Research reveals secret shared by comets and sand crabs
(Nagoya University) Researchers at Nagoya University find a mechanical connection between sand crab burrow widths and widths of cometary pits using a simple granular experiment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Aequatus -- a free, open-source visualization tool enabling in-depth comparison of homologous genes
(Earlham Institute) Aequatus -- a new bioinformatics tool developed at Earlham Institute -- is helping to give an in-depth view of syntenic information between different species, providing a system to better identify important, positively selected, and evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research Will Employ Data Science to Determine Suicide Risk in Elderly
A new research program will harness machine learning and data science to sift through tens of millions of records of U.S. nursing home and assisted living residents to identify risk factors for suicide. The project will be led by Yue Li, Ph.D., in the University of Rochester Medical Center Department of Public Health Sciences and Xueya Cai, Ph.D., in the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology and is supported by a $1.6 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - October 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Evolutionary shift toward protein-based architecture in trypanosomal mitochondrial ribosomes
Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) plays key functional and architectural roles in ribosomes. Using electron microscopy, we determined the atomic structure of a highly divergent ribosome found in mitochondria of Trypanosoma brucei, a unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans. The trypanosomal mitoribosome features the smallest rRNAs and contains more proteins than all known ribosomes. The structure shows how the proteins have taken over the role of architectural scaffold from the rRNA: They form an autonomous outer shell that surrounds the entire particle and stabilizes and positions the functionally important regions...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ramrath, D. J. F., Niemann, M., Leibundgut, M., Bieri, P., Prange, C., Horn, E. K., Leitner, A., Boehringer, D., Schneider, A., Ban, N. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Super-resolution chromatin tracing reveals domains and cooperative interactions in single cells
We report an imaging method for tracing chromatin organization with kilobase- and nanometer-scale resolution, unveiling chromatin conformation across topologically associating domains (TADs) in thousands of individual cells. Our imaging data revealed TAD-like structures with globular conformation and sharp domain boundaries in single cells. The boundaries varied from cell to cell, occurring with nonzero probabilities at all genomic positions but preferentially at CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)- and cohesin-binding sites. Notably, cohesin depletion, which abolished TADs at the population-average level, did not diminish TAD-lik...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bintu, B., Mateo, L. J., Su, J.-H., Sinnott-Armstrong, N. A., Parker, M., Kinrot, S., Yamaya, K., Boettiger, A. N., Zhuang, X. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Structure of the largest, most complex ribosome
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Imaging chromatin spatial organization
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Link Link by Isabella Rossellini review – superstar's pooch steals the show
Queen Elizabeth Hall, LondonA cod-scientific lecture on animal behaviour is given a comic twist in a surreal show that is too cutesyIsabella Rossellini went back to university to study animal behaviour, she tells us, as she delivers a cod-donnish lecture on everything from scientific theories on animal intelligence to the sex lives of whales.Co-directed by Guido Torlonia, it is billed as aone-woman show but is not quite that. Alongside her adorable and supremely obedient dog, Pan, there is alsoSchuyler Beeman, who is a silent performer, bringing stuffed animal toys or puppets on to the stage with a flourish while dressed i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Arifa Akbar Tags: Stage Theatre Culture Southbank Centre Isabella Rossellini Film Animal behaviour Biology Science Circus Source Type: news

If the Government Redefines Gender to Exclude Trans People, It Could Worsen an Urgent Public Health Crisis
The New York Times reports that the Trump Administration, via the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is circulating a memo that seeks to define gender “on a basis that is clear, grounded in science, objective and administrable.” This definition, to potentially apply throughout several federal government agencies, states: “The sex listed on a person’s birth certificate, as originally issued, shall constitute definitive proof of a person’s sex unless rebutted by reliable genetic evidence.” Whatever else one might believe about this definition and its goals, it is not grounded i...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tia Powell, Jules Chyten Brennan, Viraj Patel, Vafa Tabatabaie Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news

Pancreatic α and δ cells can produce insulin
Research, published inNature Cell Biology, suggests that pancreaticα andδ cells can produce insulin, when insulin producingβ cells become damaged or die. Phys (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 24, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Country diary: the magical mushroom biology of the fairy ring
Wenlock Edge, Shropshire: The appearance and disappearance of these strange forms gives them an uncanniness that seems to have nothing to do with their ecological functionThe fairy bonnets have popped up from the turf and the world is reflected in a million raindrops. Suspended on spindly stalks, the pale flesh of their pointy heads has an ethereal glow. TheseMarasmius fungi grow in troops or circles in grassland as rotters of organic litter, feeders of grass and stages for supernatural dances.Unable to manufacture its own food, the fungus is a collective body made of hyphae, the filaments that form the mycelium, an intric...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Paul Evans Tags: Fungi Rural affairs Biology Plants Environment Science UK news Source Type: news

UMass Amherst research shows spider eyes work together to track stimuli
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Using a specially designed eye-tracker for use with spiders, biologists Elizabeth Jakob, Skye Long and Adam Porter at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, along with colleagues in New York and New Zealand, report in a new paper that their tests in jumping spiders show a secondary set of eyes is crucial to the principal eyes' ability to track moving stimuli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Virtual reality brings dog's anatomy to life for veterinary students
(Virginia Tech) So she walked across the room and slipped on a virtual reality (VR) headset. Suddenly, she could see a large picture of a dog's lungs and skeletal structure floating in mid-air in front of her. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Innovative gene therapy trial for Parkinson's disease
(University College London) A trial for a new gene therapy, known as AXO-Lenti-PD, aimed at improving the supply of dopamine in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease has been launched by researchers at UCL and University College London Hospitals (UCLH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Giant flying squirrel fossil from a Barcelona landfill clarifies the squirrel family tree
(University of Kansas) A study just published in eLife shows a fossil found in a Barcelona landfill to be about 11.6 million years old -- making the Miopetaurista neogrivensis specimen the oldest-known giant flying squirrel discovered. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wood sponge soaks up oil from water (video)
(American Chemical Society) Oil spills and industrial discharge can contaminate water with greasy substances. Although it's true that oil and water don't mix, separating and recovering each component can still be challenging. Now, researchers have created sponges made from wood that selectively absorb oil, and then can be squeezed out and used again. They report their results in ACS Nano. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

BASF licenses CRISPR-Cpf1 from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
(BASF SE) BASF has attained a global, non-exclusive licensing agreement with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard for the use of CRISPR-Cpf1 genome editing technology to improve products in agricultural and industrial microbiology applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Caledonian crows can create compound tools
(University of Oxford) An international team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and the University of Oxford have revealed that New Caledonian crows are able to create tools by combining two or more otherwise non-functional elements, an ability so far observed only in humans and great apes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Growing noise in the ocean can cause dolphins to change their calls
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) Noise levels in the world's oceans are on the rise, but little is known about its impact on marine mammals like dolphins that rely on sound for communication. Researchers from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have found that dolphins are simplifying their calls to be heard over noise from recreational boats and other vessels in nearby shipping lanes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Caledonian crows can create compound tools
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) The birds are able to combine individual parts to form a long-distance reaching aid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Golf course managers challenged by fungicide-resistant turf grass disease
(Penn State) Dollar spot -- the most common, troublesome and damaging turfgrass disease plaguing golf courses -- is becoming increasingly resistant to fungicides applied to manage it, according to Penn State researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study uncovers the interaction of calcium channels
(DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)) Korean researchers have identified the interactions of the combinants among calcium channel proteins that exist in nerve and heart cells. The result opened a new path of developing treatments for high blood pressure and brain diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mathematicians propose new hunting model to save rhinos and whales from extinction
(City University London) Mathematicians have created a new model -- of a variety commonly found in the world of finance -- to show how to harvest a species at an optimal rate, while making sure that the animals do not get wiped out by chance.Published in the Journal of Mathematical Biology, the research was conducted by academics at Tufts University, Wayne State University, City, University of London and University of Hong Kong. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How people power can track alien species -- Study
(Anglia Ruskin University) New research published in the Nature journal Scientific Data shows how the public can play a vital role in helping to track invasive species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Breeding beans that resist weevils
(American Society of Agronomy) A small beetle can cause big losses to bean crops. But a new study has narrowed down the genetic locations of several weevil resistance genes in the common bean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Focus on western women 'skewed our ideas of what birth should look like'
Study finds large variation in shape of birth canals around world – with implications for description of birth used in standard textbooksA focus on western women has skewed our understanding of evolution and twisted ideas of what birth should look like, scientists say.Researchers have found a large variation in the shape of the birth canal between women from different parts of the world – a finding they say has implications both for our understanding of how the pelvis has evolved and our ideas about how babies should move as they leave the womb.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Biology Evolution Women Science Childbirth Source Type: news

Specieswatch: how woodlice are an early warning system for a damp problem
Woodlice are crustaceans, relatives of the shrimp, that have adapted to life on land – but they still prefer damp conditionsThe common rough woodlousePorcellio scaberis one of the five most numerous of 35 species of woodlice that are native to Britain, although there are others that arrived with imported plants and live mostly in greenhouses. Woodlice are remarkable in that they are not insects but crustaceans with 14 legs and an outer shell – their closest relatives being shrimps and lobsters. While they have adapted to life on land, they still need damp conditions to thrive and, like their aquatic cousins, us...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Paul Brown Tags: Animals Animal behaviour Environment Biology Science UK news Wildlife Source Type: news

Amgen Announces 2018 Fourth Quarter Dividend
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Oct. 23, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced that its Board of Directors declared a $1.32 per share dividend for the fourth quarter of 2018. The dividend will be paid on Dec. 7, 2018, to all stockholders of record as of the close of business on Nov. 16, 2018. About Amgen Amgen is committed to unlocking the potential of biology for patients suffering from serious illnesses by discovering, developing, manufacturing and delivering innovative human therapeutics. This approach begins by using tools like advanced human genetics to unravel the complexities of disease and understa...
Source: Amgen News Release - October 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

FINALLY: Trump administration may put an end to transgender lunacy by rigorously defining male and female rooted in biology, not fantasy
(Natural News) For years now the American Left, mostly via the Democratic Party, has been busy tearing down as many of our institutions, mores and values as they can, and this is especially true when it comes to human behavior modification. Leftist liberals have destroyed the traditional concept of marriage, for example, as well as... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GFP Discoverer Osamu Shimomura Dies
The 90-year-old marine biologist won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his isolation of green fluorescent protein. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 23, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Rewilding landscapes can help to solve more than one problem
(Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW)) Urbanisation, biodiversity loss, climate change: just some of the worldwide problems 'rewilding' -- i.e. restoring food chains by returning 'missing' species to the landscape -- can help tackle. Researcher Liesbeth Bakker (NIOO-KNAW) has edited a theme issue of the world's oldest life sciences journal, Phil Trans B, on rewilding, together with a Danish expert. The issue is now available online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nitrogen study casts doubt on ability of plants to continue absorbing same amounts of CO2
(Indiana University) A new study casts doubt as to whether plants will continue to absorb as much carbon dioxide in the future as they have in the past due to declining availability of nitrogen in certain parts of the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to mass produce cell-sized robots
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have discovered a way to mass produce tiny, cell-sized robots that could be used for industrial or biomedical monitoring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Motley crews of bacteria cleanse water at huge oceanic Georgia Aquarium exhibit
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Good bacteria cleaning water in Georgia Aquarium's huge oceanic exhibit delivered a nice surprise to researchers. The aquarium wanted to know which bacteria were at work, so Georgia Tech oceanic biochemists analyzed them: The bacterial colonies raised eyebrows because they were virtually indistinguishable from those found in natural settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Invasive species in an ecosystem harm native organisms but aid other invasive species
(Binghamton University) The presence of an invasive species in an ecosystem makes native organisms more susceptible to pollutants and may encourage the spread of additional invasive species, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Yes, your pet can tell time
(Northwestern University) A new study from Northwestern University has found some of the clearest evidence yet that animals can judge time. By examining the brain's medial entorhinal cortex, the researchers discovered a previously unknown set of neurons that turn on like a clock when an animal is waiting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research brief: Predicting how native plants return to abandoned farm fields
(University of Minnesota) Tracking how seeds move--or disperse--can be difficult because of a seed's small size. However, in a study published in Ecology, researchers at the University of Minnesota's College of Biological Sciences found a solution for tracking seed movement by using electrical engineering and mathematical models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate change, rising sea levels a threat to farmers in Bangladesh
(Ohio State University) Rising sea levels driven by climate change make for salty soil, and that is likely to force about 200,000 coastal farmers in Bangladesh inland as glaciers melt into the world's oceans, according to estimates from a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biodiversity for the birds
(University of Delaware) Can't a bird get some biodiversity around here? The landscaping choices homeowners make can lead to reduced bird populations, thanks to the elimination of native plants and the accidental creation of food deserts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study sheds light on differences between male and female fat tissue, and health
(York University) New research from York University on fat tissue is providing an important clue as to how females stay healthier than males, even as their body fat increases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

6.4 million Euros for research into the birth of agriculture in Europe
(University of Bern) An interdisciplinary team from the universities of Bern, Oxford and Thessaloniki was awarded a 'ERC Synergy Grant' grant of 6.4 million euros from the European Research Council (ERC). The team included researchers from the fields of archeology and biology. Aided by studies conducted in the lakes in Greece and in the south of the Balkans, the project should show how the climate, environment and agriculture have developed over the last 10,000 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First-ever atlas of big-game migrations published
(University of Wyoming) " Wild Migrations: Atlas of Wyoming's Ungulates " is a result of a six-year collaboration between wildlife biologists at the University of Wyoming and cartographers at the University of Oregon. The project uses state-of-the-art animal movement data and cartography to visualize migrations of animals across complex and changing landscapes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Racial differences in colorectal cancer incidence not due to biology
(Regenstrief Institute) A systematic review and meta-analysis from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine has found that, in spite of the higher incidence and death rate of colorectal cancer in blacks, no difference exists in the overall prevalence of advanced, precancerous polyps between average-risk blacks and whites who underwent a screening colonoscopy. These findings suggest that the age at which to begin screening need not differ based on race, provided all other factors -- access to screening, in particular -- are similar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Gut microbiota of infants predicts obesity in children
(American Society for Microbiology) Evaluating the gut microbiota of infants may help identify children who are at risk for becoming overweight or obese, according to results from a recent study published in mBio. The research revealed that gut microbiota composition at two years of life is associated with body mass index (BMI) at age 12. In addition, the BMI at age two was not significantly higher in children who later became overweight/obese, indicating that gut microbiota composition may be the earliest warning sign for detecting obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Applying Science
Not too long ago, the public somewhat blithely accepted the latest scientific discoveries and applications with few questions. Arguably, this is less the case today, particularly when it comes to biology. Click here to read more.       (Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials)
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Preparing Graduate Students for Success
Not long ago while perusing old issues of BioScience, I stumbled across a report in the May 1970 issue, in which Elwood B. Ehrle asked, "Will Graduate Programs in Biology Survive the Seventies?". Calls to re-envision, transform, and modernize graduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education are not new or uncommon. Click here to read more.       (Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials)
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Continue Our Standard Biology Teaching Practices? Bologna
Recently, a colleague and I stumbled onto a conversation about the (now) iconic painting by Laurentius de Voltolina. The painting depicts an image of a University of Bologna lecture, complete with sleeping and gossiping students. The painting reminded most of us how science has grown and matured as a discipline while science education has moved relatively little since the 1300s. Click here to read more.       (Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials)
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

What Are the Rules of International Biology?
Biology is a global endeavor. Regardless of whether the international dimensions of your research are immediately obvious to you, they do exist--and they are important.Click here to read more.       (Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials)
Source: AIBS BioScience Editorials - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Cannabis grown from yeast: does the future of pot lie in a lab?
Much like making craft beer, some companies are now using yeast enzymes to synthetically create THC and CBDUnlike other modern high growth industries, the pot business doesn ’t require a doctorate in science, or even a college degree. Much of the economic hype which surrounds the industry depends on it remaining an agricultural product. But it might not always be that way.In September, the Boston-basedGinkgo Bioworks, which calls itself “the organism company”, landed a deal worth approximately $100m withCronos Group, one of Canada ’s most prominent cannabis companies. Ginkgo promises to produce the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Halperin Tags: Cannabis Biology Science Drugs Society Source Type: news

Cannabis from yeast: will synthetic pot help grow the industry?
Much like making craft beer, yeast enzymes can be used to create THC and CBD, the active chemicals found in marijuanaUnlike other modern high growth industries, the pot business doesn ’t require a doctorate in science, or even a college degree. Much of the economic hype which surrounds the industry depends on it remaining an agricultural product. But it might not always be that way.In September, the Boston-basedGinkgo Bioworks, which calls itself “the organism company”, landed a deal worth approximately $100m withCronos Group, one of Canada ’s most prominent cannabis companies. Ginkgo promises to pr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Halperin Tags: Cannabis Biology Science Source Type: news