Weeding out childhood leukaemia – fighting cancer with nature
New research, led by cancer biologists from the University of Bristol, has shown that bone marrow cells can protect cancer cells from a plant derived anti-cancer agent called Parthenolide. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: ; Faculty of Biomedical Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Scientific 'dream team' shed light on motor neuron death
(The Francis Crick Institute) A group of clinical neurologists, molecular biologists and computer scientists have worked together to solve the mystery of why motor neurons die in patients with motor neuron disease, published in Nature Communications this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OSU biologist advocates ecological approach to improving human health
(Oregon State University) Chronic diseases like cancer, autoimmune disorders and obesity may ultimately vanquish the efforts of medical intervention unless people change their diet, a biologist argues in a paper published this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bumblebees confused by iridescent colors
(University of Bristol) A new study published today by the University of Bristol shows for the first time that dazzling iridescent colors in animals can act as camouflage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gut bacteria play critical role in anti-seizure effects of ketogenic diet, UCLA scientists report
This study inspires us to study whether similar roles for gut microbes are seen in people that are on the ketogenic diet,” Vuong said.“The implications for health and disease are promising, but much more research needs to be done to test whether discoveries in mice also apply to humans,” said Hsiao, who is also an assistant professor of medicine in theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.On behalf of the Regents of the University of California, the UCLA Technology Development Group has filed a patent on Hsiao ’s technology that mimics the ketogenic diet to provide seizure protection. It has exclu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Probiotics are also good for your liver
(Natural News) Probiotics are good for the liver, according to a study presented at the 2018 Experimental Biology meeting. A team of researchers looked at the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), which is a species common in many over-the-counter probiotic formulations. In the study, the research team fed mice with food containing LGG for two... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Birds had to relearn flight after meteor wiped out dinosaurs
Fossil records suggest only flightless birds survived when T rex was wiped off the EarthBirds had to rediscover flight after the meteor strike that killed off the dinosaurs, scientists say.The cataclysm 66m years ago not only wiped out Tyrannosaurus rex and ground-dwelling dinosaur species, but also flying birds, a detailed survey of the fossil record suggests.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin and agencies Tags: Fossils Birds Animals Science Dinosaurs Evolution UK news Biology World news Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Scientists find cell types behind schizophrenia
A study that compares hundreds of schizophrenia-related genes with gene maps of brain cell types locates the few cell types behind the disease's biology. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Schizophrenia Source Type: news

Scientists look to systems approach for next generation of cancer research
2018 Systems Biology Institute Symposium featured representatives from Yale and other research institutions to better understand how cancer harms the body. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

This Kind of Diet May Lower the Risk of Dying from Breast Cancer
We are what we eat, the old cliché goes, and there’s plenty of evidence to support it: eating healthy foods really can lead to a healthier life. But can food actually lower your risk of dying from a disease like cancer? In a new study published in JAMA Oncology, researchers find some intriguing evidence that diet may indeed lower the risk of dying from cancer. Dr. Rowan Chlebowski, research professor at the City of Hope National Medical Center, and his colleagues analyzed data from more than 48,000 women enrolled in the ongoing Women’s Health Initiative, a large national study at 40 centers across the U....
Source: TIME: Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Spore heroes: unlocking the life-cycle secrets of the earliest land plants
Fossils from 432m years ago push back the origin of the alternating life cycle still seen in ferns todayOur world today is dominated by theflowering plants, or angiosperms, which appeared approximately 130m years ago and rapidly diversified to become the top dogs in most ecosystems. But there are plenty of other plants from more ancient lineages still around, doing deeply weird things in their life cycles, and doing them for much longer than we have realised.Flowering plants themselves are a refinement of a much earlier innovation about 375m years ago: the seed. Seeds provide protection and a source of nutrition for the em...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Lydon Tags: Science Fossils Evolution Biology Plants Source Type: news

From narcolepsy to apnoea: the science of sleep disorders
Biologist and narcoleptic Henry Nicholls explores what happens when sleep goes wrong (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - May 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

For the past 70 years, the Danube has almost never frozen over
(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) Today, only the eldest inhabitants of the Danube Delta recall that, in the past, you could skate on the river practically every winter; since the second half of the 20th century, Europe's second-largest river has only rarely frozen over. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chameleons are masters of nanotechnology (video)
(American Chemical Society) Chameleons are nature's most talented masters of color. They use their unique color-changing abilities for all sorts of reasons. But how do they alter their hue? They wield a combination of pigments and specialized nano-scale crystals. In this video, Reactions explains how chameleons have mastered nanotech: https://youtu.be/UNj7ngzDHfk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plant symbioses -- fragile partnerships
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Symbioses between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria can be ecologically advantageous for both parties. Surprisingly, many partnerships, including some involving the ancestors of several modern fruits such as strawberries, blackberries and apples, have been dissolved during evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MSU technology and app could help endangered primates, slow illegal trafficking
(Michigan State University) New facial recognition software and app invented at Michigan State University can help protect endangered primates -- more than 60 percent of which face extinction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The big clean-up after stress
(University of W ü rzburg) When cells become stressed, they activate specific response patterns. W ü rzburg researchers have identified new details of these responses, which can help to get a better understanding of neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bold lizards of all sizes have higher mating success
(Ecological Society of America) Boldness correlates with the mating success, but not body size or sex, of yellow-spotted monitor lizards roaming the remote Oombulgurri floodplains of tropical Western Australia, ecologists report in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere. Bold individuals expose themselves to much higher risk of being eaten by predators during the dangerous wet season. The researchers demonstrated quantifiable behavioral syndromes in the large lizards, with an intriguing relationship to the lizards' seasonal hunting strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Some like it hot!
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Ecologists have no doubt that climate change will affect the earth's animals and plants. But how exactly? This is often hard to predict. There are already indications that some species are shifting their distribution range. But it is much less clear how individual animals and populations are responding to the changes. Scientists at the UFZ have been studying nocturnal desert geckos to see how they are adapting to climatic changes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Programming synthetic molecular codes to turn genes 'on'
(Kyoto University) A team of researchers in Japan developed a synthetic molecular code to script gene activation. The process, described in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, could help lead to future gene-based therapies for a wide array of diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Revealed mechanism behind citrus canker bacteria's defense system for predators
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) A study published by Brazilian researchers describes one of Xanthomonas citri's secretion systems and a signaling pathway that enhances its resistance against amoebae. Investigations might contribute for future forms of intervening and putting a stop on the development of X. citri, known for its persistency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bringing biology and mathematics together  
(Harvard University) The National Science Foundation and the Simons Foundation have awarded a grant to Harvard scientists for the creation of a new research center, dubbed the NSF-Simons Center for Mathematical and Statistical Analysis of Biology at Harvard University, aimed at bringing biologists and mathematicians together to answer some of the central questions about living systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The RNA face of phase separation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Polymenidou, M. Tags: Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

Evolution of the brain
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hines, P. J. Tags: Evolution, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Using bugs in the gut to detect blood
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Engineering, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

RNA and membraneless organelles
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Evolution of pallium, hippocampus, and cortical cell types revealed by single-cell transcriptomics in reptiles
Computations in the mammalian cortex are carried out by glutamatergic and -aminobutyric acid–releasing (GABAergic) neurons forming specialized circuits and areas. Here we asked how these neurons and areas evolved in amniotes. We built a gene expression atlas of the pallium of two reptilian species using large-scale single-cell messenger RNA sequencing. The transcriptomic signature of glutamatergic neurons in reptilian cortex suggests that mammalian neocortical layers are made of new cell types generated by diversification of ancestral gene-regulatory programs. By contrast, the diversity of reptilian cortical GABAergi...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tosches, M. A., Yamawaki, T. M., Naumann, R. K., Jacobi, A. A., Tushev, G., Laurent, G. Tags: Evolution, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

An ingestible bacterial-electronic system to monitor gastrointestinal health
Biomolecular monitoring in the gastrointestinal tract could offer rapid, precise disease detection and management but is impeded by access to the remote and complex environment. Here, we present an ingestible micro-bio-electronic device (IMBED) for in situ biomolecular detection based on environmentally resilient biosensor bacteria and miniaturized luminescence readout electronics that wirelessly communicate with an external device. As a proof of concept, we engineer heme-sensitive probiotic biosensors and demonstrate accurate diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in swine. Additionally, we integrate alternative biosensor...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mimee, M., Nadeau, P., Hayward, A., Carim, S., Flanagan, S., Jerger, L., Collins, J., McDonnell, S., Swartwout, R., Citorik, R. J., Bulovic, V., Langer, R., Traverso, G., Chandrakasan, A. P., Lu, T. K. Tags: Engineering, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

RNA buffers the phase separation behavior of prion-like RNA binding proteins
We report here that RNA critically regulates the phase behavior of prion-like RBPs. Low RNA/protein ratios promote phase separation into liquid droplets, whereas high ratios prevent droplet formation in vitro. Reduction of nuclear RNA levels or genetic ablation of RNA binding causes excessive phase separation and the formation of cytotoxic solid-like assemblies in cells. We propose that the nucleus is a buffered system in which high RNA concentrations keep RBPs soluble. Changes in RNA levels or RNA binding abilities of RBPs cause aberrant phase transitions. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maharana, S., Wang, J., Papadopoulos, D. K., Richter, D., Pozniakovsky, A., Poser, I., Bickle, M., Rizk, S., Guillen-Boixet, J., Franzmann, T. M., Jahnel, M., Marrone, L., Chang, Y.-T., Sterneckert, J., Tomancak, P., Hyman, A. A., Alberti, S. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

mRNA structure determines specificity of a polyQ-driven phase separation
RNA promotes liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) to build membraneless compartments in cells. How distinct molecular compositions are established and maintained in these liquid compartments is unknown. Here, we report that secondary structure allows messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to self-associate and determines whether an mRNA is recruited to or excluded from liquid compartments. The polyQ-protein Whi3 induces conformational changes in RNA structure and generates distinct molecular fluctuations depending on the RNA sequence. These data support a model in which structure-based, RNA-RNA interactions promote assembly of distinct d...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Langdon, E. M., Qiu, Y., Ghanbari Niaki, A., McLaughlin, G. A., Weidmann, C. A., Gerbich, T. M., Smith, J. A., Crutchley, J. M., Termini, C. M., Weeks, K. M., Myong, S., Gladfelter, A. S. Tags: Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Cell type atlas and lineage tree of a whole complex animal by single-cell transcriptomics
Flatworms of the species Schmidtea mediterranea are immortal—adult animals contain a large pool of pluripotent stem cells that continuously differentiate into all adult cell types. Therefore, single-cell transcriptome profiling of adult animals should reveal mature and progenitor cells. By combining perturbation experiments, gene expression analysis, a computational method that predicts future cell states from transcriptional changes, and a lineage reconstruction method, we placed all major cell types onto a single lineage tree that connects all cells to a single stem cell compartment. We characterized gene expressio...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Plass, M., Solana, J., Wolf, F. A., Ayoub, S., Misios, A., Glazar, P., Obermayer, B., Theis, F. J., Kocks, C., Rajewsky, N. Tags: Development, Engineering, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Cell type transcriptome atlas for the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea
The transcriptome of a cell dictates its unique cell type biology. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to determine the transcriptomes for essentially every cell type of a complete animal: the regenerative planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Planarians contain a diverse array of cell types, possess lineage progenitors for differentiated cells (including pluripotent stem cells), and constitutively express positional information, making them ideal for this undertaking. We generated data for 66,783 cells, defining transcriptomes for known and many previously unknown planarian cell types and for putative transition states between...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Fincher, C. T., Wurtzel, O., de Hoog, T., Kravarik, K. M., Reddien, P. W. Tags: Development, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Scientists to lead DNA hunt for Loch Ness monster
Samples of Scottish lake will be tested to reveal truth behind centuries-old legendA scientific examination of Loch Ness using DNA sampling techniques will try to establish exactly what lives in the UK ’s largest freshwater body – it may also discover whether there is any scientific basis to the legend of the Loch Ness monster.The mission will involve genetic code being extracted from the lake over a two-week period, which will be analysed to determine the types of creatures that live there.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Martin Belam and agencies Tags: Scotland UK news Environment Science Genetics Biology Animals World news Source Type: news

Excess nutrients, coupled with climate change, damage the most highly resilient corals
(Bar-Ilan University) Experimentalists conducted a simulation of future conditions in the Red Sea caused by global warming and acidification, while simultaneously increasing levels of nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate. They found that when nitrate and phosphate were added, the coral thermal resilience was compromised while algal growth benefited from excess CO2 and nutrients. Algal dominance over corals in the reef means losing all of the beauty and biodiversity of the coral reefs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Memory molecule limits plasticity by calibrating calcium
(Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience) Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience in collaboration with researchers at Emory University and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, have for the first time identified a novel role for the CA2-enriched protein RGS14 and provided insights into the mechanism by which it limits plasticity. RGS14 seems to be special, acting as a molecular factor that puts the brakes on plasticity when it's present, enabling specialized types of memory encoding. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Determining effective methods of irrigation as water becomes increasingly scarce
(American Society for Horticultural Science) US consumers prefer the idea of using fresh water for any watering needs. In most cases, plants irrigated with recycled water saw no negative impact when compared to the same types of plants irrigated with pure, non-recycled water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Long-term study shows crop rotation decreases greenhouse gas emissions
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Many farmers grow corn and soybean in rotation to avoid the continuous corn yield penalty, but now there's another reason to rotate. Scientists at the University of Illinois have provided further evidence that rotating crops increases yield and lowers greenhouse gas emissions compared to continuous corn or soybean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Streams may emit more carbon dioxide in a warmer climate
(Oregon State University) Streams and rivers could pump carbon dioxide into the air at increasing rates if they continue to warm, potentially compounding the effects of global warming, a new worldwide analysis has shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Uniquely human' muscles have been discovered in apes
(Frontiers) Muscles believed to be unique to humans have been discovered in several ape species, challenging long-held anthropocentric theories on the origin and evolution of human soft tissues. This questions the view that certain muscles evolved to provide special adaptations for human traits, such as walking on two legs, tool use, and sophisticated vocal communication and facial expressions. The findings highlight that thorough knowledge of ape anatomy is necessary for a better understanding of human evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A promising target in the quest for a 1-million-year-old Antarctic ice core
(University of Washington) The oldest ice core so far provides 800,000 years of our planet's climate history. A field survey in Antarctica has pinpointed a location where an entire million years of undisturbed ice might be preserved intact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Painless real-time proteomics may one day speed up cancer surgery
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers at the University of Lille developed a matrix-assisted ion source for mass spectrometry that can liberate lipids and metabolites from the skin without causing pain. Now, they have optimized protein measurement using this device. The device can be used to differentiated normal from cancerous tissues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ESF lists top 10 new species for 2018
(SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry) The large and small, beautiful and bizarre are among the newly discovered animals, plants and microbes announced by the College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) as the Top 10 New Species for 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Earth's climate to increase by four degrees by 2084
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) A new study shows the Earth's climate would increase by 4 degrees Celsius, compared to pre-industrial levels, before the end of 21st century. The study also projects precipitation changes in association with a 4 degrees Celsius global warming above the pre-industrial period using the available RCP8.5 experiments of CMIP5 models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

HHMI bets big on 19 new investigators
(Howard Hughes Medical Institute) HHMI invests $200 million in a small cadre of leading scientists, challenging them to push the limits of what we know about biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The revolutionising potential of medical AI | Letters
Readers respond to news that Theresa May has promised millions towards artificial intelligence that could help fight cancer and other diseasesThe news that Theresa May has urged the NHS and technology companies to adopt artificial intelligence techniques in order to diagnose diseases such as cancer is extremely positive for both the healthcare community and for patients (May to promise millions for AI tools to help fight cancer, 21 May).But to usher in an age of AI, there are several obstacles that must first be overcome. Beyond the prime minister encouraging greater adoption, increased investment into how AI can safe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Artificial intelligence (AI) NHS Cancer Theresa May Medical research Computing Consciousness Technology Health Society Doctors Nursing Science Biology Source Type: news

Scientists Take A Ride On The Pacific's 'Shark Highway'
Biologists knew the sharks sometimes traveled from waters off Costa Rica south to the Galapagos Islands, but they'd never actually witnessed it.(Image credit: Andy Mann/Waitt Foundation/Pacifico ) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

Tianjin University makes breakthrough in synthetic genome rearrangement
(Tianjin University) A synthetic biology team at Tianjin University (TJU) has reported new methods and strategies for genome rearrangement and accelerated the evolution of yeast strains with their three latest studies published in Nature Communications on May 22, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Recombinant E. Coli As a biofactory for the biosynthesis of diverse nanomaterials
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) A metabolic research group at KAIST and Chung-Ang University in Korea has developed a recombinant E. coli strain that biosynthesizes 60 different nanomaterials covering 35 elements on the periodic table. Among the elements, the team could biosynthesize 33 novel nanomaterials for the first time, advancing the forward design of nanomaterials through the biosynthesis of various single and multi-elements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Magnesium magnificent for plasmonic applications
(Rice University) Scientists at Rice University and the University of Cambridge synthesize magnesium nanoparticles that show plasmonic properties across the infrared, visible and ultraviolet spectrum. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pigs that digest their nutrients could reduce pork industry's carbon footprint
(eLife) Giving pigs the ability to digest more nutrients in their grains could help reduce the pork industry's environmental impact, says new research published in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news