Targeting Blood-Clotting Pathway Improves Mesothelioma Treatment
A team of researchers at the Cancer and Vascular Biology Research Center in Haifa, Israel, and the Langone Medical Center in New York collaborated on research of a common blood-clotting pathway. Targeting this pathway may offer a unique avenue for improving existing mesothelioma treatments. Researchers said the standard first-line chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma — a combination of Alimta (pemetrexed) and cisplatin — offers little benefit to most mesothelioma patients. “This treatment regimen confers a median progression-free survival of 5.7 months,” according to the study published ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 5, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Source Type: news

Study: Climate change   is leading to unpredictable ecosystem disruption for migratory birds
(Cornell University) Using data on 77 North American migratory bird species from the eBird citizen-science program, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology say that, in as little as four decades, it may be very difficult to predict how climate change will affect migratory bird populations and the ecosystems they inhabit. Their conclusions are presented in a paper published in the journal Ecography. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rethinking old-growth forests using lichens as an indicator of conservation value
(Canadian Museum of Nature) Two Canadian biologists propose a better way to assess the conservation value of North American old-growth forests -- using lichens, sensitive bioindicators of environmental change. Old-growth forests are usually defined by tree age, but the authors argue this overlooks the importance of biodiversity in those habitats. Lichens are the ideal candidates to measure this biodiversity. Scorecards with suites of lichens specific to these forests can be developed for use by conservation biologists and forest managers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Utah biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation
(University of Utah) Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. They found that preening drives rapid and divergent camouflage in feather lice transferred to different colored rock pigeons. Over four years and 60 generations, the lice evolved heritable color differences that spanned the full color range of the lice genus found on 300 bird species worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Grant allows researcher to study 'scissor-like' protein in cancers
(University of Oklahoma) A researcher in the Department of Cell Biology in the OU College of Medicine, recently received a three-year, $960,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to further her research on a protein called GGT -- gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dingoes should remain a distinct species in Australia
(Flinders University) Since the arrival of British settlers over 230 years ago, most Australians have assumed dingoes are a breed of wild dog. But 20 leading researchers have confirmed in a new study that the dingo is actually a unique, Australian species in its own right. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UM researchers study Alaska forest fires over past 450 years
(The University of Montana) In a recent study, University of Montana researchers explored the ways forest succession and climate variability interacted and influenced fires in Alaska's boreal forests over the past four centuries -- from 1550 to 2015. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Capturing bacteria that eat and breathe electricity
(Washington State University) WSU researchers traveled to Yellowstone National Park to find bacteria that may help solve some of the biggest challenges facing humanity -- environmental pollution and sustainable energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, March 2019
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Neutrons used to study how an antibacterial peptide fights bacteria; decade-long study finds higher CO2 levels caused 30 percent more wood growth in U.S. trees; ultrasonic additive manufacturing to embed fiber optic sensors in heat- and radiation-resistant materials could yield safer reactors; ORNL analyzes 'dark spots' where informal neighborhoods may lack power access; new Transportation Energy Data Book released. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NREL pioneers cleaner route to upcycle plastics into superior products
(DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered a method of plastics upcycling -- transforming discarded products into new, high-value materials of better quality and environmental value -- that could economically incentivize the recycling of waste plastics and help solve one of the world's most looming pollution problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Insilico to present at the 2019 World Medical Innovation Forum
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine, a Rockville-based company developing the end-to-end drug discovery pipeline utilizing the next generation artificial intelligence, will present its latest advances in Artificial Intelligence for Aging Research and Productive Longevity at the 2019 World Medical Innovation Forum in the section titled 'From Startup to Impact (Pharma and Diagnostics)' in Boston, on April 8. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

3D simulation of bone densitometry predict better the risk of fracture due to osteoporosis
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease in which there is a decrease in bone mass density. The bones become more porous and fragile making them more susceptible to fracture. This disease reduces bone density and weakens the bone. The weakening of the bone increases the risk of fracture. Among all possible osteoporotic fractures, hip fractures are a major problem in Western countries. In fact, it is estimated that they affect one-third of women and a fifth of men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Molecular and materials research: sharing data easily
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) 24 hours a day, the Internet offers direct access to the world's knowledge. Especially researchers handling data strive for free information flow. The exchange of raw data is, however, is prevented by obstacles. The 'Science Data Center for Molecular Materials Research' of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology aims to change this in cooperation with the Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences and FIZ Karlsruhe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Discovering the next generation of catalysts
(Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen) The use of solar and wind energy must be doubled to meet the world's demand for clean energy over the next 30 years. Catalysts that can ensure the storage of solar and wind energy in fuels and chemicals will therefore play an increasingly important role. Now researchers at the University of Copenhagen and DTU have developed a method that makes it easier to find better and cheaper catalysts, with their results having recently been published in the journal 'JOULE'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mighty mites give scrawny beetles the edge over bigger rivals
(University of Cambridge) Smaller beetles who consistently lose fights over resources can gain a competitive advantage over their larger rivals by teaming up with another species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sustainable battery production in Europe
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Scientists of the Helmholtz Institute Ulm (HIU) founded by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and their European cooperation partners are developing a sustainable cell concept that is exclusively based on ecologically and economically uncritical materials. Within the Si-DRIVE project, the consortium analyzes the complete value-added chain of a battery and plans to establish European production by 2030. The project is funded by the European Union (EU) with EUR 8 million. The project duration is four years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Owls against owls in a challenge for survival
(Ecological Society of America) Scientists are puzzling out how to address the declining numbers of northern spotted owls (NSO) in their Pacific Northwest forest habitat. A new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications explores the reasons why spotted owls are losing a foothold in their habitat, forecasts future habitat conditions and species interactions, and suggests best management practices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New reactor-liner alloy material offers strength, resilience
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) A new tungsten-based alloy developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory can withstand unprecedented amounts of radiation without damage. Essential for extreme irradiation environments such as the interiors of magnetic fusion reactors, previously explored materials have thus far been hobbled by weakness against fracture, but this new alloy seems to defeat that problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Become an Advocate for Science: Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center
Quick, free, easy, effective, impactful! Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center. The Legislative Action Center is a one-stop shop for learning about and influencing science policy. Through the website, users can contact elected officials and sign-up to interact with lawmakers. The website offers tools and resources to inform researchers about recent policy developments. The site also announces opportunities to serve on federal advisory boards and to comment on federal regulations. This new tool is made possible through contributions from the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Botanical Society of America. AIBS an...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Read About AIBS's Policy Achievements in 2018
The AIBS Public Policy Office has released its annual report for 2018. The report documents our achievements in science policy. Highlights include: Helped 165 scientists become more effective advocates for science after they completed an AIBS Communications Training Boot Camp or Science Policy Training course. Increased awareness of the needs of the biological sciences community by facilitating 102 meetings between scientists and lawmakers. Successfully opposed Administration-proposed cuts to research funding. Helped secure Arizona State Board of Education rejection of proposed science standards removing climate...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Journals Express Concerns Over European Open-Access Initiative
Publishers of high-profile journals, such as Nature and Science, have indicated that they will not be able to comply with Plan S, an open-access publishing initiative led by European funders. In September 2018, a group of European research funding organizations, with support from the European Commission and the European Research Council, launched cOAlition S, an initiative built around Plan S and dedicated to open-access publishing. The group includes 18 research funders. In November 2018, cOAlition S released a guidance for implementing Plan S, requesting feedback from the community and stakeholders. According to the g...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Short Takes
The Senate has confirmed President Trump's nominee and Acting Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler to be the next EPA chief. He previously served as a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee staffer and an energy lobbyist. Dr. Neil Jacobs, formerly the chief atmospheric scientist at Panasonic Avionics Corp. and a proponent of weather data privatization, has been named the next Acting Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). He replaces former Acting Administrator Dr. Tim Gallaudet. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has replaced 14 Principal I...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Learn to Communicate and Influence like a Pro: AIBS Communications Boot Camp for Scientists
The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is offering a professional development program designed to enhance the communication skills of scientists, particularly those interested in communicating with decision-makers and the news media. The program is an excellent way to develop new communication skills and identify effective methods for broadening the impact of research and education programs. The AIBS Communications Training Boot Camp for Scientists expands on AIBS’s highly successful media and science policy training workshops. The Boot Camp meets the needs of everyone from graduate students to senior ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Congress Passes Public Lands Package Renewing LWCF
Congress has passed a bipartisan public lands package which would permanently reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). The President is expected to sign the legislation. The Natural Resources Management Act, or S. 47, passed in Senate by a vote of 92-8 on February 12, after which the House of Representatives voted 363-62 to pass the measure on February 26. LWCF was established in 1964 to use revenues from offshore oil and gas to support the conservation of land and water resources. Authorization for LWCF expired on September 30, 2018 but Congress had appropriated $487.6 million ($425 million in discretio...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President Recruits Climate Skeptics for Climate Panel
The White House is planning to create an ad hoc panel to reassess the government’s analysis of climate science and examine whether climate change impacts national security, according to a leaked White House memo. The memo dated February 14, 2019 reveals that the White House has drafted an Executive Order to create a 12-member committee called the “Presidential Committee on Climate Security.” The memo states that recent scientific and defense reports that conclude that climate change poses a threat to national security “have not undergone a rigorous independent and adversarial peer review to examine...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Can You Really Catch Up on Lost Sleep? Here ’s What the Science Says
Experts have long said that you can’t make up for lost sleep by snoozing more on your days off. But in 2018, a study published in the Journal of Sleep Research called that conclusion into question, suggesting that sleeping in on days off could cancel out at least some of the health risks associated with work-week sleep deprivation, including the threat of early death. But a study recently published in Current Biology echoes previous convictions. It says extra weekend rest is not enough to make up for sleep lost during the week, and concludes that the “benefits of weekend recovery sleep are transient.” C...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized sleep Source Type: news

Are my slow-growing hair and nails down to a slow metabolic rate? If so, is it a bad thing?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers ’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific conceptsMy hair and nails grow about a quarter as fast as my wife ’s, so I wonder: is this because I have a slow metabolic rate? And if I have, is it a good or a bad thing?Peter Hanson, ExeterContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Biology Life and style Source Type: news

Breast cancer cells rely on pyruvate to expand in new tissues
(VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)) Most patients who die of breast cancer die of metastasis, the process by which cancer cells spread to other organs of the body. Cancer cells alter their metabolism to grow and expand across other organs. A new study by Prof. Sarah-Maria Fendt from the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology and her PhD student Ilaria Elia has shown that breast cancer cells require the nutrient pyruvate to do this. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers discover new portal of entry for influenza viruses
(University of Freiburg) Influenza viruses from bats use an entirely different portal to enter the cell than all previously known types of influenza / human cells also infectable in the lab / publication in Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetics Society of America joins the Societies Consortium on Sexual Harassment in STEMM
(Genetics Society of America) The Genetics Society of America (GSA) has joined the Societies Consortium on Sexual Harassment in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine). The Societies Consortium aims to address sexual and gender-based harassment in science and advance professional and ethical conduct, climate, and culture in STEMM fields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bringing more human intelligence to AI, data science and digital automation
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The advent of data science, wireless connectivity and sensors, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of Things has raised the prospects for digital automation, smart hospital design and the home health care industry for an aging population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Red tide rolling: Harmful algae found to flourish in both high-, low-CO2 environments
(Florida State University) Researchers find a Florida-specific strain of red-tide causing algae thrives in both high and low CO2 concentrations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How megalodon's teeth evolved into the 'ultimate cutting tools'
(Florida Museum of Natural History) Megalodon, the largest shark that ever lived, is known only from its gigantic bladelike teeth. But these teeth took millions of years to evolve into their final, iconic form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dying trees in cities? Blame it on the pavement
(North Carolina State University) A new NC State University study of urban tree life in the Southeast shows pavement and concrete may have a bigger effect than longitudinal warming. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Swimming microbes steer themselves into mathematical order
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Freeing thousands of microorganisms to swim in random directions in an infinite pool of liquid may not sound like a recipe for order, but eventually the swarm will go with its own flow. Theoretical modeling led by University of Wisconsin-Madison applied mathematician Saverio Spagnolie shows that the forces generated by different kinds of tiny swimmers will sweep them all up in predictable ways. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A faster, more accurate way to monitor drought
(Duke University) A new drought monitoring method developed at Duke University allows scientists to identify the onset of drought sooner, meaning conservation or remediation measures could be put into place sooner. The new method uses thermal stress -- the difference between air and surface temperatures at a site -- as a drought indicator. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Are mosaic embryos the 'dark horse' of IVF?
(Oregon Health& Science University) New research conducted by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at OHSU is the first to confirm in a nonhuman primate model, that mosaic embryos can adapt to their abnormalities and persist in development, resulting in positive IVF outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Forecasting mosquitoes' global spread
(Boston Children's Hospital) New prediction models factoring in climate, urbanization and human travel and migration offer insight into the recent spread of two key disease-spreading mosquitoes -- Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The models forecast that by 2050, 49 percent of the world's population will live in places where these species are established if greenhouse gas emissions continue at current rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UN declares decade of ecosystem restoration
(Society for Ecological Restoration International) The United Nations today recognized the critical role of ecosystem restoration as a tool for improving environmental conditions and enhancing human communities by designating 2021-2030 the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. This global recognition comes after growing calls and commitments by the international community to put ecological restoration at the forefront of national agendas. The Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) applauds this important step toward focusing the world's attention on the imperative of restoring degraded ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nessa Carey: ‘The most worrying thing about gene editing is that it’s really easy’
The biologist talks about the contentious Crispr-Cas9 gene-editing technique, the merit of big pharma and the UK ’s 100,000 Genomes ProjectA new technique to alter DNA is offering humans the ability to take control of food, disease and our own reproduction as never before. The workhorse of this technology isCrispr-Cas9, often described as a pair of “molecular scissors”, which can be directed to a specific part of a genome and used to make changes ranging from deactivating a gene to correcting a genetic typo or even inserting new genetic material.In her new book,Hacking the Code of Life, biologistNessa Car...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Gene editing Genetics Medical research Science Society China Source Type: news

DR MAX THE MIND DOCTOR: The lesson that could save so many young lives
Homosexuality was never discussed by the nuns and teachers — it was as though gay men and women didn’t exist. The page discussing same-sex attraction in a biology textbook was removed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Decreased insulin sensitivity from sleep deprivation is unaffected by weekend lie ins
Research, published inCurrent Biology, suggests that weekend lie ins do not lower the risk of decreased insulin sensitivity caused by sleep deprivation.BBC (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 1, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Towards a blood test for early-stage liver disease
(EMBO) One in four people in Western and Asian societies develop a build-up of fat in the liver as a result of an unhealthy diet. This disease -- non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) -- causes no symptoms initially but can develop into end-stage liver cirrhosis. A discovery, published today in Molecular Systems Biology, paves the way for a simple blood test to detect early stages of NAFLD, opening up the possibility of preventing the development of liver cirrhosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cell editors correct genetic errors
(University of Bonn) Almost all land plants employ an army of editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now transferred parts of this machinery into a bacterium. Their results confirm a controversial thesis on the functioning of this widespread mechanism. They have now been published in the journal Communications Biology of the Nature Publishing Group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How the humble marigold outsmarts a devastating tomato pest
(Newcastle University) Researchers from Newcastle University's School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, carried out a study to prove what gardeners around the world have known for generations -- marigolds repel tomato whiteflies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Balloons the No. 1 marine debris risk of mortality for seabirds
(University of Tasmania) A new IMAS and CSIRO collaborative study has found that balloons are the highest-risk plastic debris item for seabirds -- 32 times more likely to kill than ingesting hard plastics.Researchers from IMAS, CSIRO and ACE CRC looked at the cause of death of 1,733 seabirds from 51 species and found that one in three of the birds had ingested marine debris. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Spider silk could be used as robotic muscle
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers at MIT and other universities have found that spider silk produces a strong twisting motion when exposed to humidity, and may be usable for future artificial muscles or actuators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Koala-spotting drones proves a flying success
(Queensland University of Technology) QUT researchers have developed an innovative method for detecting koala populations using drones and infrared imaging that is more reliable and less invasive than traditional animal population monitoring techniques. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Paleontology: Diversification after mass extinction
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) A team led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich paleontologist Adriana L ó pez-Arbarello has identified three hitherto unknown fossil fish species in the Swiss Alps, which provide new insights into the diversification of the genus Eosemionotus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level
(University of Pennsylvania) Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. They found that sugar molecules play a key role in cellular communication, serving as the 'channels' that cells and proteins use to talk to one another. This work also provides researchers with a new tool to study other living systems in incredible detail, enabling future breakthroughs in fields from materials science to nanomedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news