Cancer Therapy - Associated Polyposis May Mimic CRC Predisposition
74 percent of TAP cases had clinical features suggesting at least one CRC predisposition syndrome (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine, Oncology, Pediatrics, Journal, Source Type: news

Cancer Therapy-Associated Polyposis May Mimic CRC Predisposition
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- Childhood and young adulthood cancer (CYAC) therapy-associated polyposis (TAP) often has clinical features suggestive of at least one colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition syndrome, according to a study published online... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New probe developed to detect a common target of anti-inflammatory drugs
(Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology) Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology have recently developed a new probe to detect the activity of Cyclooxygenase-2, an enzyme that plays a major role in driving the progression of cancer. The researchers hope that this probe can have potential applications in cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Certain factors linked with discontinuing breast cancer therapy
(Wiley) For women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, long-term endocrine therapy can greatly reduce the risk of recurrence. Many women, especially those in underserved populations, do not continue treatment, however. A new Psycho-Oncology study uncovers some of the factors that may be involved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 19, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Predicting immunotherapy success
One of the frustrations with anti-cancer therapy is that no one drug fits all: Most work well in some people but have little effect in other patients with the same type of cancer. This is as true of the newer immunotherapy treatments as it is of older types of chemotherapy. Weizmann Institute of Science researchers have now identified new markers that can help predict which patients have a better chance for a positive response to immunotherapy treatments. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

SMAC mimetics and RIPK inhibitors as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases
New therapeutic approaches for chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis are needed because current treatments are often suboptimal in terms of both efficacy and the risks of serious adverse events. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are E3 ubiquitin ligases that inhibit cell death pathways and are themselves inhibited by second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC). SMAC mimetics (SMs), small-molecule antagonists of IAPs, are being evaluated as cancer therapies in clinical trials. IAPs are also crucial regulators of inflammatory pathways because t...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - February 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jensen, S., Seidelin, J. B., LaCasse, E. C., Nielsen, O. H. Tags: STKE Reviews Source Type: news

Heart condition can be cured with a quick blast of lung cancer therapy
Ventricular tachycardia is a major cause of sudden cardiac death, and kills more than 100,000 in the UK every year. Tests show the abnormal rhythm can be corrected with a pain-free blast of radiotherapy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prebiotics May Slow Skin Cancer Tumor Growth In Mice, Study Finds
BOSTON (CBS) – A new study published in the journal Cell Reports finds that prebiotics could help fight the deadliest form of skin cancer. Probiotics are live strains of bacteria, but prebiotics are the food for bacteria and stimulate bacterial growth. Scientists in California looked at two prebiotics: mucin, which is found in the gut and inulin, found in plants like asparagus and onions. They found that when mice with melanomas were fed these prebiotics, the growth of the tumors was slowed by boosting the immune system’s ability to fight cancer. They say this is further evidence that gut microbes influence the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Glaring Gap in CV Event Reporting in Pivotal Cancer Trials Glaring Gap in CV Event Reporting in Pivotal Cancer Trials
A provocative new study points to serious shortcomings in the reporting and recognition of cardiovascular events in contemporary cancer therapy trials.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - February 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Prebiotics help mice fight melanoma by activating anti-tumor immunity
(Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that two prebiotics, mucin and inulin, slowed the growth of melanoma in mice by boosting the immune system's ability to fight cancer. The study, published today in Cell Reports, provides further evidence that gut microbes have a role in shaping the immune response to cancer, and supports efforts to target the gut microbiome to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Summary report on small cell lung cancer research points to progress and challenges
(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) In 2017, a group of lung cancer experts posed the question: 'Can recent advances in tumor biology that have led to progress treating non-small cell lung cancer translate into improved outcomes for small cell lung cancer?'According to an article " New Approaches to Small Cell Lung Cancer Therapy : From the Laboratory to the Clinic, " published in the February issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the answer is " yes. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CRISPR-Edited Cells for Cancer Therapy Safe in Humans: Trial
In the first clinical study of its kind in the US, researchers used CRISPR to modify CAR T cells to make them more potent against cancer, but the clinical benefits are unknown. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 7, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Cold plasma patch could make immunotherapy more effective for treating melanoma, study finds
This study represents an important milestone for the field of plasma medicine,” said co-senior author Richard Wirz, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UCLA Samueli. “It demonstrates that the microneedle patch can realize the plasma delivery while also working with the drug t o improve the effectiveness of cancer therapy.”“Plasma can generate reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which are a group of chemical species that can destroy cancer cells,” said Guojun Chen, who is the co-first author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in Gu’s laboratory.&ldq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Botanical drug is shown to help patients with head and neck cancers
In this study, UCLA researchers found that when APG-157 is taken through oral mucosal absorption, patients have high levels of curcumin circulating in their blood and absorbed by cancer tissues.METHODUCLA researchers conducted the study of APG-157 comparing 12 people who had oral and oropharyngeal cancer with a control group of 13 people who did not have cancer. The reason both the people with cancer and without cancer were part of the study was to show that the drug was not toxic to either people with cancer or those without cancer.The medication was given each hour for three hours and was delivered as a lozenge that slow...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lantheus touts new study on contrast echocardiography
Lantheus Medical Imaging parent company Lantheus Holdings announced the results...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Lantheus appoints new CCO Lantheus hires former Bayer director as new CMO Lantheus, CarThera partner on ultrasound cancer therapy Lantheus posts lower Q3 results Lantheus to acquire Progenics (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 4, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Expanded medication assistance program increases access to cancer medications
(MediaSource) The Medical Assistance Program at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) has helped more than 30,000 patients gain access to vital medications valued at more than $500 million, and a new program expansion will further increase access to vital cancer therapies for patients with the greatest financial need. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 4, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney
(University of Freiburg) Researchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

United Therapeutics gets disappointing news on cancer therapy
United Therapeutics Corp. ’s (NASDAQ: UTHR) trial of one of its cancer therapies in small cell lung cancer did not achieve its goals, the company announced Monday. The Silver Spring company conducted a trial, called a DISTINCT study, of Unituxin in patients with some forms of small cell lung cancer, but said Monday that the therapy did not extend the overall survival of those patients.  Unituxin, or dinutuximab, first received approval from the Food and Drug Administration in March 2015 to treat… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rebecca Cooper Source Type: news

Why a single molecule called CD166 could unlock new cancer therapies
(Indiana University School of Medicine) More than $3 million from the National Institutes of Health will allow Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center researchers to improve understanding of the complex system of how hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) survive and sustain their function in the bone marrow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Neoadjuvant checkpoint blockade for cancer immunotherapy
Cancer immunotherapies that target the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1):programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint pathway have ushered in the modern oncology era. Drugs that block PD-1 or PD-L1 facilitate endogenous antitumor immunity and, because of their broad activity spectrum, have been regarded as a common denominator for cancer therapy. Nevertheless, many advanced tumors demonstrate de novo or acquired treatment resistance, and ongoing research efforts are focused on improving patient outcomes. Using anti–PD-1 or anti–PD-L1 treatment against earlier stages of cancer is hypothesized to be one such ...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Topalian, S. L., Taube, J. M., Pardoll, D. M. Tags: Immunology, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only review Source Type: news

Would you refuse lifesaving cancer therapy if it meant losing your hair?
Research suggests 8 per cent, one in 12, refuse or delay potentially life-saving treatment due to the psychological distress of losing their hair due to chemotherapy for cancer treatment. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Biomarkers on PET, MRI show breast cancer risk
In a finding they described as "unexpected," researchers used PET and MRI to...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Can FDG-PET/MRI replace biopsy in breast cancer cases? TOF PET/MRI makes dose reduction viable for breast cancer PET tracers help guide breast cancer therapies Can dedicated breast PET identify suspicious lesions? FDG-PET/CT aids assessment of lower-stage breast cancer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 23, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

BeiGene lung cancer treatment meets main goal in late-stage study
BeiGene Ltd said on Tuesday its cancer therapy combination for treating lung cancer in previously untreated patients met the main goal in a late-stage study. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Immune cell health discovery could optimise cancer therapies
(University College London) Scientists at UCL have discovered how immune cells, essential for tackling life-threatening infections and cancers, are able to 'recycle' material within themselves in order to stay healthy and function, a breakthrough finding which could lead to more effective immunotherapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Ancient' cellular discovery key to new cancer therapies
(Flinders University) Australian researchers have uncovered a metabolic system which could lead to new strategies for therapeutic cancer treatment. A team at Flinders University and the St Vincent's Institute of Medical Research have found a link between a metabolic system in a yeast, and now mammals, which is critical for the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Light therapy for immune cells helps with side effects of cancer therapy
(University of Freiburg) A frequent side effect of cancer immunotherapies can probably be stopped by light activation of immune cells, as researchers at the Medical Center -- University of Freiburg have shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Discovery of new T-cell raises prospect of 'universal' cancer therapy
(Cardiff University) Researchers at Cardiff University have discovered a new type of killer T-cell that offers hope of a 'one-size-fits-all' cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA approves Blueprint's stomach cancer therapy priced at $32,000 per month
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Blueprint Medicines Corp's oral therapy to treat a rare form of cancer that affects the stomach and small intestine, the agency said on Thursday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Pulsed ultrasound shows promise as cancer therapy
A new form of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy shows promise for destroying...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Lantheus, CarThera partner on ultrasound cancer therapy Postsurgery ultrasound doesn't help fractured tibias Bioventus launches ultrasound system in Saudi Arabia Ultrasound may treat epileptic seizures (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 8, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Immune cell discovery opens door to new powerful cancer therapies
(University College London) Scientists at UCL have identified how a subset of immune cells are activated to kill cancerous cells, a finding in mice which could hold the key to new powerful therapies against cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Md. biotech outlines path for blood cancer drug, including in China
Rockville biotech GlycoMimetics Inc. has entered into a license agreement worth $189 million or more with a West Coast company. The deal gives cancer therapy biopharma Apollomics Inc. of Foster City, California exclusive rights to develop and commercialize GlycoMimetics' blood cancer drug in greater China, which encompasses mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau, the company said Monday. GlycoMimetics (NASDAQ: GLYC) w ill receive $9 million in cash upfront and around $180 million in milestone… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 6, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Md. biotech outlines path for blood cancer drug, including in China
Rockville biotech GlycoMimetics Inc. has entered into a license agreement worth $189 million or more with a West Coast company. The deal gives cancer therapy biopharma Apollomics Inc. of Foster City, California exclusive rights to develop and commercialize GlycoMimetics' blood cancer drug in greater China, which encompasses mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau, the company said Monday. GlycoMimetics (NASDAQ: GLYC) w ill receive $9 million in cash upfront and around $180 million in milestone… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 6, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

From cancer to stroke, the past ten years have seen astounding advances in medical science
Breakthrough cancer therapies, life-saving stroke procedures and 'rebooted' donor hearts - these are just a few of the medical advances over the past decade that are transforming our health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Obesity May Boost Effectiveness of a Lung Cancer Therapy
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - December 30, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Nursing, Oncology, Nutrition, News, Source Type: news

Obesity May Boost Effectiveness of a Lung Cancer Therapy
MONDAY, Dec. 30, 2019 -- Obesity is seldom a friend to health, but in one medical context it might give patients a slight advantage, new research suggests. Specifically, when Australian researchers looked at trials of atezolizumab, an immune... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 30, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Obesity May Boost Effectiveness of a Lung Cancer Therapy
Title: Obesity May Boost Effectiveness of a Lung Cancer TherapyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 12/30/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 12/30/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - December 30, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Common Heart Drugs May Prevent Cardiotoxicity During Cancer Treatment
The use of common heart drugs in conjunction with cancer therapy led to reduced cardiotoxicity in patients with breast and hematological cancers. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - December 30, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Kevin Wright Source Type: news

OBI Pharma Granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer for Its Antibody-Drug Conjugate (ADC) Targeted Cancer Therapy, OBI-999
First Orphan Drug Designation for OBI-999, a novel first-in-class Antibody-Drug Conjugate targeting Globo H, a glycolipid antigen found on multiple tumor types TAIPEI, Taiwan, Dec. 26, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- OBI Pharma, Inc.,... Biopharmaceuticals, Oncology, FDA OBI Pharma, Globo H, Pancreatic Cancer (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - December 26, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Maryland biotech seeks FDA approval for breast cancer treatment
MacroGenics Inc. (NASDAQ: MGNX) is closing in on the finish line to earn regulatory approval for its first product, a breast cancer therapy candidate. The Rockville biotech has submitted its Biologics License Application to the Food and Drug Administration for margetuximab, which targets “HER2” — a gene that can fuel cancer cell growth. FDA approval would give MacroGenics the final go-ahead to commercialize the product and treat patients w ith metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer along with… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 26, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

MacroGenics seeks FDA approval for breast cancer treatment
MacroGenics Inc. (NASDAQ: MGNX) is closing in on the finish line to earn regulatory approval for its first product, a breast cancer therapy candidate. The Rockville biotech has submitted its Biologics License Application to the Food and Drug Administration for margetuximab, which targets “HER2” — a gene that can fuel cancer cell growth. FDA approval would give MacroGenics the final go-ahead to commercialize the product and treat patients w ith metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer along with… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 24, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

MacroGenics seeks FDA approval for breast cancer treatment
MacroGenics Inc. (NASDAQ: MGNX) is closing in on the finish line to earn regulatory approval for its first product, a breast cancer therapy candidate. The Rockville biotech has submitted its Biologics License Application to the Food and Drug Administration for margetuximab, which targets “HER2” — a gene that can fuel cancer cell growth. FDA approval would give MacroGenics the final go-ahead to commercialize the product and treat patients w ith metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer along with… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 24, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Obesity May Up Cardiotoxicity Risk From Breast Cancer Therapy
Obesity independently associated with treatment - related cardiotoxicity in breast cancer patients (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - December 24, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Gynecology, Oncology, Pharmacy, Journal, Source Type: news

Obesity May Up Cardiotoxicity Risk From Breast Cancer Therapy
TUESDAY, Dec. 24, 2019 -- Obesity is associated with an increased risk for cardiotoxicity among patients receiving treatment for breast cancer, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in PLOS Medicine. Elis é G. Kaboré, from Inserm U1018... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 24, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How cells relieve DNA replication stress
(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists revealed that ATAD5 actively deals with replication stress, in addition to its known function to prevent such stressful situations. Though ATAD5 has been known as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability and suppressing tumorigenesis, it has been unclear whether the replication regulatory protein is also involved in the replication stress response. " We have identified the fundamental mechanism of replication stress control, which is a major cause of cancer. Hopefully our work will contribute to the development of cancer therapy, " explains director Myung. (...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Zr-89 immuno-PET could help predict cancer therapy outcomes
Researchers are one step closer to proving the worth of zirconium-89 (Zr-89)...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: ImaginAb touts research on T-cell PET imaging agent Immuno-PET could aid patients with inflammatory diseases PET tracer may aid diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease Immuno-PET tracer offers hope for early cancer treatment (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 18, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Cancer therapy may be aided by induced macropinocytosis, a rare form of cell death
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) In laboratory experiments, a metabolic inhibitor was able to kill a variety of human cancer cells of the skin, breast, lung, cervix and soft tissues through a non-apoptotic route -- catastrophic macropinocytosis. In mouse xenograft studies, the inhibitor acted synergistically with a common chemotherapy drug, cyclophosphamide, to reduce tumor growth. Thus macropinocytosis, a rarely described form of cell death, may aid in the treatment of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Victory: Novartis withdraws an abusive patent for an over-priced cancer medication
On 3 July 2019, Doctors of the World and Public Eye, represented by Lionel Vial, filed a patent opposition at the European Patent Office against a patent covering Kymriah®. Kymriah® is a gene cancer therapy from Novartis, for which the French Social Security is billed €320,000 per patient. The aim was to denounce an abusive patent that aimed to strengthen a monopoly, allowing an exorbitant price to be imposed. At the end of November 2019, Novartis announced that it was withdrawing this patent and asked for it to be revoked. Novartis withdraws one of the patent covering Kymriah®, a victory achieved by&nbs...
Source: Doctors of the World News - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Finding a non-invasive way to predict effectiveness of cancer therapy
(Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) Researchers have taken a critical step toward developing a non-invasive nuclear medicine technique that can predict the effectiveness of therapy for cancerous tumors, allowing for personalized, precision treatment. The study is featured in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Virus multiplication in 3D
(University of W ü rzburg) Vaccinia viruses serve as a vaccine against human smallpox and as the basis of new cancer therapies. Two studies now provide fascinating insights into their unusual propagation strategy at the atomic level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flipping the script on novel cancer therapy leads to insights into lupus
Impaired function of the immune system inhibitor PD-1H may be one cause of the autoimmune disease lupus, an insight that offers a new approach for treatment. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - December 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news