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‘I don’t want to imagine a world without giant snakes in it’
Neglected by most conservation groups, the Burmese python has a champion in Shariar Caesar Rahman.Here ’s a fact that illuminates many of the realities of global conservation: we know more about Burmese pythons in Florida – where they are a destructive invader – than about their lives in their natural range in Southeast Asia, where their numbers are plummeting and their very long-term survival may be up in the air.Armed with a shoestring budget and a love for mega-snakes, Shariar Caesar Rahman is trying to rectify this incongruent reality by doing something no one has done in Bangladesh before. He ’...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeremy Hance Tags: Environment Science Wildlife Animal behaviour Bangladesh Biology South and Central Asia World news Snakes Reptiles Animals Source Type: news

How forest fires spoil wine
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) If wine is cultivated where forest fires occur more often, such as in Australia or Italy, aromas that make the alcoholic drink unpalatable can develop in the finished product. Until now, it wasn't known why this is so and what happens at the molecular level. A team at Technical University Munich is describing why the smoke aromas are stored in grapes and is thus showing the way for growers to eliminate this degradation in quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Influence of C-section, formula feeding and antibiotics on infant gut microbiome
(Frontiers) Researchers characterize the combined influence of cesarean delivery, antibiotic treatment, and formula feeding on the development of gut microbiota in infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

After 15 years in vegetative state, man responds to nerve stimulation
A car accident at 20 years old left a French man in a vegetative state for 15 years. But after neurosurgeons implanted a vagus nerve stimulator in his chest, the man, now 35, is showing signs of consciousness, according to a study published Monday in the journal Current Biology. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

After 15 years in vegetative state, man shows signs of response
A car accident at 20 years old left a French man in a vegetative state for 15 years. But after neurosurgeons implanted a vagus nerve stimulator in his chest, the man, now 35, is showing signs of consciousness, according to a study published Monday in the journal Current Biology. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New open-access journal Metabarcoding & Metagenomics joins the lines of publisher Pensoft
(Pensoft Publishers) The new innovative academic journal Metabarcoding and Metagenomics is launched to welcome novel papers on environmental DNA, metabarcoding and metagenomics from basic and applied aspects. Issued via ARPHA -- the first ever publishing platform to support manuscripts all the way from authoring to peer review to publication and dissemination -- the new journal is to host a wide range of research outcomes, including data, models, methods, workflows, software, perspectives, opinions, implementation strategies and conventional research articles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Getting the measure of mud
(St John's College, University of Cambridge) For the first time, researchers have been able to use mud deposited on the depths of the ocean floor to measure changes in the speed of deep-sea currents. Using mud as a current meter could help scientists to identify fluctuating patterns in ocean current speeds stretching back into prehistory, enabling climate change researchers to get a better sense of how currents behave over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study examines legacies of rainforest burning in British Columbia
(Wiley) Analyses of temperate rain forests located on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada, suggest that for centuries, humans have intentionally used fire to manage plant life. The findings are published in the Journal of Biogeography. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Group project? Taking turns, working with friends may improve grades
(University of Washington) A University of Washington-led study of college students has found that the social dynamics of a group, such as whether one person dominates the conversation or whether students work with a friend, affect academic performance. Put simply, the more comfortable students are, the better they do, which yields benefits beyond the classroom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High-fidelity recording of molecular geometry with DNA 'nanoscopy'
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A team at Harvard's Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering led by core faculty member Peng Yin, Ph.D., has now developed a DNA nanotechnology-based method that allows for repeated, non-destructive recording of uniquely barcoded molecular pairings, rendering a detailed view of their components and geometries. In the future, the approach could help researchers understand how changes in molecular complexes control biological processes in living cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Geophysical investigation aims revealing how vegetation responds to climate change
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Researchers from five countries analyze remnants trapped in rainforest sediment to reconstruct 1 million years of Atlantic Rainforest history. Traces held by items such as microbes, pollen, isotopes, greenhouse gases and algae give clues on the variations of sunlight that caused the many glacial-interglacial cycles in the history of the planet, as well as for the impacts of the wet and dry periods on the Atlantic rainforest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

With extra sugar, leaves get fat too
(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) Eat too much without exercising and you'll probably put on a few pounds. As it turns out, plant leaves do something similar. A new study shows that retaining sugars in plant leaves can make them get fat too. In plants, this extra fat accumulation could be a good thing. It could help turn plants into factories for making biofuels and other useful chemicals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Brain damage in fish affected by plastic nanoparticles
(Lund University) A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that plastic particles in water may end up inside fish brains. The plastic can cause brain damage, which is the likely cause of behavioral disorders observed in the fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Streamlined process opens drug development to a new class of steroids
(Dartmouth College) Researchers at Dartmouth College have developed a technique to produce synthetic steroids that could pave the way for a cascade of new drug discoveries, significantly reducing the expense and time needed to develop therapeutics from an underexplored collection of molecules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Filter may be a match for fracking water
(Swansea University) A new superhydrophilic filter has proven able to remove greater than 90 percent of hydrocarbons, as well as all bacteria and particulates from contaminated water produced by hydraulic fracturing (fracking) operations at shale oil and gas wells, according to researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute at Swansea University in collaboration with researchers at Rice University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Discovering what makes organelles connect could help understand neurodegenerative diseases
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Organelles must exchange signals and materials to make the cell operate correctly. New technologies are allowing researchers to see and understand the networks that connect these organelles, allowing them to build maps of the trade routes that exist within a cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Click beetles inspire design of self-righting robots
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Robots perform many tasks that humans can't or don't want to perform, getting around on intricately designed wheels and limbs. If they tip over, however, they are rendered almost useless. A team of University of Illinois mechanical engineers and entomologists are looking to click beetles, who can right themselves without the use of their legs, to solve this robotics challenge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists discover genes are controlled by 'nano footballs'
(University of York) Research at the University of York has revealed that genes are controlled by 'nano footballs' -- structures that look like footballs but 10 million times smaller than the average ball. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Creative Use of Noise Brings Bio-Inspired Electronic Improvement
(American Institute of Physics) Researchers at Osaka University in Japan are working to exploit stochastic resonance to enhance signal transmission for a new generation of devices, using single-walled carbon nanotubes. They created a summing network SR device that detects subthreshold signals, fabricated to include a self-noise component. The researchers report their findings this week in the journal Applied Physics Letters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Better pancakes through chemistry (video)
(American Chemical Society) Everyone seems to swear by a different pancake recipe. How can you griddle up the perfect pancakes for your Saturday morning breakfast? With chemistry, of course. Just in time for National Pancake Day, this video from Reactions will show you how to use chemistry to improve your flapjacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW to host $15.6 million NSF-funded center for innovation, education in materials science
(University of Washington) The University of Washington is home to a new national center of excellence for research, education and training in materials science. The Molecular Engineering Materials Center is funded by a $15.6 million, six-year grant from the National Science Foundation as part of its highly competitive Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Role of microorganisms in the formation of unique iron ore caves
(University of Akron) The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $400,00 to three researchers in the Department of Biology and Geoscience at The University of Akron (UA) to continue their groundbreaking research on cave formation. The scientists are studying communities of microorganisms and their role in the formation of unique iron ore caves, which make up only about one percent of caves worldwide. With this funding, researchers will again travel to Brazil to study these caves firsthand. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers aim to improve gut health of livestock animals
(University of Delaware) Researchers at the University of Delaware are looking at ways to improve gut health of livestock animals. Many of the projects are funded by industry and look at mechanisms for antibiotic alternatives such as yeast cell wall extracts, feed enzymes and feed modifiers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Unpalatable truths about laboratory-grown food | Letters
Synthetic meat and fish can ’t, on their own, provide an answer to climate change, arguesIain Climie, whileDavid Ridge envisages technical problems in taking the technology out of the lab, and onto people ’s platesSynthetic meat and fish (Is ‘Frankenfish’ the start of a food revolution?, G2, 21 September) could have huge benefits – although there are cheaper and simpler ways to improve food supplies, including better livestock practices, conservation plus careful use, integrated methods, silviculture and using different animals fed more sensibly. These ideas, technology and cutting waste ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Food science Synthetic biology Environment Food waste Climate change Agriculture Technology Food safety Source Type: news

The Naked Ape at 50: ‘Its central claim has surely stood the test of time ‘
In October 1967, Desmond Morris published his landmark study of human behaviour and evolution. Here four experts assess what he got right – and wrongProfessor of evolutionary psychology at the University of OxfordContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin Dunbar, Angela Saini, Ben Garrod, Adam Rutherford Tags: Evolution Human biology Animal behaviour Science and nature Zoology Books Culture Source Type: news

Discovery of a new group of sponges could help measure impact of deep-sea mining
(Taylor& Francis Group) A completely new group of sponges has been discovered, which scientists believe could be a key indicator species in measuring future mining impact in a region targeted for deep-sea mining of polymetallic (metal-rich) nodules. They are likely to be the most abundant nodule-dwelling animal in the area. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

News Analysis: Yes, Aaron Hernandez Suffered Brain Injury. But That May Not Explain His Violence.
The links between biology and behavior are complex, and a number of factors contribute to violence. Yet evidence is mounting that C.T.E. may be involved. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Sports Injuries Brain Football Dementia Hernandez, Aaron (1989- ) Source Type: news

Sexual touch promotes early puberty
A study, published inPLOS Biology, finds that touching prepubescent female rats’ genitals can cause regional brain alterations and signs of puberty to appear up to three weeks earlier.The Scientist (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 22, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Scientists discover unique Brazilian frogs deaf to their own mating calls
Pumpkin toadlet frogs are only known case of an animal that continues to make a communication signal even after the target audience has lost the ability to hear itHumans trying to chat each other up in a noisy nightclub may find verbal communication futile. But it appears even more pointless forpumpkin toadlets after scientists discovered that females have lost the ability to hear the sound of male mating calls.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Amphibians Animal behaviour Wildlife Zoology Environment Science Biology World news Source Type: news

Long-lost Congo notebooks may shed light on how trees react to climate change
Decaying notebooks discovered in an abandoned research station contain a treasure trove of tree growth data dating from 1930sA cache of decaying notebooks found in a crumbling Congo research station has provided unexpected evidence with which to help solve a crucial puzzle – predicting how vegetation will respond to climate change.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Grossman Tags: Trees and forests Greenhouse gas emissions Climate change Environment Democratic Republic of the Congo Africa World news Science Biology UK news Source Type: news

Neanderthal boy's skull reveals they grew like modern boys
Rare discovery of child ’s partial skeleton at 49,000-year-old site in Spain suggests extinct ancestors had similar pattern of growth to modern humansThe first analysis of a Neanderthal boy ’s skull uncovered in Spain suggests that he grew much like a modern boy would, in another sign that our extinct ancestors were similar to us, researchers have said.The rare discovery of a child ’s partial skeleton was found among the remains of seven adults and five other youths at the 49,000-year-old archeological site of El Sidron.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Neanderthals Anthropology Evolution Biology Science Source Type: news

Yale announces collaboration with WBCSD to improve corporate reporting
(Yale School of Forestry& Environmental Studies) The Yale Initiative on Sustainable Finance will provide high-quality research on the flow of capital into sustainability-oriented projects and sustainable companies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NIST's quick test may speed antibiotic treatment and combat drug resistance
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a potential new tactic for rapidly determining whether an antibiotic combats a given infection, thus hastening effective medical treatment and limiting the development of drug-resistant bacteria. Their method can quickly sense mechanical fluctuations of bacterial cells and any changes induced by an antibiotic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Russian scientists have studied the genes that allow cancer cells to resist drugs
(RUDN University) Researchers from the People's Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University) have studied the mechanism of drug resistance for ovarian and breast cancer cells. They discovered that these cancer cells have redox-dependent mechanism which is tasked with sustaining their drug resistance. The results have been published in two articles in the journal of Free Radical Biology and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stimuli fading away en route to consciousness
(University of Bonn) Whether or not we consciously perceive the stimuli projected onto our retina is decided in our brain. A recent study by the University of Bonn shows how some signals dissipate along the processing path to conscious perception. This process begins at rather late stages of signal processing. By contrast, in earlier stages there is hardly any difference in the reaction of neurons to conscious and unconscious stimuli. The paper is published in Current Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USDA announces support to grow the bioeconomy
(National Institute of Food and Agriculture) The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced six grants totaling nearly $21.1 million to support the development of new jet fuel, biobased products and biomaterials from renewable sources. Funding is made through NIFA's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI), authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fires in Australia pop up in places already burned
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Fires that span across the Northern Territory and Western Australia appear to have broken out in areas that have already been burned in previous fires. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NYU dentistry study pinpoints role of proteins that produce pearls
(New York University) While it is known that pearls are made of calcium carbonate with an organic matrix core, the role of the proteins modulating the organization of these crystals has, until recently, been unclear. Researchers at NYU Dentistry reported the role of two such proteins that regulate the processes leading up to the formation of pearl. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cornell's Center for Materials Research's NSF funding extended, increased
(Cornell University) The   Cornell Center for Materials Research   - which through research and education is enhancing national capabilities in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and materials research at all levels -- has been has been granted $23.2 million for the next six years from the National Science Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A global perspective: Can humans mitigate risks associated with natural disasters?
(World Scientific) 'The Handbook of Disaster Risk Reduction& Management' explores climate change and its association with socio-economic development and cultures, particularly in vulnerable communities, and investigates how resilience to disasters can be built. As its title suggests, the focus is on mitigation strategies and policies to reduce and manage the consequences of natural disasters. The handbook covers pre- to post-disaster occurrences from a wide range of perspectives, such as gender and country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Seven exciting studies on membrane technologies explained
(World Scientific) 'Membranes for Gas Separations, Vol. 1' in the World Scientific Series in Membrane Science and Technology: Biological and Biomimetic Applications, Energy and the Environment, addresses the subject of gas separation using membranes. The book is a collection of seven gas-separating membrane technologies' studies. Each chapter of this book is dedicated to a distinctive example of different membrane compositions including inorganic, polymeric, metallic, metal organic framework and composite, which have demonstrated successes in separating several industrially relevant gas mixtures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New gene delivery approach could allow long-term persistence in proliferating cells
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers added a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) to a conventional adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector used for gene transfer, and the modified vectors were able to establish colonies and maintain long-term transgene expression in HeLa cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Crowning the 'King of the Crops': Sequencing the white Guinea yam genome
(Earlham Institute) An international collaboration involving the Earlham Institute, Norwich, UK, and the Iwate Biotechnology Research Centre, Japan, has for the first time provided a genome sequence for the white Guinea yam, a staple crop with huge economic and cultural significance on the African continent and a lifeline for millions of people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Assembly of nanoparticles proceeds like a zipper
(Aalto University) according to scientists from Aalto University Finland, viruses and nanoparticles can be assembled into processable superlattice wires. The demonstration shows that electrostatic self-assembly of nanoparticles can potentially be used to form processable materials for future applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A sustainable future powered by sea
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) OIST researchers develop turbines to convert the power of ocean waves into clean, renewable energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

She ’s Planning for College. But She’ll Miss President Trump’s Deadline to Avoid Deportation
Like many high school seniors, Indira Marquez Robles thinks a lot about her future. She knows what college she wants to go to (Bryn Mawr) and what she wants to be when she grows up (an immigration attorney) but she also doesn’t know if she’ll be at risk for deportation in the next six months. Marquez Robles is a beneficiary of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, an Obama-era program that has shielded over 700,000 immigrants brought to the U.S. as children from deportation, allowed them to get work permits and Social Security numbers, travel abroad and obtain a driver’s license. But on Sept. ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maya Rhodan Tags: Uncategorized Congress DACA Donald Trump dreamers Immigration White House Source Type: news

Vegetarian dinosaurs sometimes strayed for a shellfish snack – study
Analysis of fossilised dinosaur dung suggests some herbivorous dinosaurs may have also eaten crustaceansSome dinosaurs may not have been the strict vegetarians that palaeontologists thought they were.New analysis of fossilised dinosaur dung suggests some herbivorous dinosaurs may have also eaten crustaceans, according to a new study published Thursday in the Nature journal Scientific Reports.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Science Zoology Fossils Biology Source Type: news

Tiny diamonds could become best friends to youths with cleft palates
This study showed that our method has a contained, targeted and sustained effect, so we’re very excited about it,” Hong said.Previous experiments showed nanodiamonds to be safe within the body and to be excreted normally. Similarly, earlier work demonstrated that enzymes break down hydrogel.The researchers plan to continue laboratory studies and hope to bring their treatment to clinical trials. Their approach has implications for treating other craniofacial conditions and sleep apnea, as well as healing wounds and bone injuries.Other authors of the study were Dong-Keun Lee, Lawrence Lin, Hsin Chuan Pan, Deborah...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Caught napping: snoozing jellyfish prove a brain isn't necessary for sleep
Scientists made the discovery by observing the primitive jellyfish Cassiopea, which has no central nervous systemSnoozing jellyfish have confirmed that a brain is not necessary for sleep.Scientists made the discovery after observing a primitive jellyfish called Cassiopea that lives upside down on the sea floor and lacks any kind of central nervous system.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Animal behaviour Biology Science Sleep Marine life Source Type: news

i-Fect Delivers Plasmids!
Important for Gene Expression Studies.I have posted many examples of how our customers usei-FectTM  and otherTransfection Solutions for Gene Manipulation Studies. There are also manypublications.Here we feature how i-Fect was used to delivery plasmids to the CNS: Sara Elramah, Mar ía José López-González, Matthieu Bastide, Florence Dixmérias, Olivier Roca-Lapirot, Anne-Cécile Wielanek-Bachelet, Anne Vital, Thierry Leste-Lasserre, Alexandre Brochard, Marc Landry& Alexandre Favereaux.Spinal miRNA-124 regulates synaptopodin and nociception in an animal model of bone ...
Source: Neuromics - September 21, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Bone Cancer Pain cancer biology iFect Plasmids Transfection Reagents Source Type: news