Merck's Keytruda wins FDA approval as combination therapy for kidney cancer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Merck& Co Inc's cancer therapy, Keytruda, as part of a combination therapy for previously untreated patients with the most common type of kidney cancer, the company said on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT for prostate wins Australian favor
When a prostate cancer staging exam is needed, clinicians at one Australian...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI improves prostate cancer detection Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI benefits prostate cancer patients Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI advances prostate cancer detection Gallium-labeled PET tracer could advance cancer detection SNMMI: Early prostate cancer therapy extends lives (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Molecular target UNC45A is essential for cancer but not normal cell proliferation
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Identifying a protein that plays a key role in cancer cell growth is a first step toward the development of a targeted cancer therapy. It is especially promising when this protein is dispensable for the growth of normal cells. Their discovery that UNC45A fits these criteria has researchers, led by Dr. Ahmed Chadli, of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, excited about potential new cancer therapeutic strategies involving the inhibition of UNC45A. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genetic Crosstalk in Cancer Therapy-Induced Cardiomyopathy Genetic Crosstalk in Cancer Therapy-Induced Cardiomyopathy
A genetic study links cancer-therapy-induced and dilated cardiomyopathies and signals how identification of genetic risk factors may help change management of those at risk.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Genetic Crosstalk in Cancer-Therapy-Induced Cardiomyopathy Genetic Crosstalk in Cancer-Therapy-Induced Cardiomyopathy
A genetic study links cancer-therapy-induced and dilated cardiomyopathies and signals how identification of genetic risk factors may help change management of those at risk.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - April 18, 2019 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Ga-68 PSMA-PET/CT for prostate wins Australian favor
When a prostate cancer staging exam is needed, clinicians at one Australian...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI improves prostate cancer detection Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI benefits prostate cancer patients Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI advances prostate cancer detection Gallium-labeled PET tracer could advance cancer detection SNMMI: Early prostate cancer therapy extends lives (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 17, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Key protein a possible new target in the treatment of pancreatic cancer
(Stand Up To Cancer) Pancreatic Cancer Collective-funded research (Lustgarten Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer) from Dr. Tony Hunter (Salk Institute) and the SU2C-CRUK-Lustgarten Pancreatic Cancer Dream Team has found the presence of a key protein (Leukemia Inhibitory Factor or LIF) in PDAC microenvironment may be an exploitable treatment target to slow tumor progression or metastasis and may lead to the development of new targeted strategies for pancreatic cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers pinpoint tumor-related protein, slow progression of cancers
(University of Nebraska-Lincoln) A new study in Nature has identified a potential strategy for treating multiple forms of cancerous tumors: targeting a protein that maliciously rewires immune cells and impedes cancer therapies. The researchers showed that inhibiting the protein with an existing compound helped slow or even reject tumors stemming from four cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New cancer therapies offer great hope, but there can be suprising complications
An oncologist says the pace of change in treatment has been staggering, but for many patients, chemo is still right. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - April 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ravi Parikh Source Type: news

New cancer therapies offer great hope, but there can be surprising complications
An oncologist says the pace of change in treatment has been staggering, but for many patients, chemo is still right. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - April 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ravi Parikh Source Type: news

A new role for genetics in cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School finds that genetics may be at play and elucidates rare genetic variants which may influence risk for developing cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Varian leads $54m Series C for HistoSonics
HistoSonics said today that it closed a $54 million Series C round led by Varian Medical (NYSE:VAR) that included a contribution from Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ). The Ann Arbor, Mich.-based company, which is developing an image-guided, robotically assisted platform using non-invasive and non-thermal technologies, said Lumira Ventures, Venture Investors, the State of Wisconsin Investment Board and existing backers also participated – including robot-assisted surgery pioneer Dr. Fred Moll. HistoSonics said it plans to use the proceeds to complete “key regulatory and commercial milestones” and expa...
Source: Mass Device - April 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Featured Funding Roundup Robotics Wall Street Beat HistoSonics Inc. johnsonandjohnson Varian Medical Systems Source Type: news

Scientists compared ways of drug delivery to malignant tumors
(Sechenov University) A team of biologists from Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University and Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod) analyzed available methods of targeted drug delivery to malignant tumors. Individual approaches to cancer therapy limit the influence of drugs on healthy tissues and reduce side effects. The results of the study were published in the Cancers journal. The research was supported by a grant issued by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patients resistant to breast cancer therapy show epigenetic differences
(Experimental Biology) According to a new study, breast cancer patients who don't respond to targeted therapy have different patterns of epigenetic modifications than patients who do respond. Epigenetic modifications change gene expression without altering the DNA's genetic code. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Pancreatic Cancer Therapies Extending Lives
New chemotherapy regimens have given people with inoperable pancreatic cancer a fighting chance when delivered appropriately in conjunction with radiation therapy and surgery, according to a new study. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Not'Either/Or' but Both: Cancer Therapy and Hospice Care Not'Either/Or' but Both: Cancer Therapy and Hospice Care
Allowing hospice care without restricting active cancer treatment was associated with less aggressive medical interventions and significantly lower medical costs.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Researchers target metastasis in fight against cancer
An experimental combination drug therapy attacking the DNA integrity of cancer cells is showing promise for a possible new cancer therapy in the future. Scientists at the University of Alberta used two drugs together to enhance DNA damage to human breast cancer cells in mice and reduce their capacity to repair themselves. By doing so, the researchers were able to dramatically shrink tumours and prevent metastasis in the mice. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 28, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Researchers target metastasis in fight against cancer
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) An experimental combination drug therapy attacking the DNA integrity of cancer cells is showing promise for a possible new cancer therapy in the future.Scientists at the University of Alberta used two drugs together to enhance DNA damage to human breast cancer cells in mice and reduce their capacity to repair themselves. By doing so, the researchers were able to dramatically shrink tumours and prevent metastasis in the mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pacific Mesothelioma Center Moves Closer to Treatment Breakthrough
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Robert Cameron and the Pacific Mesothelioma Center moved closer to a major treatment advance by obtaining U.S. patent approval for their novel mesenchymal stem cell research program. The patent approval in February makes the research program more attractive to potential investors who could accelerate development and change the way malignant mesothelioma is treated. “This is a big deal in the developmental path for MSC [mesenchymal stem cell] therapy,” Patent Adviser Dr. Walid Sabbagh told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “The patent is a pathway to really help these cancer pat...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 25, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Scientists home in on microRNA processing for novel cancer therapies
(Virginia Commonwealth University) More than a decade of research on the mda-7/IL-24 gene has shown that it helps to suppress a majority of cancer types, and now scientists are focusing on how the gene drives this process by influencing microRNAs. Published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the findings could potentially have implications beyond cancer for a variety of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases caused by the same microRNA-driven processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NCCN: Costly Innovative Cancer Therapies Pose New Challenges —Financial and Otherwise
Experts shared the challenges they've encountered in integrating novel treatments such as CAR T-cell therapy into practice at the 2019 NCCN Annual Conference. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

Giving cancer patients a voice
Far too often, cancer patients and their doctors aren ’t aware of all the side effects that accompany new cancer therapies. Some of these new medications might cause fatigue, muscle aches, general pain and discomfort. A lack of information can lead to patients being unprepared to manage their symptoms or even cause some to delay or stop treatment all together. Historically, many clinical trials did not have a method to analyze or widely report the patient’s experience while undergoing a therapy.  Researchers at UCLA and across the country are trying to change that. To help people in making better-informed ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Intervention Helps Prostate Cancer Patients Make Better Choices
(MedPage Today) -- Patient preference assessment tool aligns with pros and cons of prostate cancer therapies (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - March 19, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Stress hormones promote breast cancer metastasis
(University of Basel) Scientists from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel have deciphered the molecular mechanisms linking breast cancer metastasis with increased stress hormones. In addition, they found that synthetic derivatives of stress hormones, which are frequently used as anti-inflammatory in cancer therapy, decrease the efficacy of chemotherapy. These results come from patient-derived models of breast cancer in mice and may have implications for the treatment of patients with breast cancer, as reported in Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Targeting Blood-Clotting Pathway Improves Mesothelioma Treatment
A team of researchers at the Cancer and Vascular Biology Research Center in Haifa, Israel, and the Langone Medical Center in New York collaborated on research of a common blood-clotting pathway. Targeting this pathway may offer a unique avenue for improving existing mesothelioma treatments. Researchers said the standard first-line chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma — a combination of Alimta (pemetrexed) and cisplatin — offers little benefit to most mesothelioma patients. “This treatment regimen confers a median progression-free survival of 5.7 months,” according to the study published ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 5, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Source Type: news

'Outlier' trust addresses cancer service concerns
A trust has made changes to its lung cancer service after concerns patients were much less likely to access chemotherapy and other anti-cancer therapies than elsewhere in the country. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - March 5, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Rakuten Aspyrian Announces Name Change to Rakuten Medical
SAN MATEO, Calif., March 1, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Rakuten Aspyrian, a biotechnology company developing precision-targeted cancer therapies based on its proprietary Photoimmunotherapy platform, today announced that it has change... Biopharmaceuticals, Oncology Rakuten Medical, Rakuten Aspyrian, Photoimmunotherapy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 1, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI improves prostate cancer detection
VIENNA - PET/MRI with the radiopharmaceutical gallium-68 (Ga-68) prostate-specific...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI benefits prostate cancer patients Ga-68 PSMA-11 PET/MRI advances prostate cancer detection Gallium-labeled PET tracer could advance cancer detection SNMMI letter urges FDA to ease shortage of gallium-68 SNMMI: Early prostate cancer therapy extends lives (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

A look inside the Beaverton lab developing cures for childhood cancers
When I first visited the Children's Cancer Therapy Development Institute, I had a hard time finding the place. It's located along a fairly nondescript stretch of Beaverdam Road in Beaverton, adjacent to a smoke shop. The colorful door is the first clue that maybe this place is special. In fact, the institute occupies a former paint factory that Nike later turned into a creative space. Now there's million s of dollars worth of lab equipment inside, plus desks and mouse habitats fashioned by institute… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 28, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Inovio spinoff developing patient-specific cancer therapies raises $10.5M
Geneos Therapeutics, a Montgomery County cancer immunotherapy startup, has raised $10.5 million in a private stock sale according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The company was spun off from publicly traded Inovio Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: INO), which like Geneos is based in Plymouth Meeting. Niranjan Y. Sardesai has stepped down from his post as Inovio’s chief operating officer, to serve full time as CEO of Geneos. Geneos’s series A financing was led by Santé… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 28, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

A Cancer Patient ’s Radioactive Remains Are Raising Fears of Contamination
About half of all Americans are cremated when they die. So when a 69-year-old man was cremated in Arizona in 2017, it didn’t seem out of the ordinary — until doctors learned that his body may have put others at risk of radiation exposure. In 2017, the man was admitted to a hospital for low blood pressure treatment, according to a new research letter published in JAMA. But unbeknownst to his doctors, the man had been treated at the Mayo Clinic Arizona just the day before, where he had been injected with lutetium 177, a radiopharmaceutical used to combat his pancreatic cancer. When the man died two days after bei...
Source: TIME: Health - February 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine Source Type: news

The skeletal impact of cancer therapies
This article reviews currently used cancer therapies, the impact of these therapies on the skeleton, and available data for limiting bone loss and fractures in cancer patients treated with these therapies. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists devise strategies to counteract T cell exhaustion in CAR T cancer therapies
(La Jolla Institute for Immunology) CAR T-cell therapies have saved lives in patients with blood cancers, but there has been a downside: T cells that enter solid tumors can stop working due to a phenomenon called T cell exhaustion.Now scientists at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology (LJI) have found a way of counteracting T cell exhaustion and making CAR T cell therapies more effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 27, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Lab-grown mini tumors could help identify personalized treatments for people with rare cancers
UCLA scientists have developed a new method to quickly screen hundreds of drugs in order to identify treatments that can target specific tumors.The approach could help scientists understand how a person ’s tumor would respond to a certain drug or drug combination, and it could help guide treatment decisions for people with rare and hard-to-treat cancers. Apaper detailing the new technique was published in Communications Biology.“We always focus on how we need new and better drugs to treat cancer,” said Alice Soragni, the senior author of the study and a scientist at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Can...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Patients' HIV status should not impact their cancer care
(Wiley) New articles published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, note that there is no medical justification to deny optimal cancer therapy to individuals with HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 25, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The World & #039;s Most Innovative Medtech Companies
Innovation is medtech's middle name, so it's always a nice surprise to see companies in the industry honored for being innovative. Fast Company released a list Wednesday recognizing 10 such companies in the biotech sector. Below, we highlight the companies on the list that are developing medical devices or diagnostics (excluding companies that are more on the pharma and biotech side of the life sciences industry). Foundation Medicine Foundation Medicine develops genomic profiling assays to pair cancer patients with relevant treatments and clinical trials. The company was ranked first among the Top 1...
Source: MDDI - February 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

PCPs Discuss Cancer Therapy With Patients, Despite'Gaps'PCPs Discuss Cancer Therapy With Patients, Despite'Gaps '
About one third of primary care providers discussed breast cancer treatment decisions with their patients, a new survey shows -- but it's not really their job.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Why Do Only Eight Percent Of Cancer Patients In The U.S. Participate In Clinical Trials?
Clinical trials for cancer patients give the opportunity for people to try the newest cancer therapies and receive exceptional care. So why do only 8% of cancer patients enroll in one? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 19, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Victoria Forster, Contributor Source Type: news

Gastric Acid Suppression & Oral Cancer Therapy Should Not Mix Gastric Acid Suppression & Oral Cancer Therapy Should Not Mix
Gastric acid suppressants may reduce absorption of oral cancer drugs, as shown in a study with pazopanib for sarcoma in which the interaction led to worse outcomes. Can this be practice changing?Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Feb. 18, 2019
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Immunotherapies Prove Their Mettle Against Kidney Cancer Adding immunotherapy to targeted cancer therapy boosted survival for kidney cancer... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 19, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Shorter radiotherapy works for prostate cancer treatment
A shorter radiotherapy protocol for treating prostate cancer is comparable...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: ASTRO: AI's rad therapy future is in predicting outcomes ASTRO: SBRT works well for less risky prostate cancer ASTRO releases new prostate radiation therapy guideline SNMMI: Early prostate cancer therapy extends lives Hypofractionated RT works for prostate cancer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Yoga as breast cancer therapy: The benefits are not ALL psychological – physical benefits include reduction in swelling around the lymph nodes
(Natural News) In case you still weren’t sure about whether or not cancer is one of the worst things that can ever happen to anyone, you only need to look at what happens with most female cancer patients after they have undergone treatment. In the case of breast cancer patients, it’s possible to suffer from... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. Medicare plans to track CAR-T cancer therapy outcomes
The U.S. Centers for Medicare& Medicaid Services (CMS) on Friday proposed coverage of expensive CAR-T cell therapies at cancer centers that meet criteria including an approved registry of patient results or clinical study to monitor patients for at least two years after treatment. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

U.S. proposes Medicare coverage for CAR-T cancer therapies
The U.S. Centers for Medicare& Medicaid Services (CMS) on Friday proposed Medicare coverage of approved CAR-T cell therapies that use the patient's immune system to fight cancer. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Sorting Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs)
Featuring Our Colorectal CAFSCAFs play a central role in the Tumor Microenvironment (TME). The TME has been identified as one of the driving factors of tumor progression and invasion. Inside this microenvironment, CAFs, a type of perpetually activated fibroblasts, have been implicated to have a strong tumor modulating effect and play a key role in areas such as drug resistance.This makes CAFs a target for cancer therapies. The challenge is the TME is heterogeneous making it a challenge to derive homogeneously relevant populations for basic research and drug discovery. This new study uses ourColorectal CAFs to identify...
Source: Neuromics - February 14, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Tags: CAFs Cancer Associated Fibroblasts CD90 colorectal CAFs Colorectal Cancer Flow cytometry PDGF Source Type: news

Bioluminescent deep-sea creatures illuminate the effectiveness of new cancer therapies
(University of Southern California - Health Sciences) A new tool developed by scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of USC can improve development and effectiveness of leading-edge cancer therapies derived from patients' immune systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Imaging Method Measures Efficacy of Breast Cancer Therapy
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health have discovered a new way to measure the efficacy or failure of hormone therapy for breast cancer patients. A study detailing the findings was published in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The findings showed that positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-fluorofuranylnorprogesterone (18F-FFNP) has been found to successfully measure changes in progesterone receptor (PR) levels resulting from a short-course estrogen treatment, also known as an estradiol challenge. Estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer is...
Source: MDDI - February 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

PET imaging agent may allow early measurement of efficacy of breast cancer therapy
(Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) Physicians may soon have a new way to measure the efficacy of hormone therapy for breast cancer patients, according to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer therapy rays that blast away heel pain which affects an estimated SIX MILLION Britons  
Research suggests the ten-minute targeted treatment soothes discomfort in 80 per cent of patients with plantar fasciitis, which is caused by an inflamed ligament in the foot. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer therapy rays that blast away heel pain which affects an estimated SIX MILLION Britons 
Research suggests the ten-minute targeted treatment soothes discomfort in 80 per cent of patients with plantar fasciitis, which is caused by an inflamed ligament in the foot. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news