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Space sperm produces healthy mice, raising prospect of future human settlement
Scientists say success of freeze-dried mouse sperm stored on international station could be significant for human reproduction when ‘space age’ arrivesReproduction may be possible in space, Japanese researchers have said, after freeze-dried sperm stored on the International Space Station for nine months produced healthy offspring.The scientists said their findings could have significant ramifications for human settlements in space, which they consider “likely”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elle Hunt Tags: Space Reproduction Biology Science Source Type: news

Hay fever mapping? There ’s an app for that | Letter from Dr Sheena Cruickshank
Dr Sheena Cruickshank on how ‘citizen sensors’ can help scientists to learn of how pollen, weather and pollution interact to trigger allergy symptomsSeasonal allergies, such as hay fever and allergic asthma, are on the rise in the UK as your article (First hay fever map of Britain offers some relief to sufferers, theguardian.com, 20 May) rightly points out, with up to one in four people now experiencing symptoms each year. However, these are complex conditions, and just mapping pollen levels does not tell the full story in allowing accurate prediction of allergy symptoms. Many people will react to multiple thin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Hay fever Allergies Society Apps Technology iPhone iOS Software Android Immunology Medical research Biochemistry and molecular biology Science Source Type: news

Scientists identify 40 genes that shed new light on biology of intelligence
Study significantly adds to the tally of genes connected to intellect – but researchers caution genius isn’t all down to geneticsA major study into the genetics of human intelligence has given scientists their richest insight yet into the biology that underpins our cognitive skills.The research on 60,000 adults and 20,000 children uncovered 40 new genes that play a role in intelligence, a haul that brings the number of genes known to have a bearing on IQ to 52.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Neuroscience Biology Albert Einstein Netherlands Europe World news Source Type: news

The Desperate Gambit That Could Save A Tiny Porpoise From Extinction ... Or Kill It
In 2016, scientists made a distressing announcement: There were fewer than 30 vaquitas ― a tiny porpoise that dwells in Mexico’s Gulf of California ― left in the wild. With carcasses continuing to wash up, researchers worry the vaquita could be extinct by 2018, becoming yet another mammal forced off the face of the Earth.  Losing the porpoise would be a tragedy for Mexico, the World Wildlife Fund said this week ― akin to “losing a piece” of the country, according to Maria Jose Villanueva, a project coordinator for WWF Mexico. But the demise of the vaquita would be a blow to more than...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bacterial Photography Goes Technicolor
Genetically engineered"disco bacteria" sense and respond to different colors of light, creating both stunning art in the culture dish and new possibilities for synthetic biology. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion,The Scientist Source Type: news

NASA Plans Emergency Spacewalk To Replace Key Computer On International Space Station
A pair of astronauts will venture outside the International Space Station on Tuesday for an emergency spacewalk to replace a failed computer, one of two that control major U.S. systems aboard the orbiting outpost, NASA said on Sunday. The primary device failed on Saturday, leaving the $100 billion orbiting laboratory to depend on a backup system to route commands to its solar power system, radiators, cooling loops and other equipment. The station’s current five-member crew from the United States, Russia and France were never in any danger, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said in a statement. The Ex...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune system
(Princeton University) Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have identified a small RNA molecule that helps maintain the activity of stem cells in both healthy and cancerous breast tissue. The study, which will be published in the June issue of Nature Cell Biology, suggests that this 'microRNA' promotes particularly deadly forms of breast cancer and that inhibiting the effects of this molecule could improve the efficacy of existing breast cancer therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery of an alga's 'dictionary of genes' could lead to advances in biofuels, medicine
(University of California - Los Angeles) A team of plant biologists and biochemists has produced a gold mine of data by sequencing the genome of a tiny, single-celled green alga that could be used as a source of sustainable biofuel and has health implications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New findings on formation and malformation of blood vessels
(Karolinska Institutet) In diseases like cancer, diabetes, rheumatism and stroke, a disorder develops in the blood vessels that exacerbates the condition and obstructs treatment. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now show how blood vessels can normally change their size to create a functional circulatory system and how vascular malformation during disease can occur. In the study, published in Nature Cell Biology, the researchers managed to treat vascular malformation in mice, a discovery of potential significance to numerous vascular diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two biomarkers appear to predict course of IPF
(American Thoracic Society) Two T cell biomarkers appear to predict the survival trajectory of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a lung disease that has a varied, but ultimately devastating, impact on patients, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This Is What Happens To Your Brain When You Fail (And How To Fix It)
A version of this article was originally published on Forbes. Sign up for Caroline’s newsletter to get her writing sent straight to your inbox. Four months after graduating college among the top of my class, I failed. I moved to Vancouver to be with my boyfriend and travel somewhere. I tried to be Lululemon’s Senior Director of Marketing, but somehow that didn’t work out. So I wound up a legal secretary—a job that was, for me, unfulfilling and unrelated to my passions. It got worse. I scrambled to sidestep my situation and applied to several top tier PhD programs. I didn’t get in to any. I&rsq...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Luminous bacteria will help to measure radioactivity
(Siberian Federal University) Siberian biophysicists have conducted a research concerning a biological effect of low-dose gamma radiation. The results have been published in the Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, one of the leading scientific journals in the world among those dedicated to the issues of environmental radioactivity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Global Warming Is Turning Antarctica Green, Study Says
Parts of Antarctica are starting to see more greenery as temperatures rise, a new study says. “We identified significant changepoints in all sites and proxies, suggesting fundamental and widespread changes in the terrestrial biosphere,” the study, which was published in Current Biology Thursday, reads. The changes in the Antarctic also parallel the greening occurring in the Arctic, according to the study. Changes in moss levels were tracked by analyzing carbon and reveled that significant changes began after 1950. The growth of Antarctic greening is also expected to increase as temperatures continue to rise, a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized global warming onetime Source Type: news

A peacock's tail: how Darwin arrived at his theory of sexual selection
How Darwin developed the radical idea of females ’ power to choose their mates despite it being at odds with his own notions of women as inferiorAbout 150 years ago, and “almost a lifetime” either side, Charles Darwin was beleaguered by the problem of the peacock’s tail. Just the sight of a feather, he wrote in April 1860, “makes me sick!”The plumage of the male bird represented a hole in his theory of evolution. According to Victorian thinking, beauty was divine creation: God had designed the peacock for his own and humankind ’s delight.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Elle Hunt Tags: Charles Darwin Science Evolution Biology Books Culture Source Type: news

Iron deficiency restrains marine microbes
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) Iron is a critical nutrient in the ocean. Its importance for algae and the nitrogen cycle has already been investigated in detail. Now a new discovery shows that microbes also need iron to process phosphorus. A team of researchers from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the University of Southampton, UK has just published results in the international journal Nature Communications showing that iron can limit phosphorus acquisition in the ocean. Their study contributes to knowledge of nutrient cycling in the ocean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How RNA formed at the origins of life
(University College London) A single process for how a group of molecules called nucleotides were made on the early Earth, before life began, has been suggested by a UCL-led team of researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Herpetologists describe an elf frog from the elfin forests in southern Vietnam
(Pensoft Publishers) Going under the common name of Elfin mountain toad, a new amphibian is recognized as one of the smallest representative of its group. The new species was identified from the highland wet forests of Langbian Plateau, Southern Vietnam. The discoverers gave it this name that derives from German and Celtic folklore because of the resemblance they found between the tiny delicate amphibians and elves - small magic creatures. Furthermore, their habitat is known as elfin forests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shapeshifting materials: Using light to rearrange macroscopic structures
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) OIST researchers create self-assembling molecules which can be broken down by ultraviolet light to recombine into novel macroscopic shapes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DFG to fund 15 new research training groups
(Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) Topics range from malaria to contemporary literature. € 66 million in funding for an initial four and a half years continues promotion of transferable skills. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mislocalized calcium channel causes insulin secretion defect in diabetes
(Uppsala University) Researchers from Uppsala University have studied beta cells of type-2 diabetic donors, and find that a mislocalized calcium channel contributes to the failed insulin secretion associated with the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nutritional properties of mushrooms are better when grilled or microwaved
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Culinary treatments (boiling, microwaving, grilling, and deep frying) influence on proximate composition and antioxidant capacity of most cultivated mushrooms worldwide. A study by Spanish researchers has shown that microwaving and grilling are the best processes to maintain the nutritional profile of mushrooms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A muffin a day might just keep the doctor away
(University of Queensland) A food scientist has developed a healthy heart muffin recipe that builds on an earlier discovery by University of Queensland and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls on how beta glucan fibre in oats can slow absorption of fats to reduce blood cholesterol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Epigenetic program leading to vessel differentiation
(Kumamoto University) Clarification of how human blood vessels are constructed is desperately needed to advance regenerative medicine. Researchers in Japan investigated the changes in gene functions that occur when stem cells become vascular cells. They found that the histone code, which alters the transcriptional state of the gene, changes over time as stem cells differentiate into blood vessels in response to a stimulus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Insects resist genetic methods to control disease spread, Indiana University study finds
(Indiana University) A study from Indiana University published May 19 in the journal Science Advances finds that insects possess a naturally occurring resistance to the use of gene-editing technology to prevent diseases such as malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Self-ventilating workout suit keeps athletes cool and dry
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A team of MIT researchers has designed a breathable workout suit with ventilating flaps that open and close in response to an athlete's body heat and sweat. These flaps, which range from thumbnail- to finger-sized, are lined with live microbial cells that shrink and expand in response to changes in humidity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ESF lists Top 10 new species for 2017
(SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry) A spider and an ant with names drawn from popular books, a pink katydid and an omnivorous rat made the College of Environmental Science and Forestry's list of the Top 10 New Species for 2017. Also listed: a freshwater stingray, a bush tomato that appears to 'bleed,' a devilish-looking orchid, a millipede with more than 400 legs, an amphibious centipede and a marine worm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sequestering blue carbon through better management of coastal ecosystems
(Utah State University) Focusing on the management of carbon stores within vegetated coastal habitats provides an opportunity to mitigate some aspects of global warming. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fueling the future
(University of Pittsburgh) The Royal Society of Chemistry journal Energy& Environmental Science recently published research by a team from the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Oklahoma investigating the full life cycle impact of one promising 'second-generation biofuel' produced from short-rotation oak. The study found that second-generation biofuels made from managed trees and perennial grasses may provide a sustainable fuel resource. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists investigate how the sense of smell works in bacteria
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Biophysicists have proposed a universal mechanism for the 'sense of smell' in bacteria. This was done by obtaining the structure of the NarQ protein from Escherichia coli (E. coli). The paper published in Science will help us understand how bacteria 'communicate' with one another and form biofilms on sterile surfaces or inside the human body. Drugs which affect bacteria's 'sense of smell' could potentially be used as substitutes for modern antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Portland State virus study receives major NASA grant
(Portland State University) Portland State biologist Ken Stedman has received a $540,000 grant from NASA to study the evolution of viruses, which may shed light on how viruses form, adapt and infect hosts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists Say Plants Use Sound To Find Water And Ultimately Survive
Scientists are studying and confirming how plants may actually have the ability to sense sounds, like flowing water in a pipe ― or even buzzing insects. What? Plants hear sounds? That’s an earful. But not to researchers at the University of Western Australia, whose experiments point to the possibility that some plants may actually detect sound waves. Evolutionary biologist Monica Gagliano and her colleagues worked with pea seedlings, which they inserted into pots that looked like an upside-down “Y.” According to Scientific American: One arm of each pot was placed in either a tray of water or a coiled p...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Genome to phenome: a systems biology approach to ptsd using an animal model - Chakraborty N, Meyerhoff J, Jett M, Hammamieh R.
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating illness that imposes significant emotional and financial burdens on military families. The understanding of PTSD etiology remains elusive; nonetheless, it is clear that PTSD is manifested by a cluster... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

European Molecular Biology Laboratory Site, Barcelona
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) is developing a new facility within the Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB) campus in Spain. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - May 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Evolution in butterfly eye dependent on sex, scientists find
By analyzing both the genes that control color detecting photoreceptors and the structural components of the eye itself, evolutionary biologists have discovered male and female butterflies of one particular species have the unique ability to see the world differently from each another because of sex-related evolutionary traits. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Century-old tumours could shed light on rare childhood cancers
Collection of samples found in hospital vault reveal genetic mutations that may be responsible for rarest forms of diseaseA collection of almost 100-year-old tumour samples has revealed genetic mutations that scientists believe could be responsible for some of the rarest forms of childhood cancer.Related:UK children with cancer could miss out on drug trials after Brexit, doctors warnContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Cancer research Genetics Hospitals Medical research Science Society Health Children Biology Source Type: news

The real importance of a silly-sounding GCSE question on Darwin | Jenny Rohn
Students have expressed scorn over abiology exam question on ‘Victorian monkey memes’. So how much does teaching the history of science matter?According to BuzzFeed, British year 11 students encountered a Biology exam question this week about science history and were “confused”, using Twitter to vent their frustration.Students taking the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance (AQA) version of the GCSE exam were reportedly asked to explain why Victorian journalists lampooned Charles Darwin as a monkey in cartoons – thereby scuppering their chance to shine on topics they’d studied hard for...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jenny Rohn Tags: History of science GCSEs Education Charles Darwin Exams Schools Secondary schools Source Type: news

Plant hunters discovered 1,700 new species last year
From a Turkish parsnip to Madagascar coffee beans and roses in China, the discoveries offer the prospect of better crops, medicinal uses and new garden displaysFrom new parsnips and herbs to begonias and roses, the world ’s plant hunters discovered more than 1,700 new species last year, offering the prospect of better crops and new colours and scents in the garden.TheState of the World ’s Plants report, led by scientists at the Royal Botanical Garden Kew in the UK and published on Thursday, reveals a cornucopia of new plants and assesses the risk to the plant world from pests and invasive species.Continue readi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Plants Biology Science Conservation Biodiversity Environment Kew Gardens World news Source Type: news

New types of coffee, parsnips and roses among 1,700 plants discovered last year
From a new variety of Turkish parsnip to Madagascar coffee beans, the discoveries offer the prospect of better crops, medicinal uses and new garden displaysFrom new parsnips and herbs to begonias and roses, the world ’s plant hunters discovered more than 1,700 new species last year, offering the prospect of better crops and new colours and scents in the garden.TheState of the World ’s Plants report, led by scientists at the Royal Botanical Garden Kew in the UK and published on Thursday, reveals a cornucopia of new plants and assesses the risk to the plant world from pests and invasive species.Continue reading.....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Plants Biology Science Conservation Biodiversity Environment Kew Gardens World news Source Type: news

Cystic fibrosis study offers new understanding of silent changes in genes
(University of Bristol) Researchers studying the root cause of cystic fibrosis have made a major advance in our understanding of silent gene changes with implications for the complexity of cystic fibrosis. The findings are published today in [May 16] PLoS Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers receive NIH grant to study heart problems at the molecular level
(Washington State University) Washington State University researchers have received a $1.57 million National Institutes of Health grant to understand the molecular-scale mechanisms that cause cardiomyopathy, or heart muscle disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stanford scientists use nanotechnology to boost the performance of key industrial catalyst
(Stanford University) Nanoscale stretching or compressing significantly boost the performance of ceria, a material widely used in catalytic converters and clean-energy technologies, Stanford scientists report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Engineering heart valves for the many
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the University of Zurich announced today a cross-institutional team effort to generate a functional heart valve replacement with the capacity for repair, regeneration, and growth. The team is also working towards a GMP-grade version of their customizable, scalable, and cost-effective manufacturing process that would enable deployment to a large patient population. In addition, the new heart valve would be compatible with minimally invasive procedures to serve both pediatric and adult patients. (Sou...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study helps solve a great mystery in the organization of our DNA
(Gladstone Institutes) After decades of research aiming to understand how DNA is organized in human cells, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have shed new light on this mysterious field by discovering how a key protein helps control gene organization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antarctica 'greening' due to climate change
(University of Exeter) Plant life on Antarctica is growing rapidly due to climate change, scientists have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mechanisms behind sensory deficits in Parkinson's disease
(Karolinska Institutet) Although Parkinson's disease is often associated with motor symptoms such as stiffness, poor balance and trembling, the first symptoms are often sensory and include a reduced sense of touch and smell. In a study on mice, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now been able to identify neural circuits and mechanisms behind this loss of sensory perception. The study, which is published in the scientific journal Neuron, may open avenues to methods of earlier diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCI scientists find evolution in butterfly eye dependent on sex
(University of California - Irvine) By analyzing both the genes that control color detecting photoreceptors and the structural components of the eye itself, University of California, Irvine evolutionary biologists have discovered male and female butterflies of one particular species have the unique ability to see the world differently from each another because of sex-related evolutionary traits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Warm-bloodedness possibly much older than previously thought
(University of Bonn) Warm-bloodedness in land animals could have developed in evolution much earlier than previously thought. This is shown by a recent study at the University of Bonn, which has now been published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate stabilization: Planting trees cannot replace cutting CO2 emissions
(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)) Growing plants and then storing the CO2 they have taken up from the atmosphere is no viable option to counteract unmitigated emissions from fossil fuel burning, a new study shows. The plantations would need to be so large, they would eliminate most natural ecosystems or reduce food production if implemented as a late-regret option in the case of substantial failure to reduce emissions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Members of the University of Seville discover neural stem cells can become blood vessels
(University of Seville) Mother cells from the adult carotid body can transform into blood vessels, as well as into neurons. This discovery could have important repercussions on the advance in treatment of diseases as different as pediatric tumors and Parkinson's. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Water efficiency in rural areas is getting worse, even as it improves in urban centers
(North Carolina State University) A nationwide analysis of water use over the past 30 years finds that there is a disconnect between rural and urban areas, with most urban areas becoming more water efficient and most rural areas becoming less and less efficient over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news