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Brave toddler meets 24 strangers who saved her life
It took a team of UCLA medical professionals and the generosity of 71 strangers to save 2-year-old Skye Savren-McCormick ’s life.The toddler from Ventura, California, required frequent blood and platelet transfusions, often on a daily basis, while undergoing  three grueling bone-marrow transplants, surgery to remove her swollen spleen and seven rounds of chemotherapy for leukemia and lymphoma. She received 77 units of blood and platelets during a 10-month stay at UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital.  Recently Skye ’s family got to meet and thank two dozen of the 71 strangers whose blood a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Skinny pigs? Low-fat craze gone too far
Let’s face it. You and I both know most Americans are struggling with their weight. I see it in my practice every day. There’s not one study that will tell you otherwise. What’s more, there’s been an explosion of not only obesity, but of related diseases like diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. But did you realize that the rates of obesity and disease in America began rising at the exact same time the health authorities told us to eat a low-fat diet? It started in 1977 when George McGovern led a Senate Committee that released its “Dietary Goals for the United States.” According to ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - January 17, 2018 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health Nutrition clogged arteries fat heart healthy low-fat polyunsaturated fats skinny Weight Loss Source Type: news

South Africa:Hillcrest Teen Gets Second Chance At Life
[News24Wire] A Hillcrest teen, who underwent a double lung and heart transplant, says he hopes to do all the things he dreamed of. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 8, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

These lab-grown blood vessel replacements could benefit dialysis patients
[Image from University of Minnesota]University of Minnesota researchers have developed a blood vessel replacement made of biological materials in a lab. The lab-grown vessels have no living cells at implantation and could be used as a graft for kidney dialysis patients. The lab-engineered blood vessel replacement is the first nonsynthetic, decellularized graft that is repopulated with cells using the recipient’s cells when implanted. The grafts could also be used as coronary and peripheral bypass blood vessel and tubular heart valves. Approximately 480,000 people are on dialysis in the U.S., according to the National...
Source: Mass Device - January 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Implants Regenerative Medicine Research & Development kidney dialysis MedTech University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Invasive Aspergillosis in Heart Transplant Recipients
Wed, 01/03/2018 - 12:08News blog (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - January 3, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: ROrritt Source Type: news

New year. New lungs.
I’ve had asthma and chronic lung disease since I was very young. I had to use everything — from my head to my toes — to help me breathe. I remember being able to hear myself wheezing, to feel my lungs rattling. I had marks all over my face from my oxygen mask. I thought I would never be clear of mucus and never be able to walk without being out of breath. All I ever wanted was to breathe. I spent so much energy trying to breathe that I didn’t have much left for eating, so I was really skinny. I spent a lot of time in a wheelchair. When I was able to walk, it would be for short distances and my shoul...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 3, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ndeye "Fatou" Seck Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories chronic lung disease double lung transplant Francis Fynn-Thompson Gary Visner Lung Transplant Program Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

Artificial lung dev Breethe raises $3m
Artificial lung developer Breethe raised approximately $3 million in an equity financing round, according to an SEC filing posted late last month. Funds raised during the round will cover the sales and issuance of Series Seed-4 preferred stock and the underlying common stock convertible from it, according to the filing. The Baltimore-based company is developing the Oxy-1 ambulatory artificial lung system which is designed for home use for patients who suffer from acute and chronic lung failure, according to its website. The system includes a portable pack, which contains the unit’s batteries, oxygen source and p...
Source: Mass Device - January 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Respiratory breethe Source Type: news

Rebranding HF: Who Would Be Branded With Failure? Rebranding HF: Who Would Be Branded With Failure?
In this commentary, the author wonders if the"heart failure" label, which connotes defeat and stigma, is hindering effective care.Circulation (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - December 26, 2017 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Transplant patient's Christmas plea: talk to your family about organ donation
With hundreds waiting for heart transplants, experts and patients urge public to register as organ donors – and make their wishes clear to family membersFamilies are being urged to talk about becoming an organ donor in the hope that more people on the waiting list for a heart transplant will be given the chance of life.Since last Christmas Day, 31 people have died on the heart transplant waiting list, according to NHS Blood and Transplant. To try to tackle the shortage of organs, the government hasrecently announced a consultation into an “opt-out” scheme. Everybody would be assumed to be willing to donat...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Organ donation Health Society Heart disease Science Source Type: news

5 Shocking Medical Stories From 2017
CBS Local — The field of medicine has made tremendous strides in 2017. Here’s a list of shocking stories from this year that shows just how far science has come and how unbelievable (and a little gross!) it can be. Laymen beware: the following may contain highly technical terminology for procedures (like swallowing balloons) and medical recommendations (like not to swallow coins). New Procedure Has People Swallowing Balloons To Lose Weight Having trouble hitting your goal weight? With the help of her doctor and a few gas-filled balloons, Bronx-resident Suzy Soto found out how to get rid of those last few pounds...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Medicine Science Shocking Stories Source Type: news

UR Medicine Helps Genesee County Family Embrace Heart of Holidays
“Mommy is coming home for Christmas!” You can almost hear squeals of delight from a toddler who couldn ’t possibly understand the harrowing fight for life that her mother has survived. Carrie Thornley Fisher was in heart failure near the end of her second pregnancy. After giving birth to a healthy boy, the 32-year-old spent nearly two months on life-saving mechanical support until she received a heart transplant Sept. 19 at UR Medicine ’s Strong Memorial Hospital, upstate New York’s only comprehensive heart failure service. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - December 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

2017 ’ s Year In Health News: Medical Breakthroughs, Opioid Crisis And More
CBS Local — There’s been plenty of progress in the medical world this year, and as a result we now know that more Americans than ever have high blood pressure, but also that coffee everyday is actually good for you. Here’s a look back at the year in health. Opioid Crisis The opioid crisis has dominated much of the health news cycle. President Trump declared the opioid crisis a national emergency earlier this year. Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death for people under 50 in the United States. New Guidelines for High Blood Pressure The American Heart Association revised its guidelines for high ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News best of 2017 Samantha Lazarus Bennet Source Type: news

Researchers are developing light therapy as a non-invasive, alternative treatment for disease
(Natural News) Artificial light has both its risks and benefits, but a new study shows that it may be the solution to minimally invasive, drug-free treatments. Researchers are currently developing new ways using infrared neuromodulation to treat cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart beat), hypertension (high blood pressure), asthma, sleep apnea (suspension of breathing during sleep), diarrhea, and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA senior delivers digital health monitoring to fight disease in Cameroon
As Vikash Singh looks forward to 2018 he is also looking forward to witnessing his education in action. Specifically how his background in medical research, artificial intelligence and machine learning — along with a $5,000UCLA Global Citizens Fellowship award and some innovative thinking — may potentially help save lives in Cameroon.Doctors at the HSPC Polyclinic in Kumba, a city located in the country ’s southwest region, will soon begin uploading patient information to a software application designed by Singh and a team of student programmers through Project DataReach, a company Singh launched in 2015 ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers create skeletal muscle from stem cells
UCLA scientists have developed a new strategy to efficiently isolate, mature and transplant skeletal muscle cells created from human pluripotent stem cells, which can produce all cell types of the body. The findings are a major step toward  the development of a stem cell replacement therapy for muscle diseases including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 1 in 5,000 boys in the U.S. and is the most common fatal childhood genetic disease.The study, which was published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, was led by senior author April Pyle, associate professor of microbiology, immunology and molecul...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Making heart transplants obsolete with small removable pump
(University of Houston) On this 50th anniversary of the first heart transplant, which occurred in December 1967, a University of Houston biomedical engineer is creating a next-generation heart pump for patients suffering with heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What is DIOS?
Discussion Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR). It is found in the epithelium of the bronchi, intestine, pancreatic duct and biliary tree. It regulates chloride, bicarbonate and water secretion. The heterozygous state helps prevent against secretory diarrhea, but the homozygous state causes thickened secretions in the hollow tubes of the lungs and digestive tract. There are multiple mutations (> 2000) which have been currently classified into classes depending on their protein production and activity. CF patients generally are l...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - December 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Cardiovascular AI imaging dev Bay Labs raises $6m in Series A
Cardiovascular artificial intelligence medtech firm Bay Labs said today it raised $5.5 million in a Series A round to support clinical validation and further development of its cardiovascular imaging tech. The round was led by existing investor Khosla Ventures and joined by newly invested Data Collective, Greenbox Venture Partners, Minneapolis Heart Institute Ventures and Georges Harik. As part of the funding round, Khosla Ventures general partner Ben Ling and DCVC operating partner Armen Vidian will join the San Francisco-based company’s board of directors. “Bay Labs’ unique application of AI with ultras...
Source: Mass Device - December 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Imaging Software / IT baylabs Source Type: news

Genomic blood test predicts survival rates after surgery for advanced heart failure
UCLA HealthDr. Mario DengFINDINGSAn experimental blood test developed at UCLA that uses gene activity data from immune cells was 93 percent accurate in predicting survival rates for people with advanced heart failure who had surgery to implant mechanical circulatory support devices.BACKGROUNDMechanical circulatory support devices, such as ventricular assist devices and temporary total artificial hearts, can be surgically implanted in people with advanced heart failure to help the heart ’s pumping function.But people with advanced heart failure often also suffer from multi-organ dysfunction syndrome, which can lead to...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Altmetric announces the top 100 list for 2017
This study revealed a Dinosaur species had teeth that it lost as it aged. Testing of an Ebola vaccine during the West African outbreak found that it was completely effective – offering hope should the virus return. The development of an artificial womb for lambs has opened new possibilities for their application amongst humans. Topical issues Some key themes stood out. Scientific research, technology, humanity and environmental science continue to intersect and capture the public’s attention. The most widely discussed research topics in 2017 were: Medical Science (53) Biological Science (17) Earth and Environ...
Source: News from STM - December 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

Baby Max spends first year in Southampton hospital
Max Olivares has a rare heart and lung condition, which requires a complex transplant operation. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ventricular Assist Devices as Bridge to Heart Transplantation: Therapy Options
(Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ventricular Assist Devices as Bridge to Heart Transplantation: What You Need to Know
(Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

South Africa:50 Years Since the First Heart Transplant - What a Piece of Work Is a Man!
[Daily Maverick] The 50th anniversary of the first successful heart transplant encourages J. BROOKS SPECTOR to look back at Dr Chris Barnard's unprecedented medical moment - and to think about what happens next. Shades of the final scenes in the Robin Williams film, Bicentennial Man, perhaps? (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 6, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Heart transplants could be discarded 'within 10 years'
Professor Stephen Westaby, of Oxford's John Radcliffe Hospital, thinks surgeons should begin to use artificial pumps and stem cell therapy instead. He believes it would make a good alternative. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Living ink’ points the way to 3D-printed human organs
The technology could lead to the creation of hearts and kidneys for transplantation (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - December 5, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What will medicine be able to do with hearts?
Heart transplantation has become a routine surgical operation, but the future promises equally amazing progress. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genes on Y chromosome protect against pulmonary hypertension, study suggests
This study is the first to examine the involvement of sex chromosomes in the disease's development in the absence of sex hormones. In humans, females typically have two copies of the X chromosome, while males typically have one X and one Y chromosome.METHODIn the lab, the researchers engineered mice with different chromosomal makeups and measured their development of pulmonary hypertension in an environment with 10 percent oxygen, which is a well-established setting for inducing the disease.One group of mice was engineered with sex chromosomes that were independent of their gonadal sex, or sex based on their genitalia, so ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 4, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

South Africa:How an Historic Heart Transplant Created a Celebrity Scientist 50 Years Ago
[The Conversation Africa] South Africa's Chris Barnard stands out in medical history as the heart surgeon who became a global household name after transplanting the first human heart on 3 December 1967. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 4, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

South Africa:'It Was Because of Dr Barnard That My Father Got a Second Chance'
[News24Wire] Growing up, Candice Govender had found it difficult to believe that a heart could be removed from one person's chest and placed in another's, as Dr Chris Barnard and his team had done when they performed the world's first heart transplant in 1967. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 4, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation: 50 years of heart transplantation progress
(Elsevier) This month marks the 50th anniversary of the world's first human heart transplant performed at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town by South African surgeon, Christiaan Barnard. He transplanted the heart of a 25-year-old woman into Louis Washkansky, a 53-year-old diabetes patient who was in severe heart failure. A special issue of The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation presents a chronicle of the major milestones in heart transplantation over the last 50 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Happy 50th Birthday, Heart Transplant Surgery!
A by-the-numbers look at the revolutionary procedure, then and now. by Jessica Blatt Press, AARP, December 1, 2017|Comments: 0. Heart Transplant Anniversary. Underwood Archives/Getty Images. Heart surgeon and transplant pioneer Christiaan Barnard, M.D., illustrates a  ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - December 3, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Heart Transplants: 50 years since the first operation, and medicine is beating the disease
FIFTY years ago today a Cape Town surgeon became a global icon when he performed the first life-saving human-to-human heart transplant. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fresh heart
It is 50 years since the first heart transplant took place, ushering in a new era of media attention and medical celebrity. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - December 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

South Africa:Heart Transplantation Continues to Capture the Human Imagination
[News24Wire] Fifty years after Christiaan Barnard completed the world's first successful human heart transplant, heart transplantation continues to capture the human imagination. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 2, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

FDA clears AliveCor ’ s KardiaBand ECG for Apple Watch
AliveCor said today that the FDA cleared its KardioBand electrocardiogram device for the Apple Watch, designed to monitor for early signs of atrial fibrillation. First introduced in March 2016, KardiaBand is the first medical device accessory to be cleared by the federal safety watchdog for the Apple Watch, Mountain View, Calif.-based AliveCor said. It’s designed to display and record clinical-grade cardiac rhythm readings in real time in about 30 seconds, the company said. AliveCor also said it launched the SmartRhythm artificial intelligence app for the Apple Watch, which is designed to continuously evalu...
Source: Mass Device - November 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Patient Monitoring Wall Street Beat AliveCor Cardiac Rhythm Management Source Type: news

New'Patch' May Repair Damaged Hearts
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 -- A patch that might one day help repair heart attack damage has been developed by researchers. The patch, which consists of fully functioning artificial human heart muscle, is large enough to cover damage typically caused... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Anniversary of first ever heart transplant is next week
Images from 'Christiaan Barnard: The Surgeon Who Dared' by David Cooper show the South African ground-breaking surgeon hard at work in the operating theatre doing open-heart surgery. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Story of the surgeon who did the first heart transplant
Images from 'Christiaan Barnard: The Surgeon Who Dared' by David Cooper show the South African ground-breaking surgeon hard at work in the operating theatre doing open-heart surgery. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diabetes drug could prevent heart transplant complications
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London successfully repurposed a diabetes drug to prevent rejection without the side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diabetes drug could heart transplant organ rejection
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London successfully repurposed a diabetes drug to prevent rejection without the side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is the First Bioprinted Heart Just Around the Corner?
A Chicago bioprinting startup that seeks to 3-D print human hearts for transplantation has added to its scientific advisory board of heavy hitters. But its CEO won’t say how close the company is to producing its first viable heart. Biolife4D just announced it has added regenerative biomaterials expert Adam  Feinberg, PhD to lead its scientific advisory team. Feinberg is associate professor of materials science & engineering and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and principal investigator of the regenerative biomaterials and therapeutics group. Feinberg uses materials-based engine...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Implants Source Type: news

Developing a New Score: How Machine Learning Improves Risk Prediction
Composite risk scores have been used for decades to identify disease risk and health status in the general population. However, current approaches often fail to identify people who would benefit from intervention or recommend unnecessary intervention. Machine learning promises to improve accuracy, ensuring targeted treatment for patients that need it and reducing unnecessary intervention. Framingham Risk Score, the gold standard for predicting the likelihood of heart disease, predicts hospitalizations with about 56% accuracy. It uses factors such as age, gender, smoking, cholesterol levels, and systolic blood pre...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Heather R. Johnson Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Inside the NICU: Shining light on the healing power of touch
Abigail underwent open-heart surgery and received care in Boston Children’s Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Traveling through Boston Children’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), you feel the warmth of natural light and a soothing sense of calm. One mom, leaning delicately over her son’s bedside, caresses his forehead and gently whispers a lullaby. Only a few steps away, a father rests in a chair with his tiny son on his chest. Lifesaving technology fills the 24-bed NICU and a reassuring team of specialized physicians, nurses and Child Life Specialists monitor, treat and embrace their delicate patients. Nea...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories neonatal intensive care unit NICU Source Type: news

Danny ’s journey to a biventricular heart
The first hint that something wasn’t quite right with Danny Sanchez-Garcia’s heart came at his mom’s six-month prenatal visit. “There was a little blip on the ultrasound, but then it was gone on the next one, so they didn’t think it was anything and I didn’t worry any more about it,” says Danny’s mom, Cynthia. Cynthia was overjoyed when Danny was born at her local hospital seeming perfectly healthy. But as the hospital staff monitored Danny overnight, they noticed his oxygen level was lower than normal and decided to run more tests. His doctors believed the tests pointed to a...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Biventricular Repair Complex Biventricular Repair Program congenital heart valve program double outlet right ventricle Dr. Christopher Baird Dr. Roger Breitbart ECMO Pulmonary atresia tetra Source Type: news

Doctors bring nearly DEAD heart back to life using revolutionary new “box” that can keep it beating for eight hours
(Natural News) Doctors and surgeons have managed to save a man’s life in England after giving him a transplant using a “dead” heart they were able to bring back to life. Using a revolutionary new piece of technology that’s been called a “heart in a box,” the device can keep the organ preserved and actually... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SPM in Real Life: Fall ‘17
NEW MEMBERS: Fall ‘17 Brief bios/plugs for new members (extracted from the Introduce Yourself Connect Community) After returning to school to become an OR surgical tech, Mary Mack’s heart health declined, and she quickly learned to become a strong advocate for herself. Feeling that no one was into her participatory style, Mary believes a radical change in medical student education is necessary to change the culture of medicine. She is passionate about helping to make that change happen. Her other interests include playing the guitar and speaking Mandarin Chinese. Jim Skinner created the Smart Patient Academy a...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - November 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Nanette Mattox Tags: Newsletter Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding available! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is accepting applications for health information outreach, health literacy initiatives, emergency preparedness partnerships and health sciences library projects. Applications will be due by COB on December 1. See a recent blog post from Executive Director, Kate Flewelling for details, or review our funding opportunities and start your application today! Rural Health Week begins on Monday, November 13! Wondering how you can participate?...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - November 10, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Cells to Society: Native American Heritage/ Endowment / Research News
This study evaluates treatment outcomes from a clinical cohort with task-sharing between a clinical nurse practitioner and a medical officer. The researchers examined opportunities to increase treatment rates for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in South Africa.     Read more   Climate Change ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 9, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Muscles out of the spray can
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) An artificial heart would be an absolute lifesaver for people with cardiac failure. However, to recreate the complex organ in the laboratory, one would first need to work out how to grow multi-layered, living tissues. Researchers at Empa have now come one step closer to this goal: by means of a spraying process, they have created functioning muscle fibers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news