Rhesus macaques develop promising immune response to SARS-CoV-2
(University of California - Davis) In a promising result for the success of vaccines against COVID-19, rhesus macaque monkeys infected with the human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 developed protective immune responses that might be reproduced with a vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wu & Hakami investigating COVID-19 therapies
(George Mason University) Yuntao Wu, Professor, Molecular and Microbiology, and Ramin Hakami, Associate Professor, School of Systems Biology, are conducting studies of COVID-19 therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

University of Cincinnati student uses zebrafish to study spinal deformities
(University of Cincinnati) Oriana Zinani, a doctoral student in molecular developmental biology at the University of Cincinnati, is part of a team of researchers using zebrafish embryos to study a gene mutation that causes scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine that typically occurs in humans just before puberty. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Giant worm's undersea lair discovered by fossil hunters in Taiwan
Scientists believe 2-metre-long burrow once housed predator that ambushed passing sea creaturesThe undersea lair of a giant worm that ambushed passing marine creatures 20m years ago has been uncovered by fossil hunters in Taiwan.Researchers believe the 2-metre-long burrow found in ancient marine sediment once housed a prehistoric predator that burst out of the seabed and dragged unsuspecting animals down into its lair.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Palaeontology Fossils Taiwan Marine life Oceans Asia Pacific Animals Biology World news Wildlife Source Type: news

Giant sand worm discovery proves truth is stranger than fiction
(Simon Fraser University) Simon Fraser University researchers have found evidence that large ambush-predatory worms--some as long as two metres--roamed the ocean floor near Taiwan over 20 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds racial disparities in breast cancer prognosis testing
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Women with hormone-dependent breast cancer typically have a favorable prognosis, but new research has found that even after adjusting for age at diagnosis, tumor stage and treatment, there is still a significant mortality gap between Black and non-Hispanic white women with axillary node-negative, hormone-dependent tumors that have a comparable Oncotype Recurrence Score. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mitochondrial mutation increases the risk of diabetes in Japanese men
(University of Southern California) A new study of Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Japanese populations has uncovered a previously uncharacterized genetic variant that puts male carriers at greater risk for the disease, as well as the mechanism by which it does so. The impact of the variant was most pronounced in sedentary men; those with the variant had a 65% greater rate of T2D than sedentary men without it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Personalizing cancer care with improved tumor models
(American Institute of Physics) While decades of research have resulted in substantial improvements in surviving cancer, a key challenge remains in identifying new drugs that improve outcomes for patients. InAPL Bioengineering, researchers suggest a major hurdle is the paucity of models for cancer research that accurately represent patient tumors. They provide a perspective on strategies using models from individual patients and where the field needs to go in terms of research in animal systems and in culture systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Combining best of both worlds for cancer modeling
(American Institute of Physics) Treatment options for many types of cancers remain limited, due partly to the in vitro tools used to model cancers and that results from animal studies do not always translate well to human disease. These shortcomings point to a clear need for a better, patient-specific model. Researchers suggest bioengineered microscale organotypic models can address this need. They discuss the advantages and capabilities of this technique, as well as its challenges, in the journalAPL Bioengineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The downward trend: Nature's decline risks our quality of life
(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) Scientists conducted a sweeping review of nature's contributions to humans in order to present a clear breakdown of global trends since 1970. Not surprisingly, the results are grim (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A closer look at T cells reveals big differences in mild vs. severe COVID-19 cases
(La Jolla Institute for Immunology) A big question on people's minds these days: how long does immunity to SARS-CoV-2 last following infection? Now a research team from La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI), The University of Liverpool and the University of Southampton has uncovered an interesting clue. Their new study suggests that people with severe COVID-19 cases may be left with more of the protective 'memory' T cells needed to fight reinfection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Adaptive optics with cascading corrective elements
(SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics) As reported inAdvanced Photonics, researchers from the University of Freiburg, Germany, have made a significant advance in AO microscopy through the demonstration of a new AO module comprising two deformable phase plates (DPPs). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

OSU researchers prove fish-friendly detection method more sensitive than electrofishing
(Oregon State University) Delivering a minor electric shock into a stream to reveal any fish lurking nearby may be the gold standard for detecting fish populations, but it's not much fun for the trout. Scientists at Oregon State University have found that sampling stream water for evidence of the presence of various species using environmental DNA, known as eDNA, can be more accurate than electrofishing, without disrupting the fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop new graphene nanochannel water filters
(Brown University) Brown University researchers have shown that tiny channels between graphene sheets can be aligned in a way that makes them ideal for water filtration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists make pivotal discovery on mechanism of Epstein-Barr virus latent infection
(The Wistar Institute) Wistar Researchers have discovered a new enzymatic function of the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) protein EBNA1, a critical factor in EBV's ability to transform human cells and cause cancer. Study provides new indications for inhibiting EBNA1 function, opening up fresh avenues for development of therapies to treat EBV-associated cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NeuroReality ™ : the future of telepresence
(Case Western Reserve University) Join the Human Fusions Institute on Jan. 28 at 11 a.m. EST to watch Dustin Tyler, Founder of Human Fusions Institute, and Shelly Palmer, CEO of The Palmer Group, discuss Human Fusions Institute, NeuroReality ™ , and the future of human-tech relationships. Request your calendar invitation at shellypalmer.com/neuroreality-future-telepresence/ (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Seeds transfer their microbes to the next generation
(Stockholm University) Scientists have been pondering if the microbiome of plants is due to nature or nurture. Research at Stockholm University, published inEnvironmental Microbiology, showed that oak acorns contain a large diversity of microbes, and that oak seedlings inherit their microbiome from these acorns. The microorganisms found on the seed are often valuable for the plant, promoting its growth and protecting it against certain diseases. Each plant species harbours a distinct microbial community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pioneering new technique could revolutionise super-resolution imaging systems
(University of Exeter) Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could revolutionise the accuracy, precision and clarity of super-resolution imaging systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The road to future zero emissions demands a new form of ammonia production
(Aarhus University) Ammonia is one of the most important chemicals manufactured globally today and has lately been envisaged as an opportunity to reduce carbon footprint for a range of industries. Its production however, is currently far from sustainable and carbon-free. A new innovative research project, bridging knowledge from all over the world, aims to change that by finding new ways of producing green ammonia. The project has received a generous grant by Horizon 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Separation anxiety
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Leslie, M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology Feature Source Type: news

Stealing the spotlight in the field and kitchen
(American Society of Agronomy) New dry beans from UC Davis combine desirable qualities for both farmers and consumers (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Designer DNA therapeutic wipes out cancer stem cells, treats multiple myeloma in mice
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego study supports launch of Phase I clinical trial to test a designer DNA agent -- an antisense oligonucleotide that targets a gene called IRF4 -- in patients with multiple myeloma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study shows how network of marine protected areas could help safeguard Antarctic penguins
(University of East Anglia) New research led by BirdLife International, the University of East Anglia (UEA) and British Antarctic Survey highlights how a proposed network of marine protected areas could help safeguard some of the most important areas at sea for breeding Antarctic penguins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An anode-free zinc battery that could someday store renewable energy
(American Chemical Society) Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, could help decrease the world's reliance on fossil fuels. But first, power companies need a safe, cost-effective way to store the energy for later use. Massive lithium-ion batteries can do the job, but they suffer from safety issues and limited lithium availability. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Nano Letters have made a prototype of an anode-free, zinc-based battery that uses low-cost, naturally abundant materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Intoxicating chemicals in catnip and silver vine protect felines from mosquito bites
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Rubbing against catnip and silver vine transfers plant chemicals that researchers have now shown protect cats from mosquitoes. The results also demonstrate that engaging with nepetalactol, which the study identified as the most potent of many intoxicating iridoid compounds found in silver vine, activates the opioid reward system in both domesticated felines (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New starfish-like fossil reveals evolution in action
(University of Cambridge) Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered a fossil of the earliest starfish-like animal, which helps us understand the origins of the nimble-armed creature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Squid-inspired robot swims with nature's most efficient marine animals
(University of Southampton) Scientists at the University of Southampton and University of Edinburgh have developed a flexible underwater robot that can propel itself through water in the same style as nature's most efficient swimmer - the Aurelia aurita jellyfish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sequencing of wastewater useful for control of SARS-CoV-2
(American Society for Microbiology) Viral genome sequencing of wastewater can detect new SARS-CoV-2 variants before they are detected by local clinical sequencing, according to a new study reported in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The ability to track SARS-CoV-2 mutations in wastewater could be particularly useful for tracking new variants, like the B.1.17 strain that is now widespread in the U.K. and has already been introduced in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds COVID-19 attack on brain, not lungs, triggers severe disease in mice
(Georgia State University) Georgia State University biology researchers have found that infecting the nasal passages of mice with the virus that causes COVID-19 led to a rapid, escalating attack on the brain that triggered severe illness, even after the lungs were successfully clearing themselves of the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 19, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Exploration of toxic Tiger Rattlesnake venom advances use of genetic science techniques
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) A team of researchers led by the University of South Florida has decoded the genome of the Tiger Rattlesnake, which has venom 40 times more toxic than that of Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes, the largest venomous snake in North America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Protected areas vulnerable to growing emphasis on food security
(University of Maryland) New study shows croplands are prevalent in protected areas, challenging their efficacy in meeting conservation goals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Constructing termite turrets without a blueprint
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Land deals meant to improve food security may have hurt
(University of Notre Dame) Large-scale land acquisitions by foreign investors, intended to improve global food security, had little to no benefit, increasing crop production in some areas while simultaneously threatening local food security in others, according to Notre Dame researchers who studied their effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fastener with microscopic mushroom design holds promise
(American Institute of Physics) A fastener with a microscopic design that looks like tiny mushrooms could mean advances for everyday consumers and scientific fields. Currently available fasteners are called hook and loop fasteners and require harder, stiff material. In Biointerphases, researchers describe a design that can use softer materials and still be strong. The team believes a 3D mushroom design can be made with softer, more flexible materials and provide sufficient interlocking force on the fabric and hold strong. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Counting elephants from space
(University of Bath) For the first time, scientists have successfully used satellite cameras coupled with deep learning to count animals in complex geographical landscapes, taking conservationists an important step forward in monitoring populations of endangered species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Disease threatens to decimate western bats
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A four-year study recently published inEcology and Evolution concludes that the fungal disease, white-nose syndrome, poses a severe threat to many western North American bats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Teaching youth science skills using wild birds nets UT extension agent a national award
(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) Andrew Lantz, a 4-H youth development agent with University of Tennessee-Tennessee State University Extension Davidson County, uses wild birds to teach youth STEM concepts. The lesson plans he developed to engage youth in STEM studies involving birds have won him a first-place award from the National Association of Extension 4-H Youth Development Professionals, as announced during the organization's virtual conference late last fall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists reveal structure of plants' energy generators
(eLife) Researchers have revealed the first atomic structures of the respiratory apparatus that plants use to generate energy, according to a study published today in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

With a little help from their friends, older birds breed successfully
(University of Groningen) The offspring of older animals often have a lower chance of survival because the parents are unable to take care of their young as well as they should. The Seychelles warbler is a cooperatively breeding bird species, meaning that parents often receive help when raising their offspring. A study led by biologists from the University of Groningen shows that the offspring of older females have better prospects when they are surrounded by helpers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new carbon budget framework provides a clearer view of our climate deadlines
(Concordia University) Nature's Communications Earth and Environment just published a paper by a group of researchers led by Damon Matthews in which they present a new framework for calculating the remaining carbon budget that is able to generate a much narrower estimate and its uncertainty. The researchers estimate that between 230 and 440 billion more tonnes of CO2 from 2020 onwards can be emitted into the atmosphere and still provide a reasonable chance of limiting global warming to 1.5 ° C. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Spike proteins of SARS-CoV-2 relatives can evolve against immune responses
(eLife) Scientists have shown that two species of seasonal human coronavirus related to SARS-CoV-2 can evolve in certain proteins to escape recognition by the immune system, according to a study published today in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Acidification impedes shell development of plankton off the US West Coast
(NOAA Headquarters) Results from a 2016 research cruise show ocean acidification has interfered with shell development of zooplankton that are a critical part of the marine food web. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biden Selects Life Scientist as Science Adviser
President-elect Joe Biden has announced that he will nominate Dr. Eric Lander—a geneticist, molecular biologist, and mathematician—to serve as the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and his science adviser.    Related StoriesMembers of Biden-Harris Science Team AnnouncedEPA Finalizes “Secret Science” Rule2021 Virtual Advocacy Event  (Source: AIBS Classifieds)
Source: AIBS Classifieds - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Biden Selects Life Scientist as Science Adviser
President-elect Joe Biden has announced that he will nominate Dr. Eric Lander—a geneticist, molecular biologist, and mathematician—to serve as the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and his science adviser.    Related StoriesMembers of Biden-Harris Science Team AnnouncedEPA Finalizes “Secret Science” Rule2021 Virtual Advocacy Event  (Source: Education Reports)
Source: Education Reports - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Biden Selects Life Scientist as Science Adviser
President-elect Joe Biden has announced that he will nominate Dr. Eric Lander—a geneticist, molecular biologist, and mathematician—to serve as the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and his science adviser.    Related StoriesMembers of Biden-Harris Science Team AnnouncedEPA Finalizes “Secret Science” Rule2021 Virtual Advocacy Event  (Source: BioScience Press Releases)
Source: BioScience Press Releases - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Biden Selects Life Scientist as Science Adviser
President-elect Joe Biden has announced that he will nominate Dr. Eric Lander—a geneticist, molecular biologist, and mathematician—to serve as the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and his science adviser.    Related StoriesMembers of Biden-Harris Science Team AnnouncedEPA Finalizes “Secret Science” Rule2021 Virtual Advocacy Event  (Source: AIBS News)
Source: AIBS News - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Biden Selects Life Scientist as Science Adviser
President-elect Joe Biden has announced that he will nominate Dr. Eric Lander—a geneticist, molecular biologist, and mathematician—to serve as the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and his science adviser.    Related StoriesMembers of Biden-Harris Science Team AnnouncedEPA Finalizes “Secret Science” Rule2021 Virtual Advocacy Event  (Source: Eye on Education)
Source: Eye on Education - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Biden Selects Life Scientist as Science Adviser
President-elect Joe Biden has announced that he will nominate Dr. Eric Lander—a geneticist, molecular biologist, and mathematician—to serve as the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and his science adviser.    Related StoriesMembers of Biden-Harris Science Team AnnouncedEPA Finalizes “Secret Science” Rule2021 Virtual Advocacy Event  (Source: Washington Watch)
Source: Washington Watch - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Biden Selects Life Scientist as Science Adviser
President-elect Joe Biden has announced that he will nominate Dr. Eric Lander—a geneticist, molecular biologist, and mathematician—to serve as the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and his science adviser.    Related StoriesMembers of Biden-Harris Science Team AnnouncedEPA Finalizes “Secret Science” Rule2021 Virtual Advocacy Event  (Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials)
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Latest Public Policy Report
The Public Policy Report has been released. The report provides analysis and communication on important issues in the scientific community.    Related StoriesBiden Selects Life Scientist as Science AdviserMembers of Biden-Harris Science Team AnnouncedEPA Finalizes “Secret Science” Rule  (Source: AIBS Classifieds)
Source: AIBS Classifieds - January 19, 2021 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news