QinFlow's Warrior is Proud to Be 100% Aluminum Free
PLANO, Texas — A recent study concluded that “using uncoated aluminum plates in fluid‐warming systems can lead to a risk of administering potentially harmful concentrations of aluminum when balanced crystalloid solutions are used” and that “even in a coated warming device, aluminum concentrations are detectable, but remain below the limit of quantification, LOQ (i.e. our methodology does not have the ability to differentiate between the concentrations we measured and the FDA threshold)” (Aluminium release by coated and uncoated fluid‐warming devices, T. Perl, N. Kunze‐Szikszay, A. Br&Ati...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - April 8, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: QinFlow (press release) Tags: Patient Care Press Releases Source Type: news

Predictors of hypothermia upon trauma centre arrival in severe trauma patients transported to hospital via EMS - Forristal C, Aarsen KV, Columbus M, Wei J, Vogt K, Mal S.
INTRODUCTION: Hypothermia in severe trauma patients can increase mortality by 25%. Active warming practices decrease mortality and are recommended in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines. Despite this, many emergency medical services (EMS) ve... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Thai Cave Rescue: Details for Preventing Hypothermia, Panic Thai Cave Rescue: Details for Preventing Hypothermia, Panic
The medical team sedated the boys with ketamine to prevent the boys'panic and reduce concerns about arrhythmia or medication-related drops in body temperature.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - April 3, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Emergency Medicine News Source Type: news

Epinephrine at 25 °C core body temperature and during rewarming: case report of successful infant resuscitation after cold water submersion - Mann C, Baer W, Riedel T.
Epinephrine plays a controversial role in accidental hypothermia (... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Death rates attributed to excessive cold or hypothermia among persons aged ≥15 years, by urbanization level and age group -- National Vital Statistics System, 2015-2017 - Cdcmmwr.
During 2015-2017, death rates attributed to excessive cold or hypothermia increased steadily with age among those aged ≥15 years in both metropolitan and nonmetropolitan counties. Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Neuroprotective Effects of Targeted Temperature Management
Hypothermia has a number of potential neuroprotective effects; however, they can be broken down into two main properties: metabolic and neuronal protection. When mammals hibernate, they experience acidosis both from lactate and carbon dioxide, resulting in hypoxia and hypoglycemia. These conditions are not unlike those that occur post-cardiac arrest: Hypothermia decreases metabolic rate by about 6% per 1 degree C reduction in brain temperature. If blood flow and demand are coupled, it’s possible to see a 50% decline in cerebral metabolic after cooling the brain to 32 degrees C. The protective effects occur via reduct...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 27, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brian J. O ’Neil, MD, FACEP, FAHA Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation Top Story Exclusive Articles Patient Care Heart of America Source Type: news

Hiker Recalls Being Stuck in Quicksand in Utah Park
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A man who was stranded for hours in frigid weather with his leg sunk up to the knee in quicksand at a creek in Utah's Zion National Park said Tuesday that he feared he would lose his leg and might die because the quicksand's water was so cold. Ryan Osmun, 34, of Mesa, Arizona, told NBC's "Today" show that he hallucinated at one point while waiting several hours alone after his girlfriend Jessika McNeill left him last Saturday to get help. "I thought for sure I would lose my leg," Osmun said. "And then toward the end I thought I wasn't going to make it." Quicksand ca...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Hiker Recalls Being Stuck in Quicksand in Utah Park
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A man who was stranded for hours in frigid weather with his leg sunk up to the knee in quicksand at a creek in Utah's Zion National Park said Tuesday that he feared he would lose his leg and might die because the quicksand's water was so cold. Ryan Osmun, 34, of Mesa, Arizona, told NBC's "Today" show that he hallucinated at one point while waiting several hours alone after his girlfriend Jessika McNeill left him last Saturday to get help. "I thought for sure I would lose my leg," Osmun said. "And then toward the end I thought I wasn't going to make it." Quicksand ca...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Hiker Recalls Being Stuck in Quicksand in Utah Park
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A man who was stranded for hours in frigid weather with his leg sunk up to the knee in quicksand at a creek in Utah's Zion National Park said Tuesday that he feared he would lose his leg and might die because the quicksand's water was so cold. Ryan Osmun, 34, of Mesa, Arizona, told NBC's "Today" show that he hallucinated at one point while waiting several hours alone after his girlfriend Jessika McNeill left him last Saturday to get help. "I thought for sure I would lose my leg," Osmun said. "And then toward the end I thought I wasn't going to make it." Quicksand ca...
Source: JEMS Operations - February 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Mechanical CPR: A Critical Element in Any Cardiac Arrest Bundle of Care
Mechanical CPR devices (mCPR) provide automated chest compressions during cardiac arrest. High-performance CPR improves survival, and mechanical CPR has multiple advantages over manual CPR: consistent compressions, “cognitive offloading,” effective CPR during patient transport and crew safety, as well as the ability to provide PCI/ECMO during CPR, the need for less rescuers and decreased CPR pauses. Published data showing the errors in the performance of CPR are common, and research has shown that proper CPR rate and depth improve survival.1 At present, there are no mCPR devices that actively decompress the che...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 15, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Charles Lick, MD Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation Top Story Exclusive Articles Patient Care Heart of America Source Type: news

Winter Toll: Over Two Dozen Dead, Hundreds Hurt
CHICAGO (AP) — The dangerous cold and heavy snow that hobbled the northern U.S. this week has retreated, but not before exacting a human toll: more than two dozen weather-related deaths in eight states and hundreds of injuries, including frostbite, broken bones, heart attacks and carbon monoxide poisoning. In Illinois alone, hospitals reported more than 220 cases of frostbite and hypothermia since Tuesday, when the polar vortex moved in and overnight temperatures plunged to minus 30 (minus 34 Celsius) or lower — with wind chills of minus 50 (minus 45 Celsius) or worse in some areas. Hennepin Healthcare in Minne...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 4, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Winter Toll: Over Two Dozen Dead, Hundreds Hurt
CHICAGO (AP) — The dangerous cold and heavy snow that hobbled the northern U.S. this week has retreated, but not before exacting a human toll: more than two dozen weather-related deaths in eight states and hundreds of injuries, including frostbite, broken bones, heart attacks and carbon monoxide poisoning. In Illinois alone, hospitals reported more than 220 cases of frostbite and hypothermia since Tuesday, when the polar vortex moved in and overnight temperatures plunged to minus 30 (minus 34 Celsius) or lower — with wind chills of minus 50 (minus 45 Celsius) or worse in some areas. Hennepin Healthcare in Minne...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 4, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Working during the cold weather
As many of us experience the coldest weather to date this winter spare a thought for those who have to work outdoors in sub-zero temperatures to keep our vital public services running. UNISON head of health and safety said: “Exposure to the cold can be a serious health and safety hazard causing chilblains and hypothermia. “There is an increased risk of slipping and numb figures, or ill-fitting gloves, can make potentially dangerous equipment difficult to use. “Employers must remember their duty to look after their workers by measures such as frequent breaks from the cold, facilities for warming up, warm d...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - February 1, 2019 Category: Food Science Authors: Martin Cullen Tags: Article Source Type: news

The Polar Vortex Is Causing Startling ‘Frost Quakes.’ Here’s the Science Behind Them
Weather that feels like it’s -50° F outside is unnerving enough on its own. But for some midwesterners trapped in an icy polar vortex this week, those bone-chillingly cold temperatures have been accompanied by an unsettling phenomenon: loud and seemingly inexplicable banging sounds. “A huge noise woke me around 2:30 am,” said one Twitter user. “Scared the living daylights out of me. Didn’t know what it was. A few minutes later, it happened again.” In case you missed this yesterday… A huge noise woke me around 2:30 am. Scared the living daylights out of me. Didn’t know...
Source: TIME: Science - January 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Over 2 dozen children including babies die from bitter cold in Syria camp, WHO says
At least 29 children and newborns are reported to have died in a teeming camp in northeastern Syria over the past eight weeks, mainly due to hypothermia, the World Health Organization says. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

WATCH: Hypothermia warnings as temperatures plunge
ABC News' Sam Champion reports on potential health problems and how the cold can drastically affect our bodies. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

How to Avoid Frostbite and Hypothermia in Extreme Cold Weather
During extreme cold, the blood rushes to the center of the body to protect vital organs, and the body temperature can fall to dangerous lows. The best advice is to stay inside, experts say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KAREN ZRAICK Tags: Weather Hypothermia Midwestern States (US) Frostbite Source Type: news

Midwest Cities Scramble to Keep Homeless from Dangerous Cold
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Winter's sharpest bite in years moved past painful into life-threatening territory Tuesday, prompting officials throughout the Midwest to take extraordinary measures to protect the homeless and other vulnerable people from the bitter cold, including turning some city buses into mobile warming shelters in Chicago. Temperatures plunged as low as minus 26 (negative 32 degrees Celsius) in North Dakota with wind chills as low as minus 62 (negative 52 degrees Celsius) in Minnesota. It was nearly that cold in Wisconsin and Illinois. Governors in Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan declared emergencies as ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 30, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Patient Care Source Type: news

Midwest Cities Scramble to Keep Homeless from Dangerous Cold
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Winter's sharpest bite in years moved past painful into life-threatening territory Tuesday, prompting officials throughout the Midwest to take extraordinary measures to protect the homeless and other vulnerable people from the bitter cold, including turning some city buses into mobile warming shelters in Chicago. Temperatures plunged as low as minus 26 (negative 32 degrees Celsius) in North Dakota with wind chills as low as minus 62 (negative 52 degrees Celsius) in Minnesota. It was nearly that cold in Wisconsin and Illinois. Governors in Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan declared emergencies as ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 30, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Patient Care Source Type: news

Postoperative Hypothermia After Orthopaedic Surgery Postoperative Hypothermia After Orthopaedic Surgery
How common is postoperative hypothermia among patients who have undergone orthopedic surgery -- and which risk factors may be associated with this complication?Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

Protect against extreme cold, from head to toe
Risk of frostbite and hypothermia increases rapidly at subzero temperatures. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Frostbite and Hypothermia: Tips to Stay Safe in Extreme Cold Weather
During extreme cold, the blood rushes to the center of the body to protect vital organs, and the body temperature can fall to dangerous lows. The best advice is to stay inside, experts say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KAREN ZRAICK Tags: Weather Hypothermia Midwestern States (US) Frostbite Source Type: news

Layer Up During the Polar Vortex
TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 -- As a giant polar vortex sweeps down over most of the United States, bringing with it temperatures so frigid that frostbite and hypothermia can happen within minutes, doctors have some advice for those who dare to venture... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 29, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Integrated Device Design Critical to Rapid Medical IoT Development
Medical IoT holds the promise of vastly improved patient outcomes, along with the potential for an evolutionary step-change in the way healthcare is managed and delivered. Medical IoT devices will enable more rapid detection of disease, continuous remote monitoring of a patient’s condition, and far more targeted, effective treatment of conditions ranging from diabetes to cancer. All aspects of fundamental healthcare will be impacted: Prevention and wellness, chronic care, acute care, and post-acute care monitoring. As a consequence, the market for connected medical devices is estimated to grow from $20.6B...
Source: MDDI - January 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: James Clements Tags: Electronics Source Type: news

SHOCK: Brain cooling does not benefit people who have a brain injury
(Natural News) Accident victims who suffer a traumatic brain injury usually undergo prophylactic hypothermia (“brain cooling”) in order to protect the fragile organ from further harm. However, a new Australian-led study has concluded that this practice does not actually benefit the patient, reports a The BMJ news article. Cooling the brain was previously believed to decrease the harmful... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SHOCK finding: Brain cooling does not benefit people who have a brain injury
(Natural News) Accident victims who suffer a traumatic brain injury usually undergo prophylactic hypothermia (“brain cooling”) in order to protect the fragile organ from further harm. However, a new Australian-led study has concluded that this practice does not actually benefit the patient, reports a The BMJ news article. Cooling the brain was previously believed to decrease the harmful... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

It ’s Going to Feel like 50 Below in the Midwest This Week. Here’s What Extreme Cold Does to Your Body
Parts of the Midwest are bracing for their coldest temperatures in decades this week, with Tuesday night conditions predicted to feel like 50 degrees below zero or colder in areas of the Dakotas, Minnesota and Iowa, according to AccuWeather. Temperatures in Chicago are also predicted to dip below negative 25 for the first time since the mid-1980s, AccuWeather says. Health officials have warned residents to stay indoors as much as possible, since the brutal cold can become dangerous in just minutes. But what actually happens to your body in the frigid air? TIME asked Dr. Ronald Furnival, a pediatric emergency physician and ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime weather Source Type: news

Moderate Hypothermia Risky for Post-Stroke Swelling Surgery
(MedPage Today) -- Mortality and adverse events increased in randomized trial (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - January 22, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

How to protect yourself in dangerous freezing weather
The freezing weather slamming much of the country is posing serious health risks. The frigid temperatures can lead to hypothermia, compromise lung function, cause breathing problems, and trigger confusion and other neurological effects. Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss how you can protect yourself in the icy weather. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mapping hypothermia death vulnerability in Korea - Park SJ, Kim DW, Deo RC, Lee JS.
Despite largely indisputable evidence of global warming, abnormally cold temperatures frequently affect regions of the Northern hemisphere. As a result of cold, several countries have sustained considerable property damage and numerous human fatalities. To... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Death Toll from Russian Building Collapse Stands at 39
MOSCOW (AP) — After three-and-a-half days of fighting a mountain of concrete, cold weather and time, rescue teams in an industrial Russian city ended a search for people who were inside an apartment building where an explosion triggered a partial collapse, giving a final death toll Thursday of 39. The massive operation launched by the Russian Emergencies Ministry in the jumbled maze of rubble where a section of a 10-story building stood in Magnitogorsk until Monday morning combined sophisticated equipment with grueling manual labor. Russian officials said from the start that emergency crews were racing to reach survi...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 4, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Baby Rescued Nearly 36 Hours after Apartment Explosion and Collapse in Russia
MOSCOW (AP) — Laboring through sub-freezing temperatures, Russian rescue workers were digging into a sprawling heap of jagged rubble from a collapsed apartment building when one heard the faintest sound. It was the sound of life. On Tuesday, to everyone's delight and surprise, they pulled a baby boy out of the rubble alive, nearly 36 hours after the disaster that blew apart his home. His father called it "a New Year's miracle." Photos: Rescue at Russian Apartment Explosion The building collapse in the Russian city of Magnitogorsk before dawn Monday has killed at least nine people so far, and officials say 3...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 2, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International Major Incidents News Source Type: news

How Seniors Can Prevent Hypothermia This Winter
SUNDAY, Dec. 30, 2018 -- In winter, older adults are at higher risk of losing body heat and slipping into potentially fatal hypothermia, U.S. health officials warn. Older people can lose body heat quickly and find it harder to recognize the signs,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Police Officers Save Infant after Dad Said He Drowned Her
  GREENWOOD, Mo. (AP) — Two Missouri officers saved the life of a 6-month-old girl whose father walked into their police station and said he had just drowned his daughter, authorities say. Greenwood police Chief Greg Hallgrimson and Cpl. Tom Calhoun rushed to a pond where the man said he had drowned his daughter Monday and pulled her out, performed CPR and warmed her up until she started breathing, said Lt. Aaron Fordham, who called the baby's survival a "miracle." He said the father, 28-year-old Jonathon Stephen Zicarelli, showed no emotion when he stunned officers with his report that he had left his...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 18, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press (via The Kansas City Star) Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Police Officers Save Infant after Dad Said He Drowned Her
  GREENWOOD, Mo. (AP) — Two Missouri officers saved the life of a 6-month-old girl whose father walked into their police station and said he had just drowned his daughter, authorities say. Greenwood police Chief Greg Hallgrimson and Cpl. Tom Calhoun rushed to a pond where the man said he had drowned his daughter Monday and pulled her out, performed CPR and warmed her up until she started breathing, said Lt. Aaron Fordham, who called the baby's survival a "miracle." He said the father, 28-year-old Jonathon Stephen Zicarelli, showed no emotion when he stunned officers with his report that he had left his...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 18, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press (via The Kansas City Star) Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Stranded Man Rescued after Setting Fire on Mountain
SEVIERVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee official says a man stranded for three days on a mountain after crashing an all-terrain vehicle has been rescued after setting a fire to draw rescuers to his location. Walden Creek Fire Chief Tim Baker told news outlets that crews responded Monday evening to a report of a blaze on Bluff Mountain in Sevier County. He said it took volunteer firefighters about three hours to reach the man, who was suffering from hypothermia, a broken ankle and broken ribs. Baker said they got the injured man to an ambulance around 6:30 a.m. Tuesday. State Division of Forestry crews battled the 20-ac...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 4, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press/WVLT (video) Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News News Videos Source Type: news

Stranded Man Rescued after Setting Fire on Mountain
SEVIERVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee official says a man stranded for three days on a mountain after crashing an all-terrain vehicle has been rescued after setting a fire to draw rescuers to his location. Walden Creek Fire Chief Tim Baker told news outlets that crews responded Monday evening to a report of a blaze on Bluff Mountain in Sevier County. He said it took volunteer firefighters about three hours to reach the man, who was suffering from hypothermia, a broken ankle and broken ribs. Baker said they got the injured man to an ambulance around 6:30 a.m. Tuesday. State Division of Forestry crews battled the 20-ac...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 4, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press/WVLT (video) Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News News Videos Source Type: news

Microscopic examination of pituitary glands in cases of fatal accidental hypothermia - Doberentz E, Madea B.
In cases of death caused by hypothermia, histological analysis can be used to determine the cause of death. Certain histological alterations of the pituitary glands in hypothermia have been reported in the literature, including haemorrhage, hyperaemia and ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Is Cold and Dark Weather a Trigger for Heavy Drinking?
There is a commonly held belief that winter conditions — that are characterized by extreme cold and low sunlight — are connected to heavy drinking. Whenever we think of countries in Northern Europe we instantly think of sub-zero temperatures, dark clouds and polar landscapes. We also imagine its inhabitants tucked in a bar drinking their sorrows away. What creates this image is the perception that strong spirits and binge drinking are a staple of many Northern countries. However, scientific and factual evidence shows a more nuanced picture. Statistical Verdict The argument that countries with a colder climate e...
Source: Psych Central - November 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claudiu Revnic Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse alcohol use Alcoholism heavy drinking Holiday Blues Holiday Season Public Health Winter Source Type: news

New'Cold Card' Helps First-Responders Treat Hypothermia New'Cold Card' Helps First-Responders Treat Hypothermia
Search and rescue teams and first responders have a new resource for assessing people who have been exposed to extreme cold.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - November 20, 2018 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Emergency Medicine News Source Type: news

Hypothermia Use Falling in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Hypothermia Use Falling in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
There has been a decline in application of therapeutic hypothermia in people who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to a large retrospective study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - November 20, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

New 'Cold Card' helps first-responders treat hypothermia
(Reuters Health) - Search and rescue teams and first responders have a new resource for assessing people who have been exposed to extreme cold. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Incidence and strategies for preventing sustained hypothermia of crash victims during prolonged vehicle extrication - Stroop R, Sch öne C, Grau T.
BACKGROUND: Vehicle extrication of crash victims is a highly-demanding challenge, due to the frequently life-threatening injuries of entrapped occupants. In this phase, crash victims are often exposed to the outdoor-temperature, with the risk of sustained ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Crews Rescue Injured Hiker Stuck Overnight on South Mountain in Phoenix
  PHOENIX (ABC 15 Arizona)- As temperatures dropped below 50 degrees Wednesday night, a 25-year-old man sat atop South Mountain with an injured ankle, waiting to be rescued. According to Phoenix Fire Department’s Captain Rob McDade, the man was hiking South Mountain last night when he injured his ankle. It is unknown exactly how long the man was exposed outdoors. Read more at ABC 15 Arizona. Related Article: Identifying and Managing Accidental Hypothermia   (Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News)
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 15, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ABC 15 Arizona Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News News Videos Source Type: news

Crews Rescue Injured Hiker Stuck Overnight on South Mountain in Phoenix
  PHOENIX (ABC 15 Arizona)- As temperatures dropped below 50 degrees Wednesday night, a 25-year-old man sat atop South Mountain with an injured ankle, waiting to be rescued. According to Phoenix Fire Department’s Captain Rob McDade, the man was hiking South Mountain last night when he injured his ankle. It is unknown exactly how long the man was exposed outdoors. Read more at ABC 15 Arizona. Related Article: Identifying and Managing Accidental Hypothermia   (Source: JEMS Operations)
Source: JEMS Operations - November 15, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ABC 15 Arizona Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News News Videos Source Type: news

Safety is Third, Not First, and We All Know It Should Be
Conclusion In educational opportunities, train like you plan to fight. Since there may not be an actual patient, the “benefit” in the risk-benefit analysis may be lesser. However, taking no risks in training ensures you’ll be less prepared to take risks—even R+ risks—in actual operations. For example, you don’t stop patient care because it’s raining, so don’t stop your training simply because it’s raining. Also, during your education, fight the idea that we can ever say “the scene is safe.” Accept that our work is done in an imperfect environment where safet...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - November 13, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher Davis, MD, NRP, FAWM Tags: Exclusive Articles Operations Source Type: news

Decline in Hypothermia Use for Cardiac Arrest After TTR Trial
(MedPage Today) -- Decreased survival also observed, but study limitations prevent causality (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - November 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Decline in Hypothermia Use for Cardiac Arrest After TTM Trial
(MedPage Today) -- Decreased survival also observed, but study limitations prevent causality (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - November 9, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Raising the Intubation Bar is Noble, But Not Practical
We thank Mr. Wood and Mr. Podsialdo for their insightful comments regarding the Pragmatic Airway Resuscitation Trial (PART) results.  With regards to their comment of prior studies finding better outcomes with intubation than supraglottic airways, one must bear in mind that these prior studies were biased by their retrospective designs; the airway was selected by paramedic choice and may have been influenced by a range of factors such as the patient’s condition, anatomy, the physical environment or the practitioner’s level of comfort. Meta-analysis or systematic reviews of these retrospective studies ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shannon W. Stephens, EMT-P Tags: Airway & Respiratory Exclusive Articles Source Type: news

Raising the Intubation Bar is Noble, But Not Practical
We thank Mr. Wood and Mr. Podsialdo for their insightful comments regarding the Pragmatic Airway Resuscitation Trial (PART) results.  With regards to their comment of prior studies finding better outcomes with intubation than supraglottic airways, one must bear in mind that these prior studies were biased by their retrospective designs; the airway was selected by paramedic choice and may have been influenced by a range of factors such as the patient’s condition, anatomy, the physical environment or the practitioner’s level of comfort. Meta-analysis or systematic reviews of these retrospective studies ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - November 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shannon W. Stephens, EMT-P Tags: Airway & Respiratory Exclusive Articles Source Type: news