Department of Defense Doubles Cancer Research Funding in 2015

Doctors and researchers seeking a cure for mesothelioma will soon be able to tap into millions of dollars set aside by the U.S. Department of Defense for cancer research. The Office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) invested $50 million in the Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (PRCRP) for 2015 — an amount that doubles the money awarded to the program last year. With the additional funding, asbestos-related cancer researchers can extend current studies and launch new ones to improve traditional treatments, introduce emerging therapies or test new cancer drugs. Funding in 2014 was $25 million. Researchers hold out hope that their military-focused programs will develop the medical advancements that extend life expectancy or develop a cure for U.S. service members and families affected by mesothelioma. Former service members are a prime demographic for development of the rare and fatal cancer. CDMRP spokeswoman Gail Whitehead told Asbestos.com that applicants seeking funding under the 2015 cycle must send in their applications in the fall. Winners for that round will be announced in 2016. The cancer program and CDMRP are funded through the Defense Department. Since its inception, the program has provided nearly $3 million to fund mesothelioma research, according to CDMRP documents. The Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program, also part of CDMRP, pumped $7.7 million into mesothelioma research projects from 2008 to 2010. Ongoing Mesothelioma...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

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Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Anthropology and Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being Source Type: research
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Source: Minerva Chirurgica - Category: Surgery Tags: Minerva Chir Source Type: research
NEW YORK (CBS Local/CBS News) – Smoking in the U.S. has hit another all-time low. About 14 percent of U.S adults admit to being smokers last year, down from about 16 percent in 2016, government figures from the CDC show. There hadn’t been much change the previous two years, but it’s been clear there’s been a general decline and the new figures show it’s continuing, according to K. Michael Cummings of the tobacco research program at Medical University of South Carolina. “Everything is pointed in the right direction,” including falling cigarette sales and other indicators, Cummi...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Local TV Smoking talkers Source Type: news
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Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
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