North Queensland and encounter a 20 year old Indigenous man with tonsillitis on your ED short stay ward round. He has been receiving IV penicillin and metronidazole overnight but is deteriorating and now cannot open his mouth beyond 1.5cm, and has a swollen neck (some might say ‘Bull neck&r...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine antitoxin bull neck c. diphtheriae c.ulcerans DAT pseudomembrane vaccine Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Tonsillitis and the Bull
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 011 Peer Reviewers: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia and Dr Mark Little, ED physician QLD, Australia. You are working in far North Queensland and encounter a 20 year old Indigenous man with tonsillitis on your ED short stay ward round. He has been receiving IV penicillin and metronidazole overnight but is deteriorating and now cannot open his mouth beyond 1.5cm, and has a swollen neck (some might say ‘Bull neck&r...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine antitoxin bull neck c. diphtheriae c.ulcerans DAT pseudomembrane vaccine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 23rd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 22, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Maternal Immunization for RSV
By Gertrud U. Rey Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of respiratory illness, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia, in the young, elderly, and immunocompromised. RSV poses a substantial public health threat due to its association with severe morbidity and mortality in infants and premature babies. An RSV vaccine is needed but none has yet […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 20, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information F protein maternal immunization respiratory syncytial virus rsv vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs