DGIST acquired the first KELAF Certification as a Daegu-Gyeongbuk Educational Institution
(DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)) Designated as a KELAF and held signboard hanging ceremony as organized by the Ministry of Drug and Food Safety. They will lay the foundation for advanced bio research by securing the reliability and ethicality of animal experiments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DEMRC wins 6 awards in the world's largest 2019 international exhibition for inventions
(DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)) DGIST announced that the DGIST-ETH Micro Robot Research Center (DEMRC) entered The 47th International Exhibition of Inventions Geneva with 4 inventions and won 6 awards including 3 golds, 1 silver, Special Award of Geneva State Government, and Special Award from the Taiwan Invention Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Inhibition of ribosome biogenesis as a novel approach for multi-stage cancer treatment
(Uppsala University) Nearly ninety per cent of all cancer patient deaths are due to metastasis. A study from Uppsala University shows that a process that allows the cells to metastasise is aided by the synthesis of new ribosomes, the cell components in which proteins are produced. The results open the possibility for new treatment strategies for advanced cancers. The study is published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gold makes invisible surfaces visible in CT
(University of Cologne) Zoologists in Cologne and Bonn have developed a new method for displaying previously invisible surface details using computer tomography. The key to success was a method from scanning electron microscopy: coating the sample with gold. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medicinal mushroom newly reported from Thailand helps reveal optimum growth conditions
(Pensoft Publishers) A species of globally recognised medicinal mushroom was recorded for the first time in Thailand. Commonly referred to as lingzhi, the fungus (Ganoderma tropicum) was collected from the base of a living tree in Chiang Rai Province, Northern Thailand. In their study, published in the open-access journal MycoKeys, the scientists also report the first assessment of the optimum conditions needed for the species to grow its mycelia and spread its colony. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Water flea can smell fish and dive into the dark for protection
(University of Cologne) Zoologists at the University of Cologne have discovered the messenger substance responsible for the flight of the small planktonic crustacean Daphnia from fish in lakes. This animal's dive into deeper waters has significant consequences for the concentration of algae in the lake's ecosystem. The scientists hope that in future, a better understanding of this interaction might help restore the biological balance in lakes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New England Biolabs & reg; launches myNEB & trade;, a first of its kind voice-activated digital lab assistant for Alexa & lt;
The new cloud-based service enables quick access to scientific information -- including key restriction enzyme details -- for molecular biologists in the lab. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 7, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Designing an antidote for world's most venomous jellyfish
While studying the venom of box jellyfish — one of the most deadly animals on earth — researchers in Australia stumbled across a possible antidote. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

Cell architects: 'Smart cells' improve production of pharmaceutical raw materials
(Kobe University) Researchers in Japan have developed an integrated synthetic biology system to construct new metabolic pathways and enzymes within microbes. By incorporating a " Design, Build, Test, Learn " (DBTL) workflow, the production of pharmaceutical raw materials could be systematically optimized. This application supports the concept of the DBTL workflow as a sustainable method for production of complex and valuable materials. The results were published on May 1 in the open access journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Essential tool for precision farming: new method for photochemical reflectance index measurement
(Lobachevsky University) Precision farming, which relies on spatially heterogeneous application of fertilizers, biologically active compounds, pesticides, etc., is one of the leading trends in modern agricultural science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Teaching CRISPR and antibiotic resistance to high school students
(Northwestern University) A Northwestern University-led team has developed BioBits, a suite of hands-on educational kits that enable students to perform a range of biological experiments by adding water and simple reagents to freeze-dried cell-free reactions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tibetan plateau first occupied by middle Pleistocene Denisovans
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A joint research team led by CHEN Fahu from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and ZHANG Dongju from the Lanzhou University reported their studies on a human mandible found in Xiahe, on the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oxygen variation controls episodic pattern of Cambrian explosion: study
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A multidisciplinary study, published on May 6, 2019 in Nature Geoscience by a joint China-UK-Russia research team, gives strong support to the hypothesis that the oxygen content of the atmosphere and ocean was the principal controlling factor in early animal evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Threatened sturgeon learns for the fitness
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) An international team led by IGB is providing one of the first proofs of the complex learning behavior of fish in a recent study. The Atlantic sturgeon is considered extinct in Germany. The IGB is coordinating their reintroduction and is investigating whether sturgeon training can increase their fitness for the wild. An important fitness factor is their feeding behavior. Already a two-week 'learning lead' made the search for food more efficient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biophysicists resolve true structure of highly promising optogenetic protein KR2 rhodopsin
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) A team of biophysicists has discovered and studied the structure of the KR2 rhodopsin under physiological conditions. This pioneering work breaks ground for a future breakthrough in optogenetics, a highly relevant area of biomedicine with applications in neurological disease treatment and more. The fundamental discovery will lead to a new instrument for efficient therapy of depression, anxiety disorders, epilepsy, and Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Announcing the 2019 BioOne Ambassador Award winners
(BioOne) BioOne recognizes five early career authors whose 250-word plain-language summaries of their specialized research effectively communicated the impact of their work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New 'jumping' superbug gene discovered, resistant to last-resort antibiotic
(Cornell University) While sifting through the bacterial genome of salmonella, Cornell University food scientists discovered mcr-9, a new stealthy, jumping gene so diabolical and robust that it resists one of the world's few last-resort antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Everyday stress may boost blood vessel dysfunction in people with depression
(Penn State) Long-term stress has been linked with cardiovascular disease, but for people with depression, researchers say small, everyday stressors may be enough to diminish blood vessel function in otherwise healthy adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Eye's vulnerability to macular degeneration revealed
(eLife) Scientists have found significant differences in the shape and biology of the same type of cell taken from different parts of the retina, according to a study in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure raising risk of heart disease
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart's main pumping chamber in young adults, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. This structural change increases the risk for future heart problems. The study is the first to review the question in young adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers discover a trigger for directed cell motion
(University of M ü nster) Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence at M ü nster University (Germany) have discovered that curvatures of cell membranes trigger a self-organising system. As a result, cells can move in the same direction over a longer distance, forming search patterns. The study has been published in the journal 'Nature Physics'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Factory of the future heralds new era for Australian manufacturing
(Flinders University) A proposed $50 million Flinders University-led Australian Centre for Innovative Manufacturing (ACIM) at Tonsley will be the nation's first reconfigurable 'Future Factory' -- connecting Australian companies with the latest manufacturing technologies, research expertise and providing training to modernise workforces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vaccine for African swine fever may save our bacon
(Frontiers) Wild boar can be immunized against African Swine Fever by a new vaccine delivered to the animals in their food. This is the first report of a promising inoculation against this deadly disease, which is a worldwide threat to the swine industry. The study shows immunity can be passed on via contact, but further studies need to examine how this occurs, the safety of repeated administration and its genetic stability as it is passed on. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Close relatives can coexist: two flower species show us how
(Kobe University) Scientists have discovered how two closely-related species of Asiatic dayflower can coexist in the wild despite their competitive relationship. Through a combination of field surveys and artificial pollination experiments, the new study shows that while reproductive interference exists between the two species, both can counter the negative effects of this interference through self-fertilization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New species of fish parasite named after Xena, the warrior princess
(Pensoft Publishers) A study of crustacean parasites attaching themselves inside the branchial cavities (the gills) of their fish hosts was conducted in order to reveal potentially unrecognised diversity of the genus Elthusa in South Africa. While there had only been one known species from South Africa, a new article published in the open-access journal ZooKeys adds another three to the list, including one named after fictional character Xena because of the strong appearance of the females. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate change -- early spring: Predicting budburst with genetics
(University of Montreal) Tree and shrub genetics can be used to produce more accurate predictions of when leaves will burst bud in the spring, according to a Canada-US study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Freshwater mussel shells were material of choice for prehistoric craftsmen
(University of York) An international team of researchers, including academics from the University of York, have discovered that 6000-years-ago people across Europe shared a cultural tradition of using freshwater mussel shells to craft ornaments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers uncover mechanism blocking retina regeneration
(Baylor College of Medicine) A discovery opens the possibility of one day restoring loss of vision by activating the retina's ability to regenerate. Researchers have discovered that the mammalian retina, although it does not spontaneously regenerate, has a regenerative capacity that is kept dormant by a cellular mechanism called the Hippo pathway. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New approach shows regeneration of severely damaged lungs
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Researchers have -- for the first time -- demonstrated in a clinically relevant model that severely damaged lungs can be regenerated to meet transplantation criteria. Their new study describes the cross-circulation platform that maintained the donor lung's viability and function and the recipient's stability for 36-56 hours. Current methodologies of lung support are limited to only 6-8 hours, a time too short for therapeutic interventions that could regenerate the injured lung and improve its function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Success tastes so sweet
(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) Researchers from the National Institute for Physiological Sciences characterized the role of neurons in the parabrachial nucleus of mice, which is known to relay taste information to the cortex via the gustatory thalamus. SatB2-expressing neurons encoded sweet tastes, and this was especially true for those that projected to the gustatory thalamus. SatB2-expressing neurons selectively transmitted sweet taste-specific appetitive signals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

3D 'mini-gut' model reflects autoimmune response to gluten in celiac patient tissue
(Massachusetts General Hospital) In pursuit of a novel tool for the research and treatment of celiac disease, scientists at the Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital have validated the use of intestinal organoids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

50 top biomedical and health scientists join prestigious Academy of Medical Sciences Fellowship
(Academy of Medical Sciences (UK)) The Academy of Medical Sciences has elected 50 of the UK's leading figures within biomedical and health sciences to their esteemed Fellowship, it has been announced today (Wednesday 8 May 2019). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UW-Madison research team finds new ways to generate stem cells more efficiently
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A new study published in Cell Reports by a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and School of Medicine and Public Health could improve the efficiency of creating induced pluripont stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Sea Lab's Outreach Coordinator contributes to synthesis on Deepwater Horizon oil spill
(Dauphin Island Sea Lab) The Sea Lab's Discovery Hall Programs Outreach Coordinator Rachel McDonald's work conducting outreach on ACER's research is featured in a special issue of the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative's (GoMRI) Current: The Journal of Marine Education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research brief: Surface protein editing in bacteria
(University of Minnesota) UMN research delves into an unknown cell circuit in bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The winter weather window that is costing rapeseed growers millions
(John Innes Centre) UK rapeseed growers are losing up to a quarter of their crop yield each year because of temperature rises during an early-winter weather window. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Filming how our immune system kill bacteria
(University College London) To kill bacteria in the blood, our immune system relies on nanomachines that can open deadly holes in their targets. UCL scientists have now filmed these nanomachines in action, discovering a key bottleneck in the process which helps to protect our own cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dataset bridges human vision and machine learning
(Carnegie Mellon University) Neuroscientists and computer vision scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and Fordham University say a new dataset of unprecedented size -- comprising brain scans of four volunteers who each viewed 5,000 images -- will help researchers better understand how the brain processes images. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hopping bacteria
(Princeton University, Engineering School) Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed. A new study from Princeton University illuminates precise behavior patterns of E. coli and corrects a longstanding error in predicting their behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UV lights on power lines may help save Sandhill cranes
(American Ornithological Society Publications Office) Crane species are declining around the world, and lethal collisions with power lines are an ongoing threat to many crane populations. Current techniques for marking power lines and making them more visible to cranes aren't always effective, but new research published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that adding UV lights -- to which many birds are sensitive -- can cut crane collisions with power lines by 98%. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The fossilization process of the dinosaur remains
(University of the Basque Country) A piece of work conducted between the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country and the University of Zaragoza has conducted an in-depth analysis of the dinosaur fossils at La Cantalera-1, one of the Iberian sites belonging to the Lower Cretaceous with the largest number of vertebrates. The structure of the fossilized bone tissue as well as the fossilization processes have been studied. It has been possible to confirm that most of the dinosaurs found at La Cantalera-1 were young individuals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sensor can detect spoiled milk before opening
(Washington State University) Expiration dates on milk could eventually become a thing of the past with new sensor technology from Washington State University scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New disease discovered by CU Anschutz researchers
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A new immunodeficiency disease caused by a novel genetic mutation has been identified by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus providing unique insights into cell biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bacteria causing infections can be detected more rapidly
(Pohang University of Science& Technology (POSTECH)) Prof. Young-Tae Chang, Dr. Nam Young Kang, Dr. Hwa-Young Kwon, and Xiao Liu of POSTECH Department of Chemistry developed a fluorescent probe, BacGo that can detect Gram-positive bacteria precisely and promptly. They published their research on the most renowned journal of the field of chemistry, Angewandte Chemie. The research team used bacterial sludge from wastewater for the demonstration experiment. They successfully monitored the proportion of bacteria in the process of wastewater treatment and confirmed the possible application to clinical diagnosis of keratitis...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shipwrecks off NC coast harbor tropical migrants
(Duke University) Shipwrecks and sunken structures off the North Carolina coast may act as stepping stones for tropical fish searching for favorable habitats at or beyond the edge of their normal geographic range. A study co-led by Duke University scientists finds these fishes prefer artificial reefs over natural ones and suggests linked networks of these human-made structures could be used to aid the survival of the ecologically and economically important species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Director of UM Flathead Lake Biological Station elected to National Academy of Sciences
(The University of Montana) Flathead Lake Biological Station Director and Bierman Professor of Ecology Jim Elser has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of his distinguished and continuing achievements in scientific research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When a tree falls in St. Louis, will the power go out?
(Saint Louis University) Saint Louis University researchers paired satellite imaging data with machine learning techniques to map local tree species and health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NOAA announces $94 million ocean exploration institute led by University of Rhode Island
(University of Rhode Island) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration selects University of Rhode Island to lead new $94 million consortium to support ocean exploration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Radical desalination approach may disrupt the water industry
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Columbia Engineering researchers report that they have developed a radically different desalination approach-- " temperature swing solvent extraction (TSSE) " --for hypersaline brines. Their study demonstrates that TSSE can desalinate very high-salinity brines, up to seven times the concentration of seawater. Says PI Ngai Yin Yip, " Our results show that TSSE could be a disruptive technology--it's effective, efficient, scalable, and can be sustainably powered. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Banana disease boosted by climate change
(University of Exeter) Climate change has raised the risk of a fungal disease that ravages banana crops, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news