Peter Jonas receives Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences
(Institute of Science and Technology Austria) Peter Jonas, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), receives the Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize 2018 goes in equal parts to Peter Jonas and Elly Tanaka, biochemist at the IMP. Jonas is honored for his outstanding research achievements in the field of neuroscience, in particular for his significant contribution to the understanding of synaptic signal processing at the molecular and cellular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Global warming increases frost damage on trees in Central Europe
(University of Eastern Finland) Global warming increases frost damage on trees in large areas of Central Europe, according to a new Finnish-Chinese study. Late frost damages are economically important in agriculture and forestry. In certain years, they are known to have caused losses amounting to up to hundreds of millions of euros. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Light-induced changes in photosensory proteins
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Researchers from Charit é -- Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin have been able to demonstrate how, on a molecular level, a specific protein allows light signals to be converted into cellular information. Their findings have broadened our understanding of the way how plants and bacteria adapt to changes in light conditions, which regulate essential processes, such as photosynthesis. Their research has been published in the current issue of Nature Communications*. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Mediterranean diet in pregnancy is associated with lower risk of accelerated growth
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Over 2,700 women and their children participated in this study that highlights the benefits of a healthy diet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Innovation award for climate-friendly methane cracking
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Generating energy from natural gas without climate-damaging CO2 emissions -- that's the promise of a new technology developed in a joint research project by scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam. Natural gas, which mainly consists of methane, is converted into hydrogen and fixed carbon. For their work, the researchers have now received the German Gas Industry Innovation Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The secret contamination of polar bears
(Wiley) Using a new approach to measure chemical contaminants in polar bears, scientists from Canada and the United States found a large variety of new chlorinated and fluorinated substances, including many new polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites. Worryingly, these previously unrecognized contaminants have not declined in the past decades, and many long-chain fluorinated alkyl sulfonic acids have been increasing over time, says the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New dataset expands understanding of Arctic Spring Bloom
(Dauphin Island Sea Lab) Understanding how the ocean works is like putting together a million-piece puzzle. There are many questions; finding answers takes time, resources, and opportunity. But even when scientists believe they know how the pieces fit together, new knowledge can change the shape of the puzzle. A paper recently published by Dr. Jeffrey Krause of the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the University of South Alabama adds another piece to the puzzle in understanding the impact of diatoms on the Arctic Spring Bloom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plant cells inherit knowledge of where's up and where's down from mother cell
(Institute of Science and Technology Austria) Knowing which way is up and which way is down is important for all living beings. For plants, which grow roots into the soil and flowers above ground, getting this polarization wrong would cause a whole host of problems. How polarity is reestablished after cell division was unknown -- until now. Researchers at IST Austria have solved one piece of the puzzle (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New laboratory system allows researchers to probe the secret lives of queen bees
(Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A group of researchers at the University of Illinois has established a laboratory-based method for tracking the fertility of honey bee queens, using a laboratory set-up that would mimic the key aspects of the hive environment and allow detection of egg-laying by honey bee queens living with small groups of worker bees. The resulting system allowed them to explore the relationship between worker nutrition and queen fertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why a curious crustacean could hold secret to making renewable energy from wood
(University of York) Scientists studying gribble -- a curious wood-eating crustacean -- have discovered how they are able to digest wood despite being the only known animal to have a sterile digestive system. The discovery may help to develop cheaper and more sustainable tools for converting wood into biofuel in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists call for eight steps to increase soil carbon for climate action and food security
(University of Vermont) Leading scientists call for action to increase global soil carbon, in advance of the annual climate summit of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP24) and World Soil Day (December 5). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Acute flaccid myelitis: Five things to know
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Acute flaccid myelitis, a syndrome with rapid muscle weakness in children, has been seen in hospitals in the United States and Canada this fall. A practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) outlines five things to know about this health issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Myrrh essential oil is a natural remedy for skin fungal infections
(Natural News) Cutaneous fungal infections, which are noninvasive infections of the skin, hair, or nails, may be treated using myrrh (Commiphora molmol). A study published in Pharmaceutical Biology confirmed that myrrh is an effective treatment for skin fungal infections. Myrrh, a resin obtained from the cracked stem of thorny tree species of the genus Commiphora,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Saltier waterways are creating dangerous 'chemical cocktails'
(University of Maryland) New research suggests that saltier, more alkaline freshwater can release toxic metals and harmful nitrogen-containing compounds from streambeds and soils in drainage basins. The results further suggest that many of these chemicals travel together throughout watersheds, forming 'chemical cocktails' that can have more devastating effects on drinking water supplies and ecosystems when compared with individual contaminants alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

George H.W. Bush Died Less Than 8 Months After His Wife of 73 Years. Doctors Explain Why That ’s So Common
George H.W. Bush died in his Houston home on Nov. 30, less than eight months after his wife of 73 years, Barbara. He was 94. While Bush’s case may seem extraordinary, it’s actually fairly common for spouses to die around the same time. A 2013 study published in the Journals of Gerontology found that the death of a spouse raises a person’s risk of dying by around 30%, compared to those who are still married. Some estimates are even higher. Some research has shown that in the six months after the death of a spouse, the bereaved face odds of mortality 40% to 70% greater than the general public, according to ...
Source: TIME: Health - December 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Discovery's Crest: A Profile of Marianne Bronner
Studying how neural crest cells journey through the embryo, this Caltech developmental biologist has revealed how they form major cell types, including peripheral neurons, bone, and smooth muscle. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Profile Magazine Issue Source Type: news

2018 Top 10 Innovations
Biology happens on many levels, from ecosystems to electron transport chains. These tools may help spur discoveries at all of life's scales. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Features Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Week in Wildlife – in pictures
Red fody, beached whales and wildlife rescued from an Australian heatwave in this week ’s galleryContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Week in Wildlife - in pictures
Red fody, beached whales and wildlife rescued from an Australian heatwave in this week ’s galleryContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Environment Animals World news Zoology Biology Science Source Type: news

Bowel movement: the push to change the way you poo
Are you sitting comfortably? Many people are not – and they insist that the way we’ve been going to the toilet is all wrong. By Alex BlasdelFor their 27th wedding anniversary, the Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston gave his wife, Robin, a gift that promises “to give you the best poop of your life, guaranteed”. The Squatty Potty is a wildly popular seven-inch-high plastic stool, designed by a devout Mormon and her son, which curves around the base of your loo. By propping your feet on it while you crap, you raise your knees above your hips. From thi s semi-squat position, the centuries-old seated toile...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Blasdel Tags: Health & wellbeing Biology Homes Waste Environment Science Society Life and style Source Type: news

Scientists reveal substantial water loss in global landlocked regions
(Kansas State University) A new study involving Kansas State University researchers reveals that water storage declines in global landlocked basins has aggravated local water stress and caused potential sea level rise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study offers new approach to assess sustainability of reef fish
(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine& Atmospheric Science) A new study helping to improve how sustainability is measured for popular reef fish could help better assess the eco-friendly seafood options at the dinner table. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

System can rapidly and accurately detect tumor margins during breast cancer surgery
(RIKEN) Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR), Osaka University, and collaborators have developed a new rapid and inexpensive way to accurately detect the margins between cancer and non-cancerous tissue during breast surgery. Their system is noteworthy in that it can detect the morphology of the cells, differentiating between cells that are more or less dangerous. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Holistic, network approach to life science needed to solve systemic environmental problems
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) Achieving a sustainable world will require a paradigm shift in the way we approach life sciences and ecology, according to a new book cowritten by IIASA researcher Brian Fath, with a focus on a holistic, multi-model view of life and the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Historical climate important for soil responses to future climate change
(Lund University) Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Amsterdam, examined how 18 years of drought affect the billions of vital bacteria that are hidden in the soil beneath our feet. The results show that this type of extreme weather determines how soils respond to future climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tracing iron in the North Pacific
(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) A new Chinese project (2018--2022) will explore the sources and transport of biologically available Fe in the high-nutrient and low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions. The results can give scientific advice to stakeholders on the feasibility of conducting ocean Fe fertilization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trees for bees
(Lancaster University) Planting more hedgerows and trees could hold the key to helping UK bees thrive once again, a new study argues.And researchers suggest artificial intelligence could be used as a tool to design our landscapes so that trees, hedgerows and wildflowers are planted in the right place and the right numbers to ensure our pollinators have enough food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Towards a treatment for gluten intolerance
(EMBO) Celiac disease is a severe autoimmune disorder of the intestine. It occurs when people develop sensitivity to gluten, a substance found in wheat, rye, and barley. An international research team from Italy and France has now uncovered a new molecular player in the development of gluten intolerance. Their discovery, published in The EMBO Journal, suggests potential targets for the development of therapeutic approaches for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

€ 10.5 million for kidney disease prevention research
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Approximately one in ten people in Germany are affected by chronic kidney disease, and numbers are increasing. As part of a new collaboration led by Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin, researchers from various Berlin-based institutions set out to shed light on the common pathways along which kidney disease develops. The ultimate goal is to develop new treatment strategies. The German Research Foundation (DFG) provides the 'Collaborative Research Center Renoprotection' with approximately € 10.5 million in funding over four years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Predicting oil spill and wild fire damage -- NSF grant
(Virginia Tech) Two Virginia Tech professors have been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to research how computational fluid mechanics -- the use of computers to study movement of fluid -- can improve forecasts of contaminant spread in the ocean, floodwaters, and atmosphere. Complicated simulations determine best methods for oil spill containment, but often take valuable time to render. This research aspires to make this and other contamination simulations faster -- potentially saving money, lives, and the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

National concussion study to examine gender effects -- NCAA-DOD grant
(Virginia Tech) The Virginia Tech team has been awarded over $1 million for research that will expand their ongoing concussion work into new sports not previously studied heavily for concussions, and to investigate how gender affects injury response. Factors studied will include how different genders are affected by injury, if there is a way to reliably identify when someone has experienced a concussion, why some respond to the same impact differently than others, among other variables. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New research questions fish stocking obligations
(University of Eastern Finland) Fish stocking as a fisheries compensation method in hydropower operations no longer meets latest legal and scientific requirements, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Water International, the study focuses on ecological flows from the viewpoints of law and biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expediting 3D Analysis of Normal and Diseased Tissues
The current gold standard for tissue analysis, formalin fixation paraffin embedding (FFPE) followed by 2D thin sectioning, has been around for more than a century. And like any 100-year-old technology, it has key limitations.. So, ClearLight Biotechnologies is on a mission to significantly improve the field by automating nondestructive processing of tissue in 3D as a means to initially facilitate preclinical and clinical research applications. Laurie Goodman, PhD, CEO and board manager of ClearLight Biotechnologies, explained the process in an interview with MD+DI. ClearLight’s fou...
Source: MDDI - November 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Susan Shepard Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Work on gene-edited babies blatant violation of the law, says China
Vice-minister condemns work of He Jiankui, but Chinese regulations are vagueChinese authorities have declared the work of He Jiankui, a scientist who claims to have created theworld ’s first gene-edited babies, a violation of Chinese law and called for the suspension of all related activity.“The genetically edited infant incident reported by media blatantly violated China’s relevant laws and regulations. It has also violated the ethical bottom line that the academic community adheres to. It is shocking and unacceptable,” Xu Nanping, a vice-minister for science and technology,told the state-owned CCT...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lily Kuo in Beijing Tags: Gene editing Genetics China Asia Pacific Biology Science World news Source Type: news

Tetrahydrocannabinol levels are too high in many hemp-containing foods
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) Various foods containing hemp are available in the marketplace. These include products similar to tea consisting entirely or partially of hemp leaves. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has assessed the risk of psychogenic and pharmacological effects through the consumption of hemp-containing foods with the customary levels of tetrahydrocannabinol determined by the monitoring authorities for all population groups, including children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sweet lysine degradation
(University of Konstanz) The researchers from the Departments of Chemistry and Biology at the University of Konstanz have gained fundamental new insights into the degradation of the amino acid lysine -- carcinogenic oncometabolites as intermediate products (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

EBMT and EHA joint meeting on CAR T cells, first of its kind in Europe
(European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation) Christian Chabannon, Chair, EBMT Cellular Therapy& Immunobiology Working Party and EBMT Scientific Council Vice-Chair, explains: 'The EBMT and EHA unite in designing this first-ever European Meeting which represents an amazing educational opportunity for healthcare professionals to get practical information to safely administer CAR-T Cells to a growing number of patients, both in Europe and worldwide.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lizards adapt to invasive fire ants, reversing geographical patterns of lizard traits
(Penn State) Some lizards in the eastern U.S. have adapted to invasive fire ants--which can bite, sting, and kill lizards--reversing geographical trends in behavioral and physical traits used to avoid predators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wetland experts explain role of vital carbon sinks carbon cycle in new report
(Michigan Technological University) Wetlands and soils experts Rod Chimner and Evan Kane of Michigan Tech contributed to the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Discovering a new compound
(University of Delaware) Researchers have discovered a new compound that helps us better understand how microbes keep the sulfur cycle turning, making it possible for us to enjoy ocean views and survive near the water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Thriving reef fisheries continue to provide food despite coral bleaching
(Lancaster University) The unexpected results of a 20-year study into reef fisheries published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution this week showed fisheries being maintained despite extreme coral bleaching. Remarkably, rapid proliferation of fishes with low dependence on corals led to catches remaining stable or even increasing. But the results also showed fishing success was 'patchy' and more dependent on fewer species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oldest-known ancestor of modern primates may have come from North America, not Asia
(Florida Museum of Natural History) A new fossil analysis suggests the earliest-known ancestor of modern primates may have come from North America, not Asia, as previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Insight into swimming fish could lead to robotics advances
(Johns Hopkins University) The constant movement of fish that seems random is actually precisely deployed to provide them at any moment with the best sensory feedback they need to navigate the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How the devil ray got its horns
(San Francisco State University) If you ever find yourself staring down a manta ray, you'll probably notice two things right away: its massive fins and the two fleshy growths curling out of its head that give it the nickname 'devil ray.' A new study shows that these two very different features have the same origin -- a discovery that reflects an important lesson for understanding the diversity of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High-contrast imaging for cancer therapy with protons
(Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf) Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology -- OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) are the first researchers worldwide to combine magnetic resonance imaging with a proton beam, thus demonstrating that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can indeed work with particle beam cancer treatments. This opens up new opportunities for targeted, healthy tissue-sparing cancer therapy. The researchers published their results in the journal Physics in Medicine and Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 29, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What seabirds can tell us about the tide
(European Geosciences Union) Razorbill tag data revealed that, at night, these seabirds spent a lot of their time idle on the sea surface. 'We saw this as an opportunity to (...) test if the birds might be drifting with the tidal current,' says Matt Cooper from Bangor University in Wales. It turns out they were, according to a new Ocean Science study that shows the potential of using seabirds to measure ocean currents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Forest fragmentation disrupts parasite infection in Australian lizards
(University of Colorado at Boulder) In a study with implications for biodiversity and the spread of infectious diseases, CU Boulder ecologists have demonstrated that deforestation and habitat fragmentation can decrease transmission of a parasitic nematode in a particular species of Australian lizard, the   pale-flecked garden sunskink. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Assistant Professor in Microbiology
The University of Washington Tacoma invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Microbiology in the Division of Sciences and Mathematics within the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences (SIAS). We seek an individual that shares our institutional values of excellence, community, diversity, innovation and access. This is a full-time position with a nine-month service period. The successful candidate will have a proven record of scholarship in microbiology with biomedical applications. We expect the successful candidate to actively seek extramural support to develop and maintain an excellent res...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Classifieds Tags: Other Positions Available Source Type: news

How viruses hijack part of your immune system and use it against you
ROCHESTER, Minn. ? An enzyme intended to prevent autoimmune disease can be hijacked and used by some viruses to avoid immune detection. That discovery from Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators appears in PLOS Biology. There's also good news. The same team also defined how much viral genetic material is needed to reverse the process and [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News - November 29, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Single-cell multiomics sequencing and analyses of human colorectal cancer
Although genomic instability, epigenetic abnormality, and gene expression dysregulation are hallmarks of colorectal cancer, these features have not been simultaneously analyzed at single-cell resolution. Using optimized single-cell multiomics sequencing together with multiregional sampling of the primary tumor and lymphatic and distant metastases, we developed insights beyond intratumoral heterogeneity. Genome-wide DNA methylation levels were relatively consistent within a single genetic sublineage. The genome-wide DNA demethylation patterns of cancer cells were consistent in all 10 patients whose DNA we sequenced. The can...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bian, S., Hou, Y., Zhou, X., Li, X., Yong, J., Wang, Y., Wang, W., Yan, J., Hu, B., Guo, H., Wang, J., Gao, S., Mao, Y., Dong, J., Zhu, P., Xiu, D., Yan, L., Wen, L., Qiao, J., Tang, F., Fu, W. Tags: Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news