Plague vaccine bait -- look who's coming to dinner
(Morris Animal Foundation) Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers suspected and have now confirmed that plague vaccine bait, designed to protect prairie dogs and assist with recovery efforts of the black-footed ferret, is readily consumed by thousands of small rodents each year but with no apparent ill effect. Results were recently published in the journal EcoHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cancer Treatment Less Effective in Older Patients
As age increases, so does the risk for cancer. More than half of all cancer cases occur in people over 65. This is especially true for mesothelioma. The average age at diagnosis for pleural mesothelioma — the most common form of the disease — is 69. Despite cancer being more common among the elderly, many cancer treatments work best in younger patients. Researchers now have an idea of why certain cancer treatments don’t work as well in older patients. These important findings were published in June in the medical journal Cell Reports. “While it is clear that primary T cell responses decline in the ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 6, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

New & Resurgent Infectious Diseases Can Have Far-reaching Economic Repercussions
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David E. Bloom and JP Sevilla Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Nigeria:Why Nigeria Cannot Start Producing Vaccines Now - Professor of Virology
[Premium Times] Oyewale Tomori is a professor of virology, educational administrator and former vice chancellor. He is a fellow of the Academy of Science of Nigeria, fellow of the College of Veterinary Surgeons of Nigeria and fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists of the United Kingdom. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 3, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

How a Drug For Pets May Help Prevent Zika and Malaria
Diseases spread by pests like mosquitoes and fleas remain global health problems. To prevent transmission, public health strategy has largely focused on using insecticides or bed nets. Vaccines are also under development for diseases like Zika, but few are approved for use. Now, a new study suggests that medicines already used for pets to protect against fleas and ticks could offer similar protection for humans. In the report, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the nonprofit drug discovery institute Calibr and TropIQ Health Sciences report that drugs called isoxa...
Source: TIME: Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health public health Source Type: news

How a Drug For Pets May Help Prevent Zika and Malaria
Diseases spread by pests like mosquitoes and fleas remain global health problems. To prevent transmission, public health strategy has largely focused on using insecticides or bed nets. Vaccines are also under development for diseases like Zika, but few are approved for use. Now, a new study suggests that medicines already used for pets to protect against fleas and ticks could offer similar protection for humans. In the report, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the nonprofit drug discovery institute Calibr and TropIQ Health Sciences report that drugs called isoxa...
Source: TIME: Science - July 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health public health Source Type: news

FDA Warns Of Accidental Overdosing Of Dogs
(CBS Local)– The Food and Drug Administration released a statement on its website Friday about a noise aversion drug called Sileo that is causing dogs to accidentally overdose. Sileo is a drug given to dogs to treat noise aversion or signs related to anxiety. Zoetis, the world’s largest producer of medicine and vaccinations for animals, began marketing the drug in May 2016. The FDA reportedly became aware of issues with the drug in 2017, but the problems continued. “In 2017, after becoming aware of the adverse events related to ring-stop locking issues, the FDA asked Zoetis to revise its labeling to ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News FDA Local TV talkers Source Type: news

Polio Virus Could Help Treat Brain Cancer. Here ’s How
The idea that viruses may be co-opted to do good rather than harm isn’t entirely new; researchers have been attempting to harness the power of viruses and bacteria for more than a century. Vaccines are the shining example of using bad bugs to do good in priming the immune system to fight disease. But disease-causing viruses aren’t always easy to corral, and attempts to use them to activate the immune system against things other than fellow bacteria and viruses — including cancer, for example — have not been so successful. There is only one approved virus-based treatment for cancer, which uses herpes...
Source: TIME: Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Combining different malaria vaccines could reduce cases by 91 percent
Using two experimental anti-malarial vaccines can greatly reduce the number of malaria infections in animal studies, according to a research team that includes MRC scientists. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - June 20, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Combining different malaria vaccines could reduce cases by 91 percent
(Imperial College London) Using two experimental anti-malarial vaccines, which work in different ways, can greatly reduce the number of malaria infections in animal studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yellow fever: A new method for testing vaccine safety
(Institut Pasteur) Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS and Sanofi Pasteur have recently developed a novel alternative method to animal testing that can be used to verify the safety of vaccines such as the yellow fever vaccine. This original approach is based on the development of an in cellulo device using a 3D culture model, the 'BBB-Minibrain'. A patent application has been filed by the Institut Pasteur and Inserm. The results of this research were published in the journal Biologicals in May 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new vaccine and probiotic combat cholera in animal models
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) In a pair of studies, scientists have devised new vaccine-based and probiotic interventions that help prevent severe cholera infections in animal models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Test vaccine active against many HIV strains
An experimental HIV vaccine prompted animal immune systems to form antibodies that neutralize dozens of HIV strains. A study of the test vaccine in people is being planned. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - June 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Human Trials Set for Experimental HIV Vaccine
WEDNESDAY, June 6, 2018 -- An experimental HIV vaccine protected animals from dozens of strains of HIV. And a human trial of the vaccine is expected to begin in the second half of 2019, according to U.S. researchers. The vaccine targets a vulnerable... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

HIV vaccine elicits antibodies in animals that neutralize dozens of HIV strains
NIH study results represent major advance for structure-based HIV vaccine design. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - June 4, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

HIV Vaccine Elicits Antibodies in Animals that Neutralize Dozens of HIV Strains
An experimental vaccine regimen based on the structure of a vulnerable site on HIV elicited antibodies in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys that neutralize dozens of HIV strains from around the world. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health Officials 'Cautiously Optimistic' on Ebola Response
GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization said Tuesday it is "cautiously optimistic" about efforts to curb the spread of Ebola in an urban area in Congo, although the lethal virus is still reported in at least two remote areas. There have been 35 confirmed cases, including 12 deaths. The U.N. health agency and partners have vaccinated more than 400 people with an experimental Ebola vaccine, the first time it has been used in an emerging outbreak. WHO emergencies chief Peter Salama told reporters that the response has gone "quite smoothly" and that the agency's first priority had been to stop Ebo...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Health Officials 'Cautiously Optimistic' on Ebola Response
GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization said Tuesday it is "cautiously optimistic" about efforts to curb the spread of Ebola in an urban area in Congo, although the lethal virus is still reported in at least two remote areas. There have been 35 confirmed cases, including 12 deaths. The U.N. health agency and partners have vaccinated more than 400 people with an experimental Ebola vaccine, the first time it has been used in an emerging outbreak. WHO emergencies chief Peter Salama told reporters that the response has gone "quite smoothly" and that the agency's first priority had been to stop Ebo...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - May 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Health Officials 'Cautiously Optimistic' on Ebola Response
GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization said Tuesday it is "cautiously optimistic" about efforts to curb the spread of Ebola in an urban area in Congo, although the lethal virus is still reported in at least two remote areas. There have been 35 confirmed cases, including 12 deaths. The U.N. health agency and partners have vaccinated more than 400 people with an experimental Ebola vaccine, the first time it has been used in an emerging outbreak. WHO emergencies chief Peter Salama told reporters that the response has gone "quite smoothly" and that the agency's first priority had been to stop Ebo...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Health Officials 'Cautiously Optimistic' on Ebola Response
GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization said Tuesday it is "cautiously optimistic" about efforts to curb the spread of Ebola in an urban area in Congo, although the lethal virus is still reported in at least two remote areas. There have been 35 confirmed cases, including 12 deaths. The U.N. health agency and partners have vaccinated more than 400 people with an experimental Ebola vaccine, the first time it has been used in an emerging outbreak. WHO emergencies chief Peter Salama told reporters that the response has gone "quite smoothly" and that the agency's first priority had been to stop Ebo...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - May 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Angola:Angola Needs Four Million Dosages of Animal Vaccines
[ANGOP] Lubango -Angola needs at least four million dosages of animal vaccines to cover the animal immunization campaign against contagious peripneumonia, nodular dermatitis, hematic and symptomatic carbuncles initially scheduled for the end of the month of May. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 25, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

OIE declares Brazil free of foot-and-mouth with vaccination
PARIS (Reuters) - The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) declared Brazil free of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) with vaccination on Thursday, opening new export prospects for the world's largest beef exporter. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Ebola Outbreak in Congo Is Not Yet a Global Emergency, WHO Says
World health leaders met on Friday to discuss the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and concluded that for the time being, while the outbreak is serious, it is not a public health emergency of international concern. The director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, convened the meeting of the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee in Geneva. Tedros, as he prefers to be called, previously visited an affected area of the country and said he’s impressed by the local response. “We were encouraged by what we have seen despite the cha...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

An epidemiological study of animal bite cases in a tertiary care center of Bhopal city: a cross-sectional study - Patel S, Toppo M, Lodha R.
BACKGROUND: Rabies is 100% fatal, 100% vaccine preventable disease, yet continues to kill. There are no global estimates of dog bite incidence; however, studies suggest that dog bites account for tens of millions of injuries annually. Tens of thousands of ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

'Tremendous potential' for a herpes vaccine after success in animals
Universities in Louisiana and Pennsylvania have developed vaccines that stop monkeys and guinea pigs developing symptoms after being exposed to aggressive forms of the genital herpes virus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA-led research finds vaccines against anthrax, plague and tularemia are effective in mice
Anthrax, plague and tularemia are three potent agents terrorists would be likely to use in an attack, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each is highly and quickly lethal to humans. But there are no licensed vaccines for tularemia and plague, and although there is an anthrax vaccine, it requires a burdensome immunization schedule and has severe side effects.Now, a UCLA-led group of researchers may have found a solution that, if found to be safe and effective in humans, could protect people from all three bacteria. The team used molecular engineering to develop vaccines against each that use a comm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Bill Gates Commits $12 Million To Help Find A Universal Flu Vaccine
BOSTON (CBS Local) – After a devastating flu season around the world, Bill Gates is joining the search for a universal vaccine for the potentially deadly virus. The Details: Bill Gates is offering $12 million in grants to help create a universal flu vaccine Gates made the announcement on April 27 while warning about the risk of a global pandemic The CDC says the 2017-18 flu season has killed 160 children, the most in the U.S. since 2013  In a conference at the Seaport Hotel & World Trade Center in Boston on April 27, Gates stressed the need for new treatments and a better global response to futur...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Bill Gates Chris Melore Flu Flu Vaccine Local TV Medicine talkers Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Growing up with animals makes you less stressed as an adult
A study finds that farm upbringings with animals build more resilience against stress-related physical and mental illness than pet-free city upbringings. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Immune System / Vaccines Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Growing up with animals could make you more resilient as an adult
A study finds that farm upbringings with animals build more resilience against stress-related physical and mental illness than pet-free city upbringings. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Immune System / Vaccines Source Type: news

Tanzania:Dar Gears Up to Produce Own Livestock Vaccines Next Year
[Daily News] TANZANIA gears up to become self-reliant on livestock vaccine production, with the country's veterinary laboratory agency (TVLA) set to manufacture at least eleven such products by 2020. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 1, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Marmosets as the canary in the coal mine for Zika
(Texas Biomedical Research Institute) New research shows small, New World monkeys called marmosets may be an important animal model for emerging viruses with the potential for harmful effects on fetuses. Establishing animal models for emerging diseases, like Zika, is necessary for the development of vaccines, therapies and diagnostics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Innovative vaccine offers canine cancer patients a shot at a longer, happier life
(University of Pennsylvania) Nicola Mason of the School of Veterinary Medicine is leading a multi-institutional clinical trial evaluating an immunotherapy approach to treat dogs with osteosarcoma, a cancer of the bone. A new $775,000 grant from the Morris Animal Foundation will help her build on her past successes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Horses get the flu, too
(University of Rochester Medical Center) Flu vaccines for horses haven't been updated in more than 25 years, but researchers have developed a new live equine influenza vaccine that's safe and more protective than existing vaccines. Proactively preventing the spread of flu in animals is important, as animals are the most likely source of future human pandemics. Animals can be infected with multiple influenza viruses and have the potential to act as 'mixing vessels,' generating new strains that could infect people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Veterinary Group: Dogs Can ’t Get Autism, So Please Keep Vaccinating Them
Yes, you should vaccinate your pets. And no, they can’t get autism. That’s the surreal message the British Veterinary Association (BVA) is pushing out to pet owners. It comes amid a mounting trend of individuals who refuse to vaccinate their dogs due to a mistaken belief that shots can cause autism. This theory — which originally stems from a widely discredited and later retracted 1998 study that purported to find a link between autism and the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine — has been repeatedly disproven in humans, and has no scientific basis when it comes to animals. “There’s currently ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Autism healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Dogs Can ’ t Have Autism, U.K. Officials Say After Vaccine Scare
The “ anti-vaxxer ” movement blamed for outbreaks of measles in the U.S. and Europe has now turned to pets, leading officials to rebut claims about side effects from vaccines. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CEYLAN YEGINSU Tags: Animal Behavior Dogs Vaccination and Immunization Autism Veterinary Medicine Great Britain British Veterinary Association ITV (British television network - was offered iTV, which is either a case error in the tag name or another network...) Source Type: news

No, Your Dog Can ’ t Get Autism From a Vaccine
British officials were spurred to rebut claims about the possible side effects of vaccines because the “ anti-vaxxer ” movement blamed for measles outbreaks has turned to pets. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CEYLAN YEGINSU Tags: Animal Behavior Dogs Vaccination and Immunization Autism Veterinary Medicine Great Britain British Veterinary Association ITV (British television network - was offered iTV, which is either a case error in the tag name or another network...) Source Type: news

Malawi:Lumpy Skin Disease Outbreak Hits Thyolo
[Malawi News Agency] Thyolo -Thyolo District Animal Health and Livestock Development Officer (DAHLDO), Mckinley Gudubuza on Thursday expressed concern over inadequate vaccine to arrest lumpy skin disease outbreak which has hit dairy farmers in the district. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 23, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

DISGUSTING: Study finds that animal vaccines have no safeguards against contamination and contribute to serious pet diseases like cancer
(Natural News) Most of us are incredibly attached to our pets. As such, we do everything we can to prevent them from getting ill, including getting them vaccinated at the intervals recommended on the schedules we receive from their veterinarians. What we might not realize, however, is that in getting them vaccinated we may be... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Latest Mesothelioma Immunotherapy Combination Looks Promising
Scientists at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel, two-agent immunotherapy combination that worked surprisingly well in animal models with malignant mesothelioma. The discovery has sparked new optimism for immunotherapy, which has struggled to provide consistently positive results with aggressive cancers such as mesothelioma. “This is the beginning of a new story of hope, a new combination of immunotherapy,” Dr. Mark Poznansky, director of the VIC and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, told Asbestos.com. “It worked quite well in a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 17, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Morris Animal Foundation awards $775K to test osteosarcoma immunotherapy vaccine in dogs
(Morris Animal Foundation) Morris Animal Foundation has awarded a $775,000 grant to the University of Pennsylvania to test a vaccine that could improve longevity and quality of life for dogs with the deadly bone tumor, osteosarcoma. The research team will conduct clinical trials to evaluate a novel immunotherapy treatment which combines a molecule expressed by cancer cells with a modified live form of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Are Complications of Oropharyngeal Trauma?
Discussion Oropharyngeal trauma is common and ranges from minor contusions to severe trauma of the head and neck. Sudden movement while having a foreign object in the mouth is a very common scenario with falls or collisions being common mechanisms. Common objects include toys, sticks, pens/pencils, chopsticks, toothbrushes, and popsicle sticks. Many of these injuries cause minimal problems such as a contusion to lips (i.e. “fat lip”). In general, the more anterior the location the more common the injury and the less likely to have a severe injury (i.e. lips). Whereas posterior structures are more protected, bu...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 16, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

NIH scientists develop macaque model to study Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral disease spread by ticks in the Middle East, Asia, Africa and parts of Europe. Infection with CCHF virus is fatal in nearly one of every three cases. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHF exist, primarily because a suitable animal model for studying the disease has not been available. Now, as reported in Nature Microbiology, researchers at NIAID have developed a new animal model to study the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Could BioSig Play a Vital Role in the Bioelectronics Market?
BioSig Technologies is hoping to make an impact in the $4.6 billion electrophysiology (EP) market with its first product offering. The Santa Monica, CA-based company is developing the Pure EP system, a surface electrocardiogram and intracardiac multichannel device. BioSig filed said it filed for FDA clearance of the Pure EP system in late March. Once the company receives FDA clearance then it would turn its attention toward gaining regulatory clearance in Europe. “We feel like we’ve made a very robust submission to FDA,” Ken Londoner, founder and CEO of BioSig, told MD+DI. The Pure EP Syste...
Source: MDDI - April 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Digital Health Source Type: news

Virus-like particle could lead to new cancer vaccine
(Michigan State University) Michigan State University scientists are engineering a virus-like particle, known as Qβ, that will generate anti-cancer immune responses in the body and potentially be used as a new vaccine for the treatment of cancer. The project, funded by a $2.4 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, will support the development of the vaccine to protect animals against cancerous cells that are currently untreatable, and could easily translate to vaccines for humans' use of spontaneously occurring cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UCLA scientists receive $7.7 million grant to study HIV recurrence
The virus that causes AIDS is known to hide in certain rare cells. When people with HIV stop taking their medications, the virus can re-emerge and multiply, or “rebound,” from those hiding places. To better combat HIV, scientists have been working to understand how and why the virus re-emerges.“It’s the resurrection of virus that you couldn’t see in the body before,” said Jerome Zack, professor of medicine and chair of the UCLA department of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Zack, who is director of the  UCLA Center ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Stem cell vaccine immunizes lab mice against multiple cancers
(Cell Press) Stanford University researchers report that injecting mice with inactivated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) launched a strong immune response against breast, lung, and skin cancers. The vaccine also prevented relapses in animals that had tumors removed. The work appears in the journal Cell Stem Cell on Feb. 15. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

This UV Lamp Could Prevent the Flu Virus From Spreading in Public Places
Researchers have developed an ultraviolet (UV) lamp that kills the influenza virus but isn’t harmful to human skin or eyes, according to a new study in Scientific Reports. They hope the technology can be commercialized and marketed to prevent the spread of seasonal flu in public places, such as schools, hospitals, and airports. “We’ve known for a century that UV light is extremely efficient at killing microbes, bacteria, and viruses,” says study leader David Brenner, director of the Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. For that reason, UV devices are often u...
Source: TIME: Health - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized health healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Australia's cat plague is back after 40 years – and the solution is vaccination
Herd immunity is essential. If parvovirus vaccination rates fall below 70%, cats are in troubleA deadly feline disease is now spreading between cats after hiding for nearly 40 years. Multiple cases of feline parvovirus, also known as cat plague, or panleukopenia, have been reported in stray kittens inthe greater Melbourne area this week.Feline parvovirus was a common disease in the 1960s and 1970s. Australia was one of the first countries to develop an effective vaccine. Once widespread vaccination became routine, the disease was pushed back into nature.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Westman and Richard Malik for The Conversation Tags: Veterinary medicine Cats Animals Pets Australia news New South Wales Veterinary science Medical research Source Type: news

Cancer 'vaccine' eliminates tumors in mice, Stanford researchers find
(Stanford University Medical Center) Injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 31, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Recent Dog Flu Outbreaks Have Pet Owners Worried. Here ’s What to Know
The San Francisco SPCA announced Friday on Twitter that cases of dog flu had been confirmed in the Bay Area, and encouraged dog owners to contact their veterinarians if their pets display symptoms of the virus. California is one of several states that has reported outbreaks of dog flu, also known as canine influenza, over the past several months. The Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, which monitors reports of dog flu around the country, confirmed that six dogs have tested positive for the canine influenza H3N2 virus in California in the last 45 days. Although there is also an H3N2 strain of human seasonal ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Can a dog get the flu Can dogs get the flu Can you give your dog the flu Dog flu 2018 Dog flu symptoms Dog flu symptoms and treatment dog flu vaccine healthytime public health Signs of dog flu Symptoms of dog flu the Source Type: news