Is the sky the limit?
(University of Vienna) What stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? The biomathematician Jitka Polechov á , an Elise Richter Fellow at the University of Vienna, has published a paper in PLoS Biology which explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of species, are fundamental to the stability of their range: the environmental heterogeneity and the size of the local population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Museum collection reveals distribution of Carolina parakeet 100 years after its extinction
(Pensoft Publishers) While 2018 marks the centenary of the death of the last captive Carolina parakeet -- North America's only native parrot, a team of researchers have shed new light on the previously known geographical range of the species. Their data paper, published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, is the most comprehensive occurrence dataset for the species ever produced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limit
(University of Nottingham) New University of Nottingham research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing.The study findings have the potential to vastly increase the functional capabilities of 3D-printed devices for industries such as electronics, healthcare and quantum computing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Wilmar-NUS joint lab to drive innovation in food-tech and sustainable biochemicals
(National University of Singapore) Asia's leading agribusiness group Wilmar International Limited and the National University of Singapore have established a new joint research laboratory to conduct cutting-edge clinical nutrition and synthetic biology research to create healthier food products as well as to devise green production technologies for industrial enzymes and biochemicals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study reveals
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tattoo health warning for people with weakened immune systems
A woman with cystic fibrosis and lung transplants suffered chronic pain for three years after she had a tattoo on her thighGetting a tattoo if you have a weakened immune system could put you at risk of complications, doctors have warned. The caution comes after a woman with cystic fibrosis and lung transplants developed thigh and knee pain after having body art inked on her leg.Doctors say those taking immunosuppressant drugs should take precautions if considering body art. These medicines are often given after an organ transplant or to treat autoimmune conditions such as Crohn ’s disease, lupus or rheumatoid arthrit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Tattoos Medical research Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health Cystic fibrosis Diabetes Source Type: news

Opinion: Constrain Speculation to Protect the Integrity of Science
What we can know about biology before the last universal common ancestor is limited—and we should be circumspect in filling in the gaps. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Opinion News & Source Type: news

Opinion: Constrain Speculation to Protect the Integrity of Science
What we can know about biology before the last universal common ancestor is limited-and we should be circumspect in filling in the gaps. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion,Opinion Source Type: news

Evil spirit that haunts scary movie Hereditary is the gene genie
Ari Aster ’s horror triumph feeds off suppressed fear that we cannot escape our biological fate – leaving audiences unnervedWarning: contains spoilersOn the face of it,Hereditary is a slice of silly supernatural hokum replete with thethreadbare tropes of the genre. However, Ari Aster ’s debut scarer has nonethelessstruck a nerve: it seems to linger in the minds of those who see it. Why?Many horror films (Blair Witch, The Babadook, It Follows) jog the Jungian subconscious to tickle merely fanciful fears. Others (Carrie, Don ’t Look Now,Get Out) dare to touch upon real-world terrors. Often, it ’...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Cox Tags: Hereditary Horror films Genetics Psychology Culture Society Science Biology Source Type: news

'Artificial blubber' protects divers in frigid water
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A treatment that infuses a conventional neoprene wetsuit with a heavy inert gas can improve a diver's survival time in frigid waters by a factor of three, according to scientists and others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds reduction in sulfur emissions from power plants in China
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Air pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now an innovative study co-authored by an MIT scholar shows that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working -- but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study suggests well-known growth suppressor actually fuels lethal brain cancers
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Scientists report finding a potentially promising treatment target for aggressive and deadly high-grade brain cancers like glioblastoma. Publishing online June 18 in Nature Cell Biology, the study also reports the current lack of a drug that hits the molecular target keeps it from being advanced for testing as a therapeutic strategy for patients with few treatment options. The researchers point to a protein that helps regulate cell metabolism called AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Local interventions boost coral's resilience to bleaching
(Duke University) Local conservation actions can significantly boost coral's resilience to, and recovery from, climate-induced thermal bleaching by reducing other energy-sapping stresses the coral faces, a Duke-led study finds. Scientists found they could reduce the extent of bleaching by half if they removed or reduced populations of coral-eating snails from affected reefs. The coral's recovery from bleaching was also enhanced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two new creatures discovered from dawn of animal life
(University of California - Riverside) UCR researchers have discovered two new Ediacaran era fossil animals. Their names honor President Barack Obama and Sir David Attenborough. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Life, death and carbon in the open ocean
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Oceanographic campaign plunges into 'twilight zone' to investigate how the ocean's food web sequesters carbon (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

360 degrees, 180 seconds: Technique speeds analysis of crop traits
(University of Nebraska-Lincoln) Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have devised a new LiDAR-based approach for automatically and efficiently gathering data about a plant's phenotype: the physical traits that emerge from its genetic code. The approach could allow researchers to better compare crops that have been bred or genetically engineered for specific traits - ideally those that help produce more food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists isolate protein data from the tiniest of caches -- single human cells
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Scientists have captured the most information yet about proteins within a single human cell, giving scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. The team detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell -- many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries
(University of Basel) Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have developed a method for tracing the movement of proteins within the cell. They tagged proteins with tiny nanosensors, so-called nanobodies, which enable the scientists to live track and trace the proteins' pathway through the cell. The method described in the current issue of PNAS is suitable for a wide range of research purposes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers explore whether smarter animals are bigger troublemakers
(University of Wyoming) A new paper in the journal Animal Behaviour examines whether smarter animals might be better at learning to live in cities -- but, at the same time, also may come into more conflict with humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Addgene keeps flow of CRISPR plasmids fast and affordable
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) As a key global enabler of the revolutionary genome editing technology known as CRISPR, the nonprofit organization Addgene has made available more than 100,000 CRISPR plasmids (circular DNA fragments) to 3,400 laboratories worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'
(Rice University) Rice University engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Joint paper identifies one of Mesoamerica's last intact forest blocks
(Wildlife Conservation Society) The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Yale University have created a plan to preserve one of the last intact forest strongholds for the jaguar and other iconic species in Central America: the Moskitia Forest Corridor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chesapeake Bay: Larger-than-average summer 'dead zone' forecast for 2018 after wet spring
(University of Michigan) Ecologists from the University of Michigan and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are forecasting a larger-than-average Chesapeake Bay 'dead zone' in 2018, due to increased rainfall in the watershed this spring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatment
(University of Cambridge) An algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteria
(Scripps Research Institute) A new study by Scripps Research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Devastating plant virus is revealed in atomic detail
(University of Leeds) The complex 3D structure of one of the world's most lethal families of plant viruses has been revealed in unprecedented detail by scientists at the University of Leeds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumors
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The genetic causes of a group of related infant cancers have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Wuerzburg and their collaborators. Whole genome sequencing of tumours revealed mutations which are targetable by existing drugs used to treat lung cancer and melanoma. The results have implications for clinical practice and the diagnosis of rare cancers in infants, and could lead to new, targeted treatment options for these children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Constructing new tissue shapes with light
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Constructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light. Nature Communications publishes their results, with implications for regenerative medicine, on June 18. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Large outdoor study shows biodiversity improves stability of algal biofuel systems
(University of Michigan) A diverse mix of species improves the stability and fuel-oil yield of algal biofuel systems, as well as their resistance to invasion by outsiders, according to the findings of a federally funded outdoor study by University of Michigan researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cambridge zoology museum to reopen
Sir David Attenborough to tour new premises that showcase the extinct moa bird ’s feathersWhen SirDavid Attenborough opens the University of Cambridge ’s zoology museum this week, the proud curators will show him their fabulous discovery.It ’s fair to say the casual visitor might wonder why they are so excited by the scruffy frame containing a few cobwebby grey-brown wisps, discovered during a £4.1m redevelopment of the museum.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Zoology Conservation Museums Cambridge Biology Culture Environment Science UK news Animals Source Type: news

The secret rainforest hidden at the heart of an African volcano - in pictures
A ‘dream team’ of international scientists scaled Mozambique’s Mount Lico and found a wealth of new species.Allianceearth.orgContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeff Barbee Tags: Environment Science Mountains Mozambique Africa World news Animal behaviour Biology Source Type: news

Life in the fast lane: USU ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cycles
(Utah State University) Utah State University ecologist Noelle Beckman says seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genomic testing for the causes of stillbirth should be considered for routine use
(European Society of Human Genetics) The use of whole genome and whole exome sequencing can uncover the cause of unexplained stillbirth and neonatal deaths. In addition to providing an explanation to bereaved parents, it can help the understand whether a recurrence in future pregnancies is likely. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletons
(European Society of Human Genetics) A new way of dating skeletons by using mutations in DNA associated with geography will avoid the difficulties and inaccuracies sometimes associated with existing dating methods. The technique will enable a better understanding of historical developments from the beginning of the Neolithic period, through the Bronze and Iron Ages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biologist reveals surprising insights into the effects of nuclear accidents on wildlife
(Natural News) On April 26, 1986, the world was rocked by the Chernobyl disaster, one of the worst nuclear accidents in history. Massive amounts of radioactive materials were launched into the atmosphere from one of the graphite reactor cores, forcing people living nearby to evacuate their homes by the thousands. Now, almost four decades later,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Bergamot fruit, more used for perfumes and Earl Grey tea, found to be a natural anti-cholesterol remedy
(Natural News) A study published in the Science Direct journal Bioenergetics found that the bergamot fruit, which is commonly used for perfumes and Earl Grey tea, can be a natural anti-cholesterol remedy. In conducting the study, a team of chemists at the University of Calabria in Italy collaborated with biologists at the University of Salford... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA names winner of 2018 Switzer Prize
Dr. David Sabatini, an MIT biologist and associate director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, will be the 2018 recipient of the Switzer Prize awarded by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Sabatini ’s pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate cell growth are propelling research into potential treatments for cancer and other diseases.As a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Sabatini identified the central protein, mTOR,  that turns cell growth on and off. At the Whitehead Institute and MIT, his laboratory ’s research&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sex-change mice research could help humans, say scientists
Removal of enhancer 13 DNA strands caused males to grow ovaries and female genitalia, helping research on human sexual development disordersScientists have turned male mice into females by snipping out strands of their DNA in work that could shed light on sexual development disorders which arise in humans.The male mice grew ovaries and female genitalia instead of the more conventional male anatomy after researchers removed small chunks of DNA from the animals ’ genetic code.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Biology Gender Medical research Source Type: news

Soundscape ecology with Bernie Krause – Science Weekly podcast
Do you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? Soundscape ecologist Bernie Krause does. Armed with over 5,000 hours of recordings, he takesIan Sample on a journey through the natural world and demonstrates why sound is such a powerful tool for conservationSubscribe and review onAcast,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom andMixcloud. Join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterDo you know what noise a hungry sea anemone makes? This is one of the 15,000 species that soundscape ecologistDr Bernie Krause has recorded. For half a century, Bernie has travelled the world, recording the noise of nature. His collection is now one o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Wildlife Environment Science Conservation Animal behaviour Biology Source Type: news

Genetic engineering researcher: Politicians are deaf to people's ethical concerns
(University of Copenhagen) New study from the University of Copenhagen reports that political discussions about genetically modified foods have ignored concerns among Danes that GM foods are 'unnatural'. This is very regrettable, according to Jesper Lassen, a researcher who has investigated public attitudes about genetic modification for the past 25 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Orange, tea tree & eucalyptus oils sweeten diesel fumes
(Queensland University of Technology) Waste oil from orange, tea tree and eucalyptus essential oil production mixed with diesel provides a sweet-smelling biofuel blend with comparable performance to diesel-only fuel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New method makes weather forecasts right as rain
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Meteorologists have known for some time that rainfall forecasts have flaws, as failure to take into account factors such as evaporation can affect their accuracy. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have developed a system that improves the precision of forecasts by accounting for evaporation in rainfall estimates, particularly for locations 30 miles or more from the nearest National Weather Service radar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

WGS helps diagnosis and reduces healthcare costs for neonates in intensive care
(European Society of Human Genetics) Two studies looking at the effect of carrying out rapid genome sequencing on children born seriously ill, but where diagnosis is difficult, show that it can provide speedy answers and lead to appropriate treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Primates in peril
(Deutsches Primatenzentrum (DPZ)/German Primate Center) International experts call for immediate action to protect endangered primate species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UTA researchers complete milestone in international physics experiment in Switzerland
(University of Texas at Arlington) Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have built prototypes for an aluminum electric field cage inside a particle detector for an international physics experiment conducted at the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva, Switzerland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Electronic skin stretched to new limits
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) A metal carbide within a hydrogel composite senses, stretches and heals like human skin for use in medicine and robotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Quality of diet still poor for SNAP participants
(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) A new Food-PRICE study finds persistent nutritional disparities within the food choices of those receiving assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) compared to those not receiving SNAP assistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Critical plant gene takes unexpected detour that could boost biofuel yields
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) For decades, biologists have believed a key enzyme in plants had one function -- produce amino acids, which are vital to plant survival and also essential to human diets.But for Wellington Muchero, Meng Xie and their colleagues, this enzyme does more than advertised. They had run a series of experiments on poplar plants that consistently revealed mutations in a structure of the life-sustaining enzyme that was not previously known to exist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Opioid overdose responsible for over 500,000 years of life lost in Ohio
(Ohio University) More than 500,000 years of life expectancy were lost in Ohio during a seven-year period, according to a study conducted by The Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health (OAIPH) -- a collaborative initiative formed by Ohio University's College of Health Sciences and Professions and the University of Toledo's College of Health and Human Services. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

To share or not to share?
(University of Vienna) When are primary school children willing to share valuable resources with others and when are they not? A team of researchers from the University of Vienna lead by cognitive biologist Lisa Horn investigated this question in a controlled behavioural experiment. The motivation to share seems to be influenced by group dynamical and physiological factors, whereas friendship between the children seems to be largely irrelevant. The results of their study have been published in the journal Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news