The science of sex: what happens to our bodies when we're aroused?
It ’s good for our mental and physical health, lowering blood pressure and boosting the immune systemSex is the most talked-about, joked about, thought-about issue in our culture. Every grown adult is expected to know how to do it, but beyond the basic mechanics we ’re not taught about it and fiction is coy. We are not short of information on sexual practices – thank you, Fifty Shades of Grey – but there is a general absence of accurate detail of what happens to our bodies during, and as a result of, the act.Yet sex is good for our mental and physical health. It lowers the heart rate and blood press...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Tags: Sex Health & wellbeing Life and style Relationships Science Human biology Sexuality Sexual health Source Type: news

Swedish researchers encourage less flying, with new tool to highlight climate impact
(Chalmers University of Technology) As the climate issue heats up, consumers are becoming more conscious of their impact on the environment. 'Flygskam,' or 'flight shame' is a word that has received extensive media coverage recently, reflecting the increasing awareness of flying's environmental consequences. Now, researchers from Sweden's Chalmers University of Technology present a tool that allows consumers to evaluate the outcome of their different travel options. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Table scraps can be used to reduce reliance on fossil fuels
(University of Waterloo) Wasted food can be affordably turned into a clean substitute for fossil fuels.New technology developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo engineers natural fermentation to produce a biodegradable chemical that can be refined as a source of energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Systems biology of antibiotics
(University of W ü rzburg) Bacteria can quickly become resistant to antibiotics. Which mechanisms are responsible for this and how to counteract it? Dr. Ana Rita Brochado, who is setting up a new Emmy Noether Junior Research Group at the University of W ü rzburg, is investigating this, funded with up to€1.82 million. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 23, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Canadian Arctic fossils are oldest known fungus on Earth
Fungus is half a billion years older than previous record holder found in WisconsinTiny fossils found in mudrock in the barren wilderness of the Canadian Arctic are the remains of the oldest known fungus on Earth, scientists say.The minuscule organisms were discovered in shallow water shale, a kind of fine-grained sedimentary rock, in a region south of Victoria island on the edge of the Arctic Ocean.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Biology Canada Archaeology Science Arctic Source Type: news

Newly discovered hybrid molecules could serve as a novel category of anti-cancer agent
(New York University) Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) chemistry program and colleagues from the University's biology program have developed and studied the biological activity of five new, metal-organic hybrid knotted molecules, termed metal-organic trefoil knots (M-TKs). These molecules can effectively deliver metals to cancer cells, demonstrating the potential to act as a new category of anti-cancer agents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The neural mechanisms that inhibit slow muscle activity during fast swimming in fish
(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) Using zebrafish larvae, Assistant Professor Yukiko Kimura and Professor Shin-Ichi Higashijima of the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan have discovered neural mechanisms that suppress slow muscle activity in fish swimming at high speeds. The research results were published in the May 22, 2019 issue of Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Allen Institute for Cell Science debuts first comprehensive view of human cell division
(Allen Institute) The Allen Institute today released the Integrated Mitotic Stem Cell, a data-driven model and visualization tool that captures -- for the first time -- a holistic view of human cell division. By enabling a deeper understanding of how healthy human cells divide, a process known as mitosis, the model will further basic biology research as well as studies of cancer, a disease that often results from cell division gone awry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient toy inspires tool for state-of-the-art science
(Georgia Institute of Technology) A 5,000-year-old toy still enjoyed by kids today has inspired an inexpensive, hand-powered scientific tool that could not only impact how field biologists conduct their research but also allow high-school students and others with limited resources to realize their own state-of-the-art experiments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Defects in heart valve cilia during fetal development cause mitral valve prolapse
(Medical University of South Carolina) Genetic mutations in heart valve cells of the developing fetus lead to mitral valve prolapse, report a global collaborative of researchers, including Medical University of South Carolina investigators, in today's Science Translational Medicine. These mutations or genetic variations cause defects in antenna-like cellular structures called primary cilia. This finding of a developmental cause for the disease highlights the importance of early intervention and may lead to the rethinking of treatment guidelines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Detecting bacteria in space
(University of Montreal) A new genomic approach provides a glimpse into the diverse bacterial ecosystem on the International Space Station. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Experimental noninvasive tool monitors effectiveness of stem cell transplantation
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Other than clinical observations, the stem cell field lacks a repeatable, time-sensitive, noninvasive tool to assess the effectiveness of transplanted cells in the targeted organ. Researchers analyzed biomarkers secreted from transplanted human stem cells in the recipient blood of a rodent model of heart attack. Analysis of the blood test showed responding cells had changed their gene expression, behavior and secretions, suggesting this liquid biopsy could provide a window into stem cell activity and effectiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Global temperature change attributable to external factors, confirms new study
(University of Oxford) Researchers at the University of Oxford have confirmed that human activity and other external factors are responsible for the rise in global temperature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mapping the global distribution of phytoplankton
(ETH Zurich) Researchers at ETH have charted the distribution of phytoplankton in the world's oceans for the first time and investigated the environmental factors that explain this distribution. They concluded that plankton diversity is only partially congruent with previous theories of biodiversity for the seas between the equator and the poles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Charging into the future -- novel rock salt for use in rechargeable magnesium batteries
(Tokyo University of Science) By synthesizing novel material for electrode that facilitates reversing of the chemistry of ions, a group of researchers led by Professor Idemoto from Tokyo University of Science combat the wasteful aspects of energy sources by laying an important foundation for the production of next-generation rechargeable magnesium secondary batteries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cell division requires a balanced level of non-coding RNA for chromosome stability
(The University of Hong Kong) Assistant Professor Dr Karen Wing Yee Yuen and Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Yick Hin Ling from the School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong (HKU), discovered that centromeric DNA is used as a template to produce a non-protein coding, centromeric RNA (ribonucleic acid), that is essential for chromosome stability. If there is too much or too little centromeric RNA (cenRNA), the centromere will be defective and chromosomes will be lost. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plankton as a climate driver instead of the sun?
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) Fluctuations in the orbital parameters of the Earth are considered to be the trigger for long-term climatic fluctuations such as ice ages. This includes the variation of the inclination angle of the Earth's axis with a cycle of about 40,000 years. Kiel-based marine scientists lead by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have shown by using a new model that biogeochemical interactions between ocean and atmosphere could also be responsible for climate fluctuations on this time scale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Robots activated by water may be the next frontier
(Columbia University) Columbia University scientists have developed material that can drive mechanical systems, with movements controlled by a pattern set into the design. Potential applications include opening windows in humidity, and allowing fabric to evaporate sweat (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Big energy savings for tiny machines
(Simon Fraser University) In a ground-breaking study, a team led by Simon Fraser University physics professor David Sivak demonstrates for the first time a strategy for manipulating the trillions of tiny molecular nanomachines inside us that work to keep us alive, to maximize efficiency and conserve energy. The breakthrough could impact numerous fields, including creating more efficient computer chips and solar cells for energy generation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New ultra-fast imaging technology with high frame rate and frame number
(City University of Hong Kong) Acquiring images of ultrafast processes is a technology vitally needed for many cutting-edge physical, chemical, and biological studies. The latest research conducted by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Xi'an Jiaotong University has successfully developed a novel compressed ultrafast photographic technique, enabling both an ultra-high frame rate and a large frame number. Having overcome the existing limitations, the new technique offers an important tool for observing complex transient processes on the femtosecond (10-15second) timescale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Optical illusions reveal regular waves of brain activity enable visual feature integration
(University of Tokyo) Rhythmic waves of brain activity cause us to see or not see complex images that flash before our eyes. An image can become practically invisible if it flashes before our eyes at the same time as a low point of those brain waves. We can reset that brain wave rhythm with a simple voluntary action, like choosing to push a button. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why lack of sleep is bad for your heart
(University of Colorado at Boulder) People who sleep fewer than 7 hours per night have lower levels of gene-regulating molecules, or microRNAs, which help dampen down inflammation in cells and support vascular health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CBD clinical trial results on seizure frequency in dogs 'encouraging'
(Colorado State University) Dr. Stephanie McGrath found in a small study that 89 percent of dogs who received CBD in the clinical trial had a reduction in the frequency of seizures. Nine dogs were treated with CBD, while seven in a control group were treated with a placebo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Algorithm steers catheters to the right spot to treat atrial fibrillation
(Florida Atlantic University) Some patients with atrial fibrillation or A-Fib need an ablation, which requires a catheter and an advanced 3D map of the heart. Researchers have developed the first algorithm that guides catheter movements and accurately detects A-Fib targets without 3D maps of the heart. In human simulations, this technique stops the catheter at the right target and identifies the source type with a 95.25% success rate and a 99 percent detection rate of scar tissue, regardless of scar size. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Toward zero hunger: More food or a smarter food system?
(University of Michigan) When thinking about ways to end global hunger, many scholars focus too narrowly on increasing crop yields while overlooking other critical aspects of the food system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering. Their approach modifies proteins at a specific point so that they can be chemically tethered to the scaffold using light. Since the tether can also be cut by laser light, this method can create evolving patterns of signal proteins throughout a biomaterial scaffold to grow tissues made up of different types of cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

3-million-year-old fossilized mouse reveals evolutionary secrets of color
(University of Manchester) This new study applied X-ray imaging to several 3-million-year-old fossils in order to untangle the story of key pigments in ancient animals and reveal how we might recognize the chemical signatures of specific red pigments in long extinct animals to determine how they evolved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
(DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ammonium fertilized early life on earth
(Syracuse University) A Syracuse University professor has demonstrated that ammonium -- an odiferous chemical compound, often used in fertilizer -- was a vital source of nitrogen for early life on Earth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What makes a place a home?
(Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences) Diver-led visual surveys at 11 mesophotic reef sites around Bermuda found that high densities of lionfish were associated with both higher abundances of prey fish and higher prey fish biomass. However, the influence of seawater temperature was found to have the strongest effect on lionfish distribution, with higher lionfish densities recorded at sites with lower bottom temperatures. These results suggest that cold-water upwelling may result in higher abundances of prey fish and lionfish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Extreme draining of reservoir aids young salmon and eliminates invasive fish
(Oregon State University) A new study finds that the low-cost, extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon aided downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon -- and led to the gradual disappearance of two species of predatory invasive fish in the artificial lake. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Russian scientists synthesized protein to enrich stock-raising feed
(Far Eastern Federal University) Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) have developed an effective technology for the synthesis of protein from amaranth grains and mushroom mycelium to enrich a stock-raising feed. To do this, they used genetic engineering methods, inserted into the fungus strain an element of amaranth DNA containing a storage protein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Studies find no yield benefit to higher plant populations
(American Phytopathological Society) Curtis Adams and his colleagues at Texas A&M AgriLife Research reviewed plant population studies published in 2000 or later. They found that yield is optimized at about 15,000 plants per acre (1.1 seed per foot in 40-inch rows), and contrary to popular belief, there is no yield benefit to high populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

First report of powdery mildew on phasey bean in Florida could spell trouble for papaya
(American Phytopathological Society) In the fall of 2017, leaves of phasey bean plants in Homestead, Florida, displayed powdery fungal growth, which appeared in the form of white spots on both sides of the leaves. Scientists conducted analysis by sequencing genes of genomic DNA and identified the fungus as Erysiphe fallax, which causes a disease known as powdery mildew. To their knowledge, this is the first report of powdery mildew on phasey bean in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Berkeley lab project to pinpoint methane 'super emitters'
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Methane, a potent greenhouse gas that traps about 30 times more heat than carbon dioxide, is commonly released from rice fields, dairies, landfills, and oil and gas facilities -- all of which are plentiful in California. Now Berkeley Lab has been awarded $6 million by the state to find 'super emitters' of methane in an effort to quantify and potentially mitigate methane emissions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Solving a scientific mystery and finding a solution for industry
(University of Houston) In solving a scientific mystery, researchers from the University of Houston and the nation's national laboratories also discovered a new avenue for clearing toxins from water, including wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blood proteins help predict risk of developing heart failure
(Baylor College of Medicine) Two blood proteins help predict more accurately the risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure hospitalization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to program materials
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) Can the properties of composite materials be predicted? Empa scientists have mastered this feat and thus can help achieve research objectives faster. This leads, for instance, to better recycling techniques and electrically conductive synthetic materials for the solar industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pushy bonobo mothers help sons find sexual partners, scientists find
High-ranking mothers lead sons to groups of females and keep guard while they mateTheir mothers are so keen for them to father children that they usher them in front of promising partners, shield them from violent competitors and dash the chances of other males by charging them while they are at it.For a bonobo mother, it is all part of the parenting day, and analysis finds the hard work pays off. Males of the species that live with their mothers are three times more likely to father offspring than those whose mothers are absent.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Animal behaviour Animals Primatology Science World news Biology Source Type: news

Transgenderism results in the DEATH of a baby because medical records listed the mother as "male" to appease the LGBT thought police
(Natural News) A 32-year-old woman who thinks she’s a “man” recently gave birth to a dead child – a dead child who would have lived, by the way, had its deranged, mentally-ill mother correctly indicated her natural biology upon being admitted to the hospital. Reports indicate that this brain-damaged adult patient, who self-identifies as a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

June's SLAS technology special collection now available
(SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)) The June issue of SLAS Technology features the article, 'Next Generation Compound Delivery to Support Miniaturized Biology,' which focuses on the challenges of changing the established screening paradigm to support the needs of modern drug discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery in mice could remove roadblock to more insulin production
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A new discovery made mainly in mice could provide new options for getting the insulin-making 'factories' of the pancreas going again when diabetes and obesity have slowed them down. It could offer new pathways to ramping up insulin supply to get metabolism back on track in people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists develop new recycling technology for heavy duty military batteries
(National University of Science and Technology MISIS) NUST MISIS scientists together with JSC 'Shchelkovo Plant of Secondary Precious Metals' developed an innovative cascade method for purifying silver from spent batteries used in submarines and military aircraft. Secondary use of pure precious metal from one such battery can help saving up to 500 million RUR for creating a new one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pseudohermaphrodite snails can help to assess how polluted the Arctic seas are
(St. Petersburg State University) Ivan Nekhaev, a postdoc at St. Petersburg University, studied snails of the genus Boreocingula -- tiny gastropods as small as half a centimeter -- and first discovered that Arctic micromolluscs can show signs of pseudohermaphroditism. Boreocingula martyni adult females grow underdeveloped male genital organs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shedding light on cancer metabolism in real-time with bioluminescence
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Cancerous tumors can be made to bioluminesce, like fireflies, according to the level of their glucose uptake, giving rise to a technique for quantifying metabolite absorption. The firefly imaging technique for sugar can be translated from cancer to many other metabolic diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Russian scientists make discovery that can help remove gypsy moths from forests
(Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University) The caterpillars of Lymantria dispar or Gypsy Moth are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests. Sometimes they can even make harm for coniferous forests. Gypsy Moths are widely spread in Europe, Asia and Northern America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence becomes life-long learner with new framework
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) A project of the US Army has developed a new framework for deep neural networks that allows artificial intelligence systems to better learn new tasks while forgetting less of what they have learned regarding previous tasks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Size is everything
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. Ulrich Brose from University of Jena (Germany) has therefore developed a new method that provides good results with only a few information about the properties of predators. The model confirms that a large body mass index between predator and prey creates stable systems. It can also predict which predator species play a key role. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Staying in shape: How rod-shaped bacteria grow long, not wide
(Marine Biological Laboratory) A team from Harvard University, Marine Biological Laboratory, and collaborators show how the rod-shaped bacteria Bacillus subtilis maintains its precise diameter while growing end to end. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop new lens manufacturing technique
(Washington State University) Researchers from Washington State University and Ohio State University have developed a low-cost, easy way to make custom lenses that could help manufacturers avoid the expensive molds required for optical manufacturing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news