Scientists Report Creating the First Embryo With Human and Non-Human Primate Cells
In a ground-breaking experiment, researchers have successfully created the first human-monkey chimera. The work, published in the journal Cell, describes the the first embryo containing both human and monkey cells that was cultured for 20 days. Led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study represents the culmination of decades of work in understanding early embryo development in non-human species, which Belmonte hopes will now apply to humans. But it is bound to raise serious ethical questions about the implications of combining human cells with those from a different species (even if it is a closely related one), and the...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

OCS Heart System Earns Hard-Won Backing of FDA Panel OCS Heart System Earns Hard-Won Backing of FDA Panel
The nonbinding vote moves forward the device, which advocates hailed as a potentially transformative step for heart transplantation.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - April 7, 2021 Category: Surgery Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR & NIH Stand Against Structural Racism NIDCR Director Rena D’Souza, DDS, MS, PhD, said in a statement that there is no place for structural racism in biomedical research, echoing remarks from NIH Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD, in his announcement of a new NIH ...
Source: NIDCR Science News - April 7, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Imbio signs Heart&Lung Health in U.K.
Artificial intelligence software developer Imbio has signed a deal with U.K...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Imbio nets FDA nod for RV/LV Analysis AI algorithm Aidoc and Imbio team up on AI for pulmonary embolism Siemens adds Imbio AI apps to syngo.via platform Imbio teams up with Genentech for AI in lung disease Imbio adds analysis software to Nuance AI marketplace (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 6, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

New Real-World Observational Analysis of UPTRAVI ® (selexipag) Underscores the Importance of Risk Assessment for Treating Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) Patients
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA – April 6, 2021 – Findings from an analysis of the first 500 patients enrolled in the SPHERE registry (SelexiPag: tHe usErs dRug rEgistry) found more than three-quarters (76%) of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients treated with UPTRAVI® (selexipag) either maintained (56%) or reduced (20%) their one-year mortality risk score. The SPHERE results were published in the April issue of the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation (JHLT). SPHERE is an ongoing real-world, observational, user registry using two different risk assessment methods that describes the clinical characte...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Space Can Take a Nasty Toll On An Astronaut ’s Heart, Study Finds
It’s perfectly fine that human beings want to travel in space. But we have to reckon with the fact that space doesn’t want anything to do with us. The exterior environment of space, of course, represents instantaneous death, what with the killing cold and the absence of any atmosphere. But even inside a spacecraft or a space station—cozy, pressurized, temperature-controlled, with food supplies, comfortable sleep pods, and a zero-g privy to take care of unavoidable essentials—the body doesn’t care for space. Space radiation, which makes it through the walls of even the sturdiest ship, raises an...
Source: TIME: Science - April 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Little boy who spent 260 days in the hospital finally goes home
The Covid-19 pandemic disrupted many lived, and kept millions of people home for months... but what if you couldn't go home at all? PJ Carr was born with a rare genetic disorder that affected his heart. He stayed at Atrium Health Levine Children's Hospital for 260 days, waiting for a heart transplant. While staying at LCH, PJ learned to crawl, walk, eat and play. Then, the moment that PJ's care team and family had been waiting for ... PJ was going to get his new heart and went home for the first … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 1, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Atrium Health Source Type: news

Reverse-order heart-liver transplant helps prevent rejection for certain patients
(Mayo Clinic) All too often, patients with high levels of antibodies face major challenges getting a transplant. These highly sensitized patients have a much higher risk of death while waiting for suitable organs they are less likely to reject. But there is new hope for highly sensitized patients in need of a combined heart and liver transplant, thanks to an innovative surgical approach at Mayo Clinic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reverse-order heart-liver transplant helps prevent rejection for highly sensitized patients
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- All too often, patients with high levels of antibodies face major challenges getting a transplant. These highly sensitized patients have a much higher risk of death while waiting for suitable organs they are less likely to reject. But there is new hope for highly sensitized patients in need of a combined heart [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News - April 1, 2021 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

UC group launches clinical trial using CRISPR to correct sickle cell disease gene defect
Scientists at UCLA, UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to jointly launch an early phase, first-in-human clinical trial of a CRISPR gene correction therapy in patients with sickle cell disease using the patients ’ own blood-forming stem cells.The trial will combine CRISPR technology developed at the Innovative Genomics Institute — a UC Berkeley–UCSF initiative founded by Berkeley’s Nobel Prize–winning scientist Jennifer Doudna — with UCLA’s expertise in genetic analysis and cell manufacturing, and the decades-long expertise at U...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cardiac and Kidney Benefits of Empagliflozin in Heart Failure Cardiac and Kidney Benefits of Empagliflozin in Heart Failure
This study examined the effect of empagliflozin on cardiovascular and kidney outcomes in heart failure patients with or without chronic kidney disease.Circulation (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - March 30, 2021 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Reproduction without pregnancy: would it really emancipate women? | Jenny Kleeman
It may sound far-fetched, but a breakthrough in Israel has brought us a step closer to creating artificial wombs for humansA team of Israeli scientists announced the mother of all inventions last week. Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science revealedin the journal Nature that they had successfully gestated hundreds of mice inside an artificial womb. They placed newly fertilised eggsinside glass vials rotating in a ventilated incubator, and grew the embryos for 11 days – the mid-point of a mouse pregnancy – outside their mothers’ bodies. The embryos developed normally; their hearts, visible thro...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jenny Kleeman Tags: Reproductive rights Reproduction Science Health Fertility problems Society Parents and parenting Women World news Source Type: news

Pediatric heart transplant method developed by U of A doctors allows for more surgeries, better outcomes: Study
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) A pediatric heart transplant procedure pioneered by Canadian doctors--once deemed impossible--has been shown to be at least as effective as the traditional approach, according to new research out of the University of Alberta. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

RSIP releases new CT segmentation software for orthopedics
Computer software and artificial intelligence company RSIP Vision has launche...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: RSIP Vision launches coronary artery tool RSIP Vision unveils AI-based image segmentation tool RSIP Vision launches new heart POC ultrasound RSIP Vision launches AI-based ultrasound tools RSIP Vision develops AI module for 3D knee x-ray (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 24, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Is Coffee Good for Us? Maybe Machine Learning Can Help Figure It Out.
The advice from research on coffee, and nutrition more generally, always seems to be changing. Processing vast amounts of data could help us pin it down. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kim Tingley Tags: Coffee Heart Diet and Nutrition Artificial Intelligence Cancer Source Type: news

AHA News: Stroke, Blindness, a Heart Transplant – And a Can-Do Spirit
Title: AHA News: Stroke, Blindness, a Heart Transplant – And a Can-Do SpiritCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/23/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/24/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - March 24, 2021 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

AHA News: Stroke, Blindness, a Heart Transplant – And a Can-Do Spirit
TUESDAY, March 23, 2021 (American Heart Association News) -- Hana Hooper went to college with dreams of becoming a veterinarian. She aspired to boost her knowledge of biology and intended to amplify her interest in art. She was 18, and her future... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 23, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Be Bold, Be Proud, Speak Up: Raising Asian American Daughters Now
A version of this article also appeared in the It’s Not Just You newsletter. Sign up here to receive it every Sunday. Well hello! I’m so happy you’re here. This week we have a special guest columnist: Ellen Oh is an arts program director and mother of two young girls in the San Francisco Bay Area. She writes about what keeps her hopeful and what it means to raise her two young girls in an age of activism and heightened fears in the Asian community. We also have the Coping Kit below as usual, plus some evidence of human kindness. (Send thoughts to me at Susanna@Time.com.) On Raising Asian American Daughte...
Source: TIME: Health - March 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

Artificial Heart Valves Grow with Lambs
Two of the implanted valves lasted a full year as the animals matured into adult sheep, demonstrating that it might be possible to treat children with valve replacements that grow along with them. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 19, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Researchers Make Engineered Heart-Tissue Patches Large Enough for Clinical Use Researchers Make Engineered Heart-Tissue Patches Large Enough for Clinical Use
Human engineered heart tissue patches to help remuscularize an injured heart can now be made large enough for clinical use, new research shows.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - March 19, 2021 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

A new, vital player in graft-versus-host disease and organ transplant rejection
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A long noncoding RNA whose function was previously unknown turns out to play a vital role in mobilizing the immune response following a bone marrow transplant or solid organ transplantation.The research, which included samples from more than 50 patients who underwent a bone marrow or heart transplant, suggests inhibiting the RNA therapeutically might improve outcomes for transplant recipients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 17, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Heart transplant breakthrough: NHS doctors become first in world to complete transplants in children using organs brought back to life...
The technique has saved the lives of six British youngsters and the transplants have all happened during the coronavirus pandemic. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UK doctors pioneer use of 'heart in a box' transplant technique in children
Procedure previously deemed suitable only for adults saved the lives of six young patients last yearNHS doctors have pioneered the use of a “dead” heart transplant technique – previously deemed suitable only for adults – in children, saving the lives of six young patients last year.Surgeons typically use for transplants hearts donated by patients who are declared brain stem dead but whose hearts are still beating. Retrieving the hearts of patients who have suffered cardiac death (which are far more common than brain stem deaths) is considered too risky a prospect.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Tags: Health NHS Organ donation Medical research Society Science UK news Source Type: news

Child heart transplants: 'I'm ecstatic I got such an amazing gift'
Freya Heddington, 14, had a new type of transplant where "non-beating donor hearts" are revived. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Child heart transplants: Record year for new-style operations
A novel approach is cutting waiting lists and helping children like Freya get organ transplants. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Is a Heart Transplant?
Title: What Is a Heart Transplant?Category: Procedures and TestsCreated: 1/31/2005 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/17/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - February 17, 2021 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

RSIP Vision launches coronary artery tool
Computer software and artificial intelligence company RSIP Vision has debute...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: RSIP Vision unveils AI-based image segmentation tool RSIP Vision launches new heart POC ultrasound RSIP Vision launches AI-based ultrasound tools RSIP Vision develops AI module for 3D knee x-ray RSIP Vision unveils new AI module for lung biopsy (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 16, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Should Someone With Asthma Get a COVID-19 Vaccine Before Someone With Cancer? The Next Big Challenge in the Vaccine Rollout
In an ideal world, there would be enough vaccines to inoculate everyone who wanted to get immunized against COVID-19. People would get their shots on a first come, first serve basis, we’d achieve herd immunity in a matter of months and COVID-19 would become a soon-distant memory. But with some 240 million people over age 16 who need a COVID-19 vaccine (and two doses at that), and just over 42 million administered by early February, supply is far below demand, and will likely remain that way for months to come, despite vaccine makers pushing production lines as hard as they can. As the U.S. works through the vaccine ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Deep-learning algorithm can detect, quantify aortic valve calcium
Researchers from South Korea reported that their artificial intelligence (AI...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Echo helps identify flossing-induced heart disease 3D printing enhances planning of TAVR procedures CT helps predict TAVR outcomes 4D CT sheds light on post-TAVR treatment strategies AR, 3D printing make waves in cardiac care (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 9, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

A study presents an algorithm that automates electrocardiogram recordings
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) Artificial intelligence can help health personnel to diagnose heart diseases, as shown in a study published inScientific Reports, by Guillermo Jim é nez-P é rez and Oscar Camara, members of the PhySense group, and Alejandro Alcaine, a researcher at the University of San Jorge, Zaragoza. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Heart Transplant Mortality Worse for Younger Black Adults Heart Transplant Mortality Worse for Younger Black Adults
The starkest disparities in heart transplant survival between Black patients and their non-Black counterparts in the U.S. may occur among younger adults, and within the first year posttransplant, a new study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Geisinger researchers find AI can predict death risk
(Geisinger Health System) Researchers at Geisinger have found that a computer algorithm developed using echocardiogram videos of the heart can predict mortality within a year. The algorithm--an example of what is known as machine learning, or artificial intelligence (AI)--outperformed other clinically used predictors, including pooled cohort equations and the Seattle Heart Failure score. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mortality Risk Higher for Young Black Heart Recipients
TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2021 -- Young, Black heart recipients have an increased risk for mortality in the first year after transplant, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in Circulation: Heart Failure. Hasina Maredia, M.D., from the Johns Hopkins... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 2, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Race Affects Outcomes for Young Heart Transplant Patients
TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2021 -- Heart transplants may be particularly risky for young Black Americans, with new research suggesting they are twice as likely to die after they receive their new organ. To reach that conclusion, researchers analyzed the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 2, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Racial disparities: Young, Black adults had significantly worse heart transplant outcomes
(American Heart Association) Young, Black adults (ages 18-30) are more than twice as likely to die in the first year after a heart transplant compared to non-Black transplant recipients who are the same age.By age 61 and older, there was no significant racial disparity in the health outcomes among heart transplantation recipients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Marathon runner makes plan for next race after a heart transplant
When Terry Collier learned he would need a heart transplant, he was nothing but shocked. The former director of the Las Vegas and Los Angeles marathons, who had run over 140 races himself, had no warning signs of a heart condition outside of becoming short of breath one February day in 2018. At the time, [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 2, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Hundreds of Iowans donate to father in need of heart transplant
Dustin Bachman's doctors say he has three weeks to live while local restaurant holds benefit to cover medical expenses. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic research yields breakthrough in mobile determination of QT prolongation
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Researchers from Mayo Clinic and AliveCor Inc. have been using artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a mobile device that can identify certain patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. This research has yielded a breakthrough in determining the health of the electrical recharging system in a patient's heart. The researchers determined that [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 1, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Valvular Heart Disease and Calcification in CKD Valvular Heart Disease and Calcification in CKD
Valvular calcification occurs earlier and more often in CKD patients. What are the implications?Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology Journal Article Source Type: news

Blood Biomarker May Detect Acute Heart Transplant Rejection
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2021 -- A blood biomarker, percent donor-derived cell-free DNA (%ddcfDNA), is promising for the early detection of acute rejection (AR) after heart transplant, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Circulation. Sean... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 27, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Acute heart transplant rejection detected earlier with new test
Researchers found that a blood test can detect signs of acute heart transplant rejection earlier than more invasive tissue biopsies, the current standard. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - January 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

' Liquid Biopsy' Detects Acute Heart Transplant Rejection'Liquid Biopsy' Detects Acute Heart Transplant Rejection
Monitoring donor-derived cell-free DNA in blood can detect acute heart transplant rejection early and reduce the need for endomyocardial biopsy.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - January 21, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

RSIP Vision unveils AI-based image segmentation tool
Computer software and artificial intelligence (AI) company RSIP Vision has...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: RSIP Vision launches new heart POC ultrasound RSIP Vision launches AI-based ultrasound tools RSIP Vision develops AI module for 3D knee x-ray (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 19, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Kori, nine, says transplant gives him 'another chance at life'
Kori, from Ripley in Derbyshire, was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DARZALEX FASPRO ® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj) Becomes the First FDA-Approved Treatment for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Light Chain (AL) Amyloidosis
January 15, 2021 (HORSHAM, Pa.) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DARZALEX FASPRO® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj), a subcutaneous formulation of daratumumab, in combination with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone (D-VCd) for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed light chain (AL) amyloidosis.[1] DARZALEX FASPRO® is the first and only FDA-approved treatment for patients with this blood cell disorder that is associated with the production of an abnormal protein, which leads to th...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

iTHRIV announces health research pilot project recipients
(Virginia Tech) Multi-institutional teams of scientists, physicians, and engineers will study Parkinson's disease, celiac disease, pediatric heart transplant, pediatric telemedicine, and epilepsy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood test shows promise for early detection of acute heart transplant rejection
DNA-based “liquid biopsy” could help save lives and reduce health disparities. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - January 13, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

How a new £244-a-year heart failure drug saved a man from needing a transplant
Daniel Smith from Nottingham was diagnosed with heart failure in 2012 and was told he needed a new heart until he was prescribed a £244-a-year drug. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news