Researchers tap rare pristine air to reveal pollution's impact
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Human-caused pollution spurs the production of climate-changing particles known as secondary organic aerosols much more than previously thought. Researchers made the finding by analyzing air samples that were captured aboard a research aircraft as it zigzagged between pristine air over the Amazon rainforest and polluted air over the nearby city of Manaus. It was like a trip back (and forth) through time, as scientists weaved between the two vastly different settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Bombali ebolavirus found in Kenyan bat
(University of Helsinki) Researchers have identified Bombali ebolavirus in an Angolan free-tailed bat captured in the Taita Hills, southeast Kenya. No ebolaviruses have been previously reported from wildlife in countries along the east coast of Africa. There is no current evidence that Bombali ebolavirus infects people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Claudia Bank awarded with the 2019 SMBE Allan Wilson Junior Award for Independent Research
(Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia) The Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution (SMBE) announced today that the 2019 SMBE Allan Wilson Junior Award for Independent Research winner is Claudia Bank, group leader at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ci ê ncia (IGC). This annual award distinguishes one outstanding scientist who is within the first years of his/her independent research career. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

HKUST scientists discover how RNA PoII maintains accurate transcription with super computer
(Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) Scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have recently uncovered the mechanisms of how RNA polymerase II performs intrinsic cleavage reaction to proofread RNA transcriptions, shedding light on how misregulation of accurate transcription can lead to diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sea snakes make record-setting deep dives
(University of Adelaide) Sea snakes, best known from shallow tropical waters, have been recorded swimming at 250 meters in the deep-sea 'twilight zone,' smashing the previous diving record of 133 meters held by sea snakes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High throughput method to produce and screen engineered antimicrobial lanthipeptides
(University of Groningen) Nature has provided us with lots of antimicrobials. However, given the rapid increase of antimicrobial resistance, there is a need for the development of new-to-nature antibiotics. Lantibiotics are an interesting option. Molecular biologists from the University of Groningen and their colleagues in Switzerland and Germany have now developed a pipeline to create and screen large numbers of new lantibiotic peptides. The first results were published on April 1 in Nature Chemical Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 2, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nature versus nurture: Environment exerts greater influence on corn health than genetics
(American Phytopathological Society) In one of the largest and most diverse leaf microbe studies to date, the team monitored the active bacteria on the leaves of 300 diverse lines of corn growing in a common environment. They were especially interested to see how corn genes affected bacteria and found there was little relationship between the two--in fact, the bacteria were much more affected by the environment, although genetics still had a small role. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Transplanted bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells delay ALS disease progression
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) Transplanting human bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells into mice mimicking symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) helped more motor neurons survive and slowed disease progression by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier, University of South Florida researchers report. The new research, published recently in Scientific Reports, contributes to a growing body of work exploring cell therapy approaches to barrier repair in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers developing early detection, home monitoring tests for lupus nephritis
(University of Houston) With $5 million in grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), two University of Houston biomedical researchers are transforming the way lupus is managed, putting biomarkers in the hands of patients to monitor their own disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bentham book series indexed in Scopus
(Bentham Science Publishers) Scopus has recently included eBooks for coverage in its database. Scopus is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature including scientific journals, books and conference proceedings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mosses -- Dynamic and built to last
(University of Connecticut) New UConn research dives deep into the genetic history of mosses. The researchers use DNA from multiple moss organelles and reveal how dynamic these heretofore evolutionary 'dead ends' are. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Blue light could treat superbug infections
(Purdue University) Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that causes infection in various parts of the body, is often called a 'superbug' thanks to its ability to dodge many common antibiotics. Rather than rolling the dice with a multi-drug combination or wasting precious time trying to determine which medicine to prescribe, doctors could soon use a new method for disarming the superbugs: light therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers advance in the development of 'papaya sugarcane'
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Description of genes involved in sugarcane root cell separation could lead to the development of varieties with softened cell walls similar to those of papaya, boosting the production of second-generation etanol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Brightly-colored fairy wrens not attacked by predators more than their dull counterparts
(University of Chicago Press Journals) In 'Conspicuous Plumage Does Not Increase Predation Risk: A Continent-Wide Test Using Model Songbirds,' published in the American Naturalist, Kristal E. Cain examines the factors that drive the predation levels of Australia's fairy wrens. After measuring attack rates on both conspicuously and dull colored 3D fairy wren models in various habitats, Cain found that bright or 'conspicuous' plumage is not associated with an increase in predation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plant pathologist leads research to stop spread of citrus-destroying disease
(University of California - Riverside) A molecular geneticist at the University of California, Riverside, has secured a four-year grant aimed at halting the spread of a deadly bacterial disease that continues to spread among California's citrus trees. The award of nearly $4 million, which comes from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, will help cure citrus trees affected by huanglongbing disease, or HLB, and protect healthy trees from infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trump Proposes $1B Cut to NSF
The President has proposed a $7.1 billion budget fiscal year (FY) 2020 budget for the National Science Foundation (NSF), which represents a 12.5 percent cut from its current funding level. The President’s budget asserts that NSF would accelerate its progress on its “10 Big Ideas for Future Investments,” allocating support to high-priority areas that integrate science and engineering fields and create partnership opportunities with industry, private foundations, other federal agencies, and the education sector. The agency would provide $30 million to each of the six research-focused Big Ideas, that inclu...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President Proposes Shrinking DOE Science Budget by 16 Percent
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would receive $31.7 billion in FY 2020, $3.8 billion below FY 2019 enacted appropriation. Within this, $5.5 billion (-16 percent) would be directed toward the Office of Science. The request allocates 40 percent of Office of Science’s FY 2020 budget to research. Approximately 22,000 researchers are supported by grants from the Office of Science. Funding for Biological and Environmental Research (BER) would be slashed by nearly 30 percent from the FY 2019 level to $494 million, with funds directed to research in foundational genomic sciences. The proposed level of funding for BER...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NASEM Study: Red Wolves Are a Distinct Species
A National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) panel has found that the red wolf is a taxonomically distinct species from the Mexican gray wolf. The committee released its congressionally mandated report, Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf, on March 28, 2019. In 2018, at the direction of Congress, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) asked NASEM to conduct an independent assessment of the taxonomic status of the red wolf and Mexican gray wolf. The study was mandated as a part of an appropriations bill passed in March 2018, in order to inform conser...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Opens 2019 Faces of Biology Photo Contest
Enter the Faces of Biology Photo Contest for your chance to win $250 and to have your photo appear on the cover of the journal BioScience. The competition, sponsored by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), recognizes scientists who use imagery to communicate aspects of biological research to the public and policymakers. The theme of the contest is “Faces of Biology.” Photographs entered into the competition must depict a person, such as a scientist, researcher, technician, collections curator, or student, engaging in biological research. The research may occur outside, in a lab, with a natura...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

American Academy Offers Guidance for Use of Science During a Crisis
The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (Academy) has released a new report co-authored by Drs. Rita Colwell and Gary Machlis that offers best practices and identifies research and policy priorities for improving the use of science during a significant crisis. “From earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, and landslides to oil spills, wildfires, and floods, major disasters place profound stresses on the ability of our society to respond quickly and effectively to safeguard lives, health, and property,” wrote Academy President Jonathan Fanton in the report’s preface. The number of significant, and expens...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

USDA Research and Forest Service Slated for Cuts in FY 2020
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is slated to receive $20.8 billion in FY 2020, $3.6 billion below FY 2019. The proposed budget for research, education, and economics at USDA is 8.2 percent below the FY 2019 level. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), which partners with extramural academic institutions to conduct research, education, and extension activities, would receive $1.4 billion (-5 percent) in FY 2020. Within NIFA, the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) would receive funding at $500 million (+20 percent) for competitive extramural research grants. Lower priority programs su...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

BCoN Report to Offer National Agenda for Biodiversity Collections Research and Education
The Biodiversity Collections Network (BCoN) will release its new report, Extending U.S. Biodiversity Collections to Promote Research and Education, at 9:00 AM eastern time on April 4, 2019, at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. You are invited to this event to learn more about this important report and what it means for science and society. The report is the outcome of a series of workshops and stakeholder conversations that BCoN has held over the past four years. Scientists familiar with the report have expressed enthusiasm for its recommendations. This event is free and open to the public. Space is limited. I...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Radioactivity Largely Cleared from Fish Near Fukushima Plant
An independent study published in PLOS ONE has found that fish in the waters around Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant are largely clear of dangerous radiation resulting from a March 2011 tsunami that destroyed the plant. According to a report by E&E News, the researchers said that they sampled popular seafood species taken from near the Fukushima plant and measured the concentrations of radioactive cesium in fish. Their analysis showed that cesium concentrations had either decreased to levels before the 2011 tsunami or to levels safe for consumption. The research also confirmed that fish species high...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NSF Announces First Convergence Accelerator Pilot
The National Science Foundation (NSF) issued a Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) on March 15, 2019 for a pilot Convergence Accelerator (C-Accel) activity. The program intends to fund 50 Phase 1 projects (up to 9 months) at up to $1 million each. In 2020, Phase 1 projects will be eligible to apply for Phase 2 C-Accel funding, for up to $5 million. The NSF C-Accel pilot seeks to transform how NSF supports innovative science and engineering to accelerate convergence research in areas of national importance by facilitating convergent team-building capacity around high-risk proposals. The initiative reflects NSF’s commitment ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Become an Advocate for Science: Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center
Quick, free, easy, effective, impactful! Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center. The Legislative Action Center is a one-stop shop for learning about and influencing science policy. Through the website, users can contact elected officials and sign-up to interact with lawmakers. The website offers tools and resources to inform researchers about recent policy developments. The site also announces opportunities to serve on federal advisory boards and to comment on federal regulations. This new tool is made possible through contributions from the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Botanical Society of America. AIBS an...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Proteomics profiling of arginine methylation defines PRMT5 substrate specificity
Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze arginine methylation on both chromatin-bound and cytoplasmic proteins. Accumulating evidence supports the involvement of PRMT5, the major type II PRMT, in cell survival and differentiation pathways that are important during development and in tumorigenesis. PRMT5 is an attractive drug target in various cancers, and inhibitors are currently in oncological clinical trials. Nonetheless, given the complex biology of PRMT5 and its multiple nonhistone substrates, it is paramount to fully characterize these dynamic changes in methylation and to link them to the observed antican...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - April 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Musiani, D., Bok, J., Massignani, E., Wu, L., Tabaglio, T., Ippolito, M. R., Cuomo, A., Ozbek, U., Zorgati, H., Ghoshdastider, U., Robinson, R. C., Guccione, E., Bonaldi, T. Tags: STKE Research Resources Source Type: news

Q & A: A 10,000-Genome Milestone for Shared Pediatric Cancer Data
Computational biologist Jinghui Zhang of St. Jude realized scientists could work more efficiently with tools and genomic data shared on the cloud. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

26-Foot Sperm Whale Found Dead With Nearly 50 Pounds of Plastic in Stomach
(MILAN) — An 8-meter (26-foot) sperm whale was found dead off Sardinia with 22 kilograms (48.5 pounds) of plastic in its belly, prompting the World Wildlife Foundation to sound an alarm Monday over the dangers of plastic waste in the Mediterranean Sea. The environmental group said the garbage recovered from the sperm whale’s stomach included a corrugated tube for electrical works, plastic plates, shopping bags, tangled fishing lines and a washing detergent package with its bar code still legible. The female whale beached off the northern coast of Sardinia last week, within the vast Pelagos marine sanctuary that...
Source: TIME: Science - April 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: COLLEEN BARRY / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

Women Die From Heart Attacks More Often Than Men. Here ’s Why — and What Doctors Are Doing About It
Lilly Rocha was 37 years old in 2008 when she began having strange symptoms. When people asked her questions, she knew the answers but couldn’t articulate them. A tingling sensation on her left breast became painful. She thought she might have breast cancer, but her doctor assured her she was just experiencing stress from her demanding job. Her symptoms continued to get worse, and doctors continued to dismiss her. Three months later, at work, she became seriously ill. Luckily, her boss recognized the symptoms—chest and jaw pain and numbness in her left hand—and drove her to the nearest emergency room, whe...
Source: TIME: Health - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Barbara Sadick Tags: Uncategorized heart health Source Type: news

Marine heatwave proves devastating to Shark Bay and dolphins, study finds
Dolphin survival and reproductive rates suffered a significant decline following a 2011 marine heatwave affecting around 1,000km of Western Australia ’ s coastline. The findings, published in Current Biology and representing an international collaboration of researchers and universities, including Zurich and Bristol, have important implications for marine conservation and mitigating the effects of climate change. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence Sheds New Light on Cell Developmental Dynamics
What happens inside a cell when it is activated, changing, or responding to variations in its environment? Researchers from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research have developed a map of how to best model these cellular dynamics. Their work not only highlights the outstanding challenges of tracking cells throughout their growth and lifetime, but also pioneers new ways of evaluating computational biology methods that aim to do this. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - April 1, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Sugar could be sweet solution to respiratory disease
Restriction or inhalation of common sugar could one day treat a range of respiratory diseases, according to new research led by University of Manchester biologists. The study in mice reveals how the ability of cells to use glucose helps to regulate the immune system during lung inflammation. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 1, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Biopsy alternative: 'Wearable' device captures cancer cells from blood
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A prototype wearable device, tested in animal models, can continuously collect live cancer cells directly from a patient's blood. Developed by a team of engineers and doctors at the University of Michigan, it could help doctors diagnose and treat cancer more effectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Global microbial signatures for colorectal cancer established
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Researchers from EMBL, the University of Trento, and their international collaborators have now analysed multiple existing microbiome association studies of colorectal cancer together with newly generated data. Their meta-analyses establish disease-specific microbiome changes which are globally robust - consistent across seven countries on three continents - despite differences in environment, diet and life style. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 1, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pregnant women with long commutes to work at increased risk for adverse birth outcomes
(Lehigh University) In a study published in Economics& Human Biology researchers from Lehigh University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that pregnant women who commute long-distance to work have an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, including having babies born at a low-birth weight. The study is the first to examine the impact of long-distance commuting during pregnancy on infant health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Crop yield in maize influenced by unexpected gene 'moonlighting'
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) Researchers identified a relationship between crop yield in the maize plant and activity of the RAMOSA3 gene. Better understanding of the mechanics in this relationship could further knowledge of plant architecture and help scientists create higher yield, drought-resistant maize crops. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Marine protected reserves do more than restore fish
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) In a new analysis of the effectiveness of marine protected areas worldwide, University of Massachusetts Amherst marine ecologist Brian Cheng and colleagues report that reserves not only replenish target fish populations, they also restore ecological functioning. However, not all reserves performed equally well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Grant will allow scientists to study how prairie strips on farms affect soil over time
(Iowa State University) A new grant will help Iowa State University researchers find answers to how quickly environmental benefits emerge after the installation of prairie strips among row crops and how long those benefits last after the strips are removed. The project also will involve computer modeling of topsoil depth and an economic analysis (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Building blocks of DNA and RNA could have appeared together before life began on Earth
(Scripps Research Institute) Scientists for the first time have found strong evidence that RNA and DNA could have arisen from the same set of precursor molecules even before life evolved on Earth about four billion years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chicago tops list of most dangerous cities for migrating birds
(Cornell University) Scientists at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology ranked metropolitan areas where, due to a combination of light pollution and geography, birds are at the greatest risk of becoming attracted to and disoriented by lights and crashing into buildings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Invasive round gobies may be poised to decimate endangered French Creek mussels
(Penn State) The round goby -- a small, extremely prolific, invasive fish from Europe -- poses a threat to endangered freshwater mussels in northwestern Pennsylvania's French Creek, one of the last strongholds for two species of mussels, according to researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UM researchers publish new discoveries on bacterial viruses
(The University of Montana) University of Montana researchers have published new insights in the Journal Science on how bacteria cause infections, which may help with future infection treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Human activity disrupting iconic African ecosystem, Syracuse biologist finds
(Syracuse University) A Syracuse University researcher has confirmed that Africa's Serengeti-Mara ecosystem -- one of the largest, most protected on Earth -- may be imperiled, due to increased human activity at its border. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ESA tipsheet for April 1, 2019
(Ecological Society of America) Get a sneak peek into these new scientific papers: Artificial lights from cities cause disruption among nocturnally migrating birds; How your age can predict your attitude toward nature; Thinking outside the box when cities are the last chance for saving species; Using new tech to keep a finger on Earth's pulse; Building a global research network to track wildlife in cities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Traffic jam in the cell: How are proteins assigned to specific transporters?
(University of Heidelberg) Special carriers ensure that proteins are transported to where they are needed in the cell. By combining innovative investigative techniques, biochemists at Heidelberg University have succeeded in comprehensively analysing two of these so-called transport vesicles - the COPI and COPII vesicles - for the first time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fossil fly with an extremely long proboscis sheds light on the insect pollination origin
(AKSON Russian Science Communication Association) A long-nosed fly from the Jurassic of Central Asia, reported by Russian paleontologists, provides new evidence that insects have started serving as pollinators long before the emergence of flowering plants. Equipped with a proboscis twice the length of the body, this fly predates the first angiosperms by about 40-45 million years. This suggests that insect pollination began to evolve in association with ancient gymnosperms.The results of the study are published in Gondwana Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Panvigilance -- a strategy to integrate biomarkers in clinical trials to enhance drug safety
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Modern medicines have positively contributed to public health and changed the ways human diseases are prevented and treated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Eccrine Systems announces collaboration with Maxim Integrated Products
(CincyTech) Eccrine Systems, Inc. announced that it is collaborating with Maxim Integrated Products, Inc. (NASDAQ: MXIM) on the development and integration of analog signal processing technologies to drive Eccrine's sweat sensing platform. Maxim Ventures has invested in Eccrine as part of this collaboration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New ebolavirus, found in bats, more widespread than thought
(University of Arkansas) A University of Arkansas biologist found a newly discovered species of ebolavirus, named Bombali, in a bat caught in Kenya. Bombali, which is not known to infect humans, had previously been found only in Sierra Leone, 3,400 miles to the west. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ASU partners with Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings to initiate Global KAITEKI Center
(Arizona State University) A unique center officially opens on April 3 at Arizona State University, housed within the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news