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Budget Accord Offers Opportunity to Increase Federal Science Funding
Congress approved a two-year budget plan on February 9 that would increase authorizations for federal spending. The agreement passed in the Senate (71-28) and House (240-186) and was signed into law by President Trump. The bipartisan agreement raised the caps on defense and nondefense discretionary spending by nearly $300 billion over two years, with nondefense discretionary spending - the biggest source of research funding - getting a $63 billion boost in FY 2018 and an additional $68 billion in FY 2019. Congress has yet to complete work on FY 2018 appropriations, however. Appropriations legislation is the legislative ve...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

White House Reverses Plan to Cut NSF
The White House rolled out its fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request in two parts; the original request and then a short addendum that reflects the recent budget agreement by Congress to lift spending caps for 2019. The original proposal called for a 30 percent cut to the National Science Foundation (NSF) budget, which would have rolled funding back to $5.27 billion. In the more recent twenty-six-page addendum to the budget, the White House would restore the proposed cuts and fund NSF at its 2017 level of $7.472 billion. Some highlights from the budget request: Funding for the six research directorates would increase b...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NIH Budget Remains Flat Under Trump Budget
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) would see roughly flat funding if the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request were enacted as proposed. The White House has requested $34.8 billion for NIH, approximately $2 billion below the 2018 enacted appropriation. Late adjustments to the budget reversed an originally proposed 27 percent cut to NIH. The FY 2019 budget for NIH is slated to increase only slightly by $538 million over 2017 levels because it would absorb three agencies under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that fund research on healthcare quality, occupational health, and disabiliti...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President's Budget Would Cut USGS by 21 Percent
The United States Geological Survey (USGS) would be funded at $860 million, a 21 percent cut from the fiscal year (FY) 2017 level. Funding for the water resources program would be reduced by 23 percent to $165 million. The administration’s budget would also reduce support for the natural hazards program by 19 percent. These include programs to monitor earthquakes and volcanoes, which would each be slashed by 21 percent. Other programs would also see deep cuts, with budget for the ecosystems program reduced by 40 percent, core science systems reduced by 20 percent, and science support programs cut by 15 percent. The ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Trump's NASA Budget Cancels Space Telescope and Five Earth Science Missions
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) would receive $19.9 billion if Congress adopts the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget. At this level, the agency would see an increase of about 1.3 percent over the enacted FY 2017 level. Under the President’s budget the White House would cancel numerous missions and a major telescope. The budget would zero out the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope. The orbiting observatory is designed to study dark energy and explore exoplanets. NASA has struggled to keep the costs of the program below a $3.2 billion cap, but the cancellation of a project that ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Energy Budget Cuts Research Funding, Eliminates ARPA-E
The President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request would fund the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at $30.6 billion, or a level that is approximately 2 percent below 2017 enacted levels. The administration proposes to increase spending for nuclear weapons while reducing funds for core research programs. The request would provide DOE Office of Science flat funding at $5.4 billion for basic research, which is $1.2 billion or 22 percent more than the amount stated in the original budget proposal. The number increased after Congress struck the budget deal to raise spending caps in FY 2018 and 2019. Basic energy scienc...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President's Budget Slashes NOAA
President Trump’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request would provide $4.6 billion to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a 20 percent reduction compared to enacted 2017 funding of $5.7 billion. The proposal would slash spending for climate change-related activities across the agency by $40 million, ending competitive grants for climate-change research and studies aimed at understanding the impacts of global warming on the Arctic. The administration seeks to eliminate $273 million in grants, including the National Sea Grant College Program, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, coas...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Trump Budget Offers More Deep Cuts for EPA
The White House plan for fiscal year (FY) 2019 would reduce spending for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by 25 percent, reducing the budget from $8.1 billion in FY 2017 to $6.1 billion. This would be the smallest budget for the EPA since the 1990s. The proposal would gut funding for climate-change research and reorganize research programs related to clean water, land preservation, and healthy communities. To replace these, the budget would allocate $112 million for “core mission” and $357 million for “Rule of Law and Process.” These new items might provide the agency with some leeway to m...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President Calls for Big Cuts for ESA Listings
The President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 Interior Department budget proposal would limit Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing activity to $10.9 million, which is about half the $20.4 million received in FY 2017. Gavin Shire, public affairs head of the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), said in a statement, “Our focus is on prioritizing species recovery, where we have funding for recovery planning, five-year reviews and down- and delisting packages.” The budget proposal for Interior notes that officials want to focus “available resources on the recovery of the more than 1,660 species listed domestically ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Pruitt's Reform Plan Details Major Reorganization and Workforce Reshaping
In conjunction with the fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released a “reform plan” along with its strategic plan. The plan is in response to a Presidential executive order asking for a major reorganization of the federal government and includes eleven projects to streamline EPA operations to ensure faster contracting and permitting and fewer requests for industry information. Administrator Scott Pruitt stated in an internal email, “Together the Strategic Plan and Reform Plan set a roadmap for EPA to better achieve our mission of protecting h...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Short Takes
In congressional testimony, Dan Coats, the Director of National Intelligence, warned of the potential for drastic climate change: “The impacts of the long-term trends toward a warming climate, more air pollution, biodiversity loss, and water scarcity are likely to fuel economic and social discontent - and possibly upheaval - through 2018.” He continued, “Extreme weather events in a warmer world have the potential for greater impacts and can compound with other drivers to raise the risk of humanitarian disasters, conflict, water and food shortages, population migration, labor shortfalls, price shocks, and ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Become an Advocate for Science: Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center
Quick, free, easy, effective, impactful! Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center. The Legislative Action Center is a one-stop shop for learning about and influencing science policy. Through the website, users can contact elected officials and sign-up to interact with lawmakers. The website offers tools and resources to inform researchers about recent policy developments. The site also announces opportunities to serve on federal advisory boards and to comment on federal regulations. This new tool is made possible through contributions from the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Botanical Society of America. AIBS...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Lawmakers Race to Replace Retiring Appropriations Committee Chairman
Representative Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ), the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, announced that he would retire from Congress at the end of this term. Several lawmakers are already scrambling to replace him, including Representatives Kay Granger (R-TX), Robert Aderholt (R-AL), Mike Simpson (R-ID), and Tom Cole (R-OK). Aderholt currently leads the Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee and would be next in line based on seniority for the top position on the Committee. He supports cutting discretionary funding and his comments also indicate that he may not support a resurrection of earmarks. Granger is the c...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

White House Nominates Retired Astronaut to Lead USGS
The Trump Administration has announced its intent to nominate Dr. James F. Reilly, a former NASA astronaut and exploration geologist, as the next Director of the United States Geological Survey. Reilly currently serves as a technical adviser and subject matter expert on space operations at the U.S. Air Force’s National Security Space Institute in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He worked at NASA for 13 years where he was first selected as an astronaut candidate in 1994. He flew three Space Shuttle missions, conducted 5 spacewalks, and logged over 856 hours in space, with his work primarily focused on assembling the Inte...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

House Science Committee Announces New Leadership
The House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) announced on 23 January that Representative Ralph Abraham (R-LA) would take the helm of the Subcommittee on Oversight. The announcement came after Representative Darin LaHood (R-IL) resigned the chairmanship to accept an appointment to the House Ways and Means Committee. Abraham’s background includes work as a physician, veterinarian, and business owner. He previously served as the vice chairman of the Subcommittee on Research and Technology, a position that will now be filled by Representative Roger Marshall (R-KS).    &...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

CDC Director Resigns Amid Reports of Tobacco Stock Trade
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced on January 31, 2018, that Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald would resign as the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The statement read, “Dr. Fitzgerald owns certain complex financial interests that have imposed a broad recusal limiting her ability to complete all of her duties as the CDC Director. Due to the nature of these financial interests, Dr. Fitzgerald could not divest from them in a definitive time period.” The decision came a day after Politico reported that she bought stock in a large tobacco company within a month of start...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Van Hollen, Beyer Introduce Cap and Dividend Legislation to Address Climate Change
Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) and Representative Don Beyer (R-VA) have introduced the “Healthy Climate and Family Security Act of 2018” with a cap and dividend approach to address climate change while also increasing the spending power of the middle class. The bill aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, cap carbon pollution by auctioning carbon permits to oil, coal, and natural gas sellers in the U.S. market, and return all the proceeds as quarterly dividends to every American in the form of a “Healthy Climate Dividends.” Van Hollen, a member of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committe...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Bipartisan Coalition to Take on Budget After Ending Shutdown
The bipartisan group of lawmakers that helped end a three-day government shut down are tackling the budget process. The so-called “common-sense coalition” started out with seventeen members and grew to about thirty towards the end of the shutdown. Members of the group include Senators Susan Collins (R-ME), Joe Manchin (D-WV), Tom Udall (D-NM), and Lindsey Graham (R-SC). The group is endeavoring to reach a budget deal before the federal government once again runs out of money on February 8th. Senators said that the group also has the ambitious goal of reviving the annual appropriations process. Senators believe...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

EPA Chief Questioned by Democrats at Senate Oversight Hearing
On January 30, 2018, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt testified for the first time since his confirmation hearing last year before the Senate Environmental and Public Works Committee for the first time since his confirmation hearing last year. He faced tough questions and criticisms from the Democrats on the panel. Senator Tom Carper (D-DE) urged Pruitt to come before the committee and meet with lawmakers more often and criticized some of his actions as the EPA chief, such as delaying environmental rules, removing science advisers, and taking down web pages pertaining to climate scienc...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Short Takes
The InterAcademy Partnership (IAP), a global network of academies of sciences and medicine, has released a summary of the workshop on "Assessing the Security Implications of Genome Editing Technology" that was held in Germany in October 2017 and convened by the IAP, US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, the European Academies Science Advisory Council, and the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. The international workshop brought together global experts in genetic engineering, security studies, and public policy to discuss strategies to mitigate potential security concerns posed...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Silicon Valley ’s (other) gender in tech problem: Women in Bay Area biotech are still waiting to break through
Five years ago, fresh off a post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford focused on immunobiology, Karin Lachmi decided to forge her own path in the biotech industry.   The Israeli-born scientist with a Ph.D. in molecular biology started pitching a startup: a search engine for life science research, which would digitize and summarize articles rated by peers. The Yelp-for-biotech idea quickly captured the attention of Silicon Valley venture capitalists. Pitches to male investors, though, didn’t always… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lauren Hepler Source Type: news

Animals Dropped Dead Inside Roman ‘Gate to Hell.’ Scientists Just Figured Out Why
Two millennia ago, a small Greco-Roman temple in present-day Turkey awed and enthralled its residents. Just beyond its stone gate, in a grotto shrouded in a heavy mist, a strange force worked dark deeds: Bulls ushered inside would lie down and perish; the castrated priests in charge would emerge unscathed. Was it the bloodthirsty will of Pluto, the god of the underworld? The supernatural power of the priests? New research published on Feb. 12 in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences suggests a far earthlier explanation to the cave’s mystery: noxious carbon dioxide. Using a portable gas analyzer, vol...
Source: TIME: Science - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Tepper Paley / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Archaeology onetime Source Type: news

When every fish counts
(University of California - Davis) Genetic analysis by UC Davis showed about one-third of endangered delta smelt were misidentified in surveys of the Yolo Bypass. Their study found that genetic tools can be a powerful complement to visual identification of endangered fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New partnership aids sustainable growth with Earth observations
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA and the nonprofit Conservation International are partnering to map land and water ecosystems around the world to provide decision makers with new tools for assessing natural resources for planning and management. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Purdue researchers show microscopic wood nanocrystals make concrete stronger
(Purdue University) Purdue University researchers studying whether concrete is made stronger by infusing it with microscopic-sized nanocrystals from wood are moving from the laboratory to the real world with a bridge that will be built in California this spring. The researchers have been working with cellulose nanocrystals, byproducts generated by the paper, bioenergy, agriculture and pulp industries, to find the best mixture to strengthen concrete, the most common man-made material in the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The global footprint of fisheries
(University of California - Santa Barbara) UCSB researchers collaborate to track commercial fishing worldwide in real time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New insight into plants' self-defense
(University of Delaware) Researchers at the University of Delaware and the University of California-Davis have uncovered new details of how chloroplasts move about in times of trouble. It's the fundamental kind of research information that helps scientists understand plant biology and could help farmers prevent crop loss. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research to uncover factors behind bladder cancer progression receives ACS grant
(Penn State) To find new therapies for aggressive bladder cancer, researchers must first uncover what drives each subtype at the molecular level. That's why the American Cancer Society has awarded a grant to study bladder cancer development to David DeGraff, assistant professor of pathology, surgery and biochemistry and molecular biology, and a member of Penn State Cancer Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Distinguishing males from females among king penguins
(Wiley) It is difficult to distinguish males from females among King Penguins, but a new Ibis study reveals that King Penguins can be sexed with an accuracy of 100% based on the sex-specific syllable pattern of their vocalisations. Using the beak length, King Penguin individuals can be sexed with an accuracy of 79%. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Seasonal patterns in the Amazon explained
(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) Environmental scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have led an international collaboration to improve satellite observations of tropical forests. With the help of professional tree climbers, the scientists collected field data on three factors that affect canopy 'greenness.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The successful launch of Falcon Heavy prompts a roadmap for radioresistant astronauts
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) This massively-collaborative research proposes the roadmap for making humans more resistant to radiation and multiple other forms of stress- and age-associated damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The battle for spinach
(Washington State University) Washington State University Professor Lindsey du Toit is leading research to help growers reduce the impact of a crippling fungal disease called Fusarium wilt. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Promising treatment for Ebola to be tested at Texas Biomed
(Texas Biomedical Research Institute) During the West African Ebola outbreak that began in 2013, an experimental biopharmaceutical drug called ZMappTM was a glimmer of hope in the midst of a health crisis. Now, scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio have been awarded a $2 million dollar contract by the makers of ZMapp, Mapp Biopharmaceutical, Inc., to further test this promising new therapeutic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New mutant coral symbiont alga able to switch symbiosis off
(Tohoku University) Researchers have identified the first spontaneous mutant coral symbiont alga to not maintain a symbiotic relationship with its host. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New neurons in the adult brain are involved in sensory learning
(Institut Pasteur) Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS have demonstrated that the new neurons produced in adults react preferentially to reward-related sensory stimuli and help speed up the association between sensory information and reward. Adult-born neurons therefore play an important role in both the identification of a sensory stimulus and the positive value associated with that sensory experience. The neurons generated shortly after birth are unable to perform this function. These findings are published in the journal PNAS on February 19, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

GWAS identifies genetic alteration associated with opioid dependence
(Elsevier) A genome-wide association study has identified a new genetic alteration in European-Americans with opioid dependence. The study, published in Biological Psychiatry, included over 3,000 opioid-exposed people. The new findings provide insight into the biological origins of opioid dependence, which has become an epidemic of historical proportions in the US, driven by dangerous use of prescription painkillers and heroin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Disease-bearing mosquitoes gain from shrinkage of green spaces
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) A study conducted in S ã o Paulo, Southern Hemisphere's biggest city, shows that mosquitoes belonging to vector species make up for seven out of the eight most common species found in municipal parks; adapted to urban environment, they benefit from the fragmentation of green areas, a process which leads to the extinction of wild species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New strategy to target transcription factor STAT5 to combat leukaemia
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Acute myeloid leukaemia is the most common type of acute cancer of the blood and bone marrow in adults. AML progresses quickly and only 26 percent of the patients survive longer than 5 years as resistance against established treatments arises. The most common molecular cause is FLT3 mutations, which result in hyper-activation of STAT5. A researcher consortium now reports on an early preclinical development to target STAT5 directly, which cooperates well with existing therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biologist unveils China's first private research university
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Normile, D. Tags: Asia/Pacific News, Scientific Community In Depth Source Type: news

Improved spy tactics for single cells
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kelly, P. N. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

The great escape
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Single-cell bioluminescence imaging of deep tissue in freely moving animals
Bioluminescence is a natural light source based on luciferase catalysis of its substrate luciferin. We performed directed evolution on firefly luciferase using a red-shifted and highly deliverable luciferin analog to establish AkaBLI, an all-engineered bioluminescence in vivo imaging system. AkaBLI produced emissions in vivo that were brighter by a factor of 100 to 1000 than conventional systems, allowing noninvasive visualization of single cells deep inside freely moving animals. Single tumorigenic cells trapped in the mouse lung vasculature could be visualized. In the mouse brain, genetic labeling with neural activity se...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Iwano, S., Sugiyama, M., Hama, H., Watakabe, A., Hasegawa, N., Kuchimaru, T., Tanaka, K. Z., Takahashi, M., Ishida, Y., Hata, J., Shimozono, S., Namiki, K., Fukano, T., Kiyama, M., Okano, H., Kizaka-Kondoh, S., McHugh, T. J., Yamamori, T., Hioki, H., Maki Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

BAK/BAX macropores facilitate mitochondrial herniation and mtDNA efflux during apoptosis
Mitochondrial apoptosis is mediated by BAK and BAX, two proteins that induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, leading to cytochrome c release and activation of apoptotic caspases. In the absence of active caspases, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) triggers the innate immune cGAS/STING pathway, causing dying cells to secrete type I interferon. How cGAS gains access to mtDNA remains unclear. We used live-cell lattice light-sheet microscopy to examine the mitochondrial network in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We found that after BAK/BAX activation and cytochrome c loss, the mitochondrial network broke down and large BAK...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: McArthur, K., Whitehead, L. W., Heddleston, J. M., Li, L., Padman, B. S., Oorschot, V., Geoghegan, N. D., Chappaz, S., Davidson, S., San Chin, H., Lane, R. M., Dramicanin, M., Saunders, T. L., Sugiana, C., Lessene, R., Osellame, L. D., Chew, T.-L., Dewson Tags: Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Low-Carb Vs. Low-Fat? Probably Doesn ’ t Matter
This study also looked specifically at the subjects’ genetics when it comes to metabolizing fat and carbohydrates, as well as, how their bodies secrete insulin and found that neither of those things seemed to matter when it came to weight loss with the two different diets. Scientists have wondered whether some diets fit a person’s biology better than others and this is an area which will continue to be studied. In the meantime, it’s probably best to find a meal plan that you can stick to. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Diet Dr. Mallika Marshall Healthy Eating Low Carb Diets Low Fat Source Type: news

Want to know about T rex? Chase an ibis around a track, scientists say
The Australian white ibis is one of a dozen bird species whose locomotion is revealing a lot about their dinosaur cousinsThe Australian white ibis, aka “bin chicken”, might not have won the title of Australia’s favourite bird, but its next race might help scientists solve the mystery of how Tyrannosaurus rex walked and ran.The ibis is one of a dozen bird species that scientists raced around an enclosed track, examining how their movement varied as size and pace increased.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Michael Slezak Tags: Dinosaurs Birds Science Animals Evolution Biology Australia news Source Type: news

Rejecting the Solutrean hypothesis: the first peoples in the Americas were not from Europe
A recent Canadian documentary promoted a fringe idea in American archaeology that ’s both scientifically wrong and racist Last month ’s release ofThe Ice Bridge, an episode in the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation seriesThe Nature of Things has once again revived public discussion of a controversial idea about how the Americas were peopled known as the“Solutrean hypothesis”. This idea suggests a European origin for the peoples who made the Clovis tools, the first recognized stone tool tradition in the Americas. As I was one of the experts appearing on the documentary, I want to share my thoughts abo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jennifer Raff Tags: Archaeology Americas Genetics Native Americans Science Biology Canada Documentary Source Type: news

The new specimen forcing a radical rethink of Archaeopteryx
A new specimen has redefined who ’s in and who’s out of theArchaeopteryxgenus – and poses questions about other theropod dinosaursHave you heard? There is a newArchaeopteryxin town. Number 12, to be exact. Technically, this specimen has been around since 2010, but was only formallydescribed three weeks ago, thereby making up for the tragic loss of the Haarlem specimen (now renamed asOstromia crassipes) last year.Archaeopteryxhas since long formed a central piece in evolutionary debates. At the time of its discovery, it was the first Really Old Bird ever found. Moreover, its discovery in 1861 came just a f...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Archaeopteryx Fossils Biology Science Evolution Palaeontology Source Type: news

UNIST introduces new smart contact lens for diabetics
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has succeeded in developing a new biosensing contact lens capable of detecting glucose levels in patients with diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop process producing cell-sized lipid vesicles for cell-cell synaptic therapies
(World Scientific) Novel and robust process to produce functionalized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on-demand from double emulsions templates results in artificial cells with surface ligand neuroligin-2 (NL-2) to promote insulin secretion in pancreaticβ cells, demonstrating a versatile cell-cell synaptic therapeutic paradigm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cross-bred flies reveal new clues about how proteins are regulated
(Scripps Research Institute) The investigators used a technique called bottom-up proteomics (sometimes called shotgun proteomics) to reveal which proteins of each species were present in the hybrid flies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news