Q & A: George Church's Genome Up for Auction
A founder of the field of synthetic biology is selling data from his own DNA as a nonfungible token, or NFT, through Nebula Genomics, a personal genome company he cofounded. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 19, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Conservation Biologists May Unintentionally Spread Pathogens
When conservationists relocate species, they don't always account for the pathogens hitching a ride and the consequences of introducing them to a new environment. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 19, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Cochrane PaPaS seeks full-time Systematic Reviewer - remote
Closing date: 28 April 2021Location: remote (home-working)The Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care (Cochrane PaPaS) Review Group is looking for an experienced Systematic Reviewer to undertake high quality, priority Cochrane systematic reviews for publication in the Cochrane Library.The focus of PaPaS is studies of interventions for acute pain, chronic pain, headache and migraine, palliative care for those with life-limiting disease or illness, and supportive care of patients and significant others living with serious illness.The candidate will work with a multidisciplinary team to undertake new priority reviews, o...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 19, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Common plants and pollinators act as anchors for ecosystems
(University of Colorado at Boulder) " Generalist " plants and pollinators play a crucial role in maintaining biodiversity and may also serve as buffers against some impacts of climate change, finds new University of Colorado Boulder research. The findings, published this month in Ecology, provide valuable insights for prioritizing the conservation of species that contribute to the strength of ecological communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What does the study of domesticated birds tell us about the evolution of human language?
(University of Barcelona) Language is one of the most notable abilities humans have. It allows us to express complex meanings and transmit knowledge from generation to generation. An important question in human biology is how this ability ended up being developed, and researchers from the universities of Barcelona, Cologne and Tokyo have treated this issue in a recent article. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Company of Biologists launches new journal websites
(The Company of Biologists) The Company of Biologists has migrated its leading journals to the hosting platform of Silverchair, improving user experience and maximising the discoverability of their content for the biological community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research inside hill slopes could help wildfire and drought prediction
(University of Texas at Austin) A first-of-its-kind study led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that rock weathering and water storage appear to follow a similar pattern across undulating landscapes. The findings are important because they suggest that these patterns could improve predictions of wildfire and landslide risk and how droughts will affect the landscape. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study reveals a unique mode of cell migration on soft 'viscoelastic' surfaces
(Stanford University) Stanford engineers find that cancer cells exhibit a unique mode of migration on squishy materials, which are similar to biological tissues. In contrast, cell movement - a process central to cancer metastasis and other biological processes - is typically studied on very rigid materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DNA robots designed in minutes instead of days
(Ohio State University) Someday, scientists believe, tiny DNA-based robots and other nanodevices will deliver medicine inside our bodies, detect the presence of deadly pathogens, and help manufacture increasingly smaller electronics.Researchers took a big step toward that future by developing a new tool that can design much more complex DNA robots and nanodevices than were ever possible before in a fraction of the time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Northern Red Sea corals live close to the threshold of resistance to cold temperatures
(Bar-Ilan University) In the northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba, corals have exceptionally high tolerance to increasing seawater temperatures resulting from global warming. However, climate change will also result in more variable weather patterns, including extreme cold periods. Researchers now demonstrate that a winter even 1 ° C cooler than average results in a physiological stress response similar to that seen in other corals under heat stress, detailing how perilously close they live to their lower temperature threshold. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Learning about system stability from ants
(University of Konstanz) Army ants collectively form complex, adaptable structures, without a need for communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

To forget or to do not forget?
(Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences) Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a form of progressive dementia interfering with daily living. It is caused by the decline in the number of brain cells resulting in the deterioration of our mental abilities. One of the main reasons for the worsening brain cells condition and even the brain shrinkage are molecules having a specific structure calledβ-amyloids. They are peptides that tend to agglomerate around the nerve cells, becoming toxic and damage them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ice cap study promises new prospects for accurate local climate projections
(University of Copenhagen - Faculty of Science) New, detailed study of the Renland Ice Cap offers the possibility of modelling other smaller ice caps and glaciers with much greater accuracy than hitherto. The study combined airborne radar data to determine the thickness of the ice cap with on-site measurements of the thickness of the ice cap and satellite data. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute - University of Copenhagen gathered data from the ice cap in 2015, and this work has now come to fruition: More exact predictions of local climate conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Russian scientists discover a new gene regulation mechanism
(Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech)) A team of scientists from Russia studied the role of double-stranded fragments of the maturing RNA and showed that the interaction between distant parts of the RNA can regulate gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mountain high: Andean forests have high potential to store carbon under climate change
(Washington University in St. Louis) The Andes Mountains in South America are the world's longest mountain range and a hotspot of biodiversity. But the forest that climbs up this mountain range provides another important service to humanity. Andean forests are helping to protect the planet by acting as a carbon sink, absorbing carbon dioxide and keeping some of this climate-altering gas out of circulation, according to new research published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sustainable chemical synthesis with platinum
(University of Tokyo) Researchers used platinum and aluminum compounds to create a catalyst which enables certain chemical reactions to occur more efficiently than ever before. The catalyst could significantly reduce energy usage in various industrial and pharmaceutical processes. It also allows for a wider range of sustainable sources to feed the processes, which could reduce the demand for fossil fuels required by them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Defects in a specific cell type may cause ulcerative colitis
(University of Gothenburg) There are many variants of " goblet cells " in the intestines and they seem to have different functions, according to a new study from the University of Gothenburg. The study indicates that defects in goblet cells of a particular type may be a factor contributing to ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Unexpected Ways Climate Change is Reshaping College Education
In 2018, Scott McAulay had a “Wizard of Oz moment.” He was a final-year architecture student at the University of Strathclyde in Scotland when the U.N. published a report warning that the world had 12 years to transform society to avoid catastrophic, irreversible climate change. Buildings, the report said, account for 20% of energy-related global greenhouse-gas emissions, and the architecture and construction sectors needed to rapidly overhaul their practices. Sitting in classes, McAulay had a sinking feeling: his professors, the wizards behind the curtain, had no magical solution. “We’re talking ab...
Source: TIME: Science - April 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change feature Londontime Magazine TIME 2030 Source Type: news

New data for Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) reinforce significant benefit on slowing disease progression in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Basel, 16 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new OCREVUS ® (ocrelizumab) analyses supporting its significant benefit on disease progression in early-stage relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and primary progressive MS (PPMS) as well as demonstrating high persistence and strong adherence to twice-yearly (six-monthly) dosing. These data are being presented virtually at the 73rd American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting from 17–22 April 2021. OCREVUS is the number one prescribed MS medication in the U.S. for patients starting a new treatment, and more than 200,000 peop...
Source: Roche Investor Update - April 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New data for Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) reinforce significant benefit on slowing disease progression in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Basel, 16 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new OCREVUS ® (ocrelizumab) analyses supporting its significant benefit on disease progression in early-stage relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and primary progressive MS (PPMS) as well as demonstrating high persistence and strong adherence to twice-yearly (six-monthly) dosing. These data are being presented virtually at the 73rd American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting from 17–22 April 2021. OCREVUS is the number one prescribed MS medication in the U.S. for patients starting a new treatment, and more than 200,000 peop...
Source: Roche Media News - April 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Alpine plants are losing their white " protective coat "
(University of Basel) Snow cover in the Alps has been melting almost three days earlier per decade since the 1960s. This trend is temperature-related and cannot be compensated by heavier snowfall. By the end of the century, snow cover at 2,500 meters could disappear a month earlier than today, as simulations by environmental scientists at the University of Basel demonstrate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Long-term consequences of CO2 emissions
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) According to a new study published today in the scientific journal Nature Communications, the oxygen content in the oceans will continue to decrease for centuries even if all CO2 emissions would be stopped immediately. According to the author, Prof. Dr. Andreas Oschlies, from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the slowdown of ocean circulation and the progressive warming of deeper water layers are responsible for this process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Quality and quantity of enrichments influence well-being of aquaculture fishes
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) Collaborative research of the University of Jyv ä skyl ä and Natural Research Institute Finland presents new evidence of the effects of enriched rearing on well-being of aquaculture fishes. The research demonstrates that stone enrichments that have been previously conditioned in lake water significantly improve survival of fish compared to clean stones. Also a higher number of stones has a similar positive effect. The results have practical implications for prevention of aquaculture diseases. The study was published in Antibiotics in Marc...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NSF award to help understand ocean ecology where Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic meet
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) The National Science Foundation has awarded $1 million to a team of researchers at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science to study how the nutrient plume of the nation's largest estuary, the Chesapeake Bay, changes over the course of the year and what those changes mean for food webs and nutrient cycles in the coastal Atlantic Ocean (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tarantula's ubiquity traced back to the cretaceous
(Carnegie Mellon University) Tarantulas are among the most notorious spiders, due in part to their size, vibrant colors and prevalence throughout the world. But one thing most people don't know is that tarantulas are homebodies. Females and their young rarely leave their burrows and only mature males will wander to seek out a mate. How then did such a sedentary spider come to inhabit six out of seven continents? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop microscopic theory of polymer gel
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Russian scientists have proposed a theory of phase transformation in polymer gels. It explains the mechanisms of the dramatic reduction in volume of zwitterionic hydrogels when they are cooled. The results are published in the journal Chemical Communications (ChemComm). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists call for climate projections as part of more robust biodiversity conservation
(The Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture) Research in the Peruvian Andes highlights critical climate threats to montane forests and urges for current conservation plans to take climate projections into account. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

USU researchers develop power converter for long-distance, underwater electric grids
(Utah State University) A team of researchers from Utah State University have developed a DC current-to-DC voltage power converter. This converter is equipped for long distances and minimal maintenance, making it particularly useful in underwater power distribution networks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The fate of the planet
(American Physical Society) From engineered pandemics to city-toppling cyber attacks to nuclear annihilation, life on Earth could radically change, and soon. Scientists will forecast the fate of the planet at a press conference during the 2021 APS April Meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new guide for communicating plant science
(Iowa State University) A new publication offers a comprehensive guide to help plant scientists communicate their work to the world. An Iowa State University scientist who contributed to the multi-institutional effort says it's critical that plant scientists emphasize outreach to make sure plant science is able to meet the demands of climate change and population growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

AIBS Submits Testimony in Support of FY 2022 Funding for Smithsonian Institution, USGS, USFWS, and EPA
AIBS has provided written testimony to Congress regarding fiscal year (FY) 2022 funding for biological research programs within the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).    Related StoriesLatest Public Policy ReportScientists Call for Implementing a Community Vision for the Future of Biodiversity CollectionsInfrastructure Plan Calls for Major Investments in Research  (Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials)
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Submits Testimony in Support of FY 2022 Funding for Smithsonian Institution, USGS, USFWS, and EPA
AIBS has provided written testimony to Congress regarding fiscal year (FY) 2022 funding for biological research programs within the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).    Related StoriesLatest Public Policy ReportScientists Call for Implementing a Community Vision for the Future of Biodiversity CollectionsInfrastructure Plan Calls for Major Investments in Research  (Source: Eye on Education)
Source: Eye on Education - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Submits Testimony in Support of FY 2022 Funding for Smithsonian Institution, USGS, USFWS, and EPA
AIBS has provided written testimony to Congress regarding fiscal year (FY) 2022 funding for biological research programs within the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).    Related StoriesLatest Public Policy ReportScientists Call for Implementing a Community Vision for the Future of Biodiversity CollectionsInfrastructure Plan Calls for Major Investments in Research  (Source: Washington Watch)
Source: Washington Watch - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Submits Testimony in Support of FY 2022 Funding for Smithsonian Institution, USGS, USFWS, and EPA
AIBS has provided written testimony to Congress regarding fiscal year (FY) 2022 funding for biological research programs within the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).    Related StoriesLatest Public Policy ReportScientists Call for Implementing a Community Vision for the Future of Biodiversity CollectionsInfrastructure Plan Calls for Major Investments in Research  (Source: AIBS News)
Source: AIBS News - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Submits Testimony in Support of FY 2022 Funding for Smithsonian Institution, USGS, USFWS, and EPA
AIBS has provided written testimony to Congress regarding fiscal year (FY) 2022 funding for biological research programs within the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).    Related StoriesLatest Public Policy ReportScientists Call for Implementing a Community Vision for the Future of Biodiversity CollectionsInfrastructure Plan Calls for Major Investments in Research  (Source: Education Reports)
Source: Education Reports - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Submits Testimony in Support of FY 2022 Funding for Smithsonian Institution, USGS, USFWS, and EPA
AIBS has provided written testimony to Congress regarding fiscal year (FY) 2022 funding for biological research programs within the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).    Related StoriesLatest Public Policy ReportScientists Call for Implementing a Community Vision for the Future of Biodiversity CollectionsInfrastructure Plan Calls for Major Investments in Research  (Source: BioScience Press Releases)
Source: BioScience Press Releases - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Submits Testimony in Support of FY 2022 Funding for Smithsonian Institution, USGS, USFWS, and EPA
AIBS has provided written testimony to Congress regarding fiscal year (FY) 2022 funding for biological research programs within the Smithsonian Institution, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).    Related StoriesLatest Public Policy ReportScientists Call for Implementing a Community Vision for the Future of Biodiversity CollectionsInfrastructure Plan Calls for Major Investments in Research  (Source: AIBS Classifieds)
Source: AIBS Classifieds - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

‘That’s a lot of teeth’: 2.5 billion T rex walked the earth, researchers find
Experts calculate the total number of the dinosaurs that lived over 127,000 generationsOne Tyrannosaurus rex seems scary enough. Now picture 2.5 billion of them. That ’s how many of the fierce dinosaur king probably roamed Earth over the course of a couple of million years, a new study finds.Using calculations based on body size, sexual maturity and the creatures ’ energy needs, a team at the University of California, Berkeley, figured out just how many T rex lived over 127,000 generations, according to a study in the journalScience on Thursday. It ’s a first-of-its-kind number, but just an estimate with ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Dinosaurs Science Zoology Biology Source Type: news

Human cells grown in monkey embryos reignite ethics debate
Scientists confirm they have produced ‘chimera’ embryos from long-tailed macaques and humansMonkey embryos containing human cells have been produced in a laboratory, a study has confirmed, spurring fresh debate into the ethics of such experiments.The embryos are known as chimeras, organisms whose cells come fromtwo or more “individuals”, and in this case, different species: a long-tailed macaque and a human.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Science Embryos Stem cells Biology Animals World news Source Type: news

Scientists Report Creating the First Embryo With Human and Non-Human Primate Cells
In a ground-breaking experiment, researchers have successfully created the first human-monkey chimera. The work, published in the journal Cell, describes the the first embryo containing both human and monkey cells that was cultured for 20 days. Led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study represents the culmination of decades of work in understanding early embryo development in non-human species, which Belmonte hopes will now apply to humans. But it is bound to raise serious ethical questions about the implications of combining human cells with those from a different species (even if it is a closely related one), and the...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Do humans respond differently to screams of pleasure and pain? – podcast
Why do we scream? Whilst past research has largely focused on using screams to signal danger and scare predators, humans scream in a much wider range of contexts – from crying out in pleasure to shrieking with grief.Madeleine Finlay speaks to Prof Sascha Fr ühholz about his new study identifying what emotions humans communicate through screams, and how our brains react differently to distinct types of scream callsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Biology Psychology Evolution Source Type: news

Study indicates longer reproductive life span experienced by US women
(Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center) Previous research has shown a link between the duration of a woman's reproductive life span and her overall metabolic health. By analyzing data from successive surveys spanning the 1959-1962 National Health Examination Survey I through the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 2017-2018, TTUHSC's Duke Appiah, Ph.D., and a group of collaborators investigated factors that may be driving that link for U.S. women, including an increase in age at natural menopause. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An ion pump to deliver chemotherapy agents to the brain
(Link ö ping University) Despite surgery and subsequent treatment with chemotherapy and radiation, the majority of patients experience recurrence of malignant brain tumours. Researchers at Link ö ping University, Sweden, and the Medical University of Graz, Austria, have shown in cells in culture that an ion pump can deliver drugs more accurately, which gives less severe adverse effects in chemotherapy. The results have been published in Advanced Materials Technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How can we conserve Seychelles giant trevallies?
(Save Our Seas Foundation) A recent study revealed that to better conserve the giant trevally, an economically important game fish in the Seychelles, its nursery areas should be protected, as well as the bigger areas the large adults of the species frequently use. The study praises the Seychelles Marine Protected Areas and advises that St Joseph Atoll, the nursery area in the study, should not allow extractive fishing for species like giant trevally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CityU biologists discover super-enhancers that switch on breast cancer genes
(City University of Hong Kong) Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive type of breast cancer with a high fatality rate. Currently, chemotherapy is the major treatment option, but the clinical result is unsatisfactory. A research team led by biologists at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has identified and characterised a set of specific super-enhancers that stimulate the activity of the related critical cancer genes. The latest findings may help discover new effective drug targets for TNBC patients to improve their survival chance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Objective analysis of stress in the classroom
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Is it the difficulty of a task that determines whether or not students are stressed when working on it? Dr. Nina Minkley, a biologist working in biology didactics at Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum (RUB), set out to find out the answers in an interdisciplinary research team together with Dr. Moritz Krell (Freie Universit ä t Berlin) and Dr. Kate Xu (Open Universiteit, Netherlands); to this end, the team used questionnaires and measured the heart rate in 209 test participants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

eBird data used to shape eagle management
(Cornell University) One of the world's largest citizen-science efforts, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's eBird, is now helping the federal government streamline and refine its process for assessing eagle populations and informing eagle management. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The CNRS 2021 Innovation Medal laureates
(CNRS) Antoine Aiello, Nora Dempsey, Fran ç ois J é r ô me and Amanda Silva Brun are the four recipients of the CNRS 2021 Innovation Medal. Created 10 years ago, this distinction honours people whose outstanding research has led to significant technological, economic, therapeutic or social innovations that promote French scientific research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Betting on drones as smart agricultural tools for pesticide use in farms
(Tokyo University of Science) Drones could soon be adopted as essential tools for various agricultural tasks; however, with respect to their use in farm management, research is still lacking. To address this issue, researchers in Japan compared drones to well-established technologies for spraying pesticide over rice paddy fields. Using statistical data, the researchers explore both advantages and limitations of drones and whether they currently offer an edge regarding costs, capacity, and management efficiency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Drought-induced mortality of conifers
(University of W ü rzburg) When trees die during a drought event, they die of thirst: A field study on spruce trees shows that an abrupt collapse of the hydraulic system is responsible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news