Two UCLA chemists selected as 2018 Pew scholars
UCLA chemistry professors Hosea Nelson and Jose Rodriguez have been selected among 22  Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences for 2018. The honor provides funding to outstanding young researchers whose work is relevant to the advancement of human health. The scholars, who were selected from 184 nominations, will receive four-year, $300,000 grants to advance their explorations of biological mechanisms underpinning human h ealth and disease.UCLA and UC San Diego each has two 2018 Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences; no other university has more than one.“These scientists have shown the boldness and creat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

E-Cigarette Flavorings May Impair Vascular Function
THURSDAY, June 14, 2018 -- Flavoring additives used in electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) may have adverse effects on blood vessels, according to a study published online June 14 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. Jessica L.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Human activity making mammals more nocturnal, study finds
Research involving 62 species found mammals spent relatively less time being active during the day when humans were nearbyHuman disturbance is turning mammals into night owls, with species becoming more nocturnal when people are around, research has revealed.The study, encompassing 62 species from around the globe, found that when humans were nearby, mammals spent relatively less time being active during the day and were more active at night - even among those already classed as nocturnal.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Wildlife Animal behaviour Biology Animals Environment Science World news Source Type: news

Paws and play: gene treatment helps rats with spinal cord injury regain their nerve
Hopes for injured humans and larger animals as groundbreaking gene therapy helps mend damaged nerves on the spine of rodents by dissolving scar tissueRats with spinal cord injuries have regained the use of their paws after being given a groundbreaking gene therapy that helps to mend damaged nerves in the spine.The new therapy works by dissolving the dense scar tissue that forms a thick barrier between severed nerves when the spinal column is broken.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Genetics Biology Medical research Source Type: news

Who is to blame for marine litter?
(University of Plymouth) Members of the public are more likely to blame the global marine litter crisis on retailers, industry and government, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers can count on improved proteomics method
(Princeton University) Princeton's Martin W ü hr has improved upon his method to accurately count the proteins present in a cell under different circumstances. 'The TMTc+ method is in a kind of sweet spot compared to the other methods [of isobaric tagging],' W ü hr says. 'It provides superb measurement accuracy and precision, it's at least as sensitive as any other method, and it's compatible with around ten times more mass spectrometers than TMT-MS3.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New simulation tool predicts how well HIV-prophylaxis will work
(PLOS) A new mathematical simulation approach predicts the efficacy of pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medications, which help prevent HIV infection. The framework, presented in PLOS Computational Biology by Sulav Duwal and Max von Kleist of Freie Universit ä t Berlin and colleagues, could help streamline development of new PrEP treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

3D imaging and computer modeling capture breast duct development
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Working with hundreds of time-lapse videos of mouse tissue, a team of biologists joined up with civil engineers to create what is believed to be the first 3D computer model to show precisely how the tiny tubes that funnel milk through the breasts of mammals form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

PolyU to apply smart sensing technology in urban tree management
(The Hong Kong Polytechnic University) The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) today (June 14) kicked off the Jockey Club Smart City Tree Management Project, a large-scale pilot project in Hong Kong, to apply smart sensing technology and Geographic Information Systems for monitoring tree stability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Minimalist biostructures designed to create nanomaterials
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Researchers from the IBB-UAB fabricate 4 molecules of only 7 amino acids with the ability to self-assemble and rapidly and inexpensively form nanomaterials for biomedical and nanotechnological purposes. Inspired on a type of natural assembly seen in amyloid fibres, four peptides were used to create one of the most resistant bionanomaterials described to date, nanocables and mini enzymes to act as a catalyst for the formation of nanomaterials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Proteins as a 'shuttle service' for targeted administration of medication
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) Medication that reaches the spot where it's needed without placing strain on the rest of the body is no longer a vision of the future. Friedrich-Alexander-Universit ä t Erlangen-N ü rnberg (FAU) has successfully developed proteins that function like a shuttle and release medication directly in the place in the body where they are actually needed. The study could serve as a model and could enable targeted and tissue-specific administration of medication in future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Repair and regeneration of peripheral nerves possible with dual polymer hydrogel adhesive
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers have demonstrated that a novel biocompatible adhesive made of two naturally derived polymers is 15 times stronger than adhesive materials currently used for nerve reconstruction and can support the survival, extension, and proliferation of cells essential for nerve regeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pew selects 22 scientists to investigate fundamental biomedical questions
(Pew Charitable Trusts) The Pew Charitable Trusts named 22 early-career researchers today as the 2018 class of Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences. The scholars will receive four-year grants to advance their explorations of biological mechanisms underpinning human health and disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

5 new Pew-Stewart Scholars to pursue innovative cancer research
(Pew Charitable Trusts) The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Alexander and Margaret Stewart Trust announced today the 2018 class of Pew-Stewart Scholars for Cancer Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Five new species of snail-sucking snakes discovered
(American Museum of Natural History) New research led by the American Museum of Natural History has uncovered five new species of snakes in Ecuador and Peru with peculiar dining etiquette: they suck the viscous bodies of snails out of their shells. The new species, most of which are considered endangered or vulnerable, are described today in the journal Zookeys, which also includes a new evolutionary tree for the diverse group of snail eaters in Central and South America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

There's Waldo!
(California Institute of Technology) Caltech researchers in collaboration with Cedars-Sinai and West Virginia University have discovered the neurons that activate when a person finds an item they are looking for. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New type of photosynthesis discovered
(Imperial College London) The discovery changes our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite the textbooks.It will also tailor the way we hunt for alien life and provide insights into how we could engineer more efficient crops that take advantage of longer wavelengths of light. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

TNT could be headed for retirement after 116 years on the job
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the US Army Research Laboratory in Aberdeen, Md., have developed a novel 'melt-cast' explosive material that could be a suitable replacement for Trinitrotoluene, more commonly known as TNT. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Elevated androgens don't hinder dads' parenting -- at least not in lemurs
(University of Arizona) Surprising new research findings show that male lemurs' androgen levels increase the more they engage in child care behaviors. This was unexpected, since androgens are commonly associated with aggression and mate competition, which could potentially impede nurturing behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Synthetic biologists get $1.7 million to engineer world's strongest biomaterial
(Colorado State University) Synthetic biologists at Colorado State University are attempting to manufacture sporopollenin in the lab using plants, and to control its properties using gene parts designed for specific functions, known as genetic circuits. Their goal is to produce coatings that could one day protect ships, bridges and other infrastructure that crack as they age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Novel in vitro approaches for toxicity testing of inhaled substances
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Integrated approaches that avoid the use of animals to assess the toxicity of inhaled materials may include a computational model to screen for chemical reactivity, a human tissue-based assay to predict the absorption of a chemical into the respiratory tract, and other types of advanced systems based on in vitro and in vivo respiratory biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Markers, erasers, and germs, oh my!
(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) A thorough, terminal cleaning of hospital rooms between patients is essential for eliminating environmental contamination, and a checklist is a standard tool to guide the cleaning staff. But new research presented at the APIC 45th Annual Conference offers an important reminder that the checklist is only as good as the list itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ghost cytometry
Ghost imaging is a technique used to produce an object’s image without using a spatially resolving detector. Here we develop a technique we term "ghost cytometry," an image-free ultrafast fluorescence "imaging" cytometry based on a single-pixel detector. Spatial information obtained from the motion of cells relative to a static randomly patterned optical structure is compressively converted into signals that arrive sequentially at a single-pixel detector. Combinatorial use of the temporal waveform with the intensity distribution of the random pattern allows us to computationally reconstruct cell m...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ota, S., Horisaki, R., Kawamura, Y., Ugawa, M., Sato, I., Hashimoto, K., Kamesawa, R., Setoyama, K., Yamaguchi, S., Fujiu, K., Waki, K., Noji, H. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology reports Source Type: news

Seeing ghosts
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Time to Swim in the Data Sea
Eight years ago, the Deepwater Horizon explosion in the Gulf of Mexico focused the world's attention on a catastrophic human and environmental tragedy. Not long after oil began to gush into the Gulf of Mexico, it became clear that there was inadequate scientific knowledge about the effects of an oil release of such magnitude on the environment. Click here to read more.       (Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials)
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Blending biotech and business, new UC Berkeley program targets next generation of startups
There are too few people who know biology and business to feed the management pipeline needed to grow new biotech companies. This UC Berkeley program looks to fix that. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Prof Julia Buckingham & Prof Iain Clarke recognised in 2018 Queen ’s Birthday Honours
Congratulations to two distinguished endocrinologists, Prof Julia Buckingham and Professor Iain Clarke, who are among the academics honoured in the 2018 Queen’s Birthday Honours list.Prof Julia Buckingham, Vice-Chancellor at Brunel University London and former Society for Endocrinology President has been awarded a CBE. She has been honoured for services to biology and education, in recognition of her distinguished career as a pharmacologist and academic leader. Professor Iain Clarke of Monash University in Melbourne has also been recognised as a Member in the General Division of the Order of Australia fo...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - June 13, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Big data identifies lipids as signatures of health and disease
Biology is swaddled in lipids: fats, oils, and even waxes envelop cells and their organelles, mediate the flow of vast biological information networks, protect fragile tissues, and store essential energy across multiple organisms. But despite their importance, lipids have traditionally been among the hardest biomolecules to study because of the diversity of their molecular structures, which are not determined by the well-defined building blocks and simple rules that govern DNA, RNA, and proteins. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

UGA and UConn Health researchers discover roles and teamwork of CRISPR-Cas proteins
(University of Georgia) Recently published research from the University of Georgia and UConn Health provides new insight about the basic biological mechanisms of the RNA-based viral immune system known as CRISPR-Cas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New research in Kenya finds sweet spot for harvesting reef fish
(Wildlife Conservation Society) An age-old challenge of determining the right amount of fish to harvest from the sea has finally been overcome with the creation of a new biomass-yield model that captures all the necessary factors for accuracy, according to a new WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antarctic fungi found to be effective against citrus canker
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Brazilian researchers have identified activity against Xanthomonas citri in 29 fungi isolated from samples collected in Antarctica. One of the compounds inhibited reproduction of the bacterium by up to 98 percent. The process of purifying and submitting bioactive compounds to toxicological tests is expected to be concluded no later than 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fat cell filling, ketogenic diet, and the history of biochemistry
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Recent articles in the Journal of Lipid Research investigate how brown fat converts to white, how cells in the liver fill fat droplets, and how eating a ketogenic or calorie-restricted diet may change a mouse's metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ISB develops stress test to predict how diatoms will react to ocean acidification
(Institute for Systems Biology) Researchers at the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) have shown that diatoms can withstand population collapse in an acidified environment by conserving valuable energy normally used for carbon dioxide consumption. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic soil prospecting yields wealth of potential antibiotics
(University of California - Berkeley) Though soil bacteria have provided some of our best antibiotics, the drugs come from a small group of all the microbes in soil. UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab scientists used metagenomics to sequence all the genomes of soil microbes in a teaspoon of soil to search for molecules that look like antibiotics. They found several hundred clusters of genes similar to the genes of known antibiotics, plus other complex and possibly useful molecules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

For 100 million years, amber freezes a tableau of tick's worst day ever
(University of Kansas) This is the first time this kind of interaction between ticks and spiders has been documented in the fossil record. Even though ticks aren't a typical staple of spider diets, spiders can occasionally prey on ticks in modern ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stem cell-derived organoids for testing gene delivery to retinal & photoreceptor cells
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study that compared six of the most promising adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene therapy vectors in human retinal organoid models showed clear distinctions in the efficiency of gene transfer to both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and photoreceptor cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Periodontal cell sheet technique promotes bone and ligament formation on dental implant
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers used periodontal ligament (PDL)-derived stem cells to create a cell sheet, attached it to a titanium implant, and transplanted it into the mandibular bone of a dog, demonstrating the formation of a periodontal-like structure containing both cementum- and PDL-like tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cryo-EM reveals interaction between major drug targets
(Van Andel Research Institute) For the first time, scientists have visualized the interaction between two critical components of the body's vast cellular communication network, a discovery that could lead to more effective medications with fewer side effects for conditions ranging from migraine to cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Interest in tandem solar cells heats up
(American Chemical Society) For decades, silicon solar cells have been used to convert energy from sunlight into electricity. However, recent improvements in perovskite alternatives are moving tandem devices -- made of both silicon and perovskite - closer to market, according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Muscle growth in the computer: international team wants to unravel the formation of myofibrils
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) cfaed Group Leader (TU Dresden), together with two other international scientists, acquires 'Human Frontier Science Program' funding for investigation of myofibrils. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

British mammals' fight for survival
(University of Sussex) Almost one in five of British mammal species face a high risk of extinction, according to the first comprehensive review of their populations for more than 20 years launched today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cannabis does not increase suicidal behavior in psychiatric patients: McMaster
(McMaster University) McMaster University researchers have found there is no significant association between cannabis use and suicidal behavior in people with psychiatric disorders. The study findings contrast with pre-existing data that shows the drug is linked to an increased chance of suicidal behavior in the general population. The study was published this week in the journal Biology of Sex Differences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fat cell filling, ketogenic diet, and the history of biochemistry:
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Recent articles in the Journal of Lipid Research investigate how brown fat converts to white, how cells in the liver fill fat droplets, and how eating a ketogenic or calorie-restricted diet may change a mouse's metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Network biology reveals pathogen targets in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Using systems biology, researchers successfully identified previously unknown protein targets of plant pathogens in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, employing some of the same methods used to analyze social networks or biological networks. Their theoretical framework, they say, could help analyze other interactions between species to reveal pathogen contact points. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Reason I Jump: autism memoir becomes a theatre-maze in Scotland
Autistic performers share their own stories in an outdoor production which turns Naoki Higashida ’s remarkable book into a journey through a labyrinthThe theatre can be a difficult place for people with autism. I remember taking my son when he was younger. I could feel him squirming, trapped in the seat next to me, confused by the strange convention where people seem to be talking to you but you are not allowed to talk back. The darkened auditorium filled with surprises and the lack of control over the experience made for a situation that could have been designed to make a young autistic person anxious – second...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Graham Eatough Tags: Theatre Stage Culture Autism National Theatre of Scotland Immersive theatre Young people Family Children's theatre Stagecraft Glasgow Society Life and style UK news Psychology Human biology Science Books Source Type: news

Deadly fungus found for first time in critically endangered amphibian species
(University of Plymouth) A fungal pathogen which has led to the extinction of entire species in South America has been recorded for the first time in critically endangered amphibians in India. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Environmental threats put bumblebee queens under pressure
(University of California - Riverside) In a study published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, researchers at the University of California, Riverside found that environmental threats are piling onto the stress faced by nest-building bumblebee queens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

103rd ESA Annual Meeting: Preview and highlights
(Ecological Society of America) Extreme events are made worse by human activities. The ability of ecosystems to respond depends on how resilient they are, a characteristic also undermined by land-use practices that increase effects of extreme conditions. Clearly, the sustainability of ecosystem and human well-being depends on ecosystem resilience to extreme events. The following selected sessions and events at the Annual Meeting delve into this year's meeting theme. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bacterial enzymes: The biological role of europium
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Rare earth elements (REEs) are an indispensable component of the digital technologies that are now an integral part of our everyday life. Yet their biological role has been discovered only recently. A few years ago it became apparent that these metals are essential elements for methano- and methylotrophic bacteria. One representative is the bacterium Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum SolV, which was found in a volcanic mudpot near Naples, Italy, and is known to be strictly dependent on REEs such as lanthanum and cerium for its growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Structural biology: Until the last cut
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Ribosomes are the cell's protein factories. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now structurally characterized late stages in the assembly of the human small ribosomal subunit, yielding detailed insights into their maturation principles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news