40% of world ’s plant species at risk of extinction
Race against time to save plants and fungi that underpin life on Earth, global data showsTwo in five of the world ’s plant species are at risk of extinction as a result of the destruction of the natural world, according to an international report.Plants and fungi underpin life on Earth, but the scientists said they were now in a race against time to find and identify species before they were lost.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Plants Biodiversity Conservation Environment Fungi Wildlife Biology Science Food security Farming Climate change Global development Society Source Type: news

EU hydrogen strategy
(European Academies' Science Advisory Council, Leopoldina - Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften) Hydrogen is an important alternative for sectors that are stuck in the fossil fuel economy. As national governments and European parliamentarians negotiate the EU's hydrogen strategy, EASAC issues a new commentary. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

INRS researchers develop a new membraneless fuel cell
(Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS) The research team of INRS (Institut national de la recherche scientifique) professor Mohamed Mohamedi has designed a green membraneless fuel cell that uses oxygen from the air. The results of this innovative microfluidic application -- a first in Canada -- were published in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plant droplets serve as nutrient-rich food for insects
(Rutgers University) Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps and flies, according to a Rutgers-led study, the first of its kind. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, suggests that these droplets are an important but underexplored feature in plants, with profound implications for insects in agricultural and natural ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

SphingoTec, BHR Pharmaceuticals ink agreement for distribution of SphingoTec's acute care portfolio in the UK and Ireland
(sphingotec GmbH) The collaboration in particular focuses on the UK market introduction of SphingoTec's point-of-care tests for novel and proprietary biomarkers in critical care targeting diagnostically underserved conditions such as sepsis, acute heart failure, acute kidney injury, and recently severe COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Achieving clean air for all is possible
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) Air pollution is currently the largest environmental risk factor for human health globally and can be linked to several million cases of premature deaths every year. A new study however shows that it is possible to achieve clean air worldwide with fundamental transformations of today's practices in many sectors, supported by strong political will. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
(NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center) Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Are China's pollution remediation efforts making the planet warmer?
(Carnegie Institution for Science) A 10-year effort by China to improve air quality and reduce pollution-related health risks has caused warming in areas across the northern hemisphere, according to new work published in Environmental Research Letters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Generating renewable hydrogen fuel from the sea
(Penn State) The power of the sun, wind and sea may soon combine to produce clean-burning hydrogen fuel, according to a team of Penn State researchers. The team integrated water purification technology into a new proof-of-concept design for a sea water electrolyzer, which uses an electric current to split apart the hydrogen and oxygen in water molecules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In the arctic, extreme air pollution kills trees, limits growth by reducing sunlight
(USDA Forest Service - Northern Research Station) At the most heavily polluted site on Earth, dendroecology, dendrochemistry, and process-based forward modelling were used to explore the relationship of tree growth and mortality with industrial pollution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vessel noise present year-round at Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
(Oregon State University) The environment in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of San Francisco is not a refuge from the noise generated by ship traffic, the first underwater marine acoustic study of the region has shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

OU-led study aims to use microbial information to inform global climate change models
(University of Oklahoma) A study led by researchers from the OU Institute of Environmental Genomics tackles a problem that has challenged scientists for more than a decade. The findings from which may have important implications for understanding and predicting the ecological consequences of climate warming. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New method developed to help scientists understand how the brain processes color
(University of Minnesota) Through the development of new technology, University of Minnesota researchers have developed a method that allows scientists to understand how a fruit fly's brain responds to seeing color. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New fire containment research addresses risk and safety
(Colorado State University) A team from Colorado State University and USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station address new ways to assess risks and evaluate fire fighting effectiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two pesticides approved for use in US harmful to bees
(University of Texas at Austin) A previously banned insecticide, which was approved for agricultural use last year in the United States, is harmful for bees and other beneficial insects that are crucial for agriculture, and a second pesticide in widespread use also harms these insects. That is according to a new analysis from researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

210 scientists highlight state of plants and fungi in Plants, People, Planet special issue
(New Phytologist Trust) The Special Issue, 'Protecting and sustainably using the world's plants and fungi', brings together the research - from 210 scientists across 42 countries - behind the 2020 State of the World's Plants and Fungi report, also released today by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blocking enzyme's self-destruction process may mitigate age-related diseases
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Stopping the cannibalistic behavior of a well-studied enzyme could be the key to new drugs to fight age-related diseases, according to a new study published online in Nature Cell Biology. For the first time, researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania show how the self-eating cellular process known as autophagy is causing the SIRT1 enzyme, long known to play a role in longevity, to degrade over time in cells and tissue in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SPNHC Panel Discussion on Actions to Conserve Biodiversity
The Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections (SPNHC) is hosting a panel discussion to consider how the biological collections community can most effectively contribute to protecting biodiversity. Join the SPNHC Biodiversity Crisis Response Committee and a panel of five experts on October 7, 2020 from 11:00 - 1:00 PM EDT. Panelists include: Dr. Tara Cornelisse, an insect conservation biologist and Senior Scientist with the Endangered Species Program at the Center for Biological Diversity. Dr. Robert Gropp, Executive Director of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. Dr. Rebecca Johnson, ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Last Chance to Enter the 2020 Faces of Biology Photo Contest
Enter the Faces of Biology Photo Contest for your chance to win $250 and to have your photo appear on the cover of the journal BioScience. The competition, sponsored by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), recognizes scientists who use imagery to communicate aspects of biological research to the public and policymakers. The theme of the contest is “Faces of Biology.” Photographs entered into the contest must depict a person, such as a scientist, researcher, collections curator, technician, or student, engaging in biological research. The depicted research may occur outside, in a lab, with a n...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Congress to Pass Stopgap Measure to Avoid Shutdown
With negotiations over COVID-19 pandemic relief stalled, lawmakers are looking to pass a stopgap funding bill to keep the government operational in the new fiscal year which starts on October 1. A stopgap funding measure is required because the House and Senate have not yet agreed on and passed appropriations bills to fund the government in fiscal year 2021. After House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin reached an agreement to pursue a clean short-term spending bill earlier this month, the House passed a bipartisan continuing resolution on September 22 extending federal funding through Dece...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NASEM: Biological Collections Need National Strategy, Increased Investment
According to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), biological collections - living and natural history specimens, biological materials, and data in museums, stock centers, research centers, and universities - are in need of long-term financial sustainability, digitization, recruitment and support of a diverse workforce, and infrastructure upgrades. The report, Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century, which was sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), argues that biological collections are an “invaluable, and ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

American Society of Human Genetics Denounces Unethical Use of False Genetic " Theories "
The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has issued a statement reinforcing facts about human genetics and expressing strong opposition to efforts that bend genetics knowledge for social or political ends. The statement reads, in part: “Genetics demonstrates that humans cannot be divided into biologically distinct subcategories or races, and any efforts to claim the superiority of humans based on any genetic ancestry have no scientific evidence. Moreover, it is inaccurate to claim genetics as the determinative factor in human strengths or outcomes when education, environment, wealth, and health care access are ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Global Biodiversity Goals Not Being Met, Says UN Report
A new report from the United Nations (UN) concludes that the world has not met any of the targets set 10 years ago by the Convention on Biological Diversity for protecting nature. The Global Biodiversity Outlook 5, published by the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) on September 15, 2020, serves as a final report card on progress on the 20 global biodiversity targets, known as the Aichi biodiversity targets, established in 2010 with a ten year deadline. The report found that despite some progress, natural habitats have continued to shrink, large numbers of species remain threatened by extinction from human activi...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

WHO, NASEM Unveil COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Plans
The World Health Organization (WHO) has released a preliminary framework for the global allocation of COVID-19 vaccines when they become available. The plan is intended to guide policymakers at the global, regional, and national level in their allocation and prioritization decisions about vaccines. WHO’s “fair allocation mechanism” emphasizes equitable allocation of vaccines and lists groups of people that should have priority access. The plan proposes vaccine distribution in two phases. In the first phase, all countries would receive vaccine doses in proportion to their population size - initially enoug...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Climate Science Critic to be Appointed as NOAA Chief Scientist
The White House will appoint Dr. Ryan Maue, a meteorologist and former researcher at the Cato Institute, to serve as the new Chief Scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), according to The Washington Post. Maue currently serves as the developer of weathermodels.com, a website that offers weather related information, maps, and tools. He previously worked as an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, a Libertarian think tank involved in efforts to challenge the scientific consensus on climate change. Maue acknowledges that humans contribute to climate change but has challenged connections bet...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Short Takes
Members of the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, led by Chairwoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), have introduced bipartisan legislation to create a new postdoctoral fellowship program at the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help keep early career researchers whose employment opportunities have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic in the STEM pipeline. "I am deeply concerned about the disappearance of STEM job opportunities and the potential long-term consequences for our STEM pipeline," stated Chairwoman Johnson. "For established researchers, the COVID-19 crisis has severely limited their...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

UCLA researchers ’ efforts to combat melanoma gets $13M boost from NIH
UCLA researchers have received a $13 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to find new ways to overcome melanoma resistance to some of the most promising targeted therapies and immunotherapies.There have been significant advancements in the past decade using targeted therapies and immunotherapies for treating people withadvanced forms of this deadliest type of skin cancer, but the treatments still only work in some people. Tumors can — and oftendo— become resistant to these drugs.“While these therapies have transformed the way people with melanoma are treated, only about 40% to 50% of peopl...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Coronavirus symptoms: how to tell if you have a common cold, flu or Covid
Fever, runny nose, headache? Lost your sense of taste or smell? Your guide to differentiating between the three illnessesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWith winter approaching, the UK is entering the traditional seasons for colds and flu, with the additional complication this year that symptoms of those two illnesses can be broadly similar to those experienced by people who have caught the coronavirus and may be at risk ofspreadingit.The NHS in England has produced a guide to differentiate between the three types of illnesses, which health experts hope will make it clearer to people wheth...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Martin Belam Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Biology Science World news Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Researchers discover a new method to regulate cell plasticity
(Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)) Researchers at IRB Barcelona's Cellular Plasticity and Disease Laboratory propose a more efficient way to limit cell plasticity without causing cell damage.The new method sheds light on processes in which cell plasticity is important, such as cancer and immunology.The study has been published in the journal Nature Cell Biology and has been supported by " la Caixa " Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biodiversity increases plant decomposition rate; should be factored into climate models, study finds
(Yokohama National University) An international team of researchers published a meta-analysis of 176 studies investigating the effect of diverse leaf litter decay on ecosystems around the world on Sept. 11 in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Princeton researchers join $1M NSF effort to model nation's groundwater
(Princeton University) Princeton researchers will help lead a $1 million federally funded project that will use artificial intelligence to simulate the nation's natural groundwater system in an effort to improve groundwater management, as well as flood and drought preparedness. The project was one of 29 nationwide selected for the first phase of the National Science Foundation's new Convergence Accelerator program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Naked prehistoric monsters! Evidence that prehistoric flying reptiles probably had
(University of Portsmouth) Pterosaur expert Dr David Unwin from the University of Leicester's Centre for Palaeobiology Research, and Professor Dave Martill, of the University of Portsmouth have examined the evidence that these creatures had feathers and believe they were in fact bald (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study finds novel functions of the pyruvate-sensing protein PdhR in E. Coli
(Tokyo Institute of Technology) Scientists at Meiji University, Hosei University, and Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) aimed to better understand the homeostasis of pyruvate, a key connection point of many metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli bacteria. Scientists focused on a transcription factor called PdhR because it regulates pyruvate breakdown into other molecules. They identified ~20 genes that PdhR targets, and showed their involvement in pathways connected to pyruvate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wound-healing waves
(Institute of Science and Technology Austria) How do cells in our bodies ask for directions? Without any maps to guide them, they still know where to go to heal wounds and renew our bodies. Edouard Hannezo and his group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) together with Tsuyoshi Hirashima and his group at Kyoto University just published a new study in Nature Physics that shows how mechanical and chemical waves coordinate the movement of cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Water at the end of the tunnel
(Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology) We humans need oxygen to breath - for a lot of microbes it is a lethal poison. That is why microorganisms have developed ways to render oxygen molecules harmless. Microbiologists from Bremen, Marburg and Grenoble have now succeeded in decrypting such a mechanism. They show, how methane-generating microbes transform oxygen into water without causing any damage to the cell. These findings are relevant for future bio-inspired processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new study may revise a theory of flowing viscous liquids that was accepted for 60 years
(Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology) The international collaborative team has discovered for the first time a topological change of a classical interfacial hydrodynamics, which is driven by 'a partially miscibility'. This phenomenon cannot be seen in completely mixed (fully miscible) system with infinite solubility or immiscible system with no solubility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence can help protect orchids and other species
(German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig) Many orchid species are threatened by land conversion and illegal harvesting. However, only a fraction of those species is included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, because assessments require a lot of time, resources and expertise. A new approach, an automated assessment developed under the lead of biodiversity researchers from Central Germany, now shows that almost 30% of all orchid species are possibly threatened. The new approach could speed up conservation assessments of all species on Earth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Snakes disembowel and feed on the organs of living toads in a first for science
(Pensoft Publishers) The Small-banded Kukri Snake seems to have evolved a particularly macabre feeding habit that has never been witnessed in a serpent before. Danish-Thai researchers documented three occasions where a snake uses its enlarged posterior maxillary teeth to cut open the abdomen of a large poisonous toad, then inserts its entire head to pull out the organs one by one, while the prey is still alive. The discovery was published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal Herpetozoa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers identify 'druggable' signaling pathway that stimulates lung tissue repair
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a cellular pathway that can be targeted with a naturally occurring drug to stimulate lung tissue regeneration, which is necessary for recovery from multiple lung injuries. The findings, which were published today in Nature Cell Biology, could lead to better therapies for patients with lung disease, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 28, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Disastrous duo: Heatwaves and droughts
(McGill University) Simultaneous heatwaves and droughts are becoming increasingly common in western parts of the Unites States, according to a new study led by researchers from McGill University. Periods of dry and hot weather, which can make wildfires more likely, are becoming larger, more intense, and more frequent because of climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

About 14% of cerebral palsy cases may be tied to brain wiring genes
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) In an article published in Nature Genetics, NIH funded researchers confirm that about 14% of all cases of cerebral palsy, a disabling brain disorder for which there are no cures, may be linked to a patient's genes and suggest that many of those genes control how brain circuits become wired during early development. The results led to recommended changes in the treatment of at least three patients, highlighting the importance of understanding the role genes play in the disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Landmark discovery could improve Army lasers, precision sensors
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) An Army-funded landmark discovery at New York University could change the way researchers develop and use optical technologies, such as lasers, sensors and photonic circuits over the next decade. After years of research, the team of scientists achieved what many thought was perhaps impossible-they developed a method to create colloids that crystallize into the diamond lattice. This photonic technique, published in Nature, could lead to cheap, reliable and scalable fabrication of 3D photonic crystals for optical circuits and light filters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ancient Ad é lie penguin colony revealed by snowmelt at Cape Irizar, Ross Sea, Antarctica
(Geological Society of America) Researcher Steven Emslie encountered a puzzle at Cape Irizar, a rocky cape located just south of the Drygalski Ice Tongue on the Scott Coast, Ross Sea. He found both ancient and what appeared to be fresh remains of Adelie penguins, mostly of chicks, which frequently die and accumulate at these colonies. However, the " fresh " remains were puzzling, he says, because there are no records of an active penguin colony at this site. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New interactive tool will help farmers contain the spread of clubroot
(American Phytopathological Society) 'ClubrootTracker is an interactive tool that will help farmers locate clubroot-infected areas and can be used by farmers, researchers, and industry and government representatives to share the clubroot status of their land,' explained Edel P é rez-L ó pez, one of the plant pathologists involved in the development of this tool. 'We believe that the ClubrootTracker will be a gamechanger on the management of clubroot disease both in Canada and worldwide.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

USC-led study traces the evolution of gill covers
(Keck School of Medicine of USC) In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences (PNAS), USC Stem Cell scientists and their collaborators have identified a key modification to the genome that led to the evolution of gill covers more than 430 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Robert Simoni, Cellular Membrane Biochemist, Dies at 81
Simoni spent more than four decades at Stanford University as a teacher, researcher, and administrator in the university's biology department. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 25, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Blasts from the past: how ice age ponds are coming back to life
Once watering holes for mammoth and elk, Herefordshire ’s neglected ancient ponds are being restoredEcologistWill Watson is hunting for Britain ’s largest blood-sucking leech in a 14,000-year-old pond in Herefordshire. The elusive medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis), grows up to 20cm long and has only officially been recorded three times in the county in the past two decades. In the ice age pond in Moccas Park national nature reserve it was last found in 2000.Watson shakes his net in the water. Most creatures shy away from such disturbance but this leech – the only one in Britain that sucks human blood &...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Phoebe Weston Tags: Environment Animals Wildlife Plants Biology Science Conservation UK news Source Type: news

Ultrapotent compound may help treat C. diff, reduce recurrence
(Purdue University) Purdue University innovators have advanced novel compounds they developed to help treat patients with C. diff, one of only four bacteria considered an urgent threat by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The male Y chromosome does more than we thought
(University of Montreal) While the Y chromosome's role was believed to be limited to the functions of the sexual organs, an University of Montreal's scientist has shown that it impacts the functions of other organs as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A better alternative to Phthalates?
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) In collaboration with the Medical University of South Carolina, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) analyzed urine samples from pregnant women to look for the presence of DINCH, which is short for di(isononyl)cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate. They found concentrations of DINCH in most of the urine samples but no evidence of effects in lab assays on two hormones, progesterone and estrogen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news