Interdisciplinarity for Impact: Science Communication
The American Institute of Biological Sciences works to improve the understanding of life. To achieve this, we actively endeavor to appropriately and effectively share the knowledge derived from biological sciences research with the audiences who require scientific information to inform their decisions. Click here to read more.       (Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials)
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Sue Povey obituary
Molecular geneticist who was a leading contributor to the Human Genome ProjectIn 2003the Human Genome Project (HGP) published the complete sequence of human DNA. Sue Povey, who has died aged 76, contributed greatly to this international collaborative project with her team at University College London, her work as a molecular geneticist having started much earlier, in the late 1960s. She was motivated throughout by a strong interest in people and disease.At the outset she exploited newly developed enzyme detection systems that revealed differences between individuals and among species, allowing her to solve a number of long...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dallas Swallow and Veronica van Heyningen Tags: Human Genome Project Genetics People in science Biology Source Type: news

The clitoris is a gift, so why is there an ingrained fear of talking about it? | Lucy McCormick
If we want to make progress with FGM, we need to first tackle our outdated, misogynistic views on sexThefirst UK conviction for female genital mutilation (FGM) this month was a milestone in the fight for the basic human rights of women and girls. But one of the things that stands out from the news reports of that case is how oddly furtive they were about communicating the key facts – in particular their avoidance of the C-word: clitoris.In reporting such a prominent case, are readers unable to be shown the correct medical terminology? Why do the media carefully avoid mentioning what occurred, using highly generalised...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lucy McCormick Tags: Female genital mutilation (FGM) Society Politics Sex education Feminism Women Biology UK news Source Type: news

Cervical cancer could be eliminated in most countries by 2100 – research
Millions of cases could be prevented with high HPV vaccine and screening coverageCervical cancer could be effectively eliminated in most countries around the world by the end of the 21st century, according to research.The HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccine, which protects against the virus that causes most cases, has dramatically reduced incidences of cervical cancer wherever uptake has been high. There are hopes that the jab given to young girls, together with occasional HPV screening, could end the scourge of a disease that kills more than 300,000 women globally every year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Cervical cancer HPV vaccine Health Society Vaccines and immunisation Biology Science World news World Health Organization Australia news Europe Japan Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Life-changing magic of tidying up: Complex structures' organization studied in slime mold
(University of Tokyo) Researchers in Japan think they have found an answer to the fundamental biological question of how individual cells know which way to position themselves within a complex, multicellular body. Depending on a cell's purpose in the larger structure, contact or diffuse chemical signals direct it to its final destination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps
(Oregon State University) Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Native California medicinal plant may hold promise for treating Alzheimer's
(Salk Institute) The medicinal powers of aspirin, digitalis, and the anti-malarial artemisinin all come from plants. A Salk Institute discovery of a potent neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory chemical in a native California shrub may lead to a treatment for Alzheimer's disease based on a compound found in nature. The research appears in the February 2019 issue of the journal Redox Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An intricate interaction: dietary fatty acid intake influences hypertension risk
(Kanazawa University) Hypertension is an important public health problem that can lead to life-threatening cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke. Here, the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and hypertension, using blood pressure measurement and a diet history questionnaire. A Kanazawa University research team found that increased dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids positively impacted hypertension, but that this benefit was limited to individuals without impaired glucose tolerance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Join us on an adventure to Towabonga -- coral reef ecology for kids!
(SECORE international) The new educational kids comic by awarded illustrator Bernhard Speh and SECORE International is published! Coral Heroes takes its readers on a lovingly drawn journey to the reefs of Towabonga, where they meet the mightiest builders on Earth and get to know why corals need our help. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot
(University of California - San Diego) New research revealed that foreign honey bees often account for more than 90 percent of pollinators observed visiting flowers in San Diego, considered a global biodiversity hotspot. The non-native bees have established robust feral populations and currently make up 75 percent of the region's observed pollinators. Their monopoly over the most abundantly blooming plant species may strongly affect the ecology and evolution of species that are foundational to the stability of the region's plant-pollinator interactions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plants: How cell walls are assembled
(Martin-Luther-Universit ä t Halle-Wittenberg) Plant researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants. The scientists have succeeded in understanding how processes are coordinated that are pivotal in properly separating daughter cells during cell division. In the renowned scientific publication The EMBO Journal, they describe the tasks of certain membrane building blocks and how plants are impacted when these building blocks are disrupted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists
(University of Southampton) An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of Southampton, has shown that fossilized eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Complete world map of tree diversity
(German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig) Researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have succeeded in constructing, from scattered data, a world map of the diversity of tree species. Climate plays a central role for its global distribution; however, the number of species in a specific region also depends on the spatial scale of the observation, the researchers report in Nature Ecology and Evolution. The new approach could help improve conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Earth may be 140 years away from reaching carbon levels not seen in 56 million years
(American Geophysical Union) Total human carbon dioxide emissions could match those of Earth's last major greenhouse warming event in fewer than five generations, new research finds. A new study finds humans are pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a rate nine to 10 times higher than the greenhouse gas was emitted during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a global warming event that occurred roughly 56 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nitisinone increases melanin in people with albinism
(NIH/National Eye Institute) A small pilot clinical study at the National Eye Institute (NEI) suggests that the drug nitisinone increases melanin production in some people with oculocutaneous albinism type 1B (OCA-1B), a rare genetic disease that causes pale skin and hair and poor vision. Increased melanin could help protect people with the condition against the sun's UV rays and promote the development of normal vision. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic
(Baylor University) Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according to a study by an international group of scientists that included a US team from Baylor University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers find genetic clues to high rates of asthma in those of African ancestry
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) In the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found new clues into the parts of the human genome associated with the higher rates of asthma in those of African ancestry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vigorous exercise, fasting, hormones improve elimination of toxic, misfolded, unnecessary proteins in mouse and human cells
(Harvard Medical School) A new study shows vigorous exercise and fasting improve the ability of human and mouse cells to remove misfolded, toxic, unnecessary proteins. The findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism that activates the cells' protein-disposal machinery, allowing them to adapt their protein content to shifting demands and new conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New compound could help treat ovarian cancer
(University of Sheffield) Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NSF Announces New BIO Director
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced that Dr. Joanne Tornow will serve as the next Director of the Biological Sciences Directorate (BIO). Dr. Tornow has worked in program management, leadership, and strategic development roles at NSF for nearly two decades. Tornow has previously served as Senior Adviser for strategic planning in BIO, head of BIO’s Molecular and Cellular Biosciences division, Deputy Assistant Director for NSF’s Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences Directorate (SBE), Acting head of SBE, and Head of NSF’s Office of Information and Resource Management. Prior to joining NSF...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

New insights into phenotypic complexity and diversity among cichlids
(University of Konstanz) Researchers from the University of Konstanz, the University of California-Los Angeles, Tel Aviv University and the Inter-University Institute for Marine Sciences in Eilat gain new in-sights into how phenotypic complexity influences diversification among Lake Malawi cichlid fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researcher earns federal grant to study molecule's potential as cancer drug target
(University of Oklahoma) Ralf Janknecht, Ph.D., a researcher in the Department of Cell Biology at the OU College of Medicine, has been analyzing the behavior of a particular molecule that is over produced in breast cancer. This year, he was awarded a five-year, $1.78 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to further evaluate the molecule's potential in reducing cancer metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Investigators figure out how to block new antibiotic resistance gene
(American Society for Microbiology) A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a ß -lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has found a way to block the VCC-1 enzyme, which disables that resistance gene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cervical microbiome may promote high-grade precancerous lesions
(American Society for Microbiology) Infections with a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) cause 99 percent of cervical cancer cases, and the disease's first sign is often the appearance of precancerous lesions on a woman's cervix. But bacteria may play an important role, too. New research suggests that the cervical microbiome may influence HPV infection more than researchers previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fluorescing urine signals organ transplant rejection, could replace needle biopsies
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Glowing pee may replace the biopsy needle: In detecting organ transplant rejection, a new nanoparticle has proven much faster and more thorough in the lab than a biopsy. When T cells mount their first attack on the organ's cells the nanoparticle sends an alarm signal into the urine that makes it fluoresce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ancient 'night' marsupial faced four months of winter darkness
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Paleontologists working on a steep river bank in Alaska have discovered fossil evidence of the northernmost marsupial known to science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Transformations demystified
(University of California - Santa Barbara) A wealth of potential exists in inorganic synthesis for the development of advanced materials that can perform sophisticated functions and drive complex processes. Researchers have long been developing a body of knowledge to map these chemical reactions and predict their results. Particularly in the relatively new subdiscipline of nanocluster synthesis, a little less guesswork could go a long way. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanopores make portable mass spectrometer for peptides a reality
(University of Groningen) University of Groningen scientists have developed nanopores that can be used to directly measure the mass of peptides. Although the resolution needs to be improved, this proof of principle shows that a cheap and portable peptide mass spectrometer can be constructed using existing nanopore technology and the patented pores that were developed in the lab of UG Associate Professor of Chemical Biology, Giovanni Maglia. This discovery was published in Nature Communications on 19 February. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like carapace that shields the rest of the crustacean. But engineers at MIT and elsewhere have found that this soft membrane is surprisingly tough, with a microscopic, layered, plywood-like structure that makes it remarkably tolerant to scrapes and cuts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New technology captures movement of quantum particles with unprecedented resolution
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) A new Tel Aviv University study explores the activity of quantum particles in 2D materials within an unprecedented small time frame and at an extraordinarily high spatial resolution. These are highly sought-after capabilities for advanced communications technologies and for photonics-based quantum computers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate goals of the Paris Agreement: Impact of land use
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Significantly less than two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times -- this is the temperature to which global warming should be limited, according to the Paris Climate Agreement. In a current study, a research team from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the University of Edinburgh shows that previous efforts to reduce greenhouse gases through human land use are insufficient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bringing delivery forward to collect the 'baby check' posed a risk to babies
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) A study by Libertad Gonz á lez, professor with the Department of Economics and Business at UPF and the Barcelona GSE; Cristina Borra (University of Seville) and Almudena Sevilla (University College, London), found that children born prematurely due to the scrapping of the 'baby check' weighed less at birth (between 130 and 300 grams) and had 20 percent more hospitalizations, especially due to respiratory problems, although the negative effects seem to dissipate after the second month of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plants can skip the middlemen to directly recognize disease-causing fungi
(Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research) Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have revealed that direct physical associations between plant immune proteins and fungal molecules are widespread during attempted infection. The authors' findings run counter to current thinking and may have important implications for engineering disease resistance in crop species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Renewable energy generation with kites and drones
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) A group of researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid has recently developed a new software aimed at the analysis of energy generation systems based on kites and drones. In a recently published scientific article, they used the software to study the behavior of these systems while transforming the kinetic energy of the wind into useful electrical energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Speakers announced for 2019 Experimental Biology Meeting
(Experimental Biology) Renowned scientists including Nobel laureates, research pioneers and celebrated educators will convene at the Experimental Biology (EB) 2019 meeting, to be held April 6-9 in Orlando. Bringing together more than 12,000 life scientists in one interdisciplinary community, EB showcases the latest advances in anatomy, biochemistry, molecular biology, investigative pathology, pharmacology and physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Lupus strongly linked to imbalances in gut microbiome
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) The disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) -- marked by the attack on joints, skin, and kidneys by the body's immune system -- is linked to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the gut. This is according to a new study led by scientists at NYU School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate-friendly labriculture depends on an energy revolution, says Oxford study
(Frontiers) In a first-of-its-kind study from the Oxford Martin School, the climate-change impact of several production methods for lab-grown and farmed beef was assessed accounting for the differing greenhouse gases produced. The new projections reveal that over the long term, cultured meat production methods requiring large energy inputs could increase global warming more than some types of cattle farming if energy systems remain dependent on fossil fuels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shimmer launches Verisense ™ wearable sensor platform for clinical trials
(Rana Healthcare Solutions LLC) Shimmer, a global leader in wearable technology for research applications, today launched Verisense ™ , its next-generation wearable sensor platform designed from the ground up to meet the needs of clinical trial sponsors, sites and participants. Verisense is a comprehensive and flexible solution for reliably capturing accurate and complete biometric data. Starting in March, Shimmer customers are planning to use Verisense in trials for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer-related fatigue, and stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gene therapy could treat rare brain disorder in unborn babies
Doctors could use Crispr tool to inject benign virus into foetus ’s brain to ‘switch on’ key genesScientists are developing a radical form ofgene therapy that could cure a devastating medical disorder by mending mutations in the brains of foetuses in the womb.The treatment, which has never been attempted before, would involve doctors injecting the feotus ’s brain with a harmless virus that infects the neurons and delivers a suite of molecules that correct the genetic faults.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Gene editing Neuroscience Genetics Ethics Health Society World news Biology Source Type: news

Saving the Bats, One Cave at a Time
Biologists are searching caves and abandoned mines in the West, hoping to spare many species of the winged creatures from the devastating fungus, white-nose syndrome. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JIM ROBBINS Tags: Bats Fungi Infections Caves and Caverns Hibernation Rocky Mountains Western States (US) Fish and Wildlife Service Nevada your-feed-science Source Type: news

Hot great white sharks could motor but prefer to swim slow
(The Company of Biologists) Great white sharks have warmer muscles than other cold-blooded fish so they could swimmer faster, but now it turns out that they actually choose to swim relatively slowly when browsing their feeding grounds, probably to increase their chance of catching a fat seal snack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How our plants have turned into thieves to survive
(University of Sheffield) Scientists have discovered that grasses are able to short cut evolution by taking genes from their neighbors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

As citizen scientists, farmers can make important contributions to climate adaptation
(Bioversity International) To help smallholder farmers adapt to climate change, scientists need to provide recommendations of crop varieties suitable to farmers' marginal and heterogeneous environments. However, existing on-farm approaches are difficult to scale. A novel scalable method using crowdsourced citizen science was employed on 12,409 trial plots in Ethiopia, India and Nicaragua. The results showed the potential of crowdsourced citizen science to improve variety recommendations and help farmers respond to climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

World's biggest terrestrial carbon sinks are found in young forests
(University of Birmingham) More than half of the carbon sink in the world's forests is in areas where the trees are relatively young -- under 140 years old -- rather than in tropical rainforests, research at the University of Birmingham shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Great white shark genome decoded
(Nova Southeastern University) In a major scientific step to understand the biology of this iconic apex predator and sharks in general, the entire genome of the white shark has now been decoded in detail. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Suicide system in tuberculosis bacteria might hold key to treatment
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. The genome of the bacterium that causes TB holds a special toxin-antitoxin system with spectacular action: once the toxin is activated, all bacterial cells die, stopping the disease. An international research team co-led by the Wilmanns group at EMBL in Hamburg investigated this promising feature for therapeutic targets. They now share the first high-resolution details of the system in Molecular Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 18, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Chemical engineer receives NSF CAREER award for research targeting industrial smokestacks
(University of Toledo) Dr. Ana C. Alba-Rubio is pioneering a new method for factories to approach environmental stewardship and fight pollution with help from a five-year, $558,795 grant from the National Science Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Diversity on land is not higher today than in the past, study shows
(University of Birmingham) The rich levels of biodiversity on land seen across the globe today are not a recent phenomenon: diversity on land has been similar for at least the last 60 million years, since soon after the extinction of the dinosaurs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tuberculosis: Commandeering a bacterial 'suicide' mechanism
(CNRS) The bacteria responsible for tuberculosis can be killed by a toxin they produce unless it is neutralized by an antidote protein. The European team of scientists behind this discovery is coordinated by researchers from the Institute of Pharmacology and Structural Biology (IPBS--CNRS/UPS) and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). Their findings are published in Molecular Cell. The team is now seeking to appropriate this 'suicide' mechanism for therapeutic purposes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Illinois researchers first to show hinge morphology of click beetle's latch mechanism
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) Aimy Wissa, assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering (MechSE) at Illinois, leads an interdisciplinary research team to study click beetles to inspire more agile robots. The team, which includes MechSE Assistant Professor Alison Dunn and Dr. Marianne Alleyne, a research scientist in the Department of Entomology, recently presented their ongoing and novel work on the quick release mechanism of click beetles at the 2019 Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) Annual Meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news