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Study reveals breast cancer can return years after the "all clear" – Experts already pushing to keep women on prescriptions longer (no mention of lifestyle)
(Natural News) The findings of a new study out of England have blown yet another hole in the conventional cancer therapy myth, revealing that women who undergo typical procedures like chemotherapy and radiation for breast cancer often see the deadly disease return – in some cases up to 20 years after they were supposedly “cured.”... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers invent novel RNA nanotech to decorate exosomes for effective cancer therapy
(Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) A new study shows that attaching antibody-like RNA nanoparticles to microvesicles can deliver effective RNA therapeutics specifically to cancer cells. Researchers used RNA nanotechnology to apply the RNA nanoparticles and control their orientation. The microscopic, therapy-loaded extracellular vesicles successfully targeted three types of cancer in animal models. The findings could lead to a new generation of anticancer drugs that use siRNA, microRNA and other RNA-interference technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rapid responses, few adverse effects in targeted agent in Phase1 trial in rare blood disorder
(Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) Clinical Activity in a Phase 1 Study of BLU-285, a Potent, Highly-Selective Inhibitor of KIT D816V in Advanced Systemic Mastocytosis. Study shows one of multiple ways in which novel targeted cancer therapies are now being deployed to improve outcomes and quality of life for patients with rare, advanced, or difficult-to-treat blood malignancies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

No additional risks from pausing hormone-sensitive breast cancer therapy
According to a study, published inThe Lancet, the effectiveness of breast cancer therapy was not adversely affected by patients taking a break from long-term hormone treatments.News Medical (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - December 5, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Removing cancer cell debris improves conventional cancer treatments
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Cancer therapies are designed to kill tumor cells, but produce tumor cell debris in the process. In a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and colleagues show that leftover debris can stimulate inflammation and tumor growth, but that molecules called resolvins can block that unwanted inflammatory response. The findings point towards a new way to enhance the effectiveness of current cancer therapies and potentially prevent tumor recurrence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Killing cancer softly: New approach halts tumor growth
Cancer therapy can sometimes, paradoxically, help the cancer to spread. New research shows why that is, and what can be done to stop it. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Incoming Novartis CEO On $475,000 Cancer Therapy:'No Question That The List Price Raises Eyebrows '
Incoming CEO at Swiss drugmaker Novartis, Vas Narasimhan, said he isn ’t interested in following the herd in drug development. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Michela Tindera, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Study reveals cancer therapy's double-edged sword ... and how to blunt it
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers from Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Systems Biology have discovered that the remains of tumor cells killed by chemotherapy or other cancer treatments can actually stimulate tumor growth by inducing an inflammatory reaction. The study, which will be published Nov. 30 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, also reveals that a family of molecules called resolvins can suppress this unwanted inflammatory response, suggesting new ways to enhance the effectiveness of existing cancer therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 30, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Versatile cancer drugs
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich have examined 243 kinase inhibitors which are either approved drugs or have been tested in clinical trials. According to results published in Science, some of these may have more applications than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Double-edged sword: Killing cancer cells can also drive tumor growth
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Cancer therapies including radiation and chemotherapy seek to treat the disease by killing tumor cells. Now a team including researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have shown that the dead and dying cancer cells generated by chemotherapy and targeted cancer therapy paradoxically trigger inflammation that promotes aggressive tumor growth. In a study published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, the team has illuminated the mechanism by which tumor cell death can drive primary tumor growth and metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aridis uses human antibodies to fight against “time bomb” of antibiotic resistance
Although antibodies have gained plenty of ground in recent years as vehicles for cancer therapies, Aridis Pharmaceuticals wants to use them as nature intended – to fight infection. “These are human monoclonal antibodies being investigated as anti-infectives to treat bacterial infections associated with pneumonia,” founder & CEO Vu Truong told Drug Delivery Business News, referring to the company’s projects that are in pivotal trials. “The fundamental reason is that this is exactly what the antibody is designed to do – that is, to fight infection,” he explained. G...
Source: Mass Device - November 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Hospital Care Pharmaceuticals Research & Development aridispharmaceuticals Source Type: news

People willing to trade treatment efficacy for reduced side effects in cancer therapies
(American Society of Hematology) When choosing their preferred treatment, people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia place the highest value on medicines that deliver the longest progression-free survival, but are willing to swap some drug efficacy for a reduced risk of serious adverse events according to a study published online in Blood Advances, a Journal of the American Society of Hematology. The study also suggests that factoring out-of-pocket costs into this decision-making process may significantly influence a patient's choice of treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers Say Many People Diagnosed With Cancer Suffer From PTSD
BOSTON (CBS) – Many people diagnosed with cancer suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD. Researchers in Malaysia looked at almost 500 adults who had been diagnosed with different types of cancer. One in five had developed PTSD within a few months of their diagnosis and some of those still had symptoms four years later. Getting the news that you have cancer can be shocking and the treatment itself can be traumatic. And then some patients continue to live in fear that the cancer will return. Patients with PTSD can have sleep problems, may be more likely to use substances, and may avoid seeking treatment fo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Syndicated Local Cancer Dr. Mallika Marshall PTSD Source Type: news

Targeted Cancer Therapies Bring New Precision Medicine Tools to Anatomic Pathologists and Clinical Laboratories
FDA is streamlining how new diagnostic tests are approved; encourages IVD companies to focus on ‘qualifying biomarkers’ in development of new cancer drugs It is good news for the anatomic pathology profession that new insights into the human immune system are triggering not only a wave of new therapeutic drugs, but also the need for […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - November 20, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations American Enterprise Institute anatomic pathology CDER Center for Drug Evaluation and Research cl Source Type: news

Intermittent Letrozole Similar to Continuous Administration for Extended Breast Cancer Therapy
Taking temporary treatment breaks from letrozole following endocrine therapy for breast cancer is associated with similar disease-free survival as taking letrozole continuously, according to... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - November 20, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Some cancer therapies may provide a new way to treat high blood pressure
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say Georgetown University Medical Center investigators. The finding could offer a real advance in hypertension treatment because although a number of high blood pressure drugs are now available, they work by different mechanisms that are not suited for all patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Optimizing Treatment for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Optimizing Treatment for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer
Individualizing castration-resistant prostate cancer therapy depends not only on drug profiles but also on patient-related factors. Experts offer a way through the data to reach a clinical decision.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

Gut microbiome influences efficacy of PD-1based immunotherapy against epithelial tumors
This piece of research is behind the headline: Gut bacteria " boost " cancer therapy. This early-stage study gives us some insights into factors that might influence people's responses to a specific type of cancer treatment (immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies). The findings are of interest, but don't have any immediate implications for cancer treatment. This early-stage study gives us some insights into factors that might influence people's responses to a specific type of cancer treatment (immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies).The findings are of interest, but don't have any immediate implications for c...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Loxo, Bayer to co-develop cancer drugs in up to $1.55 billion deal
(Reuters) - Loxo Oncology Inc will collaborate with Germany's Bayer AG to develop and commercialize two of its cancer therapies, the companies said on Tuesday, in deal that could bring the U.S. drug developer up to $1.55 billion. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Papers of note in Science Translational Medicine 9 (415)
This week’s articles describe a way to combat the negative effects of stress on cancer therapy; a potential target in heart failure; and why nighttime wounds heal more slowly than daytime wounds. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ferrarelli, L. K. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Q & amp;A: How to Prepare for an AI-Driven Future
For years the role of robotics and artificial intelligence within the realm of medtech has been hyped as the future of innovation and device development. Now that technological advances are beginning to catch up to our imagination, how will advanced robotic and AI technologies begin to reshape the medtech landscape?  Srihari Yamanoor With advances in machine learning and robotic design, artificial intelligence is poised to have a dramatic impact on the medical device field. With innovative opportunities on both the diagnostic and therapeutic sides of medicine, AI technologies could be the key that unlocks...
Source: MDDI - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: BIOMEDevice San Jose Assembly and Automation Digital Health Source Type: news

Can cannabinoids be used to treat cancer?
When cannabinoids activate signaling pathways in cancer cells they can stimulate a cell death mechanism called apoptosis, unleashing a potent anti-tumor effect. Yet cannabinoids, which have also shown strong activity against human tumor tissue grown in animal models, have undergone minimal testing in patients. Their potential use as antitumor drugs and/or to boost the effectiveness of conventional cancer therapies is examined in an article published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (JACM), a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - November 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Cancer treatment response may be affected by gut bacteria
Conclusion This early-stage study gives us some insights into factors that might influence people's responses to a specific type of cancer treatment (immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies). The findings are of interest, but don't have any immediate implications for cancer treatment. We don't know what the conditions that required antibiotic treatment were and whether these could have affected the response to immunotherapy. We don't know whether the antibiotics themselves influenced how well the immunotherapy worked, or whether it was their effect on gut bacteria. We also don't know whether having high levels of part...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Gut bacteria 'boost' cancer therapy
Trials suggest the trillions of micro-organisms living in us alter immunotherapy's effectiveness. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breast cancer patients forego post-surgery treatment due to mistrust, study suggests
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Nearly one-third of women with breast cancer went against their doctor's advice and chose not to begin or complete the recommended adjuvant anti-cancer therapy to kill residual tumor cells following surgery, according to a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 1, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Incyte, AstraZeneca expand collaboration on potential lung cancer therapy
Incyte Corp. is expanding its clinical collaboration with MedImmune, AstraZeneca's global biologics research and development arm. As part of the expanded agreement, the two companies will evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a combination therapy — featuring one product from each company — in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer. The phase-III study of the treatment pairing Incyte's investigational enzy me inhibitor called epacadostat with AstraZeneca's Imfinzi human monoclonal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 31, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Boehringer Ingelheim expands collaboration with Sarah Cannon Research Institute to investigate novel immuno-oncology combination therapy
Boehringer Ingelheim and Sarah Cannon Research Institute today announced an expansion of their strategic partnership to bring innovative treatments to cancer patients by developing novel immuno-oncology therapies. The new effort combines Boehringer Ingelheim's oncology research and Sarah Cannon’s expertise in clinical trial design and recruitment to evaluate BI 891065, a novel and potent SMAC mimetic, alone and as a potential combination partner with PD-1-directed cancer therapy. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - October 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Boehringer Ingelheim Business and Industry Source Type: news

NovoCure rises on Q3 EPS, sales beat
Shares in Novocure (NSDQ:NVCR) are on the rise today after the medical device maker topped revenue and losses-per-share expectations on Wall Street with its 3rd quarter earnings results. The St. Helier, N.J.-based company posted losses of $11.5 million, or 13¢ per share, on sales of $50.1 million for the 3 months ended September 30, seeing losses on the bottom-line shrink 65.8% while sales grew 131.2% compared with the same period during the previous fiscal year. Losses per share for the quarter came in under the 17¢ consensus on Wall Street, while sales beat the $43.6 million expectations on The Street. &ld...
Source: Mass Device - October 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News MassDevice Earnings Roundup NovoCure Source Type: news

Incyte enters into licensing deal valued at up to $900M
Incyte Corp. obtained worldwide rights to an experimental cancer therapy Wednesday under a collaboration and licensing agreement it signed with a Maryland biotechnology company. Under the terms of the deal, Incyte of Wilmington, Del., will make an upfront payment of $150 million to MacroGenics. MacroGenics of Rockville, Md., could receive up to $420 million in potential development and regulatory milestones, and up to $330 million in potential commercial milestones. If t he new drug candidate licensed… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 25, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

New study: 'Double decker' antibody technology fights cancer
(Scripps Research Institute) Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have created a new class of antibody-drug conjugates for cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NEHI urges prompt action to enable value-based contracts for innovative, high cost cancer therapies
(NEHI (the Network for Excellence in Health Innovation)) NEHI (the Network for Excellence in Health Innovation) called today for a series of regulatory steps and other actions to enable new payment arrangements for high cost cancer drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rockville-based cancer therapy company CytImmune Sciences in fundraising mode
The company is working on a therapy for pancreatic cancer using nanotechnology. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - October 23, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Rockville-based cancer therapy company CytImmune Sciences in fundraising mode
The company is working on a therapy for pancreatic cancer using nanotechnology. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 23, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

FDA Approves Landmark Cancer Therapy; Wilmot Positioned Among First to Offer It
UR Medicine ’s Wilmot Cancer Institute will be among the first sites in the world to offer CAR T-cell therapy —a new type of immunotherapy—to adults with aggressive lymphoma. The engineered gene therapy has been described as a revolutionary “living drug” and one of the most powerful cancer treatments to emerge in recent years. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - October 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Rockville-based cancer therapy company Cytimmune Sciences in fundraising mode
The company is working on a therapy for pancreatic cancer using nanotechnology. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 20, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Suicide molecules kill any cancer cell
(Northwestern University) A super assassin hidden in every cell forces the cell to commit suicide if it becomes cancerous, reports a new study, the first to identify molecules to trigger a fail-safe mechanism that may protect us from cancer. The mechanism -- RNA suicide molecules -- can potentially be developed into a novel form of cancer therapy. Cancer cells treated with the RNA molecules never become resistant to them because they simultaneously eliminate multiple genes that cancer cells need for survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Gilead new cancer therapy wins FDA approval — with $373,000 tag
(Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - October 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researchers release the brakes on the immune system
(University of Bonn) Many tumors possess mechanisms to avoid destruction by the immune system. For instance, they misuse the natural 'brakes' in the immune defense mechanism, which normally prevent an excessive immune response. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now been able to take off one of these brakes. The study, which involved colleagues from Hamburg and W ü rzburg, could pave the way for more effective cancer therapies. It is being published in the journal Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Immunotherapy Side Effects: New Global Guidelines for Nurses Immunotherapy Side Effects: New Global Guidelines for Nurses
Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer therapy, but these drugs have unique and sometimes life-threatening adverse events, as outlined in the new guidelines.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Vanderbilt researchers find novel mechanism of resistance to anti-cancer drugs
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Vanderbilt investigators have discovered a novel non-genetic cause of resistance to the targeted anti-cancer therapy cetuximab. Their findings, reported Oct. 16 in Nature Medicine, suggest a strategy for overcoming this resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 16, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

US NIH launches $215m Partnership for Accelerating Cancer Therapies
The US National Institutes of Health (NIH), along with 11 biopharmaceutical companies, has launched a $215m five-year public-private research collaboration to advance new cancer immunotherapy strategies for more patients. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - October 15, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NIH Partners With 11 Drugmakers to Accelerate Cancer Therapy Research NIH Partners With 11 Drugmakers to Accelerate Cancer Therapy Research
The National Institutes of Health said on Thursday it had partnered 11 biopharma companies to help advance a new class of drugs that uses the body's immune system to fight cancer.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

A range of substances with antitumor properties was synthesized at RUDN University
(RUDN University) Scientists from RUDN University have synthesized a number of new cytotoxic substances - the ones that can damage cells. In the future the results of the study can be used in cancer therapy. The compounds were obtained by domino reaction, a successive formation of several new chemical bonds. The study was published in the Synthesis journal (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

U.S. NIH, 11 drugmakers partner to accelerate cancer therapy research
(Reuters) - The Trump Administration threw its support behind a public-private partnership with 11 drug companies to advance a new class of drugs that uses the body's immune system to fight cancer. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

PhRMA, member companies and NIH create public-private partnership for immuno-oncology
The rapid pace of scientific advances has helped usher in anew era of medicine for cancer patients over the last decade. This morning, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) took asignificant step in advancing this new era by partnering with PhRMA and nine of its member companies to create the Partnership for Accelerating Cancer Therapies (PACT), a five-year research collaboration totaling $215 million as part of the Cancer Moonshot initiative. This public-private partnership will be managed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. (Source: The Catalyst)
Source: The Catalyst - October 12, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Research and Development cancer Source Type: news

NIH partners 11 drugmakers to accelerate cancer therapy research
(Reuters) - The National Institutes of Health said on Thursday it had partnered 11 biopharma companies to help advance a new class of drugs that uses the body's immune system to fight cancer. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

NIH, 11 biopharmaceutical companies partner to speed development of cancer immunotherapy strategies
(NIH/Office of the Director) The National Institutes of Health and 11 leading biopharmaceutical companies today launched the Partnership for Accelerating Cancer Therapies (PACT), a five-year public-private research collaboration totaling $215 million as part of the Cancer Moonshot. PACT will initially focus on efforts to identify, develop and validate robust biomarkers -- standardized biological markers of disease and treatment response -- to advance new immunotherapy treatments that harness the immune system to attack cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cleveland Clinic researchers reveal biomarker for guiding prostate cancer treatment
(Cleveland Clinic) Back-to-back discoveries from Cleveland Clinic demonstrate for the first time how a testosterone-related genetic abnormality can help predict individual patient responses to specific prostate cancer therapies. The studies, published in the Oct. 12 issue of JAMA Oncology, suggest that men who inherit this variant would benefit from a personalized treatment plan that targets specific hormonal pathways. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Intezyne Closes Oversubscribed $10M Series A Financing to Drive Rapid Oncology Portfolio Development
TAMPA, Fla., Oct. 6, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Intezyne Technologies, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing novel anti-cancer therapies, announced that it closed an oversubscribed $10M Series A Preferred round lead ... Biopharmaceuticals, Oncology, Venture Capital, Personnel Intezyne Technologies, Cancer Resistance Pathway (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - October 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

'Smart' immune cells: Emerging cancer therapy research boosted with NIH award
(University of California - Davis) Assistant Professor Sean Collins, Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics in the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences, has received a $1.5 million award from the National Institutes of Health to advance the development of 'smart' immune cells for therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. The five-year NIH Director's New Innovator Award aims to provide new insight into how to engineer immune cells to control their recruitment and response to tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news