Near-infrared spectroscopy could improve flu vaccine manufacturing
(North Carolina State University) Recent research outlines how near-infrared spectroscopy could be used to make cell-culture-based flu vaccine manufacturing faster and more efficient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The fine print
(University of Utah) University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Robby Bowles and his team have developed a method to 3D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blue roses could be coming soon to a garden near you
(American Chemical Society) For centuries, gardeners have attempted to breed blue roses with no success. But now, thanks to modern biotechnology, the elusive blue rose may finally be attainable. Researchers have found a way to express pigment-producing enzymes from bacteria in the petals of a white rose, tinting the flowers blue. They report their results in ACS Synthetic Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What causes nuclear waste glass to dissolve?
(University of Houston) Researchers from the University of Houston, the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Pittsburgh are working to make encasing nuclear waste in glass safer, studying what causes the glass to begin to deteriorate relatively quickly at some point and how to slow or stop the process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tiny tools for a big industry
(American Chemical Society) Even with technological advances in recent years, the petroleum industry still struggles to squeeze as much oil and gas as possible out of underground reservoirs. Now the big industry is looking to nanotechnology to boost efficiency. According to an article inChemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the tiny particles could help pinpoint oil pockets, monitor underground conditions and extract more trapped oil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Advances in deep learning for drug discovery and biomarker development published in top journal
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine, one of the industry leaders bridging deep learning for biology, chemistry and digital medicine, announced the publication of a special issue dedicated to 'Deep Learing for Drug Discovery and Biomarker Development' in one of the top industry journals celebrating its 15th anniversary published by the American Chemical Society, Molecular Pharmaceutics. The special issue starts with an article by the founder and CEO of Insilico Medicine, Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, titled " Artificial Intelligence for Drug Discovery, Biomarker Development, and Generation of Novel Chemistry " . ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New appropriate use criteria for lumbar puncture in Alzheimer's diagnosis
(Alzheimer's Association) In preparation for more tools that detect and measure the biology associated with Alzheimer's and other dementias earlier and with more accuracy, an Alzheimer's Association-led Workgroup has published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for lumbar puncture (spinal tap) and spinal fluid analysis in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antidepressants pose a threat to wildlife due to their presence in water supplies, say experts
Experts from Portsmouth’s Institute of Marine Biology are among those calling for a range of measures to tackle the issue of antidepressants in the water supply. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ScienceTake: What a Frog Needs to Make That Leap
(Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JAMES GORMAN Tags: Animal Behavior Frogs Biology Letters (Journal) Twain, Mark Chris Richards Source Type: news

Scientists go 'back to the future,' create flies with ancient genes to study evolution
(New York University) Scientists at New York University and the University of Chicago have created fruit flies carrying reconstructed ancient genes to reveal how ancient mutations drove major evolutionary changes in embryonic development--the impact of which we see today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists aim to use crowdsourced data to improve flood predictions
(University at Buffalo) In 2011, University at Buffalo hydrogeologist Chris Lowry hammered a giant measuring staff into the bottom of a Western New York pond. Nearby, he posted instructions explaining how passersby could read the staff and text him the water level. With these humble beginnings, CrowdHydrology was launched. It has since expanded to streams into 14 states, and Lowry is working with NOAA scientists to find ways to use CrowdHydrology to improve flooding predictions in the U.S. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

IIASA contributes to IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees C
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has published its Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees C, a new assessment on minimizing global warming, and multiple IIASA researchers were involved in its production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Maximizing the carbon and biodiversity benefits of restoration along rivers and streams
(Point Blue Conservation Science) Restoring forests has become a world-wide strategy for simultaneously addressing the challenges of climate change and biodiversity conservation. In a new study, scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science assessed how successful restoration efforts in California's Central Valley were at these two goals. Key among the findings was the conclusion that, in some cases, optimizing for carbon storage may come at the expense of biodiversity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This bacterium gets paid in gold
(University of California - Berkeley) UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab scientists have placed light-absorbing gold nanoclusters inside a bacterium, creating a biohybrid system that produces a higher yield of chemical products, such as biofuels, than previously demonstrated. The biohybrid captures sunlight and carbon dioxide to make chemicals useful not only on Earth but also in the exotic environment of space. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wind holds key to climate change turnaround
(University of Delaware) Research co-led by a University of Delaware professor could help bring about the kind of far-reaching changes deemed necessary in the UN's dire new climate change report. He found that when westerly winds in the Antarctic Ocean strengthen during the austral summer (Oct.-Feb.), surface waters in the region acidify faster than can be accounted for by increases in carbon dioxide from the atmosphere alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Seed oils are best for LDL cholesterol
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Using a statistical technique called network meta-analysis, researchers have combined the results of dozens of studies of dietary oils to identify those with the best effect on patients' LDL cholesterol and other blood lipids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding therapeutic targets to prevent atherosclerosis
(University of Houston) After discovering a protein partnership that protects blood vessels, University of Houston biologist Michihisa Umetani, backed by the National Institutes of Health, is working to prevent atherosclerosis, or fat buildup inside the arteries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Louisiana amphibian shows unique resistance to global disease
(Louisiana State University) Amphibian populations around the world are declining due to a skin disease caused by fungus. However, an amphibian commonly found in Louisiana, the three-toed amphiuma, has shown a resistance to the fungus, in a new study led by researchers at LSU, Southeastern Louisiana University, Duquesne University and the University of Washington. The study was published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sustainable intensification of crops topic of symposium
(American Society of Agronomy) Sustainable intensification is an approach that aims to increase crop yields on existing agricultural land while minimizing the negative environmental pressures and impacts of agricultural systems. Scientists at the American Society of Agronomy and Crop Science Society annual meeting will discuss sustainable intensification at a special symposium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA is awarded $5 million to develop tools to detect lung cancer earlier
Researchers from the UCLA School of Dentistry and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have been awarded $5 million over five years from the National Cancer Institute to develop liquid biopsy tools for testing individuals who could have lung cancer — the leading cause of cancer death in both U.S. men and women. The award, one of only six given in the nation, will support further development of the tools to improve methods for early detection of lung cancer.Today ’s standard of care in diagnosing lung cancer involves a low-dose computed tomography scan of the lungs, evaluating whether there are what are c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gene editing in human embryos takes step closer to reality
Successful correction of genetic problems in mice before birth raises hopes of similar treatments for humansGene editing to correct faulty DNA in human embryos has taken a step closer to becoming a reality, with scientists showing it is possible to correct genetic problems in mice before they are born.Researchers used a form of the gene-editing tool Crispr-Cas9 to introduce a mutation into a gene that would otherwise cause lethal liver failure in mice. While the approach has previously been shown to work in mice after birth, the latest study showed it was also possible to make the all-important tweak before they were born....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Genetics Biology Science World news Source Type: news

Genetics research 'biased towards studying white Europeans'
Ethnic minorities set to miss out on medical benefits of research, scientist warnsPeople from minority ethnic backgrounds are set to lose out on medical benefits of genetics research due to an overwhelming bias towards studying white European populations, a leading scientist has warned.Prof David Curtis, a geneticist and psychiatrist at University College London, has called on funding bodies to do more to address the emerging issue that genetic tests developed using samples from white Europeans can give meaningless results when applied to other ethnic groups. The problem could intensify as the clinical applications of gene...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Science Biology Medical research Source Type: news

Dryer, less predictable environment may have spurred human evolution
(University of Arizona) Evidence of a variable but progressively drying climate coincides with a major shift in stone-tool-making abilities and the appearance of modern Homo sapiens. Sediment cores obtained by the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project provide the first continuous environmental context for the diverse archeological evidence recovered from nearby localities in the East African rift valley. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world
(University of Washington) A new analysis that uses high-resolution data for 24 ocean regions in Africa, Europe, North and South America and Australasia shows that 14 percent of the overall seafloor shallower than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) is trawled. The analysis shows that the footprint of bottom-trawl fishing on continental shelves and slopes across the world's oceans often has been substantially overestimated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genes responsible for difference in flower color of snapdragons identified
(Institute of Science and Technology Austria) Snapdragons are tall plants, and flower in a range of colors. In Spain, where snapdragons grow wild, these flower colors show a remarkable pattern: areas of magenta and yellow blooming flowers are separated by just a two kilometer long stretch in which flower colors mix. Writing in today's edition of PNAS, scientists report that they investigate the causes of this pattern and identified the genes responsible for flower color difference from DNA sequence data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study shows land-locked Atlantic salmon also use magnetic field to navigate
(Oregon State University) A new study shows that Atlantic salmon use the Earth's magnetic field as a navigational tool -- much like their cousins, Pacific salmon -- and don't lose that ability through several generations of fish even after they have been transplanted into a land-locked lake. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Expanding fungal diversity, one cell at a time
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Reported Oct. 8, 2018, in Nature Microbiology, a team led by researchers at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, has developed a pipeline to generate genomes from single cells of uncultivated fungi. The approach was tested on several uncultivated fungal species representing early diverging fungi, the earliest evolutionary branches in the fungal genealogy that provide a repertoire of important and valuable gene products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Getting a grip on the slow but unique evolution of sharks
(RIKEN) Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan, in collaboration with other Japanese institutes and aquariums, have decoded the whole genomes of two shark species for the first time and improved the whale shark genome sequences released previously. By analyzing the genomes and comparing them with those of other vertebrate species, they have constructed an overview of their unique life histories and evolutionary paths. This work was published online in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When yesterday's agriculture feeds today's water pollution
(University of Montreal) Water quality is threatened by a long history of fertilizer use on land, Canadian scientists find. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Big discoveries about tiny particles
(University of Delaware) Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoparticles are essential to realizing their promise in being used to create exciting new products. This new research has taken a significant step toward gaining the knowledge that can lead to better performance with products using polymer nanoparticles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Carbon emissions from Amazonian forest fires up to 4 times worse than feared
(Lancaster University) Carbon losses caused by El Ni ñ o forest fires of 2015 and 2016 could be up to four times greater than thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Want to live for ever? Flush out your zombie cells
As time passes, the number of damaged, ‘senescent’ cells in our bodies increases. These in turn are responsible for many effects of ageing. Now scientists are working to eliminate themIn a lab just south of San Francisco I am looking at two blown-up images of microscope slides on a computer screen, side by side. The slides are the same cross-sections of mouse knees from a six-month-old and an 18-month-old animal. The older mouse ’s image has a splattering of little yellow dots, the younger barely any. That staining indicates the presence of so-called senescent cells – “zombie cells” that...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Ageing Medical research Biology Science Source Type: news

AIBS Launches New Programmatic Series
The American Institute of Biological Sciences is pleased to announce a new programmatic series that offers AIBS members the information, training, and resources required to advance biology, develop new professional skills, and inform decision making at all levels. The new Leadership in Biology initiative launched in June with the release of the first BioScience Talks podcast. In addition to the new monthly BioScience Talks program, AIBS is offering a series of online and in-person programs to our members in the coming year that will address emerging opportunities and challenges in data sharing, discuss new research on ...
Source: AIBS News - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Staring down IP theft lawsuit, synthetic biology company seeks $86M IPO
Twist Biosciences Corp. — a fast-growing company that makes synthetic DNA modified to serve as a tool in drug research and development, industrial chemicals, agriculture and even data storage — filed Wednesday to raise $86.3 million through an initial public offering. Twist, based in San Francisco but moving next year to space in South San Francisco, is the 18th Bay Area life sciences company to file or complete an IPO this year. It is the most biotech IPOs in a calendar year since 19 companies… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 5, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

New chapter of WormBook in GENETICS
Check out the new chapter of WormBook in GENETICS: From “the Worm” to “the Worms” and Back Again: The Evolutionary Developmental Biology of Nematodes by Eric Haag, David Fitch and Marie Delattre. (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - October 5, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication external website news wormbook Source Type: news

Last Chance to Enter the 2018 Faces of Biology Photo Contest
Enter the Faces of Biology Photo Contest for your chance to win $250 and to have your photo appear on the cover of the journal BioScience. The competition, sponsored by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), recognizes scientists who use imagery to communicate aspects of biological research to the public and policymakers. The theme of the contest is “Faces of Biology.” Photographs entered into the competition must depict a person, such as a scientist, researcher, technician, collections curator, or student, engaging in biological research. The research may occur outside, in a lab, with a natura...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Could bacteria fuel the future?
(University of Delaware) The bacteria that caused your last stomach bug might provide the key to producing new fuels from renewable sources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanoplatform developed with three molecular imaging modalities for tumor diagnosis
(Universidad Complutense de Madrid) Nanotechnology and biotechnology are bringing us increasingly closer to personalised cancer treatment. With proven effectiveness in mice, the JANUS hybrid nanoplatform developed by a team of researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) incorporates three types of molecular medical imaging to locate and diagnose solid tumours, thereby increasing the sensitivity, resolution and specificity of these tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Species-rich forests store twice as much carbon as monocultures
(German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig) Species-rich subtropical forests can take up twice as much carbon as monocultures. This has been reported by an international research team in Science. The study was carried out as part of a unique field experiment with forests grown specifically for this purpose in China. Data from plots with a total of over 150,000 trees were analyzed. The results speak in favor of using many different tree species during reforestation. Thus, both species conservation and climate protection can be promoted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

GA4GH announces new interoperability standards for genomic data sharing
(Global Alliance for Genomics and Health) Three new deliverables from the GA4GH Connect strategic roadmap, released today at the GA4GH 6th Plenary Meeting, address issues of variant discovery, reference sequence harmonisation, and cloud computing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Protein dynamics: Molecular machines at work
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a special fluorescence-based imaging technique to track the shape changes that occur when pore proteins in the cell membrane export molecules into the extracellular medium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bag a job, bag your prey
(National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)) How many jobs should an applicant consider before accepting the next job offer? Turns out the same decision-making process that goes into searching for a job also applies to hunters searching for prey, and the knowledge can be used in conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Alaskan carbon assessment has implications for national climate policy
(Ecological Society of America) A collection of articles in Ecological Applications provides a synthesis of the Alaska terrestrial and aquatic carbon cycle. These papers stem from efforts by the USGS, U.S. Forest Service, and university scientists to assess past and future carbon fluxes as mandated by congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ASU research graces cover of ACS journal
(Arizona State University) Gary Moore, an assistant professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and a researcher with the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, and his team won the coveted honor when their research article, " Electrocatalytic Properties of Binuclear Cu(II) Fused Porphyrins for Hydrogen Evolution, " was selected for the cover of the October edition of ACS Catalysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New method measures single molecules from nanoliter of blood in real time
(University of Groningen) University of Groningen scientists, led by Associate Professor of Chemical Biology Giovanni Maglia, have designed a nanopore system that is capable of measuring different metabolites simultaneously in a variety of biological fluids, all in a matter of seconds. The electrical output signal is easily integrated into electronic devices for home diagnostics. The results were published in Nature Communications on Oct. 5. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Concept Clearance » Renewal of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study
The primary goal is to create a diverse and well characterized cohort to understand how experiences in childhood interact with each other and a child ’ s changing biology to affect brain development and social, behavioral, mental and physical health outcomes. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

US plan to genetically alter crops via insects feared to be biological war plan
Program says it will use virus-carrying insects to engineer crops, but some worry it ’s a way to develop biological agentsGovernment-backed researchers in America are aiming to use virus-carrying insects to genetically engineer crops – raising fears the technology could be used for biological weapons.A new article in the journalScience explores the shadowy program funded by the USDefense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa).Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Erin Durkin Tags: Farming Insects Environment US news Biology Viruses Animals Technology Wildlife Science Source Type: news

Matter: Deep in Human DNA, a Gift From the Neanderthals
The Neanderthals probably infected modern humans with viruses, perhaps even an ancient form of H.I.V. But our extinct relatives also gave us genetic defenses. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Genetics and Heredity Proteins Neanderthal Man Viruses Evolution (Biology) Biology and Biochemistry Cell (Journal) Source Type: news

Living organisms find a critical balance
(Arizona State University) Biologists know a lot about how life works, but they are still figuring out the big questions of why life exists, why it takes various shapes and sizes, and how life is able to amazingly adapt to fill every nook and cranny on Earth. An interdisciplinary team of researchers at ASU has discovered that the answers to these questions may lie in the ability of life to find a middle ground, balancing between robustness and adaptability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Artificial enzymes convert solar energy into hydrogen gas
(Uppsala University) In a new scientific article, researchers at Uppsala University describe how, using a completely new method, they have synthesised an artificial enzyme that functions in the metabolism of living cells. These enzymes can utilize the cell's own energy, and thereby enable hydrogen gas to be produced from solar energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news