Two weeks to bowel cancer?

There’s no doubt antibiotics have saved a lot of lives. But because they’ve been overprescribed for so many years we’ve ended up with a slew of health problems. For one thing, overuse of antibiotics wreaks havoc on your microbiome… That’s your body’s ecosystem. Your microbiome has 100 trillion or so bacteria, viruses and fungi. It affects just about every organ and body system. Some of these gut bugs cause disease and infection. But other good bacteria are called “probiotics.” They boost your immune system. They help you digest your food and turn it into vitamins. But in your gut, antibiotics kill off good bacteria along with the bad. When that happens, your immune system gets weak. Your risk of obesity and heart disease goes up. So do rates of allergies, asthma, autism and autoimmune diseases.1 And now shocking new research says antibiotics can even spike your risk of bowel cancer. And it can happen in just two weeks! A study in the journal Gut looked at data from 16,000 women over 60 years old. They were part of the famous Nurses Health Study.2  Results showed that taking antibiotics increased their risk of getting adenomas or polyps. These are growths on the lining of the bowel that can become cancerous. Women who took antibiotics in their 20s and 30s for as little as 15 days to two months increased their risk by up to 36%. It was worse for those who took these drugs in their 40s and 50s for longer periods of time....
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Source Type: news

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Authors: Charytoniuk T, Małyszko M, Bączek J, Fiedorczyk P, Siedlaczek K, Małyszko J Abstract Nephrectomy, which constitutes a gold-standard procedure for the treatment of renal-cell carcinoma (RCC), has been widely discussed in the past decade as a significant risk factor of the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). RCC is the third most common genitourinary cancer in the United States, with an estimated more than 65,000 new cases and 14,970 deaths. The aim of this review was to precisely and comprehensively summarize the status of current knowledge in chronic kidney disease risk factors after nephrectom...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
Authors: Russo Picasso MF, Vicens J, Giuliani C, Jaén ADV, Cabezón C, Figari M, Gómez Saldaño AM, Figar S Abstract Background: Two hypotheses attempt to explain the increase of thyroid cancer (TC) incidence: overdetection by excessive diagnostic scrutiny and a true increase in new cases brought about by environmental factors. Changes in the mechanism of detection and the risk of incidentally diagnosed TC could result in an increase of TC incidence. Methods: Retrospective cohort study. We identified incident cases of TC from the pathological reports of patients in a HMO and review of ...
Source: Journal of Cancer Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: J Cancer Epidemiol Source Type: research
Contributors : Ting La ; Xu D ZhangSeries Type : Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Mus musculusTo investigate miRNAs in quiescent cancer cell
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencing Mus musculus Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- Also, breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy?
Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN - Category: OBGYN Source Type: news
(Reuters Health) - People with diabetes are more likely to develop certain cancers than those without the condition, and a new analysis suggests that the increased risk is greater for women than for men.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Conclusions: Higher hs-CRP as a marker of low-grade inflammation was detected in prepubertal children exposed to maternal GDM, but no differences were seen in height, weight, BMI, or markers of glucose and lipid metabolism compared to control children. This finding may reflect an ongoing process of metabolic changes in children born after a GDM pregnancy.Horm Res Paediatr
Source: Hormone Research in Paediatrics - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 August 2018Source: SteroidsAuthor(s): Julius Fink, Masahito Matsumoto, Yoshifumi TamuraAbstractSedentary lifestyle and over-nutrition are the main causes of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the same causes are major triggers of hypogonadism. Many T2D patients show low testosterone levels while hypogonadal men seem to be prone to become diabetic. Testosterone plays a major role in the regulation of muscle mass, adipose tissue, inflammation and insulin sensitivity and is therefore indirectly regulating several metabolic pathways, while T2D is commonly triggered by insulin resi...
Source: Steroids - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
(Reuters Health) - Cancer patients who use alternative, non-medical therapies may be more likely to forgo recommended medical treatments like chemotherapy and radiation, and be more likely to die as a result, a U.S. study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
In conclusion, it remains unclear whether AD is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome and its components. However, data indicate that central obesity is associated with AD and that the association is stronger for women than men.Dermatology
Source: Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
The herbicide gyphosate is the world ’ s most popular weedkiller. There is widespread disagreement among lawyers, researchers and regulators over any potential links to cancer.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Defoliants and Herbicides Pesticides Environmental Working Group Monsanto Company glyphosate General Mills Inc Quaker Oats Co Source Type: news
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