What Happened to the Flu This Year?
FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 -- The United States has far fewer flu cases than normal, and experts say it's probably due to measures people are taking to protect themselves from COVID-19. Flu season usually peaks between December and February. Influenza... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 15, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Fewer Children Died in 2020, Despite the Pandemic. Experts Are Trying to Figure Out Why
Since the global pandemic began, one of the grimmer features of daily life has been watching the coronavirus death count tick up and up as the months have gone by. With so much unnecessary death in 2020, it’s surprising that in many countries, at least according to preliminary numbers, there was one significant group that actually saw its death rates fall: children. Data from the Human Mortality Database, a research project run by a global team of demographers, suggest that COVID-19 did not reverse years-long declines in child mortality, despite a mortality surge in the general population. Demographers, pediatricians...
Source: TIME: Health - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

What Should You Know about COVID-19 Vaccines and Pregnancy
What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines if I’m pregnant? Vaccination is likely the best way to prevent COVID-19 in pregnancy, when risks for severe illness and death from the virus are higher than usual. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says COVID-19 vaccinations should not be withheld from pregnant women, and that women should discuss individual risks and benefits with their health care providers. The U.S. government’s emergency authorization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines being rolled out for priority groups doesn’t list pregnancy as a reason to withhold the ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Model analyzes how viruses escape the immune system
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have devised a way to computationally model viral escape, using models that were originally developed to model language. The model can predict which sections of viral surface proteins, including those of influenza, HIV, and SARS-CoV-2, are more likely to mutate in a way that allows the virus to evade the human immune system. It can also identify sections that are less likely to mutate, making them good targets for new vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

COVID Protections Suppressed Flu Season in US COVID Protections Suppressed Flu Season in US
Last fall, health experts said it was possible the United States could experience an easy 2020-21 flu season because health measures to fight COVID-19 would also thwart the spread of influenza.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - January 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Learning the language of viral evolution and escape
The ability for viruses to mutate and evade the human immune system and cause infection, called viral escape, remains an obstacle to antiviral and vaccine development. Understanding the complex rules that govern escape could inform therapeutic design. We modeled viral escape with machine learning algorithms originally developed for human natural language. We identified escape mutations as those that preserve viral infectivity but cause a virus to look different to the immune system, akin to word changes that preserve a sentence’s grammaticality but change its meaning. With this approach, language models of influenza ...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hie, B., Zhong, E. D., Berger, B., Bryson, B. Tags: Computers, Mathematics, Immunology reports Source Type: news

Resident help for fighting influenza
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Olingy, C. Tags: twis Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Roche ’s Xofluza approved by the European Commission for the treatment of influenza, the first new influenza antiviral for patients in almost 20 years
Basel, 11 January 2021 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved Xofluza® (baloxavir marboxil) for the treatment of uncomplicated influenza in patients aged 12 years and above. In addition, the EC has approved Xofluza for post-exposure prophylaxis of influenza i n individuals aged 12 years and above. Post-exposure prophylaxis aims to prevent influenza in individuals following contact with someone infected with the influenza virus. The Commission’s Decision follows the positive opinion received from the European Medicines Agency’s Committee for ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - January 11, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche ’s Xofluza approved by the European Commission for the treatment of influenza, the first new influenza antiviral for patients in almost 20 years
Basel, 11 January 2021 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved Xofluza® (baloxavir marboxil) for the treatment of uncomplicated influenza in patients aged 12 years and above. In addition, the EC has approved Xofluza for post-exposure prophylaxis of influenza i n individuals aged 12 years and above. Post-exposure prophylaxis aims to prevent influenza in individuals following contact with someone infected with the influenza virus. The Commission’s Decision follows the positive opinion received from the European Medicines Agency’s Committee for ...
Source: Roche Media News - January 11, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

$2.25 million NIH grant enables exploration of a pathway to better vaccines
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) To build better vaccines, scientists want to know more about how our bodies make adequate numbers of effective, durable antibodies against the influenza virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GPs in England see big drop in common cold and flu cases
Exclusive: coronavirus restrictions and increased uptake of flu vaccine is likely explanation, say expertsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageGPs in England have reported a big drop in cases of influenza, colds and other common infections – with cold rates now about a quarter of the five-year average, and flu at about a 20th of the usual level for this time of year.Social restrictions brought in to curb transmission of coronavirus combined with an increased uptake of flu vaccine is the most likely explanation, experts say.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Flu Common cold World news Infectious diseases Medical research Society Science Health policy England UK news GPs Source Type: news

Laws Promoting Flu Shot for Hospital Workers Can Cut Deaths
FRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2021 -- State laws promoting hospital worker vaccination against influenza may be effective for reducing monthly pneumonia and influenza mortality rates, especially among the elderly, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 8, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Risk of Complications Associated With COVID-19 and Influenza Risk of Complications Associated With COVID-19 and Influenza
This study found a five times higher risk for in-hospital death and increased risk for respiratory and other complications in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 compared to those with influenza.Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news

The COVID-19 Virus Is Mutating. What Does That Mean for Vaccines?
As we enter the second year of living with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus is celebrating its invasion of the world’s population with yet more mutated forms that help it to spread more easily from person to person. One, first detected in the U.K. in December, has already raised alarms about whether the COVID-19 virus is now escaping from the protection that vaccines just being rolled out now might provide. The variant has also been found in the U.S. Already, U.K. officials have tightened lockdowns in England, Scotland and Wales, and over the holidays, more than 40 countries banned travelers from the region ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

If Covid-19 is Primarily a ‘First World’ Virus, Why is the Global South in Lockdown?
A lockdown closer home. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres walking the empty corridors of the UN Secretariat building in New York in 2020. Credit: United NationsBy Darini Rajasingham-SenanayakeCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Jan 7 2021 (IPS) The currently available Covid-19 vaccines have been authorized for ‘emergency use ‘in Europe and North America. This is due to an apparent spike in Covid-19 flu cases in the northern hemisphere as winter advances. Highly advertised vaccines are being produced and rolled out at ‘warped speed’ by powerful pharmaceutical and bio-technology companies headquartered in Euro-Ameri...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Darini Rajasingham-Senanayake Tags: Aid Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Flu Activity Currently Lower Than Last 2 Seasons In Massachusetts
BOSTON (CBS) – Flu activity is currently low in Massachusetts, a good sign as the state struggles like the rest of the country with the coronavirus pandemic. According to the latest weekly flu report from the Department of Public Health, the percent of “influenza-like illness visits” to hospitals and outpatient facilities is at 1.11 percent. That’s lower than the previous two seasons in the same week. The percentage of hospitalizations is also lower than the last two flu seasons at this time. The report said “all regions are reporting minimal influenza-like illness activity.” Authorities...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Flu influenza Source Type: news

NUS researchers develop foldable tent for safe dental care during the pandemic
National University of SingaporeScience Business AnnouncementIMAGE: The Dental Droplet and Aerosol Reducing Tent (Dental DART) was developed by NUS researchers (from left) Professor Freddy Boey, Mr Sudarshan Anantharaman, Associate Professor Vinicius Rosa and their team.viewmore Credit: National University of SingaporeDental treatments are performed at close proximity to the mouths and noses of the patients, and the procedures are often related to the generation of aerosols as well as handling of oral fluids and blood. This puts dentists at a high risk of exposure to COVID-19, and other critical infectious diseas...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - January 6, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Study: Mandating flu shots for hospital workers reduces viral spread, deaths
States with laws mandating flu shots for hospital workers saw reductions in deaths from influenza and pneumonia across their populations, a study published Friday by the Annals of Internal Medicine found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Care bundles for improving outcomes in patients with COVID19 or related conditions in intensive care a rapid scoping review, Cochrane Library
Main results We included 21 studies and identified three ongoing studies. The studies were of variable designs and included a systematic review of standardised approaches to caring for critically ill patients in ICU, including but not exclusive to care bundles (1 study), a randomised trial (1 study), prospecti ve and retrospective cohort studies (4 studies), before and after studies (7 studies), observational quality improvement reports (4 studies), case series/case reports (3 studies) and audit (1 study). The studies were conducted in eight countries, most commonly China (5 studies) and the USA (4 studie s), were publis...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

National flu and COVID-19 surveillance reports, PHE (updated 31st December 2020)
National influenza and COVID-19 report, monitoring COVID-19 activity, seasonal flu and other seasonal respiratory illnesses. Update in this version (published 31st December 2020) - week 53 report, graphs and data table added. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Influenza A(H1N2) variant virus – Brazil
On 15 December 2020, the Brazil Ministry of Health reported the second confirmed human infection with influenza A(H1N2) variant virus [A(H1N2)v] in Brazil in 2020. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - January 4, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Influenza vaccination cost effective in primary school children
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - January 1, 2021 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Flu Season: No Effect on Elective Heart Surgery Result in Seniors Flu Season: No Effect on Elective Heart Surgery Result in Seniors
Among seniors who underwent elective heart surgery during influenza seasons,"no consistent associations" were seen between the severity of the season and risk of death or readmission.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Don ’t Let the Pandemic Stop Your Shots
Even as older adults await the coronavirus vaccine, many are skipping the standard ones. That ’s not wise, health experts say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paula Span Tags: your-feed-science Whooping Cough Shingles (Disease) Diphtheria Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Influenza Elderly Epidemics Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Pneumonia your-feed-healthcare Vaccination and Immunization Hepatitis Tetanus Minorities Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Autopsy, a Fading Practice, Revealed Secrets of COVID-19
By MARION RENAULT Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches? At hospital morgues, which have been steadily losing prominence and funding over several decades, pathologists were busily dissecting the disease’s first victims — and finding some answ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Here's what we know about the new variant of coronavirus | Sharon Peacock
My team at the Genomics UK consortium sequenced the new Sars-CoV-2 variant, but we ’ll need more evidence to understand how it might change the pandemicIt was always predictable that the genome of Sars-CoV-2 would mutate. After all, that ’s what viruses and other micro-organisms do. The Sars-CoV-2 genome accumulates around one or two mutations every month as it circulates. In fact, its rate of change is much lower than those of other viruses that we know about. For example, seasonal influenza mutates at such a rate that a new vacc ine has to be introduced each year.Even so, over time the virus population will a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sharon Peacock Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Source Type: news

Covid Vaccine During Pregnancy? Even Doctors Struggle With This Question
A doctor struggles with the lack of data surrounding the Covid-19 vaccine and pregnancy. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mara Gordon, M.D. Tags: Pregnancy and Childbirth Clinical Trials Vaccination and Immunization Workplace Hazards and Violations Protective Clothing and Gear Influenza Source Type: news

Risk for Death, Complications Higher With COVID-19 Versus Flu
MONDAY, Dec. 21, 2020 -- COVID-19 is associated with an increased risk for extrapulmonary organ dysfunction, death, and increased health care resource use compared with seasonal influenza, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in The... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What You Can Do Post-Vaccine, and When
Particularly in the early months of vaccination, many activities should wait, experts say — and plan to keep your masks. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire Cain Miller, Margot Sanger-Katz and Katherine J. Wu Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Content Type: Service Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Influenza Disease Rates Source Type: news

Uganda: Is Uganda Ready to Acquire the Covid-19 Vaccine?
[Monitor] The world's population, years over, has been affected by a number of viral diseases such a Ebola and Influenza which, in some cases, have caused millions of deaths. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 21, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Is Mutating. What Does That Mean for Us?
Officials in Britain and South Africa claim new variants are more easily transmitted. There ’s a lot more to the story, scientists say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: your-feed-science Vaccination and Immunization Immune System Antibodies Influenza Evolution (Biology) Genetics and Heredity Viruses Source Type: news

Molecular Point-of-Care Tests Linked to Better Influenza Detection, Treatment, Outcomes Molecular Point-of-Care Tests Linked to Better Influenza Detection, Treatment, Outcomes
Routine use of molecular point-of-care tests yielded superior influenza detection and improvements in appropriate antiviral and isolation facility use compared to usual care in an open-label randomized controlled trial in the UK.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - December 19, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

CDC: Fewer-than-normal flu cases may be due to increased vaccination
Well under 1% of nasal and throat samples screened for influenza nationally have tested positive for the seasonal virus, according to figures released Friday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cadmium Burden Linked to Mortality From Flu, Pneumonia
FRIDAY, Dec. 18, 2020 -- Cadmium burden is associated with increased mortality from influenza or pneumonia in U.S. adults, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in Environmental Health Perspectives. Sung Kyun Park, Sc.D., M.P.H., from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

For Seniors, Functional Decline After Flu Hospitalization May Be Long-Lasting
THURSDAY, Dec. 17, 2020 -- Functional loss following a hospitalization for influenza or acute respiratory illness (ARI) can be persistent and catastrophic among older adults, according to a study published online Dec. 8 in the Journal of the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 17, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What Makes COVID-19 Different From the Flu?
Living through the COVID-19 pandemic is hard. TIME’s advice column is here to help. Trying to decide if that dinner party is safe to attend? Fighting through your quarantine fatigue? Our health reporters will consult experts who can help find a safe and practical solution. Send us your pandemic dilemmas at covidquestions@time.com, and we will choose some to answer in a column on TIME.com. Today, Judy Jones from Missouri asks: Please help. I have a few friends who refuse to take the risks of COVID-19 seriously. They claim that it is no worse than the flu, and that there have always been a certain amount of deaths each...
Source: TIME: Health - December 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

Comparative evaluation of clinical manifestations and risk of death in patients admitted to hospital with covid-19 and seasonal influenza: cohort study, BMJ
Study (n=16,317) reports that among people admitted to hospital, compared with seasonal influenza, covid-19 was associated with increased risk of extrapulmonary organ dysfunction, death, and increased health resource use. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - December 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

< i > The Lancet Respiratory Medicine < /i > : COVID-19 causes more severe disease than seasonal influenza, comparison of data from over 130,000 hospitalised patients confirms
(The Lancet) Nearly twice as many people were admitted to hospital for COVID-19 at the height of the pandemic than were for influenza at the peak of the 2018/2019 flu season, a study of French national data published today inThe Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal has found (COVID-19, 89,530 patients vs influenza, 45,819 patients). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news