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Parts of Mediterranean Diet Linked With Reduced Colon Polyp Risk
Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is negatively associated with advanced colorectal polyps, and the specific portions of the diet that appear to have the most influence include high intake of fish and fruit and low intake of soft drinks. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - July 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: Colorectal Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer News Source Type: news

Interval Colorectal Cancer Risk Higher in Black Patients Interval Colorectal Cancer Risk Higher in Black Patients
Many black patients are screened by clinicians with low polyp detection rates, a red flag for poor-quality colonoscopy and missed cancer, the study authors note.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - May 22, 2017 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Black persons more likely than whites to be diagnosed with colon cancer, despite screening
(American College of Physicians) A study of elderly Medicare enrollees found that black persons face a 31 percent greater risk than white persons for interval colorectal cancer (CRC), or cancer that develops after a negative result on a colonoscopy but before the next recommended screening. The difference was more pronounced for cancer of the distal colon and rectum and for physicians with higher polyp detection rates. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What Causes Anemia?
Discussion One of the most common problems in pediatrics is anemia. It is defined as “a lower than normal value for the related measurements of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and number of red blood cells”, usually 2 standard deviations below the normal for age. Normal hematological values change with age. For a discussion of which values are used click here. The most common type of anemia in childhood is iron deficiency which is commonly caused by inadequate stores (e.g. premature infant), inadequate intake (e.g. poor nutrition) or blood loss (e.g. menses). Anemia screening is recommended at age 9-12 months, and for...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Endoscopic Approach to Polyp Recognition Endoscopic Approach to Polyp Recognition
This review explores the use of advanced imaging techniques, including chromoendoscopy, FICE, and iScan for colorectal polyp detection, recognition and characterization.Frontline Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

' Underwater' Colonoscopy Amplifies Polyp Detection'Underwater' Colonoscopy Amplifies Polyp Detection
When water is used to expand the colon before colonoscopy, instead of air, higher-risk polyps are easier to detect, new research shows, but the technique is controversial.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Survey finds colorectal cancer reported more commonly in individuals with unhealthy lifestyle
(Cleveland Clinic) A Cleveland Clinic colon cancer risk assessment survey found that respondents who exercised more, followed a healthy diet and did not smoke were less likely to have a personal history of colorectal cancer or colon polyps. The online risk analysis, which has had more than 27,000 responses from around the world, highlights the modifiable risk factors, such as diet and lifestyle behaviors, reported by patients without a personal history of colorectal cancer and polyps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Colon Cancer Rates Similar in Patients With Multiple Serrated Polyps, Serrated Polyposis Syndrome Colon Cancer Rates Similar in Patients With Multiple Serrated Polyps, Serrated Polyposis Syndrome
Colon cancer rates are similar in patients with multiple serrated polyps (MSP) and those with serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS), according to a new study from Spain.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - April 24, 2017 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Antibiotics Up Risk for Colon Polyps (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Altered gut bacteria may be culprit in middle-age adults (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - April 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibiotic use linked to 'pre-cancerous' bowel changes
Conclusion Antibiotics, like all drugs, have side effects. We know that they affect the composition of bacteria that live in a healthy gut. This study suggests that might possibly be linked to future development of bowel cancer. However, there are some major limitations to keep in mind. Bowel polyps are very common, and they're not cancerous. Most people who have them won't know they're there, unless they have a colonoscopy. Some polyps do develop into bowel cancer, but we don't know if any of these women got bowel cancer, or how many of their polyps would have become cancerous if not treated. It's highly possible that wom...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Source Type: news

Long - Term Antibiotic Use May Up Risk of Colorectal Adenomas
Medications that alter gut bacteria might set stage for polyp development, researchers say (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - April 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Infections, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Pathology, Pharmacy, Journal, Source Type: news

Could taking antibiotics raise colon cancer risk?
Drugs that alter gut bacteria might set stage for polyp development, researcher says (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antibiotic Use Linked to Later Colorectal Polyp Formation Antibiotic Use Linked to Later Colorectal Polyp Formation
Antibiotic use in early to mid-adulthood was associated with an increased risk of developing colorectal adenomas later in life, a new observational study has found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Prolonged Antibiotic Use Tied to Precancerous Colon Growths
Drugs that alter gut bacteria might set stage for polyp development, researcher says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Antibiotics, Colonic Polyps (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - April 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antibiotics overuse could increase bowel cancer risk, study finds
Extended use increases chance of polyps forming in the colon, adding weight to evidence gut bacteria plays a key role in cancer developmentThe overuse of antibiotics could increase a person ’s risk of developing bowel cancer, the findings of a US study suggest.Research published in medical journal Gut found extended use ofantibiotics significantly increased the chance of polyp formation in the colon, a precursor ofbowel cancer.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Bowel cancer Antibiotics Health Cancer research Medical research Science US news Australia news Source Type: news

Prolonged Antibiotic Use Tied to Colon Polyps
Drugs that alter gut bacteria might set stage for polyp development, researcher says (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prolonged Antibiotic Use Tied to Precancerous Colon Growths
Drugs that alter gut bacteria might set stage for polyp development, researcher says (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - April 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Infections, Oncology, News, Source Type: news

Long-term antibiotic use in early to mid-life linked to cancer-inducing polyps
(BMJ) Long-term antibiotic use in early to mid-life may be linked to a heightened risk of abnormal growths in the colon and rectum -- known as polyps or colorectal adenomas -- which precede the development of most cases of bowel cancer, reveals research published online in the journal Gut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Prolonged Antibiotic Use Tied to Precancerous Colon Growths
Drugs that alter gut bacteria might set stage for polyp development, researcher says (Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Colorectal Cancer - April 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Colorectal Cancer Rates Are Rising Sharply Among Young Americans
This study didn’t measure why colorectal cancer was rising in younger people, but the scientists did dive into past research on the subject to came up with a few theories.  Colorectal cancer risk is linked to excess body weight, cigarette smoking and the consumption of lots of alcohol and highly processed meat. At the same time, eating little fiber and a sedentary lifestyle are also linked to a higher risk of colorectal cancer. While it’s true that younger generations smoke and drink less than baby boomers, they also weigh more, and at younger ages. This prolonged obesity could be a clue, Siegel and her co...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer Facts and Figures: Death Rate Down 25% Since 1991
By Stacy Simon The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 2 decades, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. The cancer death rate for men and women combined fell 25% from its peak in 1991 to 2014, the most recent year for which data are available. This decline translates to more than 2.1 million deaths averted during this time period. “Cancer Statistics, 2017,” published in the American Cancer Society’s journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the US this year. The estimat...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news

Vitamin E, selenium don't cut colon cancer risk, study says
HealthDay News Taking vitamin E and selenium does not appear to reduce the risk of polyps that can lead to colon cancer, a new study finds. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vitamin E, Selenium Don ’ t Cut Colon Cancer Risk: Study
The two antioxidants didn't help prevent polyps, researchers say (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - December 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Oncology, Nutrition, News, Source Type: news

Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Cut Colon Cancer Risk
The two antioxidants didn't help prevent polyps, researchers say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Colorectal Cancer, Minerals, Vitamin E (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Cut Colon Cancer Risk: Study
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 -- Taking vitamin E and selenium does not appear to reduce the risk of polyps that can lead to colon cancer, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from more than 6,500 men in the United States and Canada and found... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 21, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Colorectal cancer prevention: A proven benefit of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
The comparative effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and several supplements have now been evaluated in preventing the recurrence of advanced neoplasia (polyps that are the precursor of colorectal cancer) after polyp removal. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vitamin E and selenium don't prevent polyps that can lead to colorectal cancer
(SWOG) A SWOG review of ancillary SELECT results definitively shows that two antioxidants, vitamin E and selenium, don't prevent colorectal adenomas -- polyps that are the premalignant precursors to most colorectal cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 19, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Colorectal cancer prevention: A proven benefit of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
(Mayo Clinic) Mayo Clinic researchers and a team of collaborating scientists from across the country have determined the comparative effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and several supplements in preventing the recurrence of advanced neoplasia (polyps that are the precursor of colorectal cancer) after polyp removal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Colorectal cancer prevention: A proven benefit of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
ROCHESTER, Minn. ? Mayo Clinic researchers and a team of collaborating scientists from across the country have determined the comparative effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and several supplements in preventing the recurrence of advanced neoplasia (polyps ?that are the precursor of colorectal cancer) after polyp removal. According to the World Cancer Research Fund, [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News - December 18, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Lumendi wins FDA 510(k) for DiLumen endoscope positioning accessory
Medical device developer Lumendi said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its DiLumen endoscopic accessory. The Connecticut-based company’s DiLumen device is now indicated for use in positioning endoscopes in the large intestine and assisting with optical visualization, diagnosis and endoscopic treatment. “DiLumen is the 1st step in a family of devices to enhance endoscopic treatment, including many promising endolumenal therapeutic procedures, that may ultimately improve patient care. Lumendi sees a great potential in endolumenal interventions and is committed to build on this opportunity,” CEO Dr...
Source: Mass Device - December 13, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Endoscopic / Arthroscopic Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Lumendi Source Type: news

Accuracy of Colon Capsules in Detection of Colorectal Polyps Accuracy of Colon Capsules in Detection of Colorectal Polyps
Can a new generation of capsule used in colon capsule endoscopy mitigate the criticisms of earlier versions, which were found to have suboptimal accuracy?Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

Is a No-Grain Diet Healthy?
New York City restaurant Hu Kitchen launched their first grain-free bagel last week. It's a bold move in a city that prides itself on this breakfast staple. But the eatery already offers an array of grain-free foods, from 100 percent grass-fed beef burgers on "faux-caccia" buns to treats like banana nut muffins and berry crumble. Beyond its grain-free options, Hu Kitchen is at the forefront of many food trends. It describes its offerings as organic and "preindustrial," with no GMOs, gluten, soy, dairy, emulsifiers, canola oil, or processed salt. "Don't knock it until you've cut it," said J...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GI-View wins FDA clearance for Aer-O-Scope disposable colonoscope
GI-View said today that its Aer-O-Scope colonoscopy device won 510(k) clearance from the FDA. The company’s flagship product is a disposable colonoscope with 2 channels for tools to take biopsies during a colon cancer screening. The device is the 1st colonoscope to provide a 360-degree view of the colon to detect polyps behind folds, according to Israel-based GI-View. The colonoscope uses a soft multi-lumen tube developed to reduce pressure on the colon wall. There’s no risk of contamination between patients because the device is disposable. The company reports that its hydrophilic tube reduces friction between...
Source: Mass Device - September 20, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Endoscopic / Arthroscopic Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Imaging Regulatory/Compliance GI-View Source Type: news

Longer CTC screening interval found safe, cost-effective
A new analysis of screening intervals for CT colonography (CTC) found that...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Radiologists prefer optical colonoscopy over CTC Optical colonoscopy misses polyps detected on CTC CT colonography sheds light on 'disappearing' polyps 8-year study finds polyp surveillance safe Study argues against colorectal polyp surveillance (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 31, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Colon Polyps
Title: Colon PolypsCategory: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/7/1998 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/16/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Digestion General)
Source: MedicineNet Digestion General - August 16, 2016 Category: Nutrition Source Type: news

Fusobacteria use a special sugar-binding protein to bind to colon tumors
Some bacteria, called fusobacteria, commonly found in the mouth, use a sugar-binding protein to stick to developing colorectal polyps and cancers, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 10, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fusobacteria use a special sugar-binding protein to bind to colon tumors
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Some bacteria, called fusobacteria, commonly found in the mouth, use a sugar-binding protein to stick to developing colorectal polyps and cancers, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Dental Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 10, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Discovery of a novel gene for hereditary colon cancer
The formation of large numbers of polyps in the colon has a high probability of developing into colon cancer, if left untreated. The large-scale appearance of polyps is often due to a hereditary cause; in this case the disease can occur in multiple family members. Now a team of researchers has discovered genetic changes in the MSH3 gene in patients and identified a new rare form of hereditary colon cancer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Discovery of a novel gene for hereditary colon cancer
( University of Bonn ) The formation of large numbers of polyps in the colon has a high probability of developing into colon cancer, if left untreated. The large-scale appearance of polyps is often due to a hereditary cause; in this case the disease can occur in multiple family members. Led by human geneticists of Bonn University Hospital, a team of researchers has discovered a new rare form of hereditary colon cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 28, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New blood test for colon cancer screening: Questions remain
In April, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new screening test for colorectal cancer, commonly referred to as colon cancer. This test is unique because it’s blood-based – meaning no more stool samples or the dreaded colonoscopy. Patients can have the test done as part of their annual blood tests, and they don’t have to think twice about it. But what it lacks in discomfort it makes up for in inexactitude. This newly approved test is not as sensitive or as accurate as a colonoscopy or as a Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT), which can detect hidden blood in stool, potentially indicating co...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Celia Smoak Spell Tags: Cancer Health Health care Prevention Screening Source Type: news

Benign-Appearing Colonic Polyps: Final Pathology ResultsBenign-Appearing Colonic Polyps: Final Pathology Results
Most colon polyps that appear benign but are unresectable by endoscopy are shown to be benign on final surgical pathology, researchers report. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - July 15, 2016 Category: Pathology Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps lower than previously thought
For the majority of patients with large or difficult to remove colorectal polyps (growths in the colon), the incidence of cancer is actually lower than previously thought, and using more advanced endoscopic techniques that spare the colon may be a better, safer alternative to a traditional operation in certain cases, according to study results. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps lower than previously thought
(American College of Surgeons) For the majority of patients with large or difficult to remove colorectal polyps (growths in the colon), the incidence of cancer is actually lower than previously thought, and using more advanced endoscopic techniques that spare the colon may be a better, safer alternative to a traditional operation in certain cases, according to study results published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 30, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Second-gen Capsule Colonoscopy for Detecting Colon PolypsSecond-gen Capsule Colonoscopy for Detecting Colon Polyps
This study evaluated its use in both symptomatic and screening patients. BMJ Open Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - June 23, 2016 Category: Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

Here's Why Men Don't Like Going To The Doctor
Men tend to die earlier than women, are more likely to die from eight out of the ten top causes of death in the U.S. than women, and are also more likely to smoke and drink excessively. Researchers think a mix of factors are involved in men's earlier deaths, including the fact that men tend to take more risks, are less socially connected, and have more dangerous jobs than women. But there's another very simple, easy to fix problem: Men just don't go to the doctor as much as women do.  Men are half as likely as women to go to the doctor over a 2-year period, according to 2014 survey data collected by the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

4 Cancer Screening Tests for Men
By Stacy SimonCelebrate the fathers in your life this June by encouraging them to protect their health by getting up to date on cancer screening tests. Screening tests look for cancer before a person has any signs or symptoms.Regular screenings can catch some cancers early, when they’re small, have not spread, and are easier to treat.With colon cancer, some screening tests can even help prevent cancer from developing in the first place.Colon cancerMen should start screening at age 50, or earlier if they have a family history of colon or rectal cancer or colon problems that raise their risk.Some screening tests can fi...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - June 2, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Prevention/Early Detection Prostate Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell Skin Cancer - Melanoma Source Type: news

Endoscopic Resection of Large Colorectal PolypsEndoscopic Resection of Large Colorectal Polyps
Does this study tell us anything new about the efficacy and safety of endoscopic resection of large colorectal polyps? Gut (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

Sequencing analysis identifies genomic alterations in colorectal precancers
(American Association for Cancer Research) Whole-exome sequencing of both colorectal adenomas (precancers often called polyps) and intestinal mucosa at risk for developing into adenomas from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has generated a comprehensive picture of the genomic alterations that characterize the evolution of normal mucosa to precancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Optimal timing of CRC postop colonoscopy studied
LOS ANGELES – The detection rate of significant polyps was highest for the first postoperative surveillance colonoscopies performed at 1 year following curative resection for colorectal cancer,... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - May 10, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Cancer Screening Tests All Women Should Know About
By Stacy Simon Along with giving Mother's Day gifts and sending greetings this year, encourage the moms in your life to get up to date on cancer screening tests. Screening tests look for cancer before a person has any signs or symptoms. Regular screenings can catch some cancers early, when they’re small, have not spread, and are easier to treat. With cervical and colon cancers, these tests can even prevent cancer from developing in the first place. Sweeten the deal by offering to help your mom schedule her screening, drive her to and from appointments, and keep her company in the waiting room. These are the American ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - April 29, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Prevention/Early Detection Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Endometrial Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell Source Type: news