Charging into the future -- novel rock salt for use in rechargeable magnesium batteries
(Tokyo University of Science) By synthesizing novel material for electrode that facilitates reversing of the chemistry of ions, a group of researchers led by Professor Idemoto from Tokyo University of Science combat the wasteful aspects of energy sources by laying an important foundation for the production of next-generation rechargeable magnesium secondary batteries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cell division requires a balanced level of non-coding RNA for chromosome stability
(The University of Hong Kong) Assistant Professor Dr Karen Wing Yee Yuen and Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Yick Hin Ling from the School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong (HKU), discovered that centromeric DNA is used as a template to produce a non-protein coding, centromeric RNA (ribonucleic acid), that is essential for chromosome stability. If there is too much or too little centromeric RNA (cenRNA), the centromere will be defective and chromosomes will be lost. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plankton as a climate driver instead of the sun?
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) Fluctuations in the orbital parameters of the Earth are considered to be the trigger for long-term climatic fluctuations such as ice ages. This includes the variation of the inclination angle of the Earth's axis with a cycle of about 40,000 years. Kiel-based marine scientists lead by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have shown by using a new model that biogeochemical interactions between ocean and atmosphere could also be responsible for climate fluctuations on this time scale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Robots activated by water may be the next frontier
(Columbia University) Columbia University scientists have developed material that can drive mechanical systems, with movements controlled by a pattern set into the design. Potential applications include opening windows in humidity, and allowing fabric to evaporate sweat (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Big energy savings for tiny machines
(Simon Fraser University) In a ground-breaking study, a team led by Simon Fraser University physics professor David Sivak demonstrates for the first time a strategy for manipulating the trillions of tiny molecular nanomachines inside us that work to keep us alive, to maximize efficiency and conserve energy. The breakthrough could impact numerous fields, including creating more efficient computer chips and solar cells for energy generation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New ultra-fast imaging technology with high frame rate and frame number
(City University of Hong Kong) Acquiring images of ultrafast processes is a technology vitally needed for many cutting-edge physical, chemical, and biological studies. The latest research conducted by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Xi'an Jiaotong University has successfully developed a novel compressed ultrafast photographic technique, enabling both an ultra-high frame rate and a large frame number. Having overcome the existing limitations, the new technique offers an important tool for observing complex transient processes on the femtosecond (10-15second) timescale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Optical illusions reveal regular waves of brain activity enable visual feature integration
(University of Tokyo) Rhythmic waves of brain activity cause us to see or not see complex images that flash before our eyes. An image can become practically invisible if it flashes before our eyes at the same time as a low point of those brain waves. We can reset that brain wave rhythm with a simple voluntary action, like choosing to push a button. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why lack of sleep is bad for your heart
(University of Colorado at Boulder) People who sleep fewer than 7 hours per night have lower levels of gene-regulating molecules, or microRNAs, which help dampen down inflammation in cells and support vascular health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CBD clinical trial results on seizure frequency in dogs 'encouraging'
(Colorado State University) Dr. Stephanie McGrath found in a small study that 89 percent of dogs who received CBD in the clinical trial had a reduction in the frequency of seizures. Nine dogs were treated with CBD, while seven in a control group were treated with a placebo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Algorithm steers catheters to the right spot to treat atrial fibrillation
(Florida Atlantic University) Some patients with atrial fibrillation or A-Fib need an ablation, which requires a catheter and an advanced 3D map of the heart. Researchers have developed the first algorithm that guides catheter movements and accurately detects A-Fib targets without 3D maps of the heart. In human simulations, this technique stops the catheter at the right target and identifies the source type with a 95.25% success rate and a 99 percent detection rate of scar tissue, regardless of scar size. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Toward zero hunger: More food or a smarter food system?
(University of Michigan) When thinking about ways to end global hunger, many scholars focus too narrowly on increasing crop yields while overlooking other critical aspects of the food system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering. Their approach modifies proteins at a specific point so that they can be chemically tethered to the scaffold using light. Since the tether can also be cut by laser light, this method can create evolving patterns of signal proteins throughout a biomaterial scaffold to grow tissues made up of different types of cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

3-million-year-old fossilized mouse reveals evolutionary secrets of color
(University of Manchester) This new study applied X-ray imaging to several 3-million-year-old fossils in order to untangle the story of key pigments in ancient animals and reveal how we might recognize the chemical signatures of specific red pigments in long extinct animals to determine how they evolved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
(DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ammonium fertilized early life on earth
(Syracuse University) A Syracuse University professor has demonstrated that ammonium -- an odiferous chemical compound, often used in fertilizer -- was a vital source of nitrogen for early life on Earth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What makes a place a home?
(Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences) Diver-led visual surveys at 11 mesophotic reef sites around Bermuda found that high densities of lionfish were associated with both higher abundances of prey fish and higher prey fish biomass. However, the influence of seawater temperature was found to have the strongest effect on lionfish distribution, with higher lionfish densities recorded at sites with lower bottom temperatures. These results suggest that cold-water upwelling may result in higher abundances of prey fish and lionfish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Extreme draining of reservoir aids young salmon and eliminates invasive fish
(Oregon State University) A new study finds that the low-cost, extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon aided downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon -- and led to the gradual disappearance of two species of predatory invasive fish in the artificial lake. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Russian scientists synthesized protein to enrich stock-raising feed
(Far Eastern Federal University) Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) have developed an effective technology for the synthesis of protein from amaranth grains and mushroom mycelium to enrich a stock-raising feed. To do this, they used genetic engineering methods, inserted into the fungus strain an element of amaranth DNA containing a storage protein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Studies find no yield benefit to higher plant populations
(American Phytopathological Society) Curtis Adams and his colleagues at Texas A&M AgriLife Research reviewed plant population studies published in 2000 or later. They found that yield is optimized at about 15,000 plants per acre (1.1 seed per foot in 40-inch rows), and contrary to popular belief, there is no yield benefit to high populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

First report of powdery mildew on phasey bean in Florida could spell trouble for papaya
(American Phytopathological Society) In the fall of 2017, leaves of phasey bean plants in Homestead, Florida, displayed powdery fungal growth, which appeared in the form of white spots on both sides of the leaves. Scientists conducted analysis by sequencing genes of genomic DNA and identified the fungus as Erysiphe fallax, which causes a disease known as powdery mildew. To their knowledge, this is the first report of powdery mildew on phasey bean in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Berkeley lab project to pinpoint methane 'super emitters'
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Methane, a potent greenhouse gas that traps about 30 times more heat than carbon dioxide, is commonly released from rice fields, dairies, landfills, and oil and gas facilities -- all of which are plentiful in California. Now Berkeley Lab has been awarded $6 million by the state to find 'super emitters' of methane in an effort to quantify and potentially mitigate methane emissions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Solving a scientific mystery and finding a solution for industry
(University of Houston) In solving a scientific mystery, researchers from the University of Houston and the nation's national laboratories also discovered a new avenue for clearing toxins from water, including wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blood proteins help predict risk of developing heart failure
(Baylor College of Medicine) Two blood proteins help predict more accurately the risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure hospitalization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to program materials
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) Can the properties of composite materials be predicted? Empa scientists have mastered this feat and thus can help achieve research objectives faster. This leads, for instance, to better recycling techniques and electrically conductive synthetic materials for the solar industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pushy bonobo mothers help sons find sexual partners, scientists find
High-ranking mothers lead sons to groups of females and keep guard while they mateTheir mothers are so keen for them to father children that they usher them in front of promising partners, shield them from violent competitors and dash the chances of other males by charging them while they are at it.For a bonobo mother, it is all part of the parenting day, and analysis finds the hard work pays off. Males of the species that live with their mothers are three times more likely to father offspring than those whose mothers are absent.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Animal behaviour Animals Primatology Science World news Biology Source Type: news

Transgenderism results in the DEATH of a baby because medical records listed the mother as "male" to appease the LGBT thought police
(Natural News) A 32-year-old woman who thinks she’s a “man” recently gave birth to a dead child – a dead child who would have lived, by the way, had its deranged, mentally-ill mother correctly indicated her natural biology upon being admitted to the hospital. Reports indicate that this brain-damaged adult patient, who self-identifies as a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

June's SLAS technology special collection now available
(SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)) The June issue of SLAS Technology features the article, 'Next Generation Compound Delivery to Support Miniaturized Biology,' which focuses on the challenges of changing the established screening paradigm to support the needs of modern drug discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery in mice could remove roadblock to more insulin production
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A new discovery made mainly in mice could provide new options for getting the insulin-making 'factories' of the pancreas going again when diabetes and obesity have slowed them down. It could offer new pathways to ramping up insulin supply to get metabolism back on track in people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists develop new recycling technology for heavy duty military batteries
(National University of Science and Technology MISIS) NUST MISIS scientists together with JSC 'Shchelkovo Plant of Secondary Precious Metals' developed an innovative cascade method for purifying silver from spent batteries used in submarines and military aircraft. Secondary use of pure precious metal from one such battery can help saving up to 500 million RUR for creating a new one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pseudohermaphrodite snails can help to assess how polluted the Arctic seas are
(St. Petersburg State University) Ivan Nekhaev, a postdoc at St. Petersburg University, studied snails of the genus Boreocingula -- tiny gastropods as small as half a centimeter -- and first discovered that Arctic micromolluscs can show signs of pseudohermaphroditism. Boreocingula martyni adult females grow underdeveloped male genital organs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shedding light on cancer metabolism in real-time with bioluminescence
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Cancerous tumors can be made to bioluminesce, like fireflies, according to the level of their glucose uptake, giving rise to a technique for quantifying metabolite absorption. The firefly imaging technique for sugar can be translated from cancer to many other metabolic diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Russian scientists make discovery that can help remove gypsy moths from forests
(Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University) The caterpillars of Lymantria dispar or Gypsy Moth are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests. Sometimes they can even make harm for coniferous forests. Gypsy Moths are widely spread in Europe, Asia and Northern America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence becomes life-long learner with new framework
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) A project of the US Army has developed a new framework for deep neural networks that allows artificial intelligence systems to better learn new tasks while forgetting less of what they have learned regarding previous tasks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Size is everything
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. Ulrich Brose from University of Jena (Germany) has therefore developed a new method that provides good results with only a few information about the properties of predators. The model confirms that a large body mass index between predator and prey creates stable systems. It can also predict which predator species play a key role. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Staying in shape: How rod-shaped bacteria grow long, not wide
(Marine Biological Laboratory) A team from Harvard University, Marine Biological Laboratory, and collaborators show how the rod-shaped bacteria Bacillus subtilis maintains its precise diameter while growing end to end. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop new lens manufacturing technique
(Washington State University) Researchers from Washington State University and Ohio State University have developed a low-cost, easy way to make custom lenses that could help manufacturers avoid the expensive molds required for optical manufacturing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors
(Rice University) Synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Resilience of Yellowstone's forests tested by unprecedented fire
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Monica Turner and her team describe what happens when Yellowstone -- adapted to recurring fires every 100 to 300 years -- instead burns twice in fewer than 30 years. Yellowstone as we know it faces an uncertain future, the researchers say, and one of the big questions they hope to answer is whether the forests can recover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Air pollution affects tree growth in S ã o Paulo
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Researchers in Brazil find that high levels of heavy metals and particulate matter suspended in the atmosphere restrict the growth of tipuana trees, which are ubiquitous in S ã o Paulo, the largest Brazilian city. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A better understanding of the von Willebrand Factor's A2 domain
(Lehigh University) A team of Lehigh University researchers is working to characterize the mysterious protein known as the Von Willebrand Factor (vWF). In a recent paper published in Biophysical Journal, they advance experimental data for the shear-induced extensional response of vWF, using a microfluidic device and fluorescence microscopy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Breastfeeding reduces long-term risk of heart disease in mothers
(European Society of Endocrinology) Women who breastfed their babies are less likely to develop heart disease later in life, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The study also suggests that the protective effect on heart health is increased in women who breastfed for longer periods of time. These findings provide further evidence for the long-term health benefits of breastfeeding and that women should be encouraged to do so when possible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists propose rethinking 'endangered species' definition to save slow-breeding giants
(Frontiers) Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research coinciding with World Endangered Species Day. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science
(Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena) Evolutionary biologist Ernst Haeckel became the first person to define the term ecology in his work published in 1866, entitled 'General Morphology of Organisms'. Science historians and biologists from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) have now worked out just how close his original classification is to our modern understanding of ecology -- at the invitation of the renowned journal Trends in Ecology& Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Polymers jump through hoops on pathway to sustainable materials
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) Recyclable plastics that contain ring-shaped polymers may be a key to developing sustainable synthetic materials. Despite some promising advances, researchers said, a full understanding of how to processes ring polymers into practical materials remains elusive. In a new study, researchers identified a mechanism called 'threading' that takes place when a polymer is stretched -- a behavior not witnessed before. This new insight may lead to new processing methods for sustainable polymer materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Intensive silviculture accelerates Atlantic rainforest biodiversity regeneration
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) The study shows the advantages of herbicide spraying and intensive fertilization in reforestation programs to mitigate the effects of climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Press invitation: 27th European biomass conference and exhibition, May 27-30, 2019 Lisbon
(Eta Florence Renewable Energies) An annual meeting focussing on demonstrable science, policy and industry trends, benefiting in its 2019 edition from an all-time record of 1,105 abstracts received from 75 countries, 281 keynote, plenary and oral presentations juried in, and over 1,500 delegates and 43 exhibitors pre-registered. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Opposite pathways in forest recovery
(University of G ö ttingen) Tropical forests are being deforested at an alarming rate to make way for agriculture; the good news is that they can regrow naturally when the fields are abandoned. An international research team including participation from the University of G ö ttingen found that regenerating wet and dry forests actually show opposite pathways. This implies a fundamental change in our understanding of how tropical forests change, with consequences for forest restoration and biodiversity. Results are in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sedimentary, dear Johnson: Is NASA looking at the wrong rocks for clues to Martian life?
(Frontiers) In 2020, NASA and European-Russian missions will look for evidence of past life on Mars. But while volcanic, igneous rock predominates on the Red Planet, virtually the entire Earth fossil record comes from sedimentary rocks.Addressing the problem in Frontiers in Earth Science, Swedish scientists have begun compiling evidence of fossilized microbes in underexplored igneous rock environments on Earth, to help guide where to search for a Martian fossil record - and what to look for. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Changes in subsistence hunting threaten local food security
(Wildlife Conservation Society) Scientists with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and WCS Ecuador Program publishing in the journal BioTropica say that subsistence hunting in Neotropical rain forests -- the mainstay of local people as a source of protein and a direct connection to these ecosystems -- is in jeopardy from a variety of factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cell polarity -- An aurora over the pole
(National University of Singapore) A recent research led by Assistant Professor Fumio Motegi, Principal Investigator at the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore, has identified the master switch that triggers the symmetry breaking process in the zygotes of the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news