Quick guide to animal bite treatment
  A playful nip from your pet is one thing, but when animals really sink their teeth into your skin, you need to care for the wound to prevent infection and other serious complications. Dealing with an animal bite sooner rather than later is the key to avoiding potential problems. Here’s your quick guide to understanding animal bite treatment: As much as we love our pets, sometimes they’re the cause of animal bite wounds. Consider the type of animal bite According to the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, dogs are the most common cause of animal bites. However, cats, rodents, rabbits, ferrets, far...
Source: Advanced Tissue - May 22, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: Wound Care Source Type: news

Preventing Antibiotic Resistance: Look to the Livestock Industry
Among the major drivers of the Antimicrobial Resistance crisis is the misuse and overuse of antibiotics in livestock and feed. Credit: Germán Miranda/IPS. By Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, May 21 2019 (IPS) Antimicrobial resistance is quickly becoming a global crisis and risks reversing a century of progress in health. Some organisations have already geared up and are tackling the issue from its roots. In a new report, the United Nations Interagency Coordination Group (IACG) on Antimicrobial Resistance estimates that antibiotic resistance could cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050. Already, drug-resistan...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse North America Regional Categories Sustainability TerraViva United Nations Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) WHO Source Type: news

Two companies will invest combined $34.4M in St. Joseph facilities
Boehringer Ingelheim Corp., a company in the Kansas City Animal Health Corridor, and LifeLine Foods, a corn processor, have committed to investing a combined $34.4 million in life sciences in St. Joseph. Boehringer Ingelheim will invest about $22.4 million to increase its capacity to manufacture vaccines for livestock at its St. Joseph campus. On Monday, the St. Joseph City Council will consider granting Chapter 100 sale-leaseback incentives. The project also will receive incentives from the KCP&L … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 17, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Lily Lieberman Source Type: news

Two companies will invest combined $34.4M in St. Joseph facilities
Boehringer Ingelheim Corp., a company in the Kansas City Animal Health Corridor, and LifeLine Foods, a corn processor, have committed to investing a combined $34.4 million in life sciences in St. Joseph. Boehringer Ingelheim will invest about $22.4 million to increase its capacity to manufacture vaccines for livestock at its St. Joseph campus. On Monday, the St. Joseph City Council will consider granting Chapter 100 sale-leaseback incentives. The project also will receive incentives from the KCP&L … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 17, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Lily Lieberman Source Type: news

Rabies outbreak map: What are rabies symptoms, can you get rabies from a dog bite?
RABIES was confirmed in a steer found in Larimer County, Colorado yesterday, prompting health officials to remind pet and livestock owners to keep their animals up-to-date on vaccinations. What are the symptoms of rabies and can you get rabies from a dog bite? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Uganda: Minister, Official Clash Over Vaccination Fees
[Monitor] Rakai -State minister for Animal Husbandry Joy Kabatsi has clashed with Rakai District veterinary officer Erias Kizito Nsubuga over the livestock vaccination fees. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 10, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New progress in developing an animal model of hepatitis C
(Princeton University) Researchers studying hepatitis C virus have introduced small mutations into mouse liver cells to make the animals more susceptible to the virus, a step toward using mice in hepatitis C vaccine research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccine for African swine fever may save our bacon
(Frontiers) Wild boar can be immunized against African Swine Fever by a new vaccine delivered to the animals in their food. This is the first report of a promising inoculation against this deadly disease, which is a worldwide threat to the swine industry. The study shows immunity can be passed on via contact, but further studies need to examine how this occurs, the safety of repeated administration and its genetic stability as it is passed on. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vaccine design can dramatically improve cancer immunotherapies
(Northwestern University) After comparing a series of compositionally identical yet structurally different vaccines by testing them on multiple animal models, Northwestern University researchers found the structure of SNAs in one vaccine dramatically outperformed the others, which ranged from ineffective to nearly curative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Developing a vaccine against Nipah virus
(Thomas Jefferson University) Researchers developed a novel recombinant vaccine called NIPRAB that shows robust immunization against Nipah virus in animal models and may be effective against other viruses in the same family. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists identify a key gene in the transmission of deadly African sleeping sickness
Life scientists from UCLA and the University of Bern have identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness — a severe disease transmitted by the bite of infected tsetse flies, which are common in sub-Saharan Africa.The disease is fatal if untreated, as the parasite responsible moves from the bloodstream to the central nervous system. Tens of millions of people in 36 African countries are at risk. There is no vaccine, and conventional drug treatments, which include an arsenic derivative, are antiquated, not very effective and have severe side effects.The research,  published in the journal N...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

NIH researchers make progress toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A research team led by scientists from NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has determined how several antibodies induced by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpesvirus that causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain cancers, block infection of cells grown in the laboratory. They then used this information to develop novel vaccine candidates that, in animals, elicited potent anti-EBV antibody responses that blocked infection of cell types involved in EBV-associated cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Infectious Diseases A-Z: Understanding tetanus
Tetanus?is a serious infection that can be life-threatening and easily prevented with vaccination. It is caused by a toxin produced by spores of the bacteria,?Clostridium tetani. These bacteria live?in the environment, including in soil, dust and animal feces.?"Any time someone gets a wound that may become contaminated with soil or environmental contents, they're at risk [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 25, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Pollutants, pathogens could team up to make us sick
(American Chemical Society) Many people view pollutants and pathogens as separate causes of illness. However, recent research indicates that the two can interact, changing how people and animals respond to infectious diseases. According to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, environmental pollutants appear to weaken the immune system, reduce vaccine efficacy and increase pathogen virulence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

South Africa: Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Gives Update On Foot and Mouth Disease On 14 March 2019
[Govt of SA] On 07 January this year the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries confirmed and reported an outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the high surveillance area of the foot and mouth disease free zone in Limpopo, adjacent to the protection zone. Subsequently, South Africa lost its World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) recognised foot and mouth disease free zone without vaccination status. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 18, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Some Anti-Vaxxers Aren ’t Getting Their Pets Vaccinated. Here’s Why That’s So Dangerous
Dogs can’t get autism, and even if they could, vaccines couldn’t cause it. Period. But some anti-vaxxers are increasingly making the same unfounded claims about pets and vaccines they’ve been repeating about children and vaccines for the past 20 years: that vaccines are unnecessary, dangerous and that they can cause a form of (canine) autism, along with other diseases. Just as with kids, that may be driving down pet vaccination rates. And the movement, while niche, shows no sign of stopping; in some states in the U.S., anti-vax activists have recently agitated to make state laws about mandatory pet vaccin...
Source: TIME: Health - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime Pets Source Type: news

Some Anti-Vaxxers Aren ’t Getting Their Pets Vaccinated. Here’s Why That’s So Dangerous
Dogs can’t get autism, and even if they could, vaccines couldn’t cause it. Period. But some anti-vaxxers are increasingly making the same unfounded claims about pets and vaccines they’ve been repeating about children and vaccines for the past 20 years: that vaccines are unnecessary, dangerous and that they can cause a form of (canine) autism, along with other diseases. Just as with kids, that may be driving down pet vaccination rates. And the movement, while niche, shows no sign of stopping; in some states in the U.S., anti-vax activists have recently agitated to make state laws about mandatory pet vaccin...
Source: TIME: Science - March 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime Pets Source Type: news

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been designed in an international research effort. RSV is second only to malaria as a cause of infant mortality worldwide. The new vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibodies against RSV in both mice and monkeys. The animal research findings, reported March 7 in the journal Cell, pave the way for human clinical trials. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Computer-Designed Vaccine Elicits Potent Antibodies
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been designed in an international research effort. RSV is second only to malaria as a cause of infant mortality worldwide. The new vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibodies against RSV in both mice and monkeys. The animal research findings, reported March 7 in the journal Cell, pave the way for human clinical trials. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - March 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Could CRISPR Diagnostics Provide a Valuable Weapon in the Fight against Pandemic Flu?
The flu season is up and running in the Northern Hemisphere, and early signs in both the United States and Europe are that the effects might not be quite as severe as the brutal 2017/18 season. The United States is predominantly seeing H1N1 circulating, while monitoring in Europe has identified co-circulation of H1N1 and H3N2—both varieties of Influenza A that should be covered by the seasonable vaccine. What if they weren’t though? Influenza A can be found in both human and animal populations, and it evolves rapidly through genetic mutation. Each year many humans rely on their country&a...
Source: MDDI - March 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Paul Wilkins Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, has been developed through computer design. Animal tests suggest the vaccine could provide potent, durable protection against RSV. The vaccine is being further developed for possible clinical trials. The nanoparticle platform will also be used to design potential vaccines for AIDS, hepatitis C and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 7, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

These Researchers Are Using Artificial Intelligence to Make a Better Flu Vaccine
The influenza virus is a particularly nasty bug, thanks in no small part to how rapidly it mutates. Every time the flu virus changes, it becomes harder for humans to develop an immunity. Even our best external defense against influenza, the flu shot, is based on experts’ best guess as to which flu strain or strains are most likely to be prevalent during a given flu season. Sometimes they’re right — this season’s vaccine has turned out to be a relatively good match for the strains currently in circulation. But sometimes they get it wrong, potentially leading to a more severe flu season. And influenza...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Life Reinvented medicine onetime Source Type: news

These Researchers Are Using Artificial Intelligence to Make a Better Flu Vaccine
The influenza virus is a particularly nasty bug, thanks in no small part to how rapidly it mutates. Every time the flu virus changes, it becomes harder for humans to develop an immunity. Even our best external defense against influenza, the flu shot, is based on experts’ best guess as to which flu strain or strains are most likely to be prevalent during a given flu season. Sometimes they’re right — this season’s vaccine has turned out to be a relatively good match for the strains currently in circulation. But sometimes they get it wrong, potentially leading to a more severe flu season. And influenza...
Source: TIME: Science - March 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Life Reinvented medicine onetime Source Type: news

Tanzania: Govt Now Sets Up Vaccine Production Centre
[Daily News] THE government, through the Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries, is constructing a centre at Tanzania Vaccine Institute (TVI) in Kibaha, Coast Region, for production of vaccines for bacterial diseases affecting animals. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 28, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Antigenic and Genetic Characteristics of Zoonotic Influenza Viruses and Development of Candidate Vaccine Viruses for Pandemic Preparedness
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 2/21/2019. This 10-page document summarizes the genetic and antigenic characteristics of recent zoonotic influenza viruses and related viruses circulating in animals that are relevant to influenza candidate vaccine virus updates. Zoonotic influenza viruses continue to be identified and evolve both genetically and antigenically, leading to the need for additional candidate vaccine viruses for pandemic preparedness purposes. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preventing parasites with new vaccines
Preventing parasites in poultry, cattle and other livestock is a major concern for Europe's farmers. As current treatments prove less effective or desirable, EU-funded scientists are working on new vaccines to keep animals healthy and safeguard our food supply. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 21, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Reverse Engineering for SDGs
Dr. Kakoli Ghosh, Strategic Program on Sustainable Agriculture Management Team, FAO Ms. Loreta Zdanovaite, Partnerships Officer, Division of Partnerships, FAOBy Kakoli Ghosh and Loreta ZdanovaiteROME, Feb 20 2019 (IPS)When young people from small towns and villages seek higher education they have to usually migrate to big cities leaving their local communities behind. On completion of their degree from the Universities, they generally prefer staying in cities, in search of a good job and a successful career. Though this is a standard practice, it is also a case of lost opportunities, especially for students who pursue high...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kakoli Ghosh and Loreta Zdanovaite Tags: Africa Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Green Economy Headlines Health Labour Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Water & Sa Source Type: news

Health Officials Are Worried That ‘Zombie Deer Disease’ Could Someday Spread to Humans
Officials are worried that a prion disease spreading among deer in the U.S. may someday threaten the health of humans. Chronic wasting disease (CWD), which is nicknamed “zombie deer disease,” gets its name from a range of symptoms. For deer, elk and moose, these include stumbling, listlessness, drooling and rapid weight loss. The fatal disease degrades the brains, spines and bodies of the animals it infects, and there are no known treatments or vaccines. No cases of CWD have been recorded in humans. It has not even been definitely proven that humans can be infected by CWD, though some research has suggested it&...
Source: TIME: Health - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Is this why vaccine pushers are such mean people? New vaccine study concludes that they cause antisocial behavior
(Natural News) Vaccine skepticism is heavily discouraged by the establishment, but research discrediting the myth of vaccine safety continues to pile up. A newly published study has found a link between vaccination and changes to the brain and behavior in animals. Among the results, scientist have found that vaccines with aluminum adjuvants can trigger antisocial... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Immune stimulant molecule shown to prevent cancer
(University of Louisville) An immune checkpoint molecule developed for cancer immunotherapy also protects against future development of multiple types of cancer when administered by itself. The recombinant protein molecule SA-4-1BBL has been used to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines with success in pre-clinical animal models. Surprisingly, when the researchers treated normal, healthy mice with SA-4-1BBL alone, the mice were protected when the researchers later exposed them to different types of tumor cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers Find Way For Chickens To Lay Eggs Filled With Cancer-Killing Drugs
BOSTON (CBS) – Researchers in Scotland say they have found a way to have chickens lay eggs filled with medicine. It’s a method that could make some drugs much more affordable. Scientists at The University of Edinburgh have genetically modified the birds to produce human proteins in their eggs that boost the immune system. Now, the chickens are laying eggs containing cancer-killing drugs. Researchers in Scotland have genetically modified chickens to produce human proteins in their eggs (WBZ-TV) “In the past, making these transgenic animals has been very inefficient very expensive and difficult,” says...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Seen On WBZ-TV Cancer Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

New precision medicine procedure fights cancer, advances treatment for pets and humans
(University of Missouri-Columbia) In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists at the University of Missouri have helped advance a patient-specific, precision medicine treatment for bone cancer in dogs. By creating a vaccine from a dog's own tumor, scientists worked with ELIAS Animal Health to target specific cancer cells and avoid the toxic side effects of chemotherapy, while also opening the door for future human clinical trials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Launch of first veterinary vaccines produced in China
Boehringer Ingelheim launches first veterinary vaccines produced in ChinaThe first local manufacturing plant, wholly-owned by a multinational animal health company, focuses on the China swine marketThe Taizhou plant will produce PRRS vaccines and supply them locallyThe company delivers on its long-term ‘in China, for China’ commitment while accelerating its localisation strategy (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - January 24, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

A Mysterious Company Claims to Sell Sneeze-Filled Tissues for $80. Is It Real?
The package appeared one day, unbidden, on the desk of a TIME writer. Inside was a slick white box that housed a petri dish sealed with gold tape. In the dish was a crumpled tissue—and inside the tissue were, allegedly, the germs of a sick person who had sneezed into it. Vaev Tissue, the only product of a new startup based in Los Angeles, costs $79.99, according to the company’s website. Its sole purpose is to give the user a cold virus. “We believe using a tissue that carries a human sneeze is safer than needles or pills,” read the note that came with the product, written by the founder of the comp...
Source: TIME: Health - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Anti-Opioid Vaccine Shows Promise in Mice
THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 -- A vaccine that might help combat the opioid epidemic has performed well in early animal testing, researchers report. The vaccine contains antibodies that are effective against several synthetic opioids, including fentanyl... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Shameless vaccine promoters now using zoo animals for propaganda: Baby gorilla "gets his flu shot"
(Natural News) As more Americans are wising up to the sham of vaccination, Big Pharma and the mainstream media are conjuring up pro-vaccine propaganda whenever they can. Now, the vaccine industry is stooping so low as to use zoo animals to fuel their  agenda. And at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, a baby gorilla was just... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alexa now will help take care of your pet
VCA Animal Hospitals has teamed with Amazon.com Inc. to help pet owners book veterinarian appointments and get healthcare reminders using the Alexa voice command system. Alexa users can now enable the skill after linking their device to a VCA account online. They then can open the skill by saying: "Alexa, open VCA;” "Alexa, ask VCA when my pet is due for vaccines;" or "Alexa, ask VCA to book an appointment for my pet.” Los Angeles-based VCA, which operates mo re than 850 small animal veterinary… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: I-Chun Chen Source Type: news

Mars-owned animal hospital teams with Amazon ’s Alexa to book vet appointments
VCA Animal Hospitals has teamed with Amazon.com Inc. to help pet owners book veterinarian appointments and get health care reminders using the Alexa voice command system. Alexa users can now enable the skill after linking their device to a VCA account online. They then can open the skill by saying: "Alexa, open VCA;” "Alexa, ask VCA when my pet is due for vaccines;" or "Alexa, ask VCA to book an appointment for my pet.” Los Angeles-based VCA, which operates mo re than 850 small animal veterinary… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: I-Chun Chen Source Type: news

Mars-owned animal hospital teams with Amazon ’s Alexa to book vet appointments
VCA Animal Hospitals has teamed with Amazon.com Inc. to help pet owners book veterinarian appointments and get health care reminders using the Alexa voice command system. Alexa users can now enable the skill after linking their device to a VCA account online. They then can open the skill by saying: "Alexa, open VCA;” "Alexa, ask VCA when my pet is due for vaccines;" or "Alexa, ask VCA to book an appointment for my pet.” Los Angeles-based VCA, which operates mo re than 850 small animal veterinary… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 6, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: I-Chun Chen Source Type: news

New HIV vaccine candidate shows promise in animal tests
Researchers may have cleared another hurdle to developing an HIV vaccine, as one potential candidate has shown promise in early tests with animals. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alzheimer's Vaccine Shows Promise in Mice
MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 -- An experimental Alzheimer's disease vaccine shows promise in animal tests, and researchers say it could have the potential to reduce dementia cases by half. In mice created to develop Alzheimer's, the vaccine triggered an... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Scripps Research scientists unveil promising new HIV vaccine strategy
(Scripps Research Institute) A new candidate HIV vaccine from Scripps Research surmounts technical hurdles that stymied previous vaccine efforts, and stimulates a powerful anti-HIV antibody response in animal tests. The new vaccine strategy, described in a paper on Nov. 23 in Science Advances, is based on the HIV envelope protein, Env. This complex, shape-shifting molecule has been notoriously difficult to produce in vaccines in a way that induces useful immunity to HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineering vaccines to protect farm animals from infection
An EU-funded project is using synthetic biology techniques to design broad-spectra vaccines against mycoplasmas and viral infections in farm animals. By designing a growth medium without animal components and developing a platform to engineer new vaccines, the project will give the EU livestock industry a much-needed boost. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 21, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Treatment for canine leishmaniasis exists in Brazilian vaccine
(Morris Animal Foundation) A vaccine used to prevent dogs from contracting the deadly, parasitic disease canine leishmaniasis also can be used to treat currently infected dogs, found Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Iowa, providing a new avenue of treatment for millions of infected dogs globally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccine protects animals against anthrax and plague
Scientists engineered a vaccine that protects animals from both anthrax and plague. After more development and testing, the approach could be used to combat public health threats. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mouse study suggests vaccine strategy for immunocompromised patients
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A study led by Som Nanjappa at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine identifies a cellular target that may improve efficacy in vaccines designed to protect immunocompromised individuals from potentially deadly opportunistic infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

DNA vaccine shows promising, long-term results against Ebola virus
A synthetic DNA vaccine is showing immediate and long-term promising results against the Ebola virus in preclinical animal research. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Inauguration of new global center for veterinary vaccine R & D
Boehringer Ingelheim inaugurates its new global centre for veterinary vaccine R&D in Lyon, France70 million euro investment reinforces the company ’s leading position in the veterinary vaccine marketThe new R&D center of 14,500 square meters is a high-tech facility employing more than 200 employees (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - October 10, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Boehringer Ingelheim is committed to joining forces in the global fight against rabies
The company ’s goal is to bring attention to the serious threat that rabies still poses to animals and humans in many parts of the worldAn estimated 160 people die from rabies every day, 40 per cent of whom are children1Human rabies deaths could be avoided through effective dog vaccination1 (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 28, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

New vaccine against Bovine Respiratory Disease
: Boehringer Ingelheim reaffirms its focus on preventionBovalto ® Respi Intranasal now registered in most European countries for active immunization of cattle against Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) and Bovine Parainfluenza 3 Virus (PI3V), two of the major pathogens involved in Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD)BRD is one of the most common diseases1 affecting cattle all over the worldBoehringer Ingelheim reaffirms its focus on prevention and animal well-being (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 27, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news