VIDEO – Taking on Cystic Fibrosis: A Student Story
Dartmouth College undergraduate Sam Neff D '21 fights cystic fibrosis (CF) every day by following a strict treatment regimen, by contributing to CF research in Geisel’s Lung Biology Center, and by participating in a clinical trial at Dartmouth-Hitchcock. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - August 14, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Jennifer Durgin Tags: Multimedia News Research Video cystic fibrosis Dartmouth undergraduate Home-feature Interaction student research Source Type: news

Hacking humans: Jane Metcalfe talks neobiology, consumers' role in health data
Humans have hacked all sorts of computer systems, but now we are starting to hack ourselves — specifically, our health and biology. “We [are at] the dawn of what I call the neobiological revolution, which I define as the accelerating movement of ways to use technology and biology to alter the human race,” Jane Metcalfe, founder of Wired and editor and chief of NEO.LIFE. told MobiHeal thNews. “It is also the next stage of the digital revolution.” (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 14, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

I await a second Magnum opus | Brief letters
Morris Traveller in the Alps | What ’s the point of Sats? | DNA ancestry tests | A dog called Trevor | Lolly sticksIn the early 60s, I drove a Morris Traveller (Letters, passim) laden with three friends and a month ’s worth of camping gear to Yugoslavia. We stalled on a 1:2.5 gradient up the Julian Alps from Villach in Austria to the border. We set about unloading all my passengers and possibly the luggage with a view to them humping everything to the pass. Fortunately, an Austrian army jeep came swooping do wn, swung round and threw out a tow rope, and dragged us up to the top. Angels! We then rolled down chee...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Motoring Sats Schools Education Race issues Biology Dogs Ice-cream and sorbet Source Type: news

Tenure-Eligible Senior Investigator Recruitment in Data Science, Biomedical Informatics, and Computational Biology
Posted Date: August 13, 2018; Closing Date: Until position is filled. (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - August 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Tenure-Track Investigator Recruitment in Data Science, Biomedical Informatics, and Computational Biology
Posted Date: August 13, 2018; Closing Date: Until position is filled. (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - August 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Effective material developed to prevent post-surgical adhesion
(World Scientific) In a paper published in TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers have investigated a novel Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) that provides a barrier to prevent adhesions in post-operative complications. This has the potential to avoid the need for a second surgery to remove the adhesions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When mixing granular matter, order among disorder
(Northwestern University) Researchers find mixed and non-mixed regions among tumbled granular particles, providing a new understanding of how sand, concrete, and paint mix. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists pinpoint brain networks responsible for naming objects
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified the brain networks that allow you to think of an object name and then verbalize that thought. The study appeared in the July issue of BRAIN. It represents a significant advance in the understanding of how the brain connects meaning to words and will help the planning of brain surgeries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research brief: UMN researchers use green gold to rapidly detect and identify harmful bacteria
(University of Minnesota) Researchers from the University of Minnesota (UMN) have developed a method to screen and identify harmful or antibiotic-resistant bacteria within one hour using a portable luminometer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists get new tool to track new pathogen killing frogs
(University of Central Florida) An undergraduate researcher has developed a method to screen frogs for an infectious disease that has been linked to mass die-offs of frogs around the world. Thanks to her method, scientists will be able to track the disease and try to figure out why it is triggering the deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Snake fungal disease alters skin microbiome in eastern Massasaugas
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) In the first study of its kind, researchers characterized the skin microbiome of a population of free-ranging snakes to begin to understand how the animals' environmental microbial community may promote disease resistance as well as how it may be disrupted by infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lipid droplets play crucial roles beyond fat storage
(University of Rochester) Lipid droplets were long thought of merely as formless blobs of fat. But a study by Michael Welte of the University of Rochester, and his colleagues, describes how lipid droplets regulate certain proteins involved in gene expression. The research has implications for understanding what helps embryos survive and how we look at lipid-related diseases like obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

OU study shows effects of climate warming in tallgrass prairie ecosystem
(University of Oklahoma) A University of Oklahoma professor, Jizhong Zhou, and his team have completed a new study on the effects of climate warming on soil microbes in a long-term climate change experiment at a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. The new study shows that climate warming will affect microbial communities in the future, and future community states will be more predictable under warmed climate. Eventually, microbial communities will produce different functions and feedbacks to climate warming. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Models give synthetic biologists a head start
(Rice University) Rice University researchers have developed mathematical models to predict the performance of multi-input synthetic biological circuits that can be used to engineer bacteria and other organisms to regulate cellular systems or perform functions they wouldn't in nature. Applications include biological sensing, chemical production and therapeutics such as probiotics to alter gut bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Light-engineered bacterial shapes could hold key to future labs-on-a-chip
(eLife) Scientists have used light patterns to control the swimming speed of bacteria and direct them to form different shapes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Substances associated with bee ferocity are discovered
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Chemical compounds identified by Brazilian researchers may explain why less aggressive bees become ferocious. Study is published in Journal of Proteome Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fishing quotas upended by nuclear DNA analysis
(University of Johannesburg) Fishing quotas have been decided using an inadequate method for decades, according to a Scientific Reports study. The same method has also been used to decide about culling, hunting quotas, or translocating threatened species. Analysing the nuclear genome of sardines shows previously unrecognised genetic differences between populations, which are not identified by the go-to-method for Isolation-By-Distance, mitochondrial DNA analysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NSF awards grant to Portland State for state-of-the-art instrument
(Portland State University) Portland State University investigators from the Departments of Chemistry and Biology have received a $350,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for a state-of-the-art liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Byproducts of 'junk DNA' implicated in cancer spread
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego biologists and their colleagues have revealed that enhancer RNAs play a significant role in cancer dissemination. The researchers found that eRNAs have a direct role in the activation of genes that are important for tumor development. This role is facilitated by the ability of eRNAs to directly interact with BRD4, a protein known as a cancer disseminator. BRD4 has been recognized as a promising cancer target. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inching closer to a soft spot in isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers comparing clonal strains of the mycobacteria that cause TB, before and after they developed resistance to a first-line drug, found that a single genetic change may not always have identical effects on bacterial fitness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

From office windows to Mars: Scientists debut super-insulating gel
(University of Colorado at Boulder) A new gel developed by researchers at CU Boulder could increase energy efficiency in skyscrapers and help scientists to build habitats on Mars. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why zebrafish (almost) always have stripes
(Ohio State University) A mathematical model helps explain the key role that one pigment cells plays in making sure that each stripe on a zebrafish ends up exactly where it belongs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMass Amherst computational biophysicist receives grant to study 'floppy' proteins
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Jianhan Chen at UMass Amherst has a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation to study a newly recognized class of proteins with highly flexible three-dimensional (3D) structural properties, in particular some extra-floppy ones called intrinsically disordered proteins. By staying flexible, IDPs may have an advantage in interacting with other proteins and each other, perhaps letting them respond faster than a more rigid structure, or interact with a wider variety of molecules, or both. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Kent State geologist wins grant to study climate change, inspire young scientists
(Kent State University) The National Science Foundation (NSF) presented its prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award to Dr. Herndon for her project, 'Manganese Biogeochemistry and Impacts on Carbon Storage in Plant-Soil Systems.' The five-year grant is expected to total $487,000. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What homebody island birds could tell us about adaptation and evolution
(Colorado State University) Researchers led by Colorado State University's Cameron Ghalambor are launching a National Science Foundation-supported study of what evolutionary biologists term 'microgeographic' adaptation strategies of island scrub-jays, North America's only island-endemic bird. Island scrub-jays live exclusively on Santa Cruz Island, one of the Channel Islands off the southern California coast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Getting more out of microbes
This study advances research for fundamental science and biotechnology applications by testing the performance of an unusual bacterial microorganism known as Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (Shewanella) in microgravity conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Algorithm provides early warning system for tracking groundwater contamination
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory have developed a low-cost method for real-time monitoring of pollutants using commonly available sensors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence platform screens for acute neurological illnesses at Mount Sinai
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) An artificial intelligence platform designed to identify a broad range of acute neurological illnesses, such as stroke, hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus, was shown to identify disease in CT scans in 1.2 seconds, faster than human diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Links between tax havens, deforestation and illegal fishing exposed
(Stockholm Resilience Centre) On average 68 percent of all investigated foreign capital to sectors associated with deforestation of the Amazon rainforest was transferred through tax havens. And 70 percent of the known fishing vessels involved in illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing are, or have been, registered in tax havens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Undruggable' cancers slowed by targeting growth signals
(University of California - San Francisco) As many as 50 percent of human cancer cases -- across a wide variety of tissues -- involve defects in a common cellular growth signaling pathway. These defects have so far defied most attempts to develop targeted therapies. Now researchers at UCSF and Redwood City-based Revolution Medicines Inc. have identified a new strategy for potentially treating intractable cancers by decoupling the entire RAS/MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway from external growth signals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers predict risk for common deadly diseases from millions of genetic variants
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) A research team reports a new kind of genome analysis that could identify large fractions of the population who have a much higher risk of developing serious common diseases, including coronary artery disease, breast cancer, or type 2 diabetes. These tests, which use information from millions of places in the genome to ascertain risk for five diseases, can flag greater likelihood of developing the potentially fatal conditions well before any symptoms appear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

VOX pops cereal challenge
(Rothamsted Research) A plant virus with a simple genome promises to help crop scientists understand traits and diseases in wheat and maize more quickly and easily than existing techniques and, as its full potential is tapped, to work across a range of different plant species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Disrupted nitrogen metabolism might spell cancer
(Weizmann Institute of Science) Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science, in collaboration with colleagues from the National Cancer Institute and elsewhere, have now shown that in many cancers, the patient's nitrogen metabolism is altered, producing detectable changes in the body fluids and contributing to the emergence of new mutations in cancerous tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Preliminary analysis of the influence of reinforced mortar coating
(Bentham Science Publishers) This work presents an extensive characterisation of materials and components used in non-structural masonry constructions in the region of Pernambuco, Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When these flies want to sniff out food and mates, they wing it
(Ohio State University) Fruit flies don't appear to use their tiny, translucent wings for optimal flight, as one might expect. The speedy appendages seem to be doing double duty, helping the insect sniff out food, mates and other important scents, according to new research from The Ohio State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Unexpected results with light-gated chloride channel GtACR2 lead to improved technique
(Baylor College of Medicine) Characterization of light-gated chloride channel GtACR2 in mouse cortical neurons revealed that GtACR2 activation inhibited the soma, but unexpectedly depolarized the presynaptic terminals resulting in neurotransmitter release. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Duke team finds missing immune cells that could fight lethal brain tumors
(Duke University Medical Center) Researchers at Duke Cancer Institute have tracked the missing T-cells in glioblastoma patients. They found them in abundance in the bone marrow, locked away and unable to function because of a process the brain stimulates in response to glioblastoma, to other tumors that metastasize in the brain and even to injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Thirty micrometres a minute: scientists discover the speed of death
By studying frogs ’ eggs, researchers have measured the rate at which cells kill themselves off for an organism’s greater goodName: The speed of death.Age: Not sure that is entirely relevant.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Biology Science Source Type: news

Hybrid nanomaterials bristle with potential
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) Triple-layered nanoarray electrode promises to boost battery performance and enhance other electrochemical processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Solar fuels working well under pressure
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) Computer analysis aids the formulation of methanol-based renewable fuels that can operate under compression ignition conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Renewables could drastically cut tailpipe emissions
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) Ethanol and related gasoline replacement fuels produce fewer smog-causing chemicals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Carl Zimmer: ‘We shouldn’t look to our genes for a quick way to make life better’
The science writer and Harvard professor on intelligence, the promise and dangers of gene editing, and how we get heredity wrongCarl Zimmer is a rarity among professional science writers in being influential among the scientists on whose work he writes and comments – to the extent that he has beenappointed as professor adjunct in thedepartment ofmolecularbiophysics andbiochemistry at Yale University. Zimmer has just published his13th book,She Has Her Mother ’s Laugh,a survey of “the power, perversions and potential of heredity”.What is the book ’s main message about our att...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Genetics Biology Science Books Science and nature books Culture Source Type: news

The book that fights sexism with science
WithInferior, Angela Saini counters long-held beliefs that biology stands in the way of parity between the sexes. Now her message is set to reach thousands of schoolsWhen young men and women come up againstsexist stereotypes masquerading as science, Angela Saini wants them to be armed with the facts. “I call my book ammunition,” she says of her 288-page prize-winning workInferior: The True Power of Women and the Science that Shows It. “There are people out there who insist that somehow the inequalities we see in society are not just because of historic discrimination, but also because of biology – t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Donna Ferguson Tags: Science Women Gender Physics Biology Books Culture Equality Act 2010 Source Type: news

Alnylam Prices First Gene Silencing Drug At $450,000 Per Patient, But Offers Money-Back Guarantee
This morning, after 16 years and $2.5 billion in investment, the Cambridge, Mass.-based company Alnylam finally turned a 1998 biology breakthrough into a medicine: a drug called Onpattro to treat the destruction of nerves that results from a rare disease thought to afflict about 50,000 people. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - August 10, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Matthew Herper, Forbes Staff Tags: NASDAQ:ALNY Source Type: news

Medical News Today: The war on disease: Revisiting old haunts
By doubling back and re-examining familiar components of the cell, scientists are finding new ways to approach difficult-to-treat diseases. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
A Sumatran orangutan, fireflies mating and a sea lion cooling off in record-breaking Californian heat are among this week ’s pick of images from the natural worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Wildlife Animals World news Zoology Environment Biology Science Source Type: news

DNA ancestry tests may look cheap. But your data is the price | Adam Rutherford
Do customers realise that genetic genealogy companies like 23andMe profit by amassing huge biological datasets?In 1884, at theInternational Health Exhibition in South Kensington, four million punters came to view the latest scientific marvels: drainage systems, flushing toilets and electrically illuminated fountains. There, the scientist Francis Galton set up the Anthropometric Laboratory, where common folk would pay 3d (around 80p today) to enter, and anonymously fill out a data card. Galton ’s technicians recorded 11 metrics, including height, hair colour, keenness of sight, punch strength and colour perception, an...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Adam Rutherford Tags: Genetics Biology Science GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals industry Business World news Source Type: news

Young salmon may leap to 'oust the louse'
(Simon Fraser University) A study by Simon Fraser University aquatic ecologists Emma Atkinson and John Reynolds reveals that young salmon may jump out of water to remove sea lice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sea stars critical to kelp forest resilience
(Simon Fraser University) A study by Simon Fraser University resource and environmental management researcher Jenn Burt reveals that sunflower sea stars play a critical role in the resilience of B.C.'s kelp forests, which are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Similar to land-based forests, kelp forests provide essential habitat for species and also help remove CO2 from the atmosphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

USTC develops a family of bioinspired artificial woods by traditional resins
(University of Science and Technology of China) A research team from the University of Science and Technology of China demonstrates a novel strategy for large-scale fabrication of a family of bioinspired polymeric woods with similar polyphenol matrix materials, wood-like cellular microstructures, and outstanding comprehensive performance by a self-assembly and thermocuring process of traditional resins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news