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Contraceptive pills not proven to protect against the flu

Conclusion These are interesting scientific findings but they have limited implications. Animal studies are useful for giving an indication of how biological processes may work in humans but we're not identical. Then the scenarios tested here – the progesterone, or the flu injection – can be taken as representative of real-life in humans. For one thing all the mice had surgery to remove their ovaries before being infected. It makes sense that the mice that had been given some additional recovery boost in the form of hormone replacement may have been in a better health state than those left hormone depleted. They were also directly inoculated through the nose with a flu dose that has previously been demonstrated to be lethal in these animals, and the animals did die. It's just those with progesterone survived about an extra two days. The findings do suggest the progesterone hormone may have various roles in female health – also here seeming to improve lung cellular repair. However, since most women have the progesterone hormone naturally in their bodies this doesn't mean a great deal. We can't leap to saying that women who take progestogen-containing contraception hormones have added protection against infection, or are less likely to get flu. This certainly hasn't been tested. To reduce your risk of getting flu or spreading it to other people, you should always: make sure you wash your hands regularly with soap and warm water clean surfaces such...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

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Authors: Pinkas J, Bojar I, Gujski M, BartosiƄska J, Owoc A, Raczkiewicz D Abstract BACKGROUND Increasing age, increased body mass index (BMI), and abnormal lipid profiles contribute to an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. Women who have a perimenopausal and postmenopausal reduction in estrogen levels are a high-risk group for vitamin D deficiency. The aims of this study were to compare the serum vitamin D levels, lipid profile, and BMI between perimenopausal and postmenopausal women in non-manual employment, and to determine whether there were any interdependent factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three hundred w...
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
In this study, we explored in a prospective cohort of morbidly obese women undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGP) correlations between baseline anthropometrics, metabolic parameters, resting energy expenditure (REE), body composition, and 1-year % excess body mass index loss (%EBMIL). We also investigated risk factors for insufficient %EBMIL.MethodsOne hundred three consecutive women were prospectively evaluated at baseline (age 40.6  ± 11.2, weight 113.9 kg ± 15.3, BMI 43.3 ± 4.9 kg/m2) and 1  year after LRYGP. Weight, excess weight, brach...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe long-term result for weight loss after LAGB is unsatisfactory. The revision of failed LAGB to other bariatric surgeries is safe and can be performed in one stage with a low complication rate. Patients who underwent R-LSAGB had better weight loss results than the R-LSG or R-LRYGB patients.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
This study aims to assess the safety and durability of single-stage conversion from LAGB to SAGB in patients who are intolerant to LAGB and who also fail to lose weight, or re-gain weight.MethodsSeventy-four patients with BMI> 35 kg m−2 were selected from a prospective bariatric database between July 2012 and December 2015 for revisional laparoscopic SAGB surgery and were followed up at 6  weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months after their operation.ResultsThe mean BMI at 6  weeks, then 3, 6 and 12 months were 41.6 ± 7.66, 38.8 ± 7.54, 35.4 ± ...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionNot long ago, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) was considered a safe and effective treatment of morbid obesity; however, long-term outcomes revealed significant complication and failure rates. We hypothesized that LAGB has higher rates of weight loss failure, reoperation, and overall failure compared to laparoscopic gastric bypass (LRYGB) at long-term follow-up.MethodsA matched case-control study was performed. Patients who underwent primary LAGB or LRYGB at a university hospital between 2004 and 2011 were propensity matched for age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), and weight-related ...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsThere is a continued overall trend in the increased popularity of the SG and decreased utilization of the RYGB and LAGB, although growth of the SG appears to be slowing. This is also true among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Regardless of surgery type, underinsured and African-American race were more likely to be readmitted.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundEvaluating how morbidity and costs evolve for new bariatric centers is vital to understanding the expected length of time required to reach optimal outcomes and cost efficiencies. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to evaluate how morbidity and costs changed longitudinally during the first 5  years of a regionalized center of excellence system.MethodsThis was a longitudinal analysis of the first 5  years of a bariatric center of excellence system. The main outcomes of interest were all-cause morbidity and cost for the index admission. Predictors of interest included patient demographic...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
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