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Boehringer Ingelheim beefs up St. Joe manufacturing after merger
After closing its mega-merger with Merial this year, Boehringer Ingelheim slowly began ramping up its animal health manufacturing in St. Joseph. The company confirmed that it would increase production capacity as it transfers products from its former Fort Dodge, Iowa, facility. Elanco U.S. Inc. acquired the facility from Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health in 2016, as well as a portfolio of its vaccine products, for $885 million as part of Boehringer Ingelheim’s acquisition of Merial. The St.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Fighting HIV on Multiple Fronts Might Lead to Vaccine
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 -- A combination antibody strategy could be the key to halting the spread of HIV, according to results from two promising animal studies. Two separate research groups completely protected their own sets of lab monkeys from... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Techweek KC animal health panel: How tech for Fido can help humans
From better vaccines to data-tracking wearables for dogs, a growing portion of Kansas City tech companies are devoting time to improving the health of pets and livestock. This year’s Techweek KC brought together industry executives from three fast-growing companies for a discussion on the importance of innovation in animal health. “The companies within this region are developing groundbreaking innovations every day that not only are keeping our pets healthy, b ut are also making sure our food… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - September 14, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

FDA Clears Immune Globulin Kedrab for Rabies Treatment FDA Clears Immune Globulin Kedrab for Rabies Treatment
The plasma-derived human rabies immune globulin should be given immediately after contact with a rabid or possibly rabid animal, concurrently with a full course of rabies vaccine.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Alert Source Type: news

University spin out company addresses new vaccines
(University of Plymouth) The University of Plymouth has launched a new spin out company which will address new vaccines for diseases which spread from animals to humans and for use in infection control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 8, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Could cows be the clue that leads to an HIV vaccine?
Conclusion This early stage research on cows indicates that they had a broad and quick immune response to HIV infection when given a specific vaccine. Because the immune proteins produced in cows are able to neutralise many different strains of HIV virus, the authors suggest this potentially gives them an edge over the human proteins that have been looked at so far. As always with animal studies it is important to remember that what works in cows might not work in the same way in humans. Many drug studies that appear promising at first, fall at the first hurdle once humans are involved. The study was also carried out on ju...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Source Type: news

Cow antibodies yield important clues for developing a broadly effective AIDS vaccine
(International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) As outlined in a study published today in Nature, lead author Devin Sok, Director, Antibody Discovery and Development at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), reports the elicitation of powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies in cows in a matter of weeks - a process that usually takes years in humans. The unexpected animal model is providing clues for important questions at a moment when new energy has infused HIV vaccine research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New animal models for hepatitis C could pave the way for a vaccine
(Rockefeller University) In the rats that roam New York City's streets and tunnels, scientists have found a virus that resembles hepatitis C. They have used it to create the first animal model of the human disease, a breakthrough that potentially could yield a much-needed vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mouse models of acute and chronic hepacivirus infection
An estimated 71 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The lack of small-animal models has impeded studies of antiviral immune mechanisms. Here we show that an HCV-related hepacivirus discovered in Norway rats can establish high-titer hepatotropic infections in laboratory mice with immunological features resembling those seen in human viral hepatitis. Whereas immune-compromised mice developed persistent infection, immune-competent mice cleared the virus within 3 to 5 weeks. Acute clearance was T cell dependent and associated with liver injury. Transient depletion of CD4+ T cells before infectio...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Billerbeck, E., Wolfisberg, R., Fahnoe, U., Xiao, J. W., Quirk, C., Luna, J. M., Cullen, J. M., Hartlage, A. S., Chiriboga, L., Ghoshal, K., Lipkin, W. I., Bukh, J., Scheel, T. K. H., Kapoor, A., Rice, C. M. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

WHO (World Health Organization) Advisory Committee on Variola Virus Research: Report of the Eighteenth Meeting
World Health Organization. 05/2017 This 58-page report summarizes the 18th meeting of the Advisory Committee on Variola Virus Research, held on November 2-3, 2016. The Advisory Committee reviewed the implications for its upcoming work in light of the 69th World Health Assembly's decision to have a substantive agenda item at the 72nd World Health Assembly in May 2019 on the destruction of smallpox virus stocks. It was also updated on continuing research projects using live variola virus for the development of diagnostic tests, animal models, smallpox vaccines, and antiviral and therapeutic agents. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Li...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - July 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Three-Zone Biosecurity Offers New Hope to Indonesian Farmers
James McGrane, FAO ECTAD Indonesia Team Leader, at his office in Jakarta. Credit: Kanis Dursin/IPSBy Kanis DursinJAKARTA, Indonesia, Jul 10 2017 (IPS)Poultry farmer Bambang Sutrisno Setiawan had long heard about biosecurity but never gave serious thought to it, even when the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 forced him to cull thousands of his layer chickens in 2003 and 2009.Eighteen years into the business, however, Bambang, who is called Ilung by friends, is now converting his second farm into a three-zone biosecurity poultry with a strong conviction that it is the only way to save his business amid continued threat...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kanis Dursin Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Projects avian flu biosafety Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Improving the lives of rural populations: better nutrition & agricultu Source Type: news

Antibodies halt placental transmission of CMV-like virus in monkeys
(Duke University Medical Center) Researchers from Duke University School of Medicine and Tulane National Primate Research Center report findings in monkeys that demonstrates a CMV vaccine approach that appears to be capable of protecting the animal's fetus from infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Jinyu Bio-technology Research Facility, Kansas
China's largest animal vaccine company Jinyu Bio-technology unveiled plans to establish its first US-based vaccine research lab and office facility in May 2017. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - June 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Discovering the early age immune response in foals
(Cornell University) Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered a new method to measure tiny amounts of antibodies in foals, a finding described in the May 16 issue   of PLOS ONE. The methodology will help understand how fast a foal starts producing its own antibodies, which in turn will help optimize recommendations for young horse vaccination schedules, said Dr. Julia Felippe, associate professor of large animal medicine, and research associate Rebecca Tallmadge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Painless' flu vaccine skin patch shows promise
Conclusion Further testing in larger trials needs to be done to be sure these initial results hold true and that the vaccine patch is safe and effective. This is the first time these flu microneedle patches have been tested on humans, and the study was relatively small, with only 100 participants. But if the results are confirmed, this new method of delivering the flu vaccination could make a big difference. The patches could have several main advantages over traditional injections: they may be preferred by people who dislike needles and avoid vaccination because of the fear of pain it may be quicker and easier to admi...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Swine flu Source Type: news

Cholesterol-lowering jab 'shows promise' for heart disease
Conclusion This mouse study evaluated the potential of the AT04A vaccine to lower cholesterol levels and potentially reduce or prevent heart disease. The results were promising, showing that mice given the vaccine produced antibodies against the enzyme that stops LDL cholesterol being cleared from the body. This resulted in reduced total and LDL blood cholesterol levels, as well as reduced atherosclerosis. No major safety concerns or side effects were reported. Following this research, AT04A has now moved on to a phase I clinical trial. A small number of people will be given the vaccine to see if it's safe for use in huma...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner on opioid drugs with abuse-deterrent properties
Last month, I asked my colleagues at the FDA to identify what additional and more forceful steps the FDA can take, on top of the vigorous work the agency is already doing, to address the crisis of opioid addiction. Everyone at the FDA is committed to focusing on all aspects of the epidemic. The new policy steps that we announced included the formation of a steering committee to examine additional regulatory and policy actions that we can take to combat this crisis. This steering committee will place particular emphasis on evaluating efforts we can take to reduce the number of new cases of addiction. The FDA is committed to...
Source: Mass Device - June 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog FDA Voice Source Type: news

Using Viruses to Boost Mesothelioma Immunotherapy
Immunotherapy through clinical trials is becoming a promising treatment option for some mesothelioma patients. Checkpoint inhibitor drugs, such as Keytruda, already have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as first-line treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), edging immunotherapy drugs closer to becoming a viable second-line therapy for other thoracic cancers, including pleural mesothelioma. However, overall response to immune therapies remains relatively low. Researchers across the country are striving to enhance responsiveness to immunotherapy drugs. Leading that trend is viroimmunotherapy, or t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 6, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Biomedicines checkpoint blockade Checkpoint inhibitor drugs clinical trials for mesothelioma Dr. Alexander Dash Dr. Manish Patel FDA approval Keytruda immune response cancer immunotherapy response mesothelioma intratumoral injections k Source Type: news

Antibodies from Ebola survivor could lead to treatments and vaccines
Antibodies from an Ebola survivor protected animals from deadly ebolaviruses and could help inform the development of potential treatments and vaccines. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - June 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'All Scientific Hands On Deck' To End The Opioid Crisis
By Nora Volkow (Director, NIDA) and Francis Collins (Director, NIH) In 2015, 2 million people had a prescription opioid use disorder and 591,000 suffered from a heroin use disorder; prescription drug misuse alone cost the nation $78.5 billion in health care, law enforcement, and lost productivity. But while the scope of the crisis is staggering, it is not hopeless. We understand opioid addiction better than many other drug use disorders; there are effective strategies that can be implemented right now to save lives and to prevent and treat opioid addiction. At the National Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, GA las...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH scientists find real-time imaging in mice a promising influenza study tool
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Real-time imaging of influenza infection in mice is a promising new method to quickly monitor disease progression and to evaluate whether candidate vaccines and treatments are effective in this animal model, according to scientists from NIAID. They evaluated the live imaging system as a potential alternative to traditional methods of assessing investigative influenza vaccines and treatment in mice, which can be time consuming and require more study animals for valid statistical comparison. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 30, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rabies vaccine to be air dropped by helicopter over parts of Northeast Ohio
(Natural News) The World Health Organization (WHO) describes rabies as a “fatal zoonotic disease, transmitted to humans through contact (mainly bites and scratches) with infected animals.”  This condition kills 55,000 people worldwide every year, with nearly 100 percent of fatal cases occurring in Asia and Africa. Worldwide, another ten million people are exposed yearly, but, according to the Center for Disease... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Discover First Human Antibodies That Work Against All Ebolaviruses
May 18, 2017—(BRONX, NY)—After analyzing the blood of a survivor of the 2013-16 Ebola outbreak, a team of scientists from academia, industry and the government has discovered the first natural human antibodies that can neutralize and protect animals against all three major disease-causing ebolaviruses. The findings, published online today in the journalCell, could lead to the first broadly effective ebolavirus therapies and vaccines. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - May 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pandemic Alert: How Lessons From China Can Help Us Rethink Urgent Health Threats
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Potential Zika virus vaccine
Preclinical research results in animal models demonstrate favorable outcomes in developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne Zika virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Entrepreneur: Hiring C-level expertise
Meeting the cancer moonshot is no easy task, but with the right team, Gary Wood hopes to accomplish this through his Olathe-based immunotherapy startup. TVAX Biomedical uses a two-pronged approach — cancer vaccine and white blood cells — to target numerous types of tumors, including brain and kidney cancer. He has spun off an animal health company that uses similar methods to target canine cancers. Wood started TVAX in 2004, based on 25 years ’ work in the University of Kansas pathology department.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 10, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Stem cell vaccine found to increase immune responses, inhibit tumors in animal models
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have found that a cancer stem cell vaccine, engineered to express a pro-inflammatory protein called interleukin-15 (IL-15) and its receptor (IL-15Ralpha), caused T cell production in animal models and enhanced immune responses against tumors. This T cell production showed a cellular immune response that could lead to new immunotherapy treatments for cancer with improved side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CCNY, TechnoVax translational research leads to potential Zika virus vaccine
(City College of New York) Preclinical results of research by City College of New York scientists and TechnoVax, Inc. in animal models demonstrate favorable outcomes in developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The results were announced by Tarrytown, New York-based TechnoVax, a biotechnology developer of novel vaccines whose proprietary virus-like particle (VLP) is the center of the research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The World Is Not Ready for the Next Pandemic
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news

He Was Searching For Intersexual Pigs And Ended Up Finding The World's Rarest Dog
Twenty years after beginning his quest to find what’s been called the world’s rarest canine species, James “Mac” McIntyre was vindicated. There on his camera screen were the images he’d been waiting years for. The New Guinea highland wild dog — an animal once feared extinct — was alive and well, his pictures showed. “I squealed like a girl,” the 62-year-old said earlier this month, speaking from his Florida home. “It was emotionally such a tremendous moment. It was justification for all the work I’ve done.” How McIntyre ended up finding the New Guinea ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

One Health
What is 'One Health'? (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: antimicrobial resistance [subject], food safety [subject], food poisoning, immunization [subject], vaccination, influenza [subject], flu, seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza, zoonose [subject], animal diseases, FAQ [doctype] Source Type: news

Frog slime could protect us against future flu epidemic
Conclusion This study has identified a substance in the mucus secreted by a south Indian frog which can kill certain types of flu virus. Researchers often turn to natural substances with known health-giving properties to find potential new drugs for humans. For example, aspirin was developed based on a compound found in willow bark – which had been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years. Some other drugs – such as some chemotherapy and anticlotting drugs – have also been developed from chemicals found in plants. By isolating the substances that have an effect the researchers can make sure...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

Innovate UK funds new kind of vaccine to target deadly pathogens emerging from animals
(University of Plymouth) A team of international scientists led by Dr Michael Jarvis at the University of Plymouth has received funding in excess of £ 408,000 from Innovate UK to develop a new and economic vaccine designed to halt the spread of highly pathogenic 'zoonotic' (spreading from animals to humans) infectious diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cannibalism, vaccines and animal-human hybrid DNA: Dave Hodges interviews Mike Adams about the planned destruction of the human race
(Natural News) In case you haven’t noticed, humanity appears to be stuck in a downward spiral of “evolution,” if you will. The dumbing down of the general population seems to be progressing with increasing swiftness, and its cause can largely be traced to the things that many people are exposed to on a daily basis... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Common Viral Infection Could Trigger Celiac Disease
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Common Viral Infection Could Trigger Celiac Disease
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Effective one-shot vaccination of newborns moves closer to reality
(Boston Children's Hospital) Newborns are highly vulnerable to infections and don't respond optimally to most vaccines because their young immune systems typically mount weak antibody responses. Now, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital report achieving strong vaccine responses in newborn animals, including monkeys -- the final preclinical model before human trials -- by adding compounds known as adjuvants that boost the immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Natural compound protects against Zika virus infection and microcephaly
FINDINGSNew UCLA research could lead to the development of a drug that combats several mosquito-borne viruses, including Zika virus. The research reveals that an enzyme produced naturally by the immune system protects animals against Zika virus infection and the neurological damage linked to the virus. The enzyme, called 25-hydroxycholestrol or 25HC, can be manufactured to create a compound that works against a broad range of viruses. The research was led by senior author Genhong Cheng, professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics and a member of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and S...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Vaccine warning for VEGANS: Vaccines are made with a cocktail of animal parts, human fetal tissue cell lines and African monkey cells
(Natural News) Vegans and vaccines: If you’re eliminating animal products from your diet, should you be taking a closer look at vaccine excipients? The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a document online detailing the small amount of ancillary ingredients or excipients included in 61 different FDA licensed and approved vaccines. The agency... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA scientists show how to amplify or stifle signals for immune responses
T cells, the managers of our immune systems, spend their days shaking hands with another type of cell that presents small pieces of protein from pathogens or cancerous cells to the T cell. But each T cell is programmed to recognize just a few protein pieces, known as antigens, meaning years can go by without the T cell, or its descendants, recognizing an antigen.When the T cell does recognize an antigen, it gives the cell presenting the antigen a “hug,” so to speak, instead of a handshake. This initial interaction causes the T cell to search nearby to find other cells that are presenting the same antigen to giv...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Rabies Kills 189 People Every Day. Here's Why You Never Hear About It.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. Rabies is one of the most lethal viruses known to man. It kills virtually 100 percent of victims who don’t get the vaccine. Today, there is both the knowledge and the practical means to eradicate the disease, but it still causes 69,000 deaths worldwide every year. That’s 189 people a day. Rabies is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected animal, usually a dog. After infection, it typically takes between one and three months for a person to show...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Health Risks Does Climate Change Pose?
Discussion Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a Flavivirae, arbovirus that is endemic to many areas of Asia and the Pacific. It is estimated to affect ~70,000 people/year with ~10-15,000 deaths yearly in 20 countries, with a fatality rate of 35-40%. It can cause encephalitis and irreversible neurological morbidity. JEV is spread by Culex mosquitos which feed on swine. Increased environmental temperature and increased humidity (warm air is more moist) increases mosquito numbers, their survivability and ultimate dissemination. China has the highest rates of JEV with particular areas being more prone, as some areas co-farm ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - March 6, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Veterinarian says pet deaths caused by over-vaccination
(Natural News) Hailing from Connecticut, veterinarian Dr. John Robb has been in the business of saving animals and safeguarding their health for over 30 years. Robb has dedicated his life to saving pets, even if it means being ridiculed or being arrested. On one occasion, Robb even lost his clinic — all in the name... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Antibiotics Urgently Needed to Combat Resistant Bacteria
Credit: WHO/Jim HolmesBy IPS World DeskROME/GENEVA, Feb 28 2017 (IPS)The United Nations health organisation has just published its first ever list of antibiotic-resistant “priority pathogens” – a catalogue of 12 families of bacteria that pose the greatest threat to human health. The list was drawn up in a bid to guide and promote research and development (R&D) of new antibiotics, as part of the World Health Organization (WHO) efforts to address growing global resistance to antimicrobial medicines.The list highlights in particular the threat of gram-negative bacteria that are resistant to multiple anti...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 28, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: IPS World Desk Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

South Korea to establish foot-and-mouth vaccine plant by 2020
SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea plans to set up a plant to manufacture a locally developed foot-and-mouth vaccine by 2020 as part of efforts to combat outbreaks of the viral animal disease, the country's agriculture ministry said on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Moderna unveils promising data on Zika vaccine in mice
Moderna Therapeutics, one of the largest and most secretive biotechs in Cambridge, has published the first data from an animal study of its Zika vaccine, suggesting it helped a significant number of mice survive an infection. The data, published on Friday in the medical journal Cell, shows that a vaccine created by the company to protect against the Zika virus prompted a strong immune response in mice. The vaccine is being tested in humans in a closely-watched Phase 1/2 study that began in December,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 17, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

More evidence that Zika mRNA vaccines can stop viral replication in mice
(Cell Press) Vaccine developers have successfully protected mice against Zika by injecting synthetic messenger RNA that encodes for virus proteins into the animals. The cells of the mice then build parts of the virus, training the immune system to recognize a future infection. The research, published Feb. 17 in Cell, follows a Feb. 2 Letter in Nature (doi:10.1038/nature21428) that showed similar positive results for a messenger RNA vaccine for Zika in mice and monkeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cordova facility focuses on treating the sickest animals
When the Memphis Zoo's entire penguin population faced an ailment that leads to blindness, the zoo turned to an avian expert at a local speciality veterinary practice to save the day. Memphis Veterinary Specialists (MVS), founded by Dr. Todd Tobias, is the Mid-South's only board-certified speciality veterinary practice. Instead of offerings such as vaccines, flea prevention and wellness exams, MVS is home to specialists who practice veterinary oncology, ophthalmology, dermatolo gy, radiology, internal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 13, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elle Perry Source Type: news

#ActualLivingScientist Hashtag Introduces America To Our Scientists
Many scientists report feeling under siege under the specter of the new administration. President Donald Trump has expressed anti-science rhetoric, including a belief that the “concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese” and a flirtation with vaccine conspiracy theories.  Anti-science cabinet picks like former Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson and Scott Pruitt, who sued the Environmental Protection Agency 13 times as Oklahoma attorney general, have done little to quell fears.  But it’s also a reflection of American attitudes in general. Part of the disconne...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: newtag Source Type: news