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Everything You Have to See at MD & amp;M Minneapolis
Discussion: Jumpstart Your Medtech Career Whether you’re hoping to score your first job in the medical device industry or looking for tips to advance your career, you’ll definitely benefit from the advice shared by local medtech recruiters from Abbott, Atricure, and The Walstrom Group. They’ll explain which positions are in demand at medical device companies right now, cover the pros and cons of working at a startup versus a big-name company, and answer your questions on topics ranging from how best to move your career forward to ways to maximize your earnings. Networking Opportunities With thousands of y...
Source: MDDI - September 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Jamie Hartford Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Dental Work Tied to Heart Infections in People With Artificial Valves Dental Work Tied to Heart Infections in People With Artificial Valves
Invasive dental procedures may raise the risk of rare but serious infections in people who have prosthetic heart valves, a recent French study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Benefit for Harbor House Home-Away-From-Home is Sept. 23
The 11th annual “And the Beat Goes On…” benefit dinner for Rochester’s Harbor House will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23, at the Locust Hill Country Club. Harbor House is a home-away-from-home for people who have traveled a long distance for UR Medicine heart and organ transplant and other critical car e. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - September 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Selena Gomez Had a Kidney Transplant for Lupus. What Is That?
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan / Health Tags: Uncategorized celebrities kidney transplant lupus lupus symptoms public health Selena Gomez Selena gomez disease Selena gomez Kidney Transplant Selena Gomez lupus what disease does selena gomez have What is lupus Why did selena gomez Source Type: news

Dental work tied to heart infections in people with artificial valves
(Reuters Health) - Invasive dental procedures may raise the risk of rare but serious infections in people who have prosthetic heart valves, a recent French study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Researchers visualize cardiac conduction system in 3D
A multinational research group said it has used 3D reconstruction of micro-CT...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3D printing helps evaluate leaks after TAVR procedures 3D-printed patch mends broken hearts Funding, expertise give Jump an edge on 3D hearts 3D images aid selection of heart transplant donors 3D models put pediatric hearts in surgeons' hands (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 13, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

This Girl Tr òn: The Forgotten Subject of Vietnam War Photographer Larry Burrows
Larry Burrows was a seasoned veteran of the Vietnam War when, in early 1968, he met 12-year-old Nguyễn Thị Tròn. Operating out of Saigon, the southern Republic of Vietnam’s capital, the photographer had been covering the conflict for LIFE magazine since 1962. He shadowed American troops, documenting ferocious firefights, surviving hours in the air with helicopter-gunship crews, and freeze-framing harrowing moments of bravery and despair, exhaustion, and appalling violence in combat zones. Though much of his best work had been shot in the thick of the action, he had come to be haunted by the trauma visited ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gary Jones/ Suối Đá Tags: Uncategorized Larry Burrows LIFE Magazine photography Vietnam Vietnam War Source Type: news

Why a $1,000 iPhone Isn ’t as Crazy as It Sounds
It’s iPhone day, the annual non-holiday where smartphone addicts cozy up to Apple’s keynote to find out what the touchscreen fairies are bringing good little fanboys and girls. If you’re like me, you’ve been waiting with especially bated breath, because your handset is several years old, loses power faster than an overthrown dictator and inexplicably smells like fish tacos. In other words, it’s upgrade time, baby, and we all deserve the latest and greatest. This time around, however, Apple’s top-of-the-line iPhone will probably be more expensive than in years past. In addition to trumpet...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Patrick Pullen Tags: Uncategorized Apple iPhone iPhone 2017 iPhone 8 Tech in Real Life Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Sept. 8, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From BrainScope’s pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device to EOS Imaging releasing new surgery planning software, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth a mention. 1. BrainScope to develop pediatric traumatic brain injury assessment device BrainScope announced in a Sept. 7 press release that it will immediately start creating a pediatric capability for its BrainScope One medical neurotechnology. The technology is an FDA-cleared handheld medical device that is designed to assess the full spectrum of traumatic brain injury. The company sa...
Source: Mass Device - September 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Imaging mHealth (Mobile Health) Neurological Regulatory/Compliance Research & Development Spinal AliveCor Bonesupport Bra Source Type: news

Villafa ña-founded artificial vessel developer Medical 21 looks to raise $15m
St. Jude Medical founder Manny Villafaña’s newest medtech play, Medical 21, is looking to raise $15 million in an equity round of funding, according to an SEC filing posted recently. The company is developing an artificial blood vessel as an alternative to harvesting blood vessels for coronary artery bypass surgeries, and has already begun animal testing of the technology, according to a Twin Cities Business report. Bypass surgeries, which are performed over 500,000 times a year in the US, require surgeons to harvest blood vessels from a patient’s body to be stitched into the heart to repair the circulat...
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular medical21 Source Type: news

3D-printed organ dev BioLife4D registers for $50m IPO
Biological 3D printing developer BioLife4D has filed for a $50 million initial public offering as it looks to commercialize its cardiac tissue regeneration and organ replacement processes. The Chicago-based company said yesterday it is developing technologies with an end goal of creating a 3D bioprinted viable human heart suitable for transplant. Funds from the offering are slated to support working capital and fund initiatives which include expanding personnel, acquiring additional laboratory space and licensing related technologies. “Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide – killing one in four ...
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Regenerative Medicine Research & Development biolife4d Source Type: news

Google ’ s Verily is developing AI-powered heart disease test using retinal images
Google (NSDQ:GOOG) parent Alphabet‘s (NSDQ:GOOGL) Verily is developing a new artificial-intelligence powered test that searches for indicators of heart disease risk present in retina images, according to a new study. The study, which has not yet been peer reviewed but has been published by Cornell University, details a new machine-learning powered system designed by Verily to “discover new knowledge from retinal fundus images.” The system operates on data from 284,335 patients, validated on 2 independent datasets of 12,026 and 999 patients, to predict cardiovascular risks “not previously t...
Source: Mass Device - September 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Imaging Optical/Ophthalmic Research & Development Alphabet Inc. Google Inc. Verily Source Type: news

NaviGate touts 1st 52mm transcatheter tricuspid valve procedure
NaviGate Cardiac Structures touted this week that its Gate catheter-guided tricuspid atrioventricular valved stent was implanted six weeks ago into a patient’s transplanted heart. The patient’s transplanted heart was failing due to severe tricuspid valve insufficiency. The successful implantation at the Policlinico of the University of Padua, Italy, is the first European-based patient treated with the company’s tricuspid replacement heart valve. Three hours after the procedure, the patient was showing improved renal function, NaviGate reported. Two months after the intervention, the 67-year-old male patie...
Source: Mass Device - September 1, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular NaviGate Cardiac Structures Inc Source Type: news

NHS no longer uses post-it notes for heart transplants
The pioneering system is 300 times faster, NHS Blood and Transplant experts claim, and has removed around 40 lengthy steps from the organ matching process. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Advocating for Bridget: Coping with Hirschsprung ’s disease
On June 20, Bridget Landry celebrated a very special day with a hearty steak dinner. But it wasn’t her birthday. Instead, the 10-year-old and her family were marking the sixth anniversary of the day her ostomy bag was removed. As she enjoyed her meal, her parents, Carl and Laura, marveled at just how far their daughter had come. “For her first birthday, she couldn’t even take a bite of cake,” remembers Carl. Bridget’s first few months of life were similar to those of most infants: She had a typical birth, nursed and met all her milestones. Yet at six months, her parents began to notice somethi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 31, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Samuel Nurko Dr. Tom Jaksic Hirschsprung's disease Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for August 28, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Resonetics acquires Aduro Laser Resonetics announced that it has acquired Aduro Laser. The financial details of the deal were not disclosed. “We are very excited to partner with Grayson Beck and Demian Backs, who have cre...
Source: Mass Device - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Abbott wins FDA nod for HeartMate 3 pump
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today that the FDA approved its HeartMate 3 implantable pump for heart failure patients awaiting a transplant. The approval is the latest for the HeartMate line of left ventricular assist devices first developed by Thoratec, which was later acquired by St. Jude Medical before a $25 billion merger brought it to Abbott earlier this year. Abbott said HeartMate 3 features full magnetic levitation for the pump’s impeller, aiming to cause less trauma to blood cells as they pass through the pump. Although it is smaller than its predecessor, Abbott claimed it has the industry’s largest ...
Source: Mass Device - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiac Assist Devices Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Abbott Source Type: news

Many Heart Failure Patients Don ’ t Recognize the Risks of Their Illness Many Heart Failure Patients Don ’ t Recognize the Risks of Their Illness
Even though doctors think most people with heart failure have a high likelihood of requiring a heart transplant or dying from complications of their illness, a small U.S. study suggests that many patients see a much rosier picture of their future.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Eleven-Year-Old Boy Receives Kidney for Christmas at Duke
Treatment TermsPediatric Kidney Transplant Author Hallie Potocki Overview After battling kidney disease his entire young life, 11-year-old Kaleek Beatty got the best present he could ask for, just five days before Christmas 2016. Duke Children's Hospital called to say they had found a kidney for him. Hero Imagekaleekbeatty_blog.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks Header Born with Kidney Disease ContentAsk a typical 11-year-old, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” and you’re likely to hear “sports superstar” or “rock musician.” Ask Kaleek Beatty, though, and his u...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Fewer antibiotic prescriptions are being filled, a new analysis finds
The use of antibiotics among Americans with commercial health insurance has decreased during the past several years, according to a new analysis that nevertheless shows lingering variations for different ages and in different parts of the country. The study released on Thursday provides the latest evidence of how doctors and patients have begun to heed warnings […]Related:NIH unit deletes references to climate ‘change’Do your eyes hurt after the solar eclipse? Here’s what you need to know.A heart transplant saved this 13-year-old boy’s life. But he died on his first day of school. (Sourc...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Many heart failure patients don ’t recognize the risks of their illness
(Reuters Health) - Even though doctors think most people with heart failure have a high likelihood of requiring a heart transplant or dying from complications of their illness, a small U.S. study suggests that many patients see a much rosier picture of their future. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Medical Extrusion Technologies loses trademark bid
A U.S. trademark board last week shot down a bid by Medical Extrusion Technologies to trademark its name, ruling that the name is not distinct enough to trademark. MET applied to trademark its name for “polyurethanes in the form of sheets, films, pellets, granules, and tubes for use in the manufacture of medical devices, medical diagnostic devices, artificial vascular grafts, stents, pacemaker leads, artificial heart pump diaphragms, catheters, drug delivery devices, orthopedic and spinal implants, blood glucose monitors, and blood gas analyzers.” Get the full story at our sister site, Medical Design ...
Source: Mass Device - August 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News apollomedicalextrusiontechnologies U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) Source Type: news

New Use of Blood Cleaning Device Saves High-Risk Patients With Liver Failure
Severe acute liver failure (ALF), a rare but life-threatening illness, is associated with high death rates if patients don’t receive timely treatment or a liver transplant. Unlike the heart or the kidneys, there is no established mechanical device to replace the liver’s function. Now, University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) researchers report that a device that removes toxins from the blood can also effectively provide a bridge to liver transplantation or buy time for a traumatically injured liver to heal, suggesting broader uses for the device than previously thought. (Source: University of Maryland...
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Do your eyes hurt after the solar eclipse? Here ’ s what you need to know.
So you looked directly at the sun while trying to watch the solar eclipse. Maybe you didn't read the warnings or couldn't get your hands on a pair of eclipse glasses. Or maybe you did have them but couldn't resist, just for a few seconds, staring straight at the sun with your naked eyes, experts be darned. […]Related:A heart transplant saved this 13-year-old boy’s life. But he died on his first day of school.Elderly couple got ‘deepest wish’ — to die together — in rare euthanasia caseTibetan Buddhism-based ‘compassion’ training for doctors targets burnout (Source: ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boy with heart transplant dies on first day of school
Peyton West's parents would never have thought that his first day of school this year was going to be his last. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boy who had heart transplant dies on first day of school
Peyton West's parents don't know what went wrong with his heart (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A heart transplant saved this 13-year-old boy ’ s life. But he died on his first day of school.
Peyton West woke up early Thursday morning, his first day back to school. Carrying his red backpack, wearing his gray shirt and his red-framed glasses — red and gray are his favorite colors — he posed for a first-day-of-school picture outside his family's house in Ohio, just outside Cincinnati. The 13-year-old, who was born with only […]Related:Elderly couple got ‘deepest wish’ — to die together — in rare euthanasia caseTibetan Buddhism-based ‘compassion’ training for doctors targets burnoutThere’s plague in Arizona. Authorities warn of fleas that can infect...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk Assessment Differs for Doctors, Heart Failure Patients
Doctors consider most patients with advanced heart failure to be at high risk for transplant, LVAD, death (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - August 17, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Internal Medicine, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Should we transplant pig organs into humans? | Chas Newkey-Burden and Susan Watts
With a breakthrough in gene editing, the prospect of breeding animals to harvest their organs looms. Chas Newkey-Burden and Susan Watts go head to headPigs are intelligent creatures with social instincts and emotional depth. We are so closely related to them that their hearts can replace our own. But what sort of person would kill a relative for spare parts?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Chas Newkey-Burden and Susan Watts Tags: Medical research Genetics Science Animal welfare Animals World news Biology Organ donation Health Source Type: news

A biventricular repair for Jayce ’s one-of-a-kind heart
Amanda Mattioli was working in Afghanistan as a government contractor and had just completed a whirlwind round of travel to three separate continents when she learned she was pregnant. The helicopter unit that took her back to the main base so she could return home for her pregnancy gave her a unit sticker to commemorate her baby’s first helicopter ride. Little did she know it would also mark the beginning of a much longer journey for her and her son, William “Jayce” James. Amanda got her first hint the ride would be bumpy at her 20-week ultrasound, when she learned Jayce’s heart was on the right si...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 14, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories atrioventricular canal Biventricular Repair Biventricular Repair Program Dr. Gerald Marx Dr. Pedro del Nido Heterotaxy syndrome Pulmonary atresia transposition of the great arteries Source Type: news

Gene editing brings pig organ transplant closer
Conclusion This promising research shows that it can be possible to use gene editing techniques to eliminate retroviruses from pigs, removing one of the potential barriers to using genetically modified pigs as organ donors for humans. There are a few points to note. As the researchers say, though they have shown that pig retroviruses can be passed onto human cells in the laboratory, we don't know what the effects would be in real life. We don't know whether pig retroviruses would be transferred to humans and whether they could cause cancers or immunodeficiency illnesses, for example. The research is at an early stage. The ...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

UR Medicine Provides 3 Heart Transplants in 5 Days
UR Medicine ’s Advanced Heart Failure team recently performed three heart transplant surgeries in a span of just five days at Strong Memorial Hospital, providing the Gift of Life for three men from across Upstate New York. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - August 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

WATCH: California man to get lifesaving kidney donation
Michael Hermogeno suffers from severe heart disease and has been on dialysis and waiting for a transplant for nearly a year. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Aum Cardiovascular gets permission to start using heart monitoring device
Northfield-based Aum Cardiovascular said Tuesday it's received permission from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to start selling a handheld digital stethoscope that pairs with an artificial-intelligence system to help medical experts look for signs of heart murmurs in patients with chest pain. The Star Tribune reports on the approval and Aum's plans for the device, called Cadence, which can identify sounds associated with issues such as heart valve disease, congestive heart failure and obstructive… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Patrick Rehkamp Source Type: news

Pearls From: Eileen Hsich, MD
(MedPage Today) -- Why is mortality while awaiting heart transplant higher for women? (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - August 8, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

HealthWatch: How Sweeteners And Sleep Influence Weight Gain
BOSTON (CBS) – A new report shows inadequate sleep could be making you fat. Researchers in the United Kingdom found that adults who slept an average of 6 hours a night weighed more and had a waist circumference about an inch larger than those getting 9 hours of sleep a night. They also had lower levels of HDL or “good” cholesterol. While most of us do not get 9 hours of sleep a night, we should all strive to get at least 7 to 8. That’s because there is growing evidence that chronic sleep deprivation can increase our risk of obesity and metabolic disorders like diabetes and high cholesterol, which...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News artificial sweeteners Dr. Mallika Marshall Health Watch Weight Loss Source Type: news

South Africa: Five-Year-Old Becomes Africa's Youngest Artificial Heart Recipient
[News24Wire] A five-year-old boy from Newcastle, KwaZulu-Natal, has become the youngest patient in Africa to receive an artificial heart, the Maboneng Heart Institute said on Wednesday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 2, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Bose joins $3m Series A for HF monitor dev Signature Medical
Signature Medical said today it closed a $2.5 million Series A funding round which was joined by audio tech giant Bose Corporation to support its AcoustiCare wearable heart failure monitor. Also joining the round was Riot Ventures, and Allied Minds, of which Signature Medical is a portfolio company of. “We are excited about Signature Medical’s innovative use of audio to help heart patients with their recovery, and we’re pleased to support Signature Medical in their efforts,” Bose Ventures’ Steve Romine said in a prepared release. “Signature Medical’s incorporation of artificial int...
Source: Mass Device - July 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Patient Monitoring signaturemedical Source Type: news

WATCH: 5-year-old heart-transplant recipient dies
Ari Schultz, the 5-year-old heart-transplant recipient who wow'd people with his positive attitude and joyful exuberance, has died. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle Source Type: news

HCA Midwest transplants 7 cardiologists from Olathe Health
HCA Midwest Health, the Kansas City area's largest hospital system, has poached seven cardiologists from Olathe Health. According to a release, the seven doctors are expected to practice at HCA Midwest's Overland Park hospitals — Menorah Medical Center and Overland Park Regional Medical Center — and will increase the health system's stable of cardiologists by more than 20 percent. The Midwest Heart& Vascular Specialists group already had 32 cardiologists. The cardiologists are: Dr. Thomas… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Andrew Vaupel Source Type: news

Artificial sweeteners found to cause weight gain
(Natural News) A study published online on the Canadian Medical Association Journal website revealed that using artificial sweeteners may increase the odds of long-term obesity and related conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. The use of artificial or non-nutritive sweeteners — such as sucrose, stevia, and aspartame — picked up steam in the previous... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This 3-D-printed artificial heart actually beats
A heart of gold may be hard to find, but a heart of silicone may be within reach. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zion, the world ’s youngest double hand transplant recipient, can now swing a baseball bat
In 2015, Zion Harvey became known to the public as the youngest person in the world to go through a successful bilateral hand transplant. Zion, who was 8 at the time, captured hearts with his upbeat attitude toward life and his wise-beyond-his-years expositions — on everything from losing both of his hands to an infection at age […]Related:Scientists plan to trick Zika-carrying mosquitoes into breeding themselves out of existenceUnapproved stem-cell treatments touted on federal database ClinicalTrials.gov, study saysA gunshot destroyed her face. A rare surgery just gave her a new one. (Source: Washin...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - July 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AliveCor partners with Mayo Clinic in sudden cardiac death study
AliveCor today announced it will collaborate with the Mayo Clinic to develop tools to screen for Long QT Syndrome by combining AliveCor’s artificial intelligence technology with patented algorithms from the Mayo Clinic. LQTS can be both congenital and acquired, and causes 3,000 to 4,000 sudden deaths in children and young adults a year, the Mountain View, Calif.-based company said. The acquired form of the syndrome can be caused by antibiotics or antidepressants and other medications. “This agreement makes our vision of universal screening for the early detection of long QT syndrome – a potentially lethal...
Source: Mass Device - July 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Patient Monitoring Research & Development AliveCor Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Stacie Pridden: My new lungs don't work any more
Stacie Pridden, 26, from Swindon, waited three years for a rare heart and double lung transplant. Here, she details her journey - and pleads for more governmental support. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists create a 3D-printed silicone artificial heart
A soft, artificial heart has been created using pioneering 3D printing technology by Swiss researchers. Made out of silicone, it is said to imitate the real thing 'in form and function'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Science: Sugar substitute effects not so sweet
Not so sweet. Switching out sucralose or other artificial sweeteners for sugar won ’t help you lose weight and may cause future health problems, researchers who reviewed multiple scientific studies on the topic said. Researchers found a link between consuming artificial sweeteners and higher risks of weight gain, Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, stroke and heart disease, Live Sci ence reported, while weight loss results were minimal. The purpose of the review was to determine the effects of non-nutritive… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 17, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Artificial sweeteners linked to risk of weight gain, heart disease and other health issues
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Artificial sweeteners may be associated with long-term weight gain and increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, according to a new study published in CMAJ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers create 3D printed, silicone artificial heart
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a 3D-printed silicone heart designed to beat in a similar fashion to human hearts. The soft artificial heart has both a right and left ventricle, much like a human heart, though the chambers are separated by an additional chamber instead of a septum, according to the report. The chamber is designed to be inflated and deflated by pressurized air to pump fluid from the blood chambers to replace the muscle contraction of the human heart. Researchers who developed the heart aimed to create a new device which overcomes disadvantages of mechanical blood pumps, which are susceptible to com...
Source: Mass Device - July 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Research & Development ethzurich Source Type: news

Separating food facts from fiction
UCLA Broadcast Studio As a nutritional epidemiologist devoted to prevention, Karin Michels has spent much of her career studying how health can be optimized through a proper diet.“People think it all comes down to their genes, but there is so much we can control by not smoking or being overweight, eating right and exercising at least moderately,” says Michels, professor and chair of the epidemiology department in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.What constitutes healthy eating? Michels, who frequently gives public talks on the topic, has found there are many widely held misconceptions that le...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news