Pseudopolyps Not Associated With Greater Colorectal Cancer Risk Pseudopolyps Not Associated With Greater Colorectal Cancer Risk
Post-inflammatory polyps (PIPs) are not associated with colorectal neoplasia (CRN) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to new findings.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Post-Inflammatory Polyps Not Linked to Colorectal Neoplasia
FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 -- For patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), post-inflammatory polyps (PIPs) are associated with greater severity and extent of colon inflammation and higher rates of colectomy, but not with development of colorectal... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: When can you stop colon cancer screening?
Colon cancer screening: At what age can you stop? People older than 75 who have been getting regular colon cancer screening since age 50 and who have had consistently negative screenings ? no polyps or colon cancer, and who are not at an increased risk of colon cancer because of family history, may not need [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Colorectal Cancer Screening Pill to Be in US Pilot Study
Check-Cap is getting one step closer to having its capsule-based screening method for colorectal cancer on the U.S. market. The Isfiya, Israel-based company has received FDA conditional approval for an IDE to initiate a pilot study of the C-Scan capsule. FDA’s conditional approval of the IDE requires Check-Cap to provide additional information to the agency and the company may begin enrolling patients immediately upon approval by the study site's Institutional Review Board (IRB). The trial will consist of up to 45 patients and it will be a single-arm study. Patients who are enrolled will be those conside...
Source: MDDI - December 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Implants Source Type: news

Check-Cap wins conditional IDE approval for C-Scan pilot study
Check-Cap (NSDQ:CHEK) said today it won conditional approval from the FDA for its investigational device exemption application to launch a pilot study of its C-Scan system. The Israel-based company’s C-Scan system is designed as an alternative to standard colon cancer screening methods. The system uses an ingestible, ultra-low dose X-ray capsule and a wireless tracking system to return structural information on the lumen of the colon to create 2D and 3D maps. The conditional approval will require Check-Cap to provide additional information to the FDA, but will allow the company to being enrolling patients immedi...
Source: Mass Device - December 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Check-Cap Source Type: news

Wendy Atkin obituary
Epidemiologist whose research led to a breakthrough in bowel cancer screening programmes worldwide“Breakthrough” is an overused word when applied to medical advances. But in the case of the2010 trial of a new screening test for bowel cancer led by Wendy Atkin, professor of gastrointestinal epidemiology atImperial College London, who has died of acute myeloid leukaemia aged 71, it is fully deserved. Its impact will be felt by millions. The trial was the first in the world to show that bowel cancer – the second biggest cancer killer in the UK – could be prevented with a simple, five-minute test.The ex...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ara Darzi Tags: Cancer research Health Medical research Science Source Type: news

Many Patients With Polyps Delay Follow-up Colonoscopy: Study
MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 -- Many people found to have colon polyps (adenomas) that can lead to cancer don't have follow-up colonoscopies at recommended times, a new study finds. Patients who have certain types of adenomas, or large or numerous ones,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Many Patients With Polyps Delay Follow-up Colonoscopy: Study
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - November 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Treating a rare genetic disorder that causes colon cancer in children
(University of Houston) A University of Houston pharmaceutical scientist is developing a new drug that recycles through the colon to treat children suffering with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, a rare genetic disorder characterized by hundreds -- if not thousands -- of colorectal polyps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence could help doctors identify hard-to-spot colon polyps
Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - November 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How AI could help doctors identify hard-to-spot colon polyps
"Colon cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. but colonoscopies have been found to reduce the risk of death from the disease by 70 percent or more by detecting cancer early. But doctors don ’t always find every polyp. As a gastroenterologist, CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook knows all too well that colon polyps can be tough to spot. But a new high-tech tool may be able to help doctors spot them. " (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - November 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Precision medicine is not enough: Moving towards precision surveillance
(Regenstrief Institute) The interval at which an individual undergoes a repeat colonoscopy because of previous pre-cancerous polyps -- a practice known as 'surveillance' -- should be tailored to the individual and not simply be determined by the results of prior colonoscopies, according to Regenstrief Institute research scientist Thomas Imperiale, M.D. In a American Journal of Gastroenterology editorial he calls for 'precision surveillance,' a phrase he has coined to echo the personalized, targeted focus of precision medicine and application of these concepts to colon cancer screening and surveillance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Higher CRC Risks in Black Americans Not Related to Biology Higher CRC Risks in Black Americans Not Related to Biology
The overall prevalence of advanced, precancerous polyps does not differ with race, but uniform screening guidelines could still leave many at increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC).Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Racial differences in colorectal cancer incidence not due to biology
(Regenstrief Institute) A systematic review and meta-analysis from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine has found that, in spite of the higher incidence and death rate of colorectal cancer in blacks, no difference exists in the overall prevalence of advanced, precancerous polyps between average-risk blacks and whites who underwent a screening colonoscopy. These findings suggest that the age at which to begin screening need not differ based on race, provided all other factors -- access to screening, in particular -- are similar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AI colonoscopies may produce smarter results, doctors say
New test uses artificial intelligence to spot polyps, where all colorectal cancers begin. Doctors hope the technology will help save lives. CBS News' Chris Martinez reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AI colonoscopies may produce smarter results, save lives, doctors say
New test uses artificial intelligence to spot polyps, where all colorectal cancers begin. CBS News' Chris Martinez reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors Using Artificial Intelligence To Make Colonoscopies More Accurate
BOSTON (CBS) – Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States and now doctors in California are using artificial intelligence to make colonoscopies more accurate and help save lives. AI colonoscopies would not replace routine colonoscopies, which most people need to get every 10 years starting at age 45 or 50 depending on whom you ask, but this new technology can help doctors identify polyps that they might otherwise miss. Polyps are growths that can turn into cancer but if removed early can prevent cancer from growing. The artificial intelligence uses an algorithm, analyzing 98 images ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen AI colonoscopy Cancer Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Check-Cap touts interim post-CE Mark C-Scan study results
Check-Cap (NSDQ:CHEK) today released interim results from the post-CE Mark approval study of its C-Scan system version 3, touting the device’s ability to detect polyps in un-prepped colons. The Israel-based company’s C-Scan system is designed as an alternative to standard colon cancer screening methods. The system uses an ingestible, ultra-low dose X-ray capsule and a wireless tracking system to return structural information on the lumen of the colon to create 2D and 3D maps. The study aimed to assess the safety and clinical performance of the C-Scan system version 3 in detecting polyps, Check-cap said. Da...
Source: Mass Device - September 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Diagnostics Oncology Check-Cap Source Type: news

Targeting Inflammation Slows STK11 Mutation-Driven Polyp Growth
A study shows that LKB1 deficiency in T cells increases gastrointestinal polyposis development. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

AI Improves Colonoscopy Diagnostics in Prospective Trial AI Improves Colonoscopy Diagnostics in Prospective Trial
Artificial intelligence performs extremely well in the diagnosis of diminutive nonneoplastic polyps in the distal colon, allowing endoscopists to safely diagnose them and leave them alone.Medscape Medical Ethics (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

LKB1 deficiency in T cells promotes the development of gastrointestinal polyposis
Germline mutations in STK11, which encodes the tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), promote Peutz–Jeghers syndrome (PJS), a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by the development of gastrointestinal (GI) polyps. Here, we report that heterozygous deletion of Stk11 in T cells (LThet mice) is sufficient to promote GI polyposis. Polyps from LThet mice, Stk11+/– mice, and human PJS patients display hallmarks of chronic inflammation, marked by inflammatory immune-cell infiltration, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation, and increased expression of inflammatory factors asso...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Poffenberger, M. C., Metcalfe-Roach, A., Aguilar, E., Chen, J., Hsu, B. E., Wong, A. H., Johnson, R. M., Flynn, B., Samborska, B., Ma, E. H., Gravel, S.- P., Tonelli, L., Devorkin, L., Kim, P., Hall, A., Izreig, S., Loginicheva, E., Beauchemin, N., Siegel Tags: Immunology, Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about colon polyps
Colon polyps are common, especially in those over 50 years of age. Most colon polyps are harmless, though some can become cancerous. A doctor can diagnose colon polyps with a series of exams. Learn how they treat colon polyps and how to prevent them. Plus, use a 3-D body map to get a better picture of colon polyps. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

A blood test for leukemia? Genetic changes in the blood can be spotted five years before
The findings by British and Canadian scientists could be a game-changer for the hard-to-treat cancer, allowing doctors to monitor patients' risks in the same way that polyps can be red flags for colon cancers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Colon cancer: Scientists find new predisposition mechanism
New research finds a novel mechanism that genetically predisposes some people to the development of colon polyps and potentially cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

High BMI, Male Gender Predict Colon Polyps in Younger Patients (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Chronic kidney disease also a risk factor, study finds (Source: MedPage Today Nephrology)
Source: MedPage Today Nephrology - June 7, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

PENTAX Medical Announces U.S. Deal To Distribute Third Eye(R) Panoramic(TM) Imaging System For Colon Cancer Screening
Provides 'Panoramic' View to Detect Potentially Cancerous Polyps Standard Colonoscopes May Not See MONTVALE, N.J., May 31, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- PENTAX Medical Company, a healthcare industry leader in diagnostic and therapeu... Devices, Gastroenterology, Oncology, Distribution PENTAX Medical, Avantis Medical Systems, Third Eye, colonoscopy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 31, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Lumendi wins FDA nod for DiLumen IS endoscopic scissors
Lumendi said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its DiLumen IS endolumenal interventional scissors, now indicated for cutting, dissecting and cauterizing tissue within the digestive tract during endoscopic procedures. The Westport, Conn.-based company touted the sterile, single-use disposable, monopolar electrosurgical device as the fourth it’s developed, and said that it and its recently cleared DiLumen CT are intended to help improve access and therapy in the colon and reduce the need for surgical interventions. The recently cleared C2  is a second-gen Endolumenal interventional platform designed to en...
Source: Mass Device - May 29, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Endoscopic / Arthroscopic Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Lumendi Source Type: news

Bringing AI to Colorectal Cancer Screening
Freenome is looking to build a diagnostic test that can learn from its mistakes. The South San Francisco, CA- based company is using artificial intelligence to improve colorectal cancer screening. To do this, Freenome has initiated AI-EMERGE, a clinical study for the AI-Genomics blood test, which will collect samples from up to 3,000 patients in the U.S. and Canada. Freenome CEO, Gabe Otte said the infusion of AI is a natural step in the evolution of diagnostics that should have been taken years ago. “If you look at the traditional molecular diagnostic tests that are out there – the PSA tests for example &ndash...
Source: MDDI - May 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Blue dye tablet helps identify polyps during colonoscopy
(Digestive Disease Week) Ingestion of a blue dye tablet during bowel prep for colonoscopy could be a significant advance in the early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). When used in conjunction with colonoscopy, the blue dye increased adenoma detection rate (ADR) by nearly 9 percent, according to a study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week ® (DDW) 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Colon Polyp Type May Be Key to Cancer Risk
Their study of almost 16,000 patients who underwent colonoscopy found that the long-term risk for colon cancer was 2.5 times greater for those with advanced polyps, compared to people without such growths. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Colon Polyp Type May Be Key to Cancer Risk
Title: Colon Polyp Type May Be Key to Cancer RiskCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/15/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/16/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - May 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Colon Polyp Type May Be Key to Cancer Risk
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - May 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Colon Polyp Type May Be Key to Cancer Risk
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - May 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gastroenterology, Oncology, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Colon Polyp Type May Be Key to Cancer Risk
TUESDAY, May 15, 2018 -- The type of colon polyp that's spotted during a colonoscopy may help predict the likelihood of colon cancer, new research shows. These polyps -- also called adenomas -- can be labeled advanced or non-advanced, explained... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

CRC Polyps May Allow for Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Premalignant Lesions
Colorectal carcinomas in LS patients appear in background of mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency, show a unique immune profile, and response to immunotherapy. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - May 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: Colorectal Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer News Source Type: news

Check-Cap closes $20m Series C
Check-Cap (NSDQ:CHEK) said yesterday it closed an offering of Series C shares and warrants, raising approximately $20.2 million in total. In the offering, the Isfiya, Israel-based company floated approximately 3.2 million units for $5.50 per unit, with each unit in the offering consisting of a single ordinary share or ordinary share equivalent and a Series C warrant to purchase one ordinary share. The offering also included an underwriter’s option for an additional 478,407 shares and Series C warrants to purchase up to 478,407 shares, which was exercised in full, Check-Cap said. Proceeds from the round are slate...
Source: Mass Device - May 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Funding Roundup Wall Street Beat Check-Cap Source Type: news

Olympus inks co-development deal with Ai4gi for AI-supported colonoscopy solution
Olympus (TYO:7733) said today it inked a co-development deal with artificial intelligence joint venture Ai4gi which will give Olympus exclusive rights to offer Ai4gi’s AI solution designed for clinical decision support during colonoscopy screening and surveillance procedures. Ai4gi is a joint venture between Imagia and Satis Operations, Tokyo-based Olympus said. The company added that the co-development agreement is intended to improve clinical outcomes during colonoscopy procedures, reduce costs and improve quality of life for patients. “Ai4gi’s solutions to early colon cancer recognition are going ...
Source: Mass Device - May 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Software / IT ai4gi Olympus Source Type: news

Precancerous colon polyps in patients with Lynch syndrome exhibit immune activation
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Colon polyps from patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that raises colorectal cancer risk, display immune system activation well before cancer development, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The preclinical research challenges traditional models of cancer immune activation and suggests immunotherapy may be useful for colorectal cancer prevention in certain high-risk groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Identifying characteristics of colon polyps most likely to progress to cancer
Researchers at Mayo Clinic are closer to answering the question, why does one colon polyp transform to cancer while another seemingly identical polyp does not? A colon polyp is a small clump of cells that forms on the lining of the colon. While most colon polyps are harmless some can develop into colon cancer, which [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - March 31, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Too much low-grade calcium supplementation linked to increased risk of colon polyps
(Natural News) When scientists set out to find out whether calcium supplements could help reduce the chances of a person developing colon polyps, they were very surprised when they discovered the opposite effect. Their findings are a perfect example of why it’s important to use caution when it comes to using certain supplements. Polyps are... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dietary fibre for the prevention of recurrent colorectal adenomas and carcinomas
This Cochrane Review has led to a practice changing update on DynaMed Plus. It concludes that dietary fiber with wheat bran, ispaghula husk, or high fiber sources of food might increase risk of colorectal cancer in patients with history of adenomatous polyps. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Viagra may cut colorectal cancer risk by half
A new study in mice finds that a small daily intake of Viagra can reduce the formation of potentially cancerous polyps by 50 percent. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Colorectal Cancer Source Type: news

Could VIAGRA prevent colorectal cancer?
Scientists at Augusta University found that Viagra halved the risk of forming polyps, an abnormal clump of cells on the lining of the intestines that have the potential to turn into cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A small, daily dose of Viagra may reduce colorectal cancer risk
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) A small, daily dose of Viagra significantly reduces colorectal cancer risk in an animal model that is genetically predetermined to have the third leading cause of cancer death, scientists report.Viagra cut in half the formation of polyps, an abnormal and often asymptomatic clump of cells on the lining of the intestines that may become cancer, says Dr. Darren D. Browning, cancer researcher at the Georgia Cancer Center and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Calcium supplements may increase risk of abnormal bowel growths
Calcium supplements, taken with or without vitamin D, may increase the risk of polyps growing in the colon, suggest researchers following a large US trial. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - March 5, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Calcium Supplements Tied to Higher Odds of Colon Polyps
(Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - March 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news