Will this new £5 mask kill the Covid virus?
Normal breathing alone can produce thousands of virus-laden aerosols - the volumes are even larger if you shout, cough or sneeze. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hiccups, tinnitus and stammering are bizarre signs of Covid too, say doctors
A constant cough, high temperature, thumping headache and a sudden loss of smell or taste are all common symptoms. But what is clear is that Covid-19 can affect the body from head to toe. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DARZALEX FASPRO ® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj) Becomes the First FDA-Approved Treatment for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Light Chain (AL) Amyloidosis
January 15, 2021 (HORSHAM, Pa.) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DARZALEX FASPRO® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj), a subcutaneous formulation of daratumumab, in combination with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone (D-VCd) for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed light chain (AL) amyloidosis.[1] DARZALEX FASPRO® is the first and only FDA-approved treatment for patients with this blood cell disorder that is associated with the production of an abnormal protein, which leads to th...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Covid new strain symptoms: Ten signs indicating you may have already had COVID-19
COVID new strain symptoms: Signs of a COVID-19 infection have ranged from a cough to more peculiar ones such as a loss of taste. Now experts believe having any of these ten symptoms could indicate you have been previously infected without even realising it. What are the symptoms? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GA EMT Saving Lives During COVID Thanks to High School Training Program
Mark Rice Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Ga. (MCT) Alejandro Corredor is the first participant in the two-year-old emergency medical technician program at Shaw High School to pass the national certification exam. He also is the first to be hired. “We’re 18-year-old kids,” he told the Ledger-Enquirer, “but we’re doing big things.” Big things such as saving lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even before the winter surge in coronavirus cases, Corredor said, the medics at EMS Care Ambulance in Columbus went on every call assuming the patient was COVID-1...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News News Feed Spotlight Training EMT Georgia Source Type: news

GA EMT Saving Lives During COVID Thanks to High School Training Program
Mark Rice Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Ga. (MCT) Alejandro Corredor is the first participant in the two-year-old emergency medical technician program at Shaw High School to pass the national certification exam. He also is the first to be hired. “We’re 18-year-old kids,” he told the Ledger-Enquirer, “but we’re doing big things.” Big things such as saving lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even before the winter surge in coronavirus cases, Corredor said, the medics at EMS Care Ambulance in Columbus went on every call assuming the patient was COVID-1...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News News Feed Spotlight Training EMT Georgia Source Type: news

GA EMT Saving Lives During COVID Thanks to High School Training Program
Mark Rice Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Ga. (MCT) Alejandro Corredor is the first participant in the two-year-old emergency medical technician program at Shaw High School to pass the national certification exam. He also is the first to be hired. “We’re 18-year-old kids,” he told the Ledger-Enquirer, “but we’re doing big things.” Big things such as saving lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even before the winter surge in coronavirus cases, Corredor said, the medics at EMS Care Ambulance in Columbus went on every call assuming the patient was COVID-1...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News News Feed Spotlight Training EMT Georgia Source Type: news

GA EMT Saving Lives During COVID Thanks to High School Training Program
Mark Rice Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Ga. (MCT) Alejandro Corredor is the first participant in the two-year-old emergency medical technician program at Shaw High School to pass the national certification exam. He also is the first to be hired. “We’re 18-year-old kids,” he told the Ledger-Enquirer, “but we’re doing big things.” Big things such as saving lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even before the winter surge in coronavirus cases, Corredor said, the medics at EMS Care Ambulance in Columbus went on every call assuming the patient was COVID-1...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News News Feed Spotlight Training EMT Georgia Source Type: news

GA EMT Saving Lives During COVID Thanks to High School Training Program
Mark Rice Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Ga. (MCT) Alejandro Corredor is the first participant in the two-year-old emergency medical technician program at Shaw High School to pass the national certification exam. He also is the first to be hired. “We’re 18-year-old kids,” he told the Ledger-Enquirer, “but we’re doing big things.” Big things such as saving lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even before the winter surge in coronavirus cases, Corredor said, the medics at EMS Care Ambulance in Columbus went on every call assuming the patient was COVID-1...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News News Feed Spotlight Training EMT Georgia Source Type: news

GA EMT Saving Lives During COVID Thanks to High School Training Program
Mark Rice Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Ga. (MCT) Alejandro Corredor is the first participant in the two-year-old emergency medical technician program at Shaw High School to pass the national certification exam. He also is the first to be hired. “We’re 18-year-old kids,” he told the Ledger-Enquirer, “but we’re doing big things.” Big things such as saving lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even before the winter surge in coronavirus cases, Corredor said, the medics at EMS Care Ambulance in Columbus went on every call assuming the patient was COVID-1...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: News News Feed Spotlight Training EMT Georgia Source Type: news

Covid tongue warning - the 'strange' symptom of coronavirus in your mouth
COVID symptoms usually include a high fever, a new cough, and losing your sense of taste or smell. But a scientist has now warned of a "strange" sign of infection inside your mouth. Would you recognise the symptoms of Covid tongue? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Disposable helmet retains cough droplets, minimizes transmission to dentists
(American Institute of Physics) Dentists and otolaryngologists are at particular risk of infection of COVID-19, since they need direct access to the mouth, nose, and throat of patients. The current solutions are expensive, not highly effective, and not very accessible. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss their design of an open-faced helmet that is connected to a medical-grade air filtration pump from the top that creates a reverse flow of air to prevent cough droplets from exiting the helmet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

2 Gorillas In California Contract The Coronavirus
Gorillas at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park developed a cough last week. The apes were tested and found to have the virus. It may have come through a human staffer, despite precautions.(Image credit: Christina Simmons/San Diego Zoo Global Archives) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dustin Jones Source Type: news

An Appreciation for Vaccines, and How Far They Have Come
The DTP vaccine teaches us about how brilliant vaccine technology can be, but also how it can be studied and improved over time. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Perri Klass, M.D. Tags: Whooping Cough Vaccination and Immunization Tetanus Smallpox Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Children and Childhood Diphtheria Poliomyelitis Source Type: news

Africa: Unsung Heroes in Africa's Covid-19 Response
[Africa Renewal] Thirty-two-year-old Mariam Traor é, a community health worker in Mali, starts her day with a COVID-19 self-check, including body temperature and other symptoms such as cough, sore throat, loss of smell or taste. If all is good, Ms. Traoré then gears up with a mask and face shield before leaving her house in Yirimadio, a district on the outskirts of the capital Bamako. She remembers to carry enough gloves to protect herself and others when visiting patients across her local town. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 9, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA restricts use of prescription codeine pain and cough medicines and tramadol pain medicines in children; recommends against use in breastfeeding women
FDA is restricting the use of codeine and tramadol medicines in children. Codeine is approved to treat pain and cough, and tramadol is approved to treat pain. These medicines carry serious risks, including slowed or difficult breathing and death, which appear to be a greater risk in children younger than 12 years and must not be used in these children. These medicines should also be limited in some older children. Single-ingredient codeine and all tramadol-containing products are FDA-approved only for use in adults. We are also recommending against using codeine and tramadol medicines in breastfeeding mothers due to possib...
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - January 7, 2021 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

EMS Needs to Assume the Role of Messaging for COVID-19
When the nation refers to frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is nobody closer to the front than EMS workers. Not only do EMS workers enter the high viral loaded homes of people sick with COVID-19, but they also then spend up to about 30 minutes in the back of a poorly ventilated enclosed space with that person during treatment and transport. This exposure time places the EMS provider in direct danger – making the process of donning, decontaminating and doffing PPE of paramount importance. The beginning of the pandemic saw old protocols used for severe hypoxia. This led to an enormous amount of intu...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Commentary Coronavirus Exclusives Patient Care EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

EMS Needs to Assume the Role of Messaging for COVID-19
When the nation refers to frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is nobody closer to the front than EMS workers. Not only do EMS workers enter the high viral loaded homes of people sick with COVID-19, but they also then spend up to about 30 minutes in the back of a poorly ventilated enclosed space with that person during treatment and transport. This exposure time places the EMS provider in direct danger – making the process of donning, decontaminating and doffing PPE of paramount importance. The beginning of the pandemic saw old protocols used for severe hypoxia. This led to an enormous amount of intu...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Commentary Coronavirus Exclusives Patient Care EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

EMS Needs to Assume the Role of Messaging for COVID-19
When the nation refers to frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is nobody closer to the front than EMS workers. Not only do EMS workers enter the high viral loaded homes of people sick with COVID-19, but they also then spend up to about 30 minutes in the back of a poorly ventilated enclosed space with that person during treatment and transport. This exposure time places the EMS provider in direct danger – making the process of donning, decontaminating and doffing PPE of paramount importance. The beginning of the pandemic saw old protocols used for severe hypoxia. This led to an enormous amount of intu...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Commentary Coronavirus Exclusives Patient Care EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

EMS Needs to Assume the Role of Messaging for COVID-19
When the nation refers to frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is nobody closer to the front than EMS workers. Not only do EMS workers enter the high viral loaded homes of people sick with COVID-19, but they also then spend up to about 30 minutes in the back of a poorly ventilated enclosed space with that person during treatment and transport. This exposure time places the EMS provider in direct danger – making the process of donning, decontaminating and doffing PPE of paramount importance. The beginning of the pandemic saw old protocols used for severe hypoxia. This led to an enormous amount of intu...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Commentary Coronavirus Exclusives Patient Care EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

EMS Needs to Assume the Role of Messaging for COVID-19
When the nation refers to frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is nobody closer to the front than EMS workers. Not only do EMS workers enter the high viral loaded homes of people sick with COVID-19, but they also then spend up to about 30 minutes in the back of a poorly ventilated enclosed space with that person during treatment and transport. This exposure time places the EMS provider in direct danger – making the process of donning, decontaminating and doffing PPE of paramount importance. The beginning of the pandemic saw old protocols used for severe hypoxia. This led to an enormous amount of intu...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Commentary Coronavirus Exclusives Patient Care EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

EMS Needs to Assume the Role of Messaging for COVID-19
When the nation refers to frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is nobody closer to the front than EMS workers. Not only do EMS workers enter the high viral loaded homes of people sick with COVID-19, but they also then spend up to about 30 minutes in the back of a poorly ventilated enclosed space with that person during treatment and transport. This exposure time places the EMS provider in direct danger – making the process of donning, decontaminating and doffing PPE of paramount importance. The beginning of the pandemic saw old protocols used for severe hypoxia. This led to an enormous amount of intu...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Commentary Coronavirus Exclusives Patient Care EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

Dispersants associated with health symptoms in cleanup workers
NIEHS study reports worker exposure to dispersants after the Deepwater Horizon spill is linked to cough, skin irritation, and other symptoms. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 6, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Finding time for creativity will give you respite from worries
Drawing, singing, writing, knitting … lose yourself in something creative to find inner calm. You might also come up with solutions to problemsWhen the first lockdown began in March, my son developed a persistent cough. I was anxious and when I couldn ’t sleep I would write. Inspired by the authorElizabeth Gilbert, whose soothing Instagram I would turn to in the ungodly hours, and reassured by her pragmatic take on creative endeavours, I poured my anxiety on to the page and lost myself in my story.My son ’s cough wasn’t Covid-19 as it turned out, but writing about it had helped me manage my fears a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sharon Walker Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Featured Review: Does behavioural support help people to stop smoking?
Behavioural interventions for smoking cessation: an overview and network meta ‐analysisKey messages Behavioural support can help more people to stop smoking for six months or longer, without causing unwanted effects.Some types of support appear to work better than others. More studies are needed to identify the best ways to support people who are trying to stop smoking, and to identify the best people to support them.Stopping smokingThe best thing people who smoke can do for their health is to stop smoking. People breathe more easily and cough less when they stop smoking. Stopping also lowers their risk of getting l...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - December 31, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Rachel Klabunde Source Type: news

High blood pressure symptoms: How frequently do you cough? It could be a sign
HIGH blood pressure is famously branded a "silent killer" due to its absence of symptoms. However, research suggests your cough may signal you're at risk of hypertension. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Consumer Health: Treating bladder control problems in women
Urinary incontinence, or the loss of bladder control, is a common and often embarrassing problem. Severity can range from occasionally leaking urine when you cough or sneeze to having an urge to urinate that's so sudden and strong that you don't get to a toilet in time. Bladder control problems may require medical attention for [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 29, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Don ’t Let the Pandemic Stop Your Shots
Even as older adults await the coronavirus vaccine, many are skipping the standard ones. That ’s not wise, health experts say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paula Span Tags: your-feed-science Whooping Cough Shingles (Disease) Diphtheria Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Influenza Elderly Epidemics Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Pneumonia your-feed-healthcare Vaccination and Immunization Hepatitis Tetanus Minorities Source Type: news

Nigeria: The Year of the Face Mask
[This Day] What a year. WhatAyear. What. A. Year. Muddled and fragmented. Masked up and washed up. It was a tasteless year, the year we could barely smell the coffee, the year humanity was severely fatigued. It was the year that soaked our hands in an ocean of sanitizers and distanced us from each other. It was the year that mercilessly coughed up the sick and the elderly, raising their temperature and taking their breath away. We cannot even cough in peace; we will start suspecting we have caught the virus. Someone, (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 27, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Chronic Cough: The Long Haul Approach Chronic Cough: The Long Haul Approach
The Curbsiders share timely tips for managing the ever-so-common chronic cough in primary care.The Curbsiders (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine Commentary Source Type: news

Masks not enough to stop COVID-19's spread without distancing
(American Institute of Physics) Wearing a mask may not be enough to prevent the spread of COVID-19 without social distancing. In Physics of Fluids, researchers tested how different types of mask impacted the spread of droplets that carry the coronavirus when we cough or sneeze. Every material tested dramatically reduced the number of droplets that were spread. But at distances of less than 6 feet, enough droplets to potentially cause illness still made it through several of the materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Is a Cough Contagious
? (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - December 17, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Is Whooping Cough Pertussis Contagious
Is Whooping Cough (Pertussis) Contagious? (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - December 15, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Oura Ring detects the onset of fever, a common COVID-19 symptom
This report represents early findings from the TemPredict study, which has a goal to develop an algorithm that predicts the onset of symptoms such as fever, cough and fatigue.     (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - December 14, 2020 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

COVID-19 may also invade the central nervous system, cause neurological illnesses
(Cleveland Clinic) COVID-19 is known primarily as a respiratory disease, with symptoms that include cough, shortness of breath, and, in severe cases, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Now, Cleveland Clinic researchers note in a recent review that infection with the coronavirus may also affect the central nervous system and cause corresponding neurological disorders, including ischemic stroke, encephalitis, encephalopathy and epileptic seizures.According to the review published in Cells, the symptoms of COVID-19-related neurological manifestations include dizziness, headache, a loss of consciousness and ata...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

COVID-19: persistent symptoms in one third of cases
(Universit é de Gen è ve) A team of physicians and epidemiologists from the University of Geneva the University Hospitals of Geneva and the General Health Directorate of the State of Geneva followed nearly 700 people who tested positive for SARS-COV2 but did not require hospitalisation. Six weeks after diagnosis, 33% of them still reported suffering from fatigue, loss of smell or taste, shortness of breath or cough. These results call for better communication, reminding that SARS-CoV-2 infection is not trivial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news