Expanding donor list shortens heart transplant wait times, study finds
Accepting hearts from older donors and those with some chronic health conditions allowed surgeons at Yale New Haven Hospital to perform more transplants and reduce the time recipients spent on the waiting list. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Yale succeeds with a more inclusive approach to heart transplants
A more aggressive selection process for new heart recipients has more than quadrupled the number of successful transplants at Yale New Haven Hospital. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Severely Obese Heart Donors Not Tied to Adverse Transplant Outcomes
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2020 -- Severe obesity in organ donors is not associated with adverse heart transplant outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Circulation: Heart Failure. Elizabeth D. Krebs, M.D., from the University of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

C-MIMI: AI peer review can spot missed lung cancer
A peer review process that's driven by artificial intelligence (AI) can identify...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: C-MIMI: Use of AI in radiology is evolving Medical imaging AI market projected for strong growth Can AI diagnose heart failure on chest x-rays? AI aids classification of indeterminate lung nodules Ferrum deploys AI platform for lung cancer detection (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 15, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Study: Pesco-Mediterranean Diet May Be Ideal For Heart Health
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

C-MIMI: Use of AI in radiology is evolving
The use of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology to aid in image interpretation...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI reduces no-shows for MRI exams Medical imaging AI market projected for strong growth Can AI diagnose heart failure on chest x-rays? Radiologists, AI make a great team in screening mammo AI tool to detect imaging threat to debut at AIME 2020 (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 14, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

AI tool screens for heart disease using gut bacteria, study shows
Artificial intelligence can help screen adults for heart disease by detecting specific bacteria in the gut, according to a study published Thursday by the journal Hypertension. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can AI diagnose heart failure on chest x-rays?
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm can provide a promising level of...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Radiology harnesses x-ray's versatility and technology to battle COVID-19 AI can assess COVID-19 severity on chest x-rays Free AI software can help triage COVID-19 on x-ray AI may predict COVID-19 progression on chest x-rays Lung ultrasound beats chest x-ray for heart failure detection (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 8, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Selective recertification of pilots who have undergone a cardiac transplant - Norris A, Skaggs V, Kaye D, De Voll J, McGiffin D.
The objective of this study was to evaluate certificatio... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Featured Review: Oxygen therapy in adult intensive care patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome
Approaches to guiding oxygen therapy in adult intensive care patients with acute respiratory distress syndromeAcute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a very severe breathing problem with a high mortality rate (chance of dying). It has many potential causes, including viral infections such as COVID-19, and there are no specific treatments for it except for giving patients oxygen via a ventilator (artificial breathing machine) on an intensive care unit, often for long periods of time. However, large amounts of oxygen (either a high concentration of oxygen or oxygen administered for a long period of time) are known to i...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 1, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Katie Abbotts Source Type: news

Liver Disease Common After Fontan Procedure Liver Disease Common After Fontan Procedure
Most patients will develop liver fibrosis after their Fontan procedure, and many will require heart-liver transplants, according to a new review.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - August 20, 2020 Category: Radiology Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

New clues to a 500-year old mystery about the human heart
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute) Researchers used artificial intelligence and genetic analyses to examine the structure of the inner surface of the heart using 25 000 MRI scans. They found that the complex network of muscle fibres lining the inside of the heart, called trabeculae, allows blood to flow more efficiently and can influence the risk of heart failure. The study answers old questions in human physiology and leads to new directions for understanding heart diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI-Enabled ECG in the ED May Pinpoint Dyspnea Patients With Heart Failure AI-Enabled ECG in the ED May Pinpoint Dyspnea Patients With Heart Failure
Applying artificial intelligence to an ECG may rapidly identify left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients presenting to the emergency department, an observational study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Two-thirds of people on heart transplant lists survive at least a year, study finds
More than two-thirds of people on waiting lists for heart transplants survive for at least one year until a donor organ becomes available, a study published Wednesday by JAMA Cardiology found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Preparticipation CV Screening: Who Gets the Red Card? Preparticipation CV Screening: Who Gets the Red Card?
Which cardiac conditions are disqualifying for kids who play sports? From hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to heart transplant, Mayo Clinic's Jonathan Johnson and Bernard Gersh have answers that may surprise you.Mayo Clinic (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - August 12, 2020 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

Heart regeneration using stem cells: Why irregular heartbeats occur after transplantation
(Shinshu University) Increased predominance of the matured ventricular subtype in embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo elucidated why arrhythmia occurs post-transplant of hESC-CMs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 5, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This ER doctor and heart transplant survivor wants you to wear a mask
Dr. Alin Gragossian gets it. Wearing a mask, social distancing, frequently washing your hands, using a sanitizing gel or wipe on everything you touch -- all that gets old, fast. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart Transplant Activity Plummets Across US During COVID-19 Heart Transplant Activity Plummets Across US During COVID-19
Even in regions with low prevalence of virus, donor recovery and transplant volumes dropped in March, April, and May.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - July 24, 2020 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Heart Transplant Volumes Decreased in COVID-19 Era
FRIDAY, July 24, 2020 -- In the COVID-19 era, there has been a decrease in heart transplant (HT) volumes, according to a study published online July 22 in JAMA Cardiology. Ersilia M. DeFilippis, M.D., from the Columbia University Irving Medical... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 24, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center teaming with Mercy Health on Lima transplant clinic
Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center has built out a transplant clinic in Lima as part of a two-year partnership with Mercy Health to fill shortages in specialty care in more of the state. The clinic is opening on the campus of Mercy Health – St. Rita's Medical Center in Lima, about an hour north of Dayton. Patients can have evaluations before organ transplant surgery without repeat trips to Columbus. Consultations are starting with liver and kidney transplant, adding heart and lu ng specialties… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 24, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Carrie Ghose Source Type: news

Heart transplants declined sharply during pandemic
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) Heart transplants, donor hearts, and transplant waitlists all fell sharply at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, Columbia University researchers have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 24, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Changes in US heart transplant waitlist activity, volume during COVID-19 pandemic
(JAMA Network) National and regional changes in waitlist inactivations and additions, donor recovery and heart transplant volume during the COVID-19 pandemic are described in this observational study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMass Amherst team makes artificial energy source for muscle
(University of Massachusetts Amherst) Muscle physiologist Ned Debold and colleagues at UMass Amherst sought an alternative energy source to replace the body's usual one, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Such a source could control muscle activity, and might lead to new muscle spasm-calming treatments in cerebral palsy, for example, or activate or enhance skeletal muscle function in MS, ALS and chronic heart failure. They report this month that they have made a series of synthetic compounds to serve as alternative energy sources for the muscle protein myosin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New heart valve could transform open heart surgery for millions of patients globally
A new polymeric heart valve with a life span potentially longer than current artificial valves that would also prevent the need for the millions of patients with diseased heart valves to require life-long blood thinning tablets has been developed by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge. The team's latest in-vitro results, published in Biomaterials Science, suggest that the PoliValve could last for up to 25 years. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 29, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Translational Health Sciences, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol Heart Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

The tug-of-war at the heart of cellular symmetry
(Kyoto University) Researchers develop an artificial cell that brings to light the dynamics that govern each cell's internal symmetry. Two coexisting actomyosin networks with opposing functions exists in cells: a ring-like centripetal actomyosin that pushes toward the center, and radially-formed bulk actomyosin bridges that pull to the edges. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Meet OHSU's section head for the Heart Failure and Transplant program
Dr. Deborah Meyers, who started out her professional life as an artist, moved to Portland during the Covid-19 pandemic. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 23, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

A lifesaving lung transplant at UCLA for patient who was turned away by more than 20 hospitals
Miriam Merianos was a healthy mom of three living in Texas when she got the flu in November 2018.Before long, the virus worsened, fluid built up in her lungs and Merianos was strugglingto breathe. She was taken to a local hospital and placed onan ECMO machine, a device that puts oxygen into the blood, bypassing the heart and lungs.Merianos remained on the ECMO machine for 10 months — significantly longer than the typical treatment — and she was told her only chance for survival was a double lung transplant. But her doctors also told Merianos that surgery would be too risky for her. All of the antibodies her imm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 22, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Direct reprogramming: Defying the contemporary limitations in cardiac regeneration
(Bentham Science Publishers) Repair and regeneration of myocardium are the best possible therapy for the end-stage heart failure patients because the current therapies that can help restore the lost cardiomyocytes are limited to heart transplantation only. Emerging interests to directly reprogram a mammalian heart with minimal regenerative capacity holds a promising future in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart Transplant Patients May Have Higher COVID - 19 Mortality
However, presenting symptoms similar to those seen in the general population (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - June 19, 2020 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Infections, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Heart Transplant Patients May Have Higher COVID-19 Mortality
FRIDAY, June 19, 2020 -- Heart transplant patients admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 symptoms may be sicker than nontransplant patients, but they present with the same symptoms as the general population, according to a study recently published... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AHA News: Organ Transplants Make A Turnaround From COVID-19 Decline
Title: AHA News: Organ Transplants Make A Turnaround From COVID-19 DeclineCategory: Health NewsCreated: 6/18/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/19/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - June 19, 2020 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces Winners of 2020 Women in STEM2D Scholars Award
(New Brunswick, N.J. – June 18) – Johnson & Johnson today announced the six winners of the third annual Johnson & Johnson Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award. Each recipient, representing each of the STEM2D disciplines: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design, will receive a grant of $150,000 and three years of mentorship. Launched in June 2017, the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award seeks to fuel development of future female STEM2D leaders and feed the STEM2D talent pipeline by awarding and sponsoring women at critical points in their careers. The goal is to su...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AHA News: Organ Transplants Make A Turnaround From COVID-19 Decline
THURSDAY, June 18, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Along with so much else across America, the coronavirus jolted the system that provides lifesaving organ transplants. As hospitals scrambled and doctors grappled with the risks to... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 18, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Variability in Donor Heart Acceptance Practices in the U.S. Variability in Donor Heart Acceptance Practices in the U.S.
Variances in donor heart acceptance rates results in the underutilization of available organs. What factors may account for these disparities?American Journal of Transplantation (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Transplantation Journal Article Source Type: news

Subcutaneous Daratumumab Combination Resulted in Deep and Rapid Hematologic Responses and Improved Clinical Outcomes in the Treatment of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Light Chain (AL) Amyloidosis
RARITAN, NJ, June 13, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today results from the first randomized Phase 3 study investigating subcutaneous daratumumab[i] in the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed light chain (AL) amyloidosis, a rare and potentially fatal disease.[1],[2] The data demonstrated subcutaneous daratumumab in combination with cyclophosphamide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (D-CyBorD) resulted in a higher hematologic complete response rate (CR), (53 percent vs. 18 percent [P
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Building the medical affairs organisation of tomorrow
Medical affairs has a lot on its plate. As the pharma model has been shifting from primary-care, blockbuster-drug discovery through to more specialised medicine and gene therapy, the science has naturally become more complicated. ‘  The rise of artificial intelligence and big data means evidence generation now goes far beyond interventional studies, while the environment continues to demand more discussion around value and pricing.    Unwrapping complex science and value makes for a challenging remit for medical – without adding the shifting demands caused by the changing working patterns and g...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lucy Fulford Source Type: news

Building the medical affairs organisation of tomorrow
Medical affairs has a lot on its plate. As the pharma model has been shifting from primary-care, blockbuster-drug discovery through to more specialised medicine and gene therapy, the science has naturally become more complicated. ‘  The rise of artificial intelligence and big data means evidence generation now goes far beyond interventional studies, while the environment continues to demand more discussion around value and pricing.    Unwrapping complex science and value makes for a challenging remit for medical – without adding the shifting demands caused by the changing working patterns and g...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lucy Fulford Source Type: news

Research begins to rapidly understand deadly link between Covid-19 and cardiovascular diseases
Improved care for people with heart and circulatory disease suffering from COVID-19 could soon be available after the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) announced support for six flagship research programmes. Researchers from across the UK including the University of Bristol will combine data from hospitals, information about our health and lifestyle, genetic studies, and cutting-edge imaging and artificial intelligence techniques to better understand how the virus affects the heart and circulatory system. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, Health, Grants and Awards; Institutes, ALSPAC, Institutes, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School; Press Release Source Type: news

Texas Heart Institute & 7 Hills Pharma awarded NIH grant to improve stem cell transplants
(Texas Heart Institute) The Texas Heart Institute and 7 Hills Pharma (7 Hills) received a $1.9 million, Phase II STTR (R42) grant from the National Heart Lung Blood Institute to advance further their lead product 7HP349, a novel integrin activator, to define the optimal dosing schedule for cord blood transplant along with a focus on development and production of a formulation that meets safety standards for filing an IND application with the FDA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hibernation in mice: Are humans next?
(University of Tsukuba) University of Tsukuba and RIKEN researchers identified cells in the brain that can induce a hibernation-like state in mice or rats, species that do not naturally hibernate. In this state, oxygen consumption, body temperature, heart rate, and respiration were all lowered, and animals spontaneously recovered without any tissue damage. Inducing this state in humans could have several medical benefits, especially for buying time in emergency medical situations and extending the life of organs for transplant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

After COVID-19 Left Her Lungs ‘Full of Holes,’ First U.S. Coronavirus Patient Receives Double Lung Transplant
Surgeons in Chicago have given a new set of lungs to a young woman with severe lung damage from the coronavirus. Northwestern Medicine on Thursday announced the procedure, which took place last Friday. Only a few other COVID-19 survivors, in China and Europe, have received lung transplants. The Chicago patient is in her 20s and was on a ventilator and heart-lung machine for almost two months before her operation at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. The 10-hour procedure was challenging because the virus had left her lungs full of holes and almost fused to the chest wall, said Dr. Ankit Bharat, who performed the operation. S...
Source: TIME: Health - June 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Tanner / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news

Racial, gender disparities observed in heart transplant recipients with COVID-19 infection
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Researchers suggest focusing on disparities to help identify which patients with a heart transplant may be at higher risk for a worse course of COVID-19 infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 9, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

PIRs mediate innate myeloid cell memory to nonself MHC molecules
Immunological memory specific to previously encountered antigens is a cardinal feature of adaptive lymphoid cells. However, it is unknown whether innate myeloid cells retain memory of prior antigenic stimulation and respond to it more vigorously on subsequent encounters. In this work, we show that murine monocytes and macrophages acquire memory specific to major histocompatibility complex I (MHC-I) antigens, and we identify A-type paired immunoglobulin-like receptors (PIR-As) as the MHC-I receptors necessary for the memory response. We demonstrate that deleting PIR-A in the recipient or blocking PIR-A binding to donor MHC-...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Dai, H., Lan, P., Zhao, D., Abou-Daya, K., Liu, W., Chen, W., Friday, A. J., Williams, A. L., Sun, T., Chen, J., Chen, W., Mortin-Toth, S., Danska, J. S., Wiebe, C., Nickerson, P., Li, T., Mathews, L. R., Turnquist, H. R., Nicotra, M. L., Gingras, S., Tak Tags: Immunology reports Source Type: news

Consider the Promises and Challenges of Medical Image Analyses Using Machine Learning
Medical imaging saves millions of lives each year, helping doctors detect and diagnose a wide range of diseases, from cancer and appendicitis to stroke and heart disease. Because non-invasive early disease detection saves so many lives, scientific investment continues to increase. Artifical intelligence (AI) has the potential to revolutionize the medical imaging industry by sifting through mountains of scans quickly and offering providers and patients with life-changing insights into a variety of diseases, injuries, and conditions that may be hard to detect without the supplemental technology. Images are the largest source...
Source: MDDI - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Partha S. Anbil and Michael T. Ricci Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

COVID-19 Mortality Higher Among Heart Transplant Patients COVID-19 Mortality Higher Among Heart Transplant Patients
Heart transplant patients are a vulnerable population. A new study suggests a high risk for death if these patients contract COVID-19, pointing to the need for increased precautions and vigilance.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

AI can handle quality assessment of 3D cardiac MRI
An artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm can automatically assess image quality...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI-based image reconstruction poses challenges AMVC 2020: What now for artificial intelligence? 3D fusion improves CT, MRI heart disease diagnosis AI predicts heart attack, stroke on cardiac MRI 3D printing helps unravel rare cardiac anomalies (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 2, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Medtronic Issues Recall for HVAD Pump Outflow Graft
Medtronic is recalling its HeartWare HVAD pump outflow graft and outflow graft strain relief because of the risk of breaks and tears during the pre-implant pump assembly process. FDA has identified this as a Class I recall. The Dublin-based company said it has received 92 complaints. The recalled products according to FDA’s release are: HeartWare HVAD Pump Outflow Graft and Outflow Graft Strain Relief Model Numbers:HVAD Pump Outflow Graft: 1125 HVAD Pump Implant Kit: 1103 HVAD Implant Accessories Kit: 1153 Distribution Dates: March 1, 2018 to April 1, 2020   Medtronic said the use of the affe...
Source: MDDI - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Cardiovascular Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Fear of Covid-19 Leads Other Patients to Decline Critical Treatment
Psychologists say anxiety and uncertainty prompt irrational decisions — like turning down a transplant when an organ becomes available. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Hafner Tags: Transplants Emergency Medical Treatment Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Liver Fear (Emotion) Anxiety and Stress Cancer Heart your-feed-science your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Eko Moves Deeper into Telemedicine in the Age of Social Distancing
Physicians and clinicians are facing the unique challenge of practicing social distancing with their patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. It seems almost impossible because the practice of healthcare is so hands-on. However, Eko Health is hoping to overcome this challenge by marrying its technology with telemedicine. Last week, the digital health company launched Eko Telehealth, an artificial intelligence-powered telemedicine platform geared toward cardiac exams. “As we think of the future of healthcare, the fact the clinician and the patient aren’t in the same room shouldnâ€...
Source: MDDI - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Tags: COVID-19 Digital Health Source Type: news