New wheelchair design: A hand gear for better ergonomics
(Vienna University of Technology) Using biomedical modelling, researchers at TU Wien have developed a completely new type of wheelchair. Specially designed handles make the drive more efficient and ergonomic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DDT exposure tied to breast cancer risk for all women through age 54
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) All women exposed to high levels of DDT are at increased risk for breast cancer through age 54, but the timing of cancer risk depends on when they were first exposed. Women exposed before 14 years of age, particularly in infancy and early childhood, were most likely to develop premenopausal breast cancer, while those who were exposed after infancy were at increased risk of developing cancer later, at 50-54 years of age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Human antiviral 'GS-441524' shows great promise against feline infectious peritonitis
(SAGE) The emergence of exotic diseases such as Ebola and SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) in people has prompted intensive research into new drug treatments, and this is indirectly bringing benefit to cats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Customized mix of materials for three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Three-dimensional structures on the micrometer and nanometer scales have a great potential for many applications. An efficient and precise process to print such structures from different materials is now presented by researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Carl Zeiss AG in Science Advances: they integrated a microfluidic chamber into a 3D laser lithography device. Then, they used this system to produce multi-colored, fluorescent security features to protect banknotes, documents, and branded products against counterfeiting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Konstanz gains new insights into development of the human immune system
(University of Konstanz) Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study yields new clues to predict tipping points for marsh survival
(Duke University) Sea-level rise, sediment starvation and other environmental woes pose increasing threats to coastal wetlands worldwide. But a new Duke study could help stem the losses by giving scientists a broader understanding of which wetlands are most at risk and why. The study assessed wetland distribution and resilience in hundreds of US estuaries at five different spatial scales. Its findings will help guide future efforts to preserve or restore threatened wetlands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Upcycling plastic bags into battery parts (video)
(American Chemical Society) Plastic bag pollution has become a huge environmental problem, prompting some cities and countries to heavily tax or ban the sacks. But what if used plastic bags could be made into higher-value products? Now, researchers have reported a new method to convert plastic bags into carbon chips that could be used as anodes for lithium-ion batteries. They report their results in ACS Omega. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Exercise gives older men a better brain boost
(American Physiological Society) New research suggests that the relationship between physical and brain fitness varies in older adults by virtue of their sex. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Carbon gas storage cavern is the best way to obtain clean energy from a fossil fuel
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) The Research Center for Gas Innovation is developing technology to separate CO2 and methane in oil and gas exploration and store it in offshore salt caverns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New method uses fluorescence to identify disease-causing forms of proteins
(Penn State) A new method uses fluorescence to detect potentially disease-causing forms of proteins as they unravel due to stress or mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FEFU scientists found persistent organic pollutants in animal fur
(Far Eastern Federal University) Scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), working as part of an international toxicologists' team, studied fur samples of the wild terrestrial mammals in Primorye, Russian Far East. All samples contained persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which are resistant to decomposition, tend to accumulate in body tissues and are potentially risky for human and animal health. Some of them are prohibited by the Stockholm Convention. The research outcome was published in Environmental Science and Pollution Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Newly isolated human gut bacterium reveals possible connection to depression
(DOE/Argonne National Laboratory) Researchers have established a correlation between depression and a group of neurotransmitter-producing bacteria found in the human gut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ancient fossilized tracks suggest multicellular life far older than previously thought
(University of Alberta) Newly discovered fossilized tracks suggest multicellular life could be 1.5 billion years older than previously thought, according to a new study by an international team of researchers including scientists at the University of Alberta. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mount Sinai research program awarded $12.5 million NIH grant to continue to study the role of hormones in menopause and aging biology
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) A new program will look at the role of the Follicle Stimulating Hormone in obesity and osteoporosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lopez named to UT System Academy of Distinguished Teachers
(University of Texas at Arlington) Ramon Lopez, a professor of physics at The University of Texas at Arlington, has been named to the UT System Academy of Distinguished Teachers for his excellence in teaching and mentoring students. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Half-Earth preservation with Natura 2000
(American Institute of Biological Sciences) In recent years, calls to preserve greater swaths of the Earth's land- and seascapes have grown. In particular, numerous conservationists have called for the protection of half of the planet's surface, a bold initiative that would preserve much of the world's existing biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the path to such a 'half-Earth' preservation model lies largely in uncharted territory, with many potential pitfalls along the way. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists look to past to help identify fish threatened with local extinction
(Wildlife Conservation Society) Marine scientists from the University of Queensland, WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups have developed a methodology to assess fish stocks that combines new data with archeological and historical records - some dating back to the 8th Century AD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Future of US citrus may hinge on consumer acceptance of genetically modified food
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A tiny insect, no bigger than the head of a pin, is threatening to topple the multibillion-dollar citrus industry in the US by infecting millions of acres of orchards with an incurable bacterium called citrus greening disease.The battle to save the citrus industry is pitting crop producers and a team of agriculture researchers -- including agricultural communications professor Taylor K. Ruth of the University of Illinois -- against a formidable brown bug, the Asian citrus psyllid, which spreads the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why it matters to call external female genitalia ‘vulva’ not ‘vagina’ | Lynn Enright
Yes, some people use the term vagina, but getting it right is vital to female sexual agencyWhen you find yourself mansplaining the term “mansplaining” to a worked-up faction of Twitter on a Sunday evening, you can assume you’re not getting the best out of your leisure time. And that’s not even the most foolish thing a man calledPaul Bullen didover the weekend.On Saturday, theGuardian published an extract from an upcoming book, Womanhood: The Bare Reality by the photographer and writer Laura Dodsworth. Alongside photographs of external genitalia was first-person testimony from the subjects pictured. ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lynn Enright Tags: Biology Sex UK news Gender World news Women Life and style Language Science Source Type: news

New AI Toolkit is the 'Scientist that never Sleeps'
Researchers have developed a new AI-driven platform that can analyse how pathogens infect our cells with the precision of a trained biologist. The platform, HRMAn ('Herman'), which stands for Host Response to Microbe Analysis, is open-source, easy-to-use and can be tailored for different pathogens including Salmonella enterica. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - February 12, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

The physical forces of cells in action
(Universit é de Gen è ve) The detection of physical forces is one of the most complex challenges facing science. Considered to play a decisive role in many biological processes, the chemical tools to visualize the physical forces in action do not exist. But today, researchers from UNIGE and NCCR in Chemical Biology have developed probes inspired by lobster cooking, they enable to enter into cells. For the first time, physical forces can be imaged live inside the cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New AI toolkit is the 'scientist that never sleeps'
(The Francis Crick Institute) Researchers have developed a new AI-driven platform that can analyze how pathogens infect our cells with the precision of a trained biologist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Infection biology: What makes Helicobacter so adaptable?
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori owes its worldwide distribution to its genetic adaptability. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich microbiologists have identified an enzyme that plays a vital role in the flexible control of global gene expression in the species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Laser-induced graphene gets tough, with help
(Rice University) Laser-induced graphene created at Rice University combines with many materials to make tough, conductive composites for wearable electronics, anti-icing, antimicrobial applications, sensors and water treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Moving artificial leaves out of the lab and into the air
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have proposed a design solution that could bring artificial leaves out of the lab and into the environment. Their improved leaf, which would use carbon dioxide -- a potent greenhouse gas -- from the air, would be at least 10 times more efficient than natural leaves at converting carbon dioxide to fuel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Slower runners benefit most from elite methods
(University of Colorado at Boulder) How much do high-tech shoes, special diets and exercises, drafting behind other runners and other strategies to improve your 'running economy' actually improve your finish time? A new study spells it out. The takeaway: The faster you are, the harder it is to get faster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Testosterone limits for female athletes based on 'flawed' research
(University of Colorado at Boulder) New rules governing international track and field competitions would require some women to medically reduce their testosterone levels to compete. A new study suggests the regulations are rooted in flawed science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Large study fails to link phthalates and increased breast cancer risk
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) In the largest study to date on phthalates and postmenopausal breast cancer, a University of Massachusetts Amherst cancer epidemiology researcher found no association between breast cancer risk and exposure to the plasticizing and solvent chemicals used in such common products as shampoo, makeup, vinyl flooring, toys, medical devices and car interiors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nature prefers asymmetrical pollen grains, study finds
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) A study published in Cell shows that plants favor the production of uneven, asymmetrical patterns on the surface of pollen grains over more symmetrical patterns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate of North American cities will shift hundreds of miles in one generation
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) In one generation, the climate experienced in many North American cities is projected to change to that of locations hundreds of miles away -- or to a new climate unlike any found in North America today. A new study and interactive web application aim to help the public understand how climate change will impact the lives of people who live in urban areas of the United States and Canada. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ancient spider fossils, surprisingly preserved in rock, reveal reflective eyes
(University of Kansas) A new paper in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, coauthored by a KU researcher, describes fossil spiders found in an area of Korean shale called the Lower Cretaceous Jinju Formation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mom's reward: Female Gal á pagos seabird has a shorter lifespan than males
(Wake Forest University) The male Nazca booby, a large seabird of the Gal á pagos Islands, often outlives the domineering female of the species, according to new research from Wake Forest University published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology. Why? It's a story of rotating sex partners, the cost of being a parent and how the body falls apart in old age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Consciousness rests on the brain's ability to sustain rich dynamics of neural activity
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) Consciousness, from the moment we go to sleep until we wake up, seems to come and go every day. Consciousness can be temporarily abolished by pharmacological agents or more permanently by brain injury. Each of these departures from conscious wakefulness brings about different changes in brain function, behaviour and in the brain's neurochemistry. However, they all share a common feature: the lack of reported subjective experience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Marshall School of Medicine professor earns ASPET for career achievements
(Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine) Gary O. Rankin, Ph.D., a professor and vice dean for basic sciences at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has been named the recipient of the 2019 Career Award from the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET) Division for Toxicology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Drug-induced cellular membrane complexes induce cancer cell death
(Medical University of South Carolina) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology researchers at the Hollings Cancer Center at the Medical University of South Carolina delved into the microscopic world of cell surface sphingolipids and discovered a new sub-cellular complex, as described in the January 2019 issue of Journal of Biological Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Texas A & M researchers develop fire-retardant coating featuring renewable materials
(Texas A&M University) Texas A&M University researchers are developing a new kind of flame-retardant coating using renewable, nontoxic materials readily found in nature, which could provide even more effective fire protection for several widely used materials (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate Adaptation: WCS awards $2.5 Million to 13 US conservation projects
(Wildlife Conservation Society) WCS has announced 13 new grants to nonprofit organizations implementing on-the-ground, science-driven projects that will help wildlife and ecosystems adapt to climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ancient rock wiggles could be earliest trace of moving organism
Scientists say 2.1bn-year-old fossils may show evidence of self-propelled motionA collection of short wiggly structures discovered in ancient rocks could be the earliest fossilised traces of organisms able to move themselves, scientists say.If scientists are correct, the 2.1bn-year-old structures point to an earlier origin than generally thought for eukaryotes – cells with a membrane-bound nucleus and which make up plants, animals and fungi – previouslybelieved to have first emerged about 1.8bn years ago. It also pushes back the earliest evidence of self-propelled movement of eukaryotes by 1.5bn years – s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Fossils Science Biology Evolution Gabon Africa Source Type: news

Basics: Everywhere in the Animal Kingdom, Followers of the Milky Way
As scientists learn more about milk ’ s evolution and compositional variations, they are redefining what used to be a signature characteristic of mammals. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NATALIE ANGIER Tags: Milk Animal Behavior Mammals Spiders Insects Flies Beetles Breastfeeding Birds Parenting Biology and Biochemistry Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian National Zoological Park University of Bayreuth University of California, Dav Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Simple drug formula regenerates brain cells
Scientists have shown how a drug cocktail of four compounds can convert glia, or support cells, next to damaged neurons into new working neurons. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

National Cancer Institute selects M.D.-Ph.D. Cancer Biology Graduate Program student ’s work for 2018 research showcase
(Source: Karmanos Cancer Institute)
Source: Karmanos Cancer Institute - February 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Explore Cells from the Inside Out
Download this eBook from Molecular Devices to learn about the wide variety of applications used in modern cell biology! (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Marketplace The Scientist Source Type: news

A bioengineered factory for T-cells
(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard engineers and stem cell biologists have developed an injectable sponge-like gel that enhances the production T-cells after a bone marrow transplant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Many Arctic lakes give off less carbon than expected
(University of Washington) New research by the University of Washington and US Geological Survey suggests many lakes in the Arctic pose little threat to global carbon levels, at least for now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

On the land, one-quarter of vertebrates die because of humans
(SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry) Humans have a " disproportionately huge effect " on the other species of vertebrates that share Earth's surface with us, causing more than 25 percent of the deaths among an array of species all over the globe, according to a recently published study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New role for death molecule
(Thomas Jefferson University) To unravel programmed cell death pathways, investigators examine a molecule deemed unimportant, and find new function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NUS marine scientists find toxic bacteria on microplastics retrieved from tropical waters
(National University of Singapore) A team of marine scientists from the National University of Singapore had uncovered toxic bacteria living on the surfaces of microplastics (which are pieces of plastic smaller than 5 millimetres in size) collected from the coastal areas of Singapore. These bacteria are capable of causing coral bleaching, and triggering wound infections in humans. The team also discovered a diversity of bacteria, including useful organisms - such as those that can degrade marine pollutants like hydrocarbons - in the plastic waste. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research offensive on regenerative fuels
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) With the project 'reFuels - Re-thinking Fuels,' the state government, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), and industry wish to establish alternatives to fossil fuels. Today (January 18, 2019), State Minister of Transport Winfried Hermann officially started the project within the framework of the Policy Dialog on Automotive Industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gene involved in colorectal cancer also causes breast cancer
(Radboud University Medical Center) Rare mutations in the NTHL1 gene, previously associated with colorectal cancer, also cause breast cancer and other types of cancer. Researchers from Radboud university medical center, Leiden University Medical Center and the Princess M á xima Center in the Netherlands report this new multi-tumor syndrome, in collaboration with international colleagues, in Cancer Cell. Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, professor of Hereditary Cancer at Radboud university medical center: 'We presumed to know all multi-tumor syndromes, but we have taken yet another step in identifying cancer genes.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop flags that generate energy from wind and sun
(University of Manchester) Scientists have created flags that can generate electrical energy using wind and solar power. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news