Black women are 42% more likely to die of breast cancer than white women in the USĀ 
Two biology researchers from Georgia State University describe the racial gap, why it eludes scientists, and what we are learning about how to close the gap. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

En route to custom-designed natural products
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to industrial assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists at Goethe University have now been able to discover how these enzymes interact with each other. This brings them one step closer to their goal of engineering the production of such peptide natural products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New fly species found in Indiana may indicate changing climate, says IUPUI researcher
(Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science) A new type of blow fly spotted in Indiana points to shifting species populations due to climate change. Researchers at IUPUI have observed the first evidence of Lucilia cuprina in Indiana, an insect previously known to populate southern states from Virginia to California. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Montana State researchers win $1.5 million for developing carbon dioxide tech
(Montana State University) Stephen Sofie, professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, and Lee Spangler, director of Montana State's Energy Research Institute, received the US Energy Department grant in September. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Epidemic in turf management: Herbicide resistance in annual bluegrass
(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) Researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture are participating in a national effort to address what many landscape managers call an epidemic of herbicide resistance in annual bluegrass plaguing managed turf systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic breakthrough by CU Denver scientists will aid whitebark pine conservation efforts
(University of Colorado Denver) A University of Colorado Denver-led research team for the first time developed reliable genetic markers known as nuclear microsatellites for the whitebark pine, a discovery that could improve the tree's prospects for survival. Whitebark pine, which is declining rapidly nearly range-wide, is currently being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stem cell biologist Sean Morrison elected to the National Academy of Medicine
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) UT Southwestern Professor Dr. Sean Morrison, Director of the Children's Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Estimating the feeding habits of corals may offer new insights on resilient reefs
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and colleagues have found that corals living in more productive waters take advantage of the increased food availability. The findings reevaluate scientific understanding of how corals survive and could aid predictions on coral recovery in the face of climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

OSU researchers propose CRISPR as influencer of low genetic diversity in deadly bacteria
(Oregon State University) Scientists at Oregon State University have shed light on the evolutionary history of a soil-borne bacteria that is so dangerous to grazing animals it is kept behind lock-and-key to prevent its spread. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Government corruption tops 5th annual Chapman University survey of American fears
(Chapman University) More Americans are afraid than ever, according to the 5th annual Chapman University Survey of American Fears, released today. The 2018 survey revealed that government corruption remains Americans' primary concern, and the state of the environment, which for the first time represents fully half of Americans' top 10 fears. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Geek Girl' gamers are more likely to study science and technology degrees
(University of Surrey) Girls who play video games are three times more likely to choose physical science, technology, engineering or maths (PSTEM) degrees compared to their non-gaming counterparts, according to new research from the University of Surrey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Novel DNA vaccine design offers broad protection against influenza-A H3N2
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers developed a novel DNA influenza vaccine based on four micro-consensus antigenic regions selected to represent the diversity of seasonal H3N2 viruses across decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to catch fruit flies (video)
(American Chemical Society) You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar -- or can you? In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry behind why fruit flies love vinegar so much that some entomologists call them 'vinegar flies'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Advanced sequencing technology provides new insights into human mitochondrial diseases
(University of Helsinki) Researchers have for the first time been able to investigate the abundance and methyl modifications of all mitochondrial tRNAs in patients suffering from one of the most common inherited mitochondrial tRNA mutations. The analysis pipeline revealed quantitative changes that had dramatic effects on protein synthesis within mitochondria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Elucidating cuttlefish camouflage
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Computational image analysis of behaving cuttlefish reveals principles of control and development of a biological invisibility cloak. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

South American marsupials discovered to reach new heights
(Ecological Society of America) There have long been speculations that the mouse-sized marsupial monito del monte climbs to lofty heights in the trees. Yet, no previous records exist documenting such arboreal habits for this creature. Researchers set motion-sensing camera traps to capture photographic evidence confirming the high-climbing theories surrounding this miniature mammal. The findings are published in a new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Allergy research: Test predicts outcome of hay fever therapies
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Allergen-specific immunotherapy can considerably improve everyday life for allergy sufferers. It is unclear, however, what exactly happens during this treatment. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen investigated the processes taking place in the body over the course of a three-year allergen-specific immunotherapy. The researchers found clues as to why the allergy immunization takes so long and how the chances of success can be determined at a very early stage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Muscle mass should be a new vital sign, research shows
(GCI Health NY) Adults go to the doctor roughly three times a year.1 During their visit, vitals are taken such as blood pressure, pulse, and weight, but are these measurements really showing the full picture of a person's overall health? Extensive research shows health care professionals should be considering something often overlooked - muscle mass. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Valuable insights into the modeling, application, and production of bioactive materials
(Bentham Science Publishers) This book provides comprehensive coverage on computational modeling and the types of bioceramics and surface modifications currently used in dentistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists uncover how rare gene mutation affects brain development and memory
(University of California - Irvine) Researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, have found that a rare gene mutation alters brain development in mice, impairing memory and disrupting the communication between nerve cells. They also show memory problems could be improved by transplanting a specific type of nerve cell into the brain. The findings were published today in Neuron. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Samara Polytech University created healthy candies with original fillings
(Samara Polytech (Samara State Technical University)) Today, not only Polytech scientists are engaged in making sweets by hand. However, many sellers of handmade chocolate products cheat using ready-made chocolate. It is usually not very high quality, contains not cocoa butter, but a large amount of vegetable fat and thickeners. Very rarely, in such sweets there is praline nut, usually manufacturers prefer cheaper fruit and berry fillings: marmalade and jams. These products can not be attributed to the premium class. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Infection biology: Staying a step ahead of the game
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness, evades the immune system by repeatedly altering the structure of its surface coat. Sequencing of its genome and studies of its 3D genome architecture have now revealed crucial molecular aspects of this strategy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Carbon fiber can store energy in the body of a vehicle
(Chalmers University of Technology) A study led by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has shown that carbon fibers can work as battery electrodes, storing energy directly. This opens up new opportunities for structural batteries, where the carbon fiber becomes part of the energy system. The use of this type of multifunctional material can contribute to a significant weight-reduction in the aircraft and vehicles of the future -- a key challenge for electrification. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biodiversity can also destabilize ecosystems
(University of Zurich) According to the prevailing opinion, species-rich ecosystems are more stable against environmental disruptions such as drought, hot spells or pesticides. The situation is not as simple as it seems, however, as ecologists at the University of Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag) have now discovered. Under certain environmental conditions, increased biodiversity can also lead to an ecosystem becoming more unstable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Structure of the human voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.4 in complex with {beta}1
Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, which are responsible for action potential generation, are implicated in many human diseases. Despite decades of rigorous characterization, the lack of a structure of any human Nav channel has hampered mechanistic understanding. Here, we report the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the human Nav1.4-β1 complex at 3.2-Å resolution. Accurate model building was made for the pore domain, the voltage-sensing domains, and the β1 subunit, providing insight into the molecular basis for Na+ permeation and kinetic asymmetry of the four repeats. Structural analysis of repo...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Pan, X., Li, Z., Zhou, Q., Shen, H., Wu, K., Huang, X., Chen, J., Zhang, J., Zhu, X., Lei, J., Xiong, W., Gong, H., Xiao, B., Yan, N. Tags: Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Supracellular contraction at the rear of neural crest cell groups drives collective chemotaxis
Collective cell chemotaxis, the directed migration of cell groups along gradients of soluble chemical cues, underlies various developmental and pathological processes. We use neural crest cells, a migratory embryonic stem cell population whose behavior has been likened to malignant invasion, to study collective chemotaxis in vivo. Studying Xenopus and zebrafish, we have shown that the neural crest exhibits a tensile actomyosin ring at the edge of the migratory cell group that contracts in a supracellular fashion. This contractility is polarized during collective cell chemotaxis: It is inhibited at the front but persists at...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Shellard, A., Szabo, A., Trepat, X., Mayor, R. Tags: Cell Biology, Development reports Source Type: news

Supracellular cable drives collective cell movement
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Cell Biology, Development twis Source Type: news

Supracellular contractions propel migration
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Adameyko, I. Tags: Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

Dr. Peter M. Monti to Deliver 10th Annual Jack Mendelson Honorary Lecture at the National Institutes of Health
What:The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces that Peter M. Monti, Ph.D., will deliver the 10th Annual Jack Mendelson Honorary Lecture. The title of his presentation is “Alcohol Misuse and HIV: Biology, Beliefs and Behavior.”  (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - October 17, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: groa Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Do your surroundings affect your taste? Virtual reality answers
Our sense of taste impacts many of our choices, but how do our surroundings influence it? A series of virtual reality experiments now provide an answer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

Why White Supremacists Are Chugging Milk (and Why Geneticists Are Alarmed)
The appropriation of genetic research by those with extremist views on race has scientists grappling with how to respond. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AMY HARMON Tags: Genetics and Heredity Race and Ethnicity Fringe Groups and Movements Genealogy DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Population Research American Society of Human Genetics Evolution (Biology) Source Type: news

Arctic greening thaws permafrost, boosts runoff
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) A new collaborative study has investigated Arctic shrub-snow interactions to obtain a better understanding of the far north's tundra and vast permafrost system. Incorporating extensive in situ observations, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists tested their theories with a novel 3D computer model and confirmed that shrubs can lead to significant degradation of the permafrost layer that has remained frozen for tens of thousands of years. These interactions are driving increases in discharges of fresh water into rivers, lakes and oceans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dry conditions in East Africa half a million years ago possibly shaped human evolution, study finds
(Georgia State University) Samples of ancient sediments from a lake basin in East Africa have revealed that arid conditions developed in the area around half a million years ago, an environmental change that could have played a major role in human evolution and influenced advances in stone technology, according to an international research team that includes geologists from Georgia State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study uncovers new link between neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and bumblebee decline
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Adding to evidence that pesticide use may be abetting the decline of bumblebee, a new study reveals that daily consumption of even small doses of neonicotinoids reduces the survival of queen and male bees, which are critical to the viability of wild populations. The study also found that exposure to neonicotinoids alters the expression of many bee genes, suggesting that the chemicals may be having a greater impact on wild bee populations than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Substantial changes in air pollution across China during 2015 to 2017
(University of Leeds) The first detailed analysis of air pollution trends in China reveals a 20 per cent drop in concentrations of particulate pollution over the last three years (2015-2017). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Evolution is everywhere
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Human Evolution Beyond Biology and Culture: Evolutionary Social, Environmental and Policy Sciences (Cambridge University Press, October 2018) is a new book written by ICREA Research Professor Jeroen van den Bergh of at ICTA-UAB. It offers a complete account of evolutionary thinking in the social, environmental and policy sciences, while creating bridges with biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bone cell response to mechanical force is balance of injury and repair
(eLife) Scientists have revealed the intricate process that bone cells use to repair themselves after mechanical injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Novel method for precise, controllable cell deposition onto tissue engineering constructs
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study presents a novel method of using a microfluidic flow cell array to achieve precise and reproducible control of cell deposition onto engineered tissue constructs to produce tunable cell patterns and generate essential integration zones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Breakthrough Prize to CSHL professor for SMA research
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) Professor Adrian Krainer has received the 2019 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences for his work on the first FDA-approved treatment of SMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

World Heritage Sites threatened by rising sea levels
(Kiel University) In the Mediterranean region, there are numerous UNESCO World Heritage Sites in low-lying coastal areas. In the course of the 21st century, these sites will increasingly be at risk by storm surges and increasing coastal erosion due to sea-level rise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New imaging tool captures how sound moves through the chinchilla ear
(The Optical Society) Researchers have developed a new device that can be used to visualize how sound-induced vibrations travel through the ear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study documents paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants. How these effects are transmitted across generations, however, remains mysterious. A new study in the roundworm C. elegans documents the transmission via sperm of epigenetic marks that are both necessary and sufficient to guide proper development of germ cells in the offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Are microplastics in the environment truly harmful?
(Wiley) Investigators who analyzed the published literature have found significant gaps in our understanding of the effects of microplastics -- plastic particles less than 5mm in size -- in the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UNH researchers say winter ticks killing moose at alarming rate
(University of New Hampshire) Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that the swell of infestations of winter ticks -- which attach themselves to moose during the fall and feed throughout the winter -- is the primary cause of an unprecedented 70 percent death rate of calves over a three-year period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Penetrating the soil's surface with radar
(American Society of Agronomy) Ground penetrating radar measures the amount of moisture in soil quickly and easily. Researchers' calculations from the data informs agricultural water use and climate models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ERS Genomics and Syngulon Sign License Agreement on CRISPR-Cas9 Genome...
ERS Genomics Ltd and Syngulon, a synthetic biology startup developing original genetic technologies using bacteriocins, announced today a non-exclusive license agreement which provides Syngulon with...(PRWeb October 17, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/ers_genomics_and_syngulon_sign_license_agreement_on_crispr_cas9_genome_editing_patents_for_industrial_applications/prweb15840777.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Enhance your Interdisciplinary and Team Science Skills
Reports abound from professional societies, the Academies, government agencies, and researchers calling attention to the fact that science is increasingly an inter-disciplinary, transdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and international endeavor. In short, science has become a “team sport.” There is a real and present need to better prepare scientists for success in this new collaborative environment. The American Institute of Biological Sciences is responding to this call with a new program for scientists, educators, and individuals who work with or participate in scientific teams. Team science is increasingl...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Last Chance to Enter the 2018 Faces of Biology Photo Contest
Enter the Faces of Biology Photo Contest for your chance to win $250 and to have your photo appear on the cover of the journal BioScience. The competition, sponsored by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), recognizes scientists who use imagery to communicate aspects of biological research to the public and policymakers. The theme of the contest is “Faces of Biology.” Photographs entered into the competition must depict a person, such as a scientist, researcher, technician, collections curator, or student, engaging in biological research. The research may occur outside, in a lab, with a natura...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Teleflex, Arcis enter agreement for cancer diagnostics
Cancer-detection company Arcis Biotechnology said today it has signed an agreement allowing Teleflex (NYSE:TFX) to use Arcis’ advanced nucleic acid sample preparation chemistry in the development of a novel technology. Daresbury, England-based Arcis’ diagnostics use a two-step nucleic acid extraction and preservation technology. The company said it has an extensive patent portfolio covering DNA and RNA extraction and preservation for downstream processing by qPCR, RT-qPCR and sequencing in under three minutes. The platform may be used for point-of-care, microfluidics or field-based testing, and supports both co...
Source: Mass Device - October 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Featured Oncology arcisbiotechnology Teleflex Source Type: news

Just how blind are bats? Color vision gene study examines key sensory tradeoffs
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Could bats' cave-dwelling nocturnal habits over eons enhanced their echolocation acoustic abilities, but also spurred their loss of vision?A new study led by Bruno Sim õ es, Emma Teeling and colleagues has examined this question in the evolution of color vision genes across a large and diverse group of bat species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news