UB researchers discover a disease threatening the most plentiful starfish in Antarctica
(University of Barcelona) A study led by experts from the University of Barcelona's Faculty of Biology and Institute for Research on Biodiversity (IRBio) have identified a disease that is affecting the starfish Odontaster validus, one of the most common species on the Antarctic sea floor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study shows some corals might adapt to climate changes
(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine& Atmospheric Science) New research shows that not all corals respond the same to changes in climate. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led study looked at the sensitivity of two types of corals found in Florida and the Caribbean and found that one of them -- mountainous star coral -- possesses an adaptation that allows it to survive under high temperatures and acidity conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Thin films can enhance vorticity in the ocean
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Scientists from the Higher School of Economics and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences have investigated how vortex flows penetrate the interior of a liquid. The authors of the article have shown that specific (thin liquid and insoluble) films on the surface of water enhance eddy currents. These currents are produced by the interacting surface waves directed at an angle to each other. The results of the study have been published in Physical Review Fluids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How plant-rotting bacteria steal iron to survive
(PLOS) In a new study, researchers identify important new insights into a survival mechanism of the bacteria that cause rotting in certain plants, including some highly invasive weeds. The study, publishing on Aug. 2 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, demonstrates for the first time exactly how the bacterium Pectobacterium obtains the iron vital to its survival and replication: by pirating it from iron-bearing proteins in the host plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Radar better than weather balloon for measuring boundary layer
(Penn State) Improving forecasting for a host of severe weather events may be possible thanks to a more comprehensive method for measuring the Earth's boundary layer depth, developed by Penn State researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fecal deposits reveal the fruit fly's pheromone flag
(RIKEN) Fruit flies have a rich language of smell messages that they exchange, but now their secret is out. In a report published Aug. 2 in Current Biology, scientists were able to tap into the communications among freely interacting flies using a bioluminescent technology to monitor their brain activity. They discovered that males signal their presence by placing droppings that act as a calling card for flies to find each other and even lure females to designated locations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clothing, furniture also to blame for ocean and freshwater pollution
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Lakes choked with algae and marine 'dead zones' result from too many nutrients in the water. The traditional culprit is agriculture, which relies on fertilizer to boost production. But the production of consumer goods, like clothing, is also a major -- and growing -- contributor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Multiplexed protein maps link subcellular organization to cellular states
Obtaining highly multiplexed protein measurements across multiple length scales has enormous potential for biomedicine. Here, we measured, by iterative indirect immunofluorescence imaging (4i), 40-plex protein readouts from biological samples at high-throughput from the millimeter to the nanometer scale. This approach simultaneously captures properties apparent at the population, cellular, and subcellular levels, including microenvironment, cell shape, and cell cycle state. It also captures the detailed morphology of organelles, cytoskeletal structures, nuclear subcompartments, and the fate of signaling receptors in thousa...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gut, G., Herrmann, M. D., Pelkmans, L. Tags: Cell Biology, Techniques r-articles Source Type: news

Here, there, and everywhere: The importance of ER membrane contact sites
Our textbook image of organelles has changed. Instead of revealing isolated cellular compartments, the picture now emerging shows organelles as largely interdependent structures that can communicate through membrane contact sites (MCSs). MCSs are sites where opposing organelles are tethered but do not fuse. MCSs provide a hybrid location where the tool kits of two different organelles can work together to perform vital cellular functions, such as lipid and ion transfer, signaling, and organelle division. Here, we focus on MCSs involving the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle forming an extensive network of cisternae ...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Wu, H., Carvalho, P., Voeltz, G. K. Tags: Cell Biology review Source Type: news

Making multiplexed subcellular protein maps
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology, Techniques twis Source Type: news

It's all about your contacts
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Hands-on biology education kits
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Peppas, N. A. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Training Opportunity: Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications
Registration is now open for the second cohort of Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians (BBEL): Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications. BBEL is a 16-week, self-paced course worth 25 hours of continuing education credit from the Medical Library Association. The course will run Aug  20 – Dec 7, 2018. The course will accept 50 registrants and 20 wait list spaces. There are due dates involved to successfully complete this course, please consider carefully before registering. Pre-Work: August 31, 2018 Part I: September 28, 2018 Part II: November 2, 2018 Part III: December 7, 2018 Detailed agenda...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - August 1, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Education Source Type: news

Registration now open: Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians: Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications (Aug 20-Dec 7, 2018)
Registration is now open for the second cohort of Bioinformatics and Biology Essentials For Librarians (BBEL): Databases, Tools, and Clinical Applications. BBEL is a 16-week, self-paced course worth 25 hours of continuing education credit from the Medical Library Association. The course will run Aug  20 – Dec 7, 2018. The course will accept 50 registrants and 20 waitlist spaces. There are due dates involved to successfully complete this course, please consider carefully before registering. Pre-Work: August 31, 2018 Part I: September 28, 2018 Part II: November 2, 2018 Part III: December 7, 2018 Detailed agenda ...
Source: MCR News - August 1, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: #CC/Academic List #Health Sciences List Source Type: news

Medical News Today: New antibiotic found in common weed
Researchers have found a new type of antibiotic on the leaf of a common weed and suggest that this little-explored ecosystem could yield many new drugs. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

Effort to Reproduce Cancer Studies Scales Down to 18 Papers
The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology initially aimed to replicate the results of 50 high-impact research articles. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Understanding soil through its microbiome
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Soil is full of life, essential for nutrient cycling and carbon storage. To better understand how it functions, an international research team led by EMBL and the University of Tartu (Estonia) conducted the first global study of bacteria and fungi in soil. Their results show that bacteria and fungi are in constant competition for nutrients and produce an arsenal of antibiotics to gain an advantage over one another. Nature publishes the results on Aug. 1, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Breaking up 'fatbergs': UBC engineers develop technique to break down fats, oil and grease
(University of British Columbia) Cooking oil and similar waste can clog pipes, harm fish and even grow into solid deposits like the 'fatbergs' that recently blocked London's sewage system. But UBC researchers may have found a way to treat these fats, oils and grease -- collectively called FOG -- and turn them into energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fishing fleets travelling further to catch fewer fish
(University of British Columbia) Industrial fishing fleets have doubled the distance they travel to fishing grounds since 1950, which means that they are now able to reach 90 percent of the global ocean, but are catching only a third of what they did 65 years ago per kilometer traveled. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trees travelling west: How climate is changing our forests
(Ecological Society of America) Many studies on the impacts of global temperature rise have suggested that the range of trees will migrate poleward and upward. However, research that will be presented at the 2018 ESA Annual Meeting in August suggests that more tree species have shifted westward than poleward. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Newly discovered crossbill species numbers few
(American Ornithological Society Publications Office) As might be expected for a recently discovered bird species in the continental United States -- only the second in nearly 80 years -- the Cassia crossbill is range-restricted, occurring in just two small mountain ranges on the northeast edge of the Great Basin Desert. Based on a new study, Cassia crossbills occupy about 70 km2 of lodgepole pine forest and number only ~5,800 birds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DIY robots help marine biologists discover new deep-sea dwellers
(The City University of New York) A multidisciplinary group of engineers, marine biologists, and roboticists have developed a sampling device that is soft, flexible, and customizable, which allows scientists to gently collect different types of organisms from the sea without harming them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Harmful dyes in lakes, rivers can become colorless with new, sponge-like material
(University of Washington) A team led by the University of Washington has created an environmentally friendly way to remove color from dyes in water in a matter of seconds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chirality switching in biomineral structures
(McGill University) Researchers at McGill University have discovered a mechanism by which helical biomineral structures can be synthesized to spiral clockwise or counterclockwise using only either the left-handed or right-handed version of a single acidic amino acid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Alzheimer's drug may stop disease if used before symptoms develop
(University of Virginia) Biologists have gained new understanding of how Alzheimer's disease begins, and how it might be halted using a current medication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NSF backs strategy to reconstruct cancer cells' evolution
(Rice University) Rice University computational biologist Luay Nakhleh has received two National Science Foundation grants to expand big data techniques in the fight against cancer and to scale up methods that infer connections between evolutionary pathways. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Questioning conventional understanding of antifreeze proteins
(Hokkaido University) Scientists have discovered that an ice-binding protein (fcIBP) from the sea ice microalga does not fit in the conventional classification of ice-binding proteins, suggesting unknown mechanisms behind its antifreeze property. This finding could lead to a broader application of the antifreeze protein in food and medical industries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Animals and fungi enhance the performance of forests.
(German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig) In addition to the diversity of tree species, the variety of animal and fungus species also has a decisive influence on the performance of forests. Forest performance comprises many facets besides timber production, such as carbon storage and climate regulation. The study is based on ten years of research in species-rich subtropical forests. A team of researchers led by iDiv and the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg has published the results in the new issue of Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Insight into catalysis through novel study of X-ray absorption spectroscopy
(Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin f ü r Materialien und Energie) An international team has made a breakthrough at BESSY II. For the first time, they succeeded in investigating electronic states of a transition metal in detail and drawing reliable conclusions on their catalytic effect from the data. These results are helpful for the development of future applications of catalytic transition-metal systems. The work has now been published in Chemical Science, the Open Access journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: In darters, male competition drives evolution of flashy fins, bodies
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Scientists once thought that female mate choice alone accounted for the eye-catching color patterns seen in some male fish. But for orangethroat darters, male-to-male competition is the real force behind the flash, a new study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Smarter cancer treatment: AI tool automates radiation therapy planning
(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science& Engineering) Beating cancer is a race against time. Developing radiation therapy plans -- individualized maps that help doctors determine where to blast tumours -- can take days. Now, engineering researcher Aaron Babier of the University of Toronto has developed automation software that aims to cut the time down to mere hours. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pinpointing a molecule for sea lamprey control
(Michigan State University) A team of scientists has identified a single molecule that could be a key in controlling invasive sea lampreys. Researchers from Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota and Western Michigan University have homed in on a fatty molecule that directs the destructive eels' migration. The results, published in the current issue of PNAS, could lead to better ways to control sea lampreys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists draw new connections between climate change and warming oceans
(University of Toronto) Earth scientists exploring how ocean chemistry has evolved found similarities between an event 55 million years ago and current predicted trajectories of planet temperatures, with regards to inputs of CO2 into the atmosphere and oxygen levels in the oceans. As the oceans warm, oxygen decreases while hydrogen sulfide increases, making the oceans toxic and putting marine species at risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births
(American Chemical Society) More than one in 10 babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to the World Health Organization. Now scientists report in ACS Biomaterials Science& Engineering that they have developed an organ-on-a-chip that could help explain why. The device, which replicates the functions of a key membrane in the placenta, could lead to a better understanding of how bacterial infections can promote preterm delivery. It could also lead to new treatments for this condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Synthetic suede gives high-end cars that luxury feel
(American Chemical Society) Leather car seats were once synonymous with luxury, but these days, synthetic suede is becoming the material of choice for high-end automobiles. With increased affluence worldwide, and the growing popularity of car-sharing and luxury-driving services, business is booming for manufacturers of synthetic suede. Among these companies, Japanese firms sit snugly in the driver's seat, reports an article inChemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sex problems among middle-aged Canadians common, University of Guelph study reveals
(University of Guelph) Researchers found nearly 40 per cent of women and almost 30 per cent of men between the ages of 40 and 59 face challenges in their sex lives.Based on a first-ever national survey of 2,400 people, the study found low desire, vaginal dryness and difficulty achieving orgasm to be common challenges facing women. Low desire and erectile and ejaculation problems are the common challenges facing men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fast, cheap and colorful 3D printing
(American Chemical Society) People are exploring the use of 3D printing for wide-ranging applications, including manufacturing, medical devices, fashion and even food. But one of the most efficient forms of 3D printing suffers from a major drawback: It can only print objects that are gray or black in color. Now, researchers have tweaked the method so it can print in all of the colors of the rainbow. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Soil phosphorus availability and lime: More than just pH?
(American Society of Agronomy) Plants can't do without phosphorus. But there is often a 'withdrawal limit' on how much phosphorus they can get from the soil. A new study looks at how liming, soil management history and enzymes relate to plants' access to phosphorus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Cell ’s Integrated Circuit: A Profile of Lucy Shapiro
Shapiro helped to found the field of systems biology. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Profile Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Amgen Announces 2018 Third Quarter Dividend
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., July 31, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced that its Board of Directors declared a $1.32 per share dividend for the third quarter of 2018. The dividend will be paid on Sept. 7, 2018, to all stockholders of record as of the close of business on Aug. 17, 2018. About Amgen Amgen is committed to unlocking the potential of biology for patients suffering from serious illnesses by discovering, developing, manufacturing and delivering innovative human therapeutics. This approach begins by using tools like advanced human genetics to unravel the complexities of disease and unders...
Source: Amgen News Release - July 31, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Dr. Michael Simons appointed the Von Zedtwitz Professor of Cardiology
Simons conducts research on the biology of arterial vasculature, spanning basic, translational, and clinical areas of investigations. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - July 31, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists discover why elusive aye-aye developed such unusual features
(University of York) A new study has, for the first time, measured the extent to which the endangered aye-aye has evolved similar features to squirrels, despite being more closely related to monkeys, chimps, and humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Predatory sea corals team up to feed on stinging jellyfish
(University of Edinburgh) Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

River complexity maintains regional population stability
(Hokkaido University) An international group of researchers has demonstrated that branching complexity of rivers affects regional population stability and persistence in nature, contrary to current theories which suggest the importance of an ecosystem's size. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

San Francisco's Exploratorium partners with NOAA for Ocean Discovery Month
(Exploratorium) In advance of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, the Exploratorium is hosting a month-long series of events about the world's oceans, focusing on ocean health and the Exploratorium's partnership with NOAA. Ocean Discovery Month will highlight programs and partnerships that help us communicate environmental and climate science to the public, and to connect our community to scientists, artists, and policy-makers working on the most pressing environmental problems of our time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Clearer vision of the biochemical reaction that allows us to see
(Springer) What happens when a photon collides with a molecule? A reaction takes place that often changes the shape of the molecule, and therefore its functionality. This is what makes it possible for us to see, for example. In a study published in EPJ B, Federica Agostini, University Paris-Sud, Orsay, France, and colleagues propose a refined approximation of the equation that describes the effect of this photo-excitation on the components of such molecules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists discover potential therapy for human copper metabolism disorders
(Texas A&M AgriLife Communications) Individuals with defects in copper metabolism may soon have more targeted treatment options thanks to a discovery by a research team led by Dr. Vishal Gohil of Texas A&M AgriLife Research in College Station.A paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences at http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/07/17/1806296115 reports that an investigational anticancer-drug, elesclomol, can restore the production of cytochrome oxidase protein complex, a critical copper-dependent enzyme required for mitochondrial energy production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Aphids manipulate their food
(Bielefeld University) Aphids - who hasn't been bothered by these little insects at one time or another? Why do they reproduce on plants so successfully? These are among the questions that Professor Dr Caroline M ü ller and her research team are addressing at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Biology. They have found out that aphids are able to influence the quality of their food, and that this may enable them to construct a niche on their own host plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Goldschmidt2018, the world's major geochemistry congress
(Goldschmidt Conference) Goldschmidt2018, the world's major geochemistry congress, is due to take place in Boston, MA, USA, from August 12th-17th, 2018. More than 3000 items of new research are expected, with up to 3500 attendees. Journalists are welcome to attend. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Recreational fisheries pose threat to skittish sea turtles
(Florida State University) When recreational scallopers flocked to Florida's Crystal River region, native sea turtles turned tail. Researchers say that sudden behavioral disruption could mean trouble the turtles overall health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news