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Antibody-dependent enhancement of severe dengue disease in humans
For dengue viruses 1 to 4 (DENV1-4), a specific range of antibody titer has been shown to enhance viral replication in vitro and severe disease in animal models. Although suspected, such antibody-dependent enhancement of severe disease has not been shown to occur in humans. Using multiple statistical approaches to study a long-term pediatric cohort in Nicaragua, we show that risk of severe dengue disease is highest within a narrow range of preexisting anti-DENV antibody titers. By contrast, we observe protection from all symptomatic dengue disease at high antibody titers. Thus, immune correlates of severe dengue must be ev...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Katzelnick, L. C., Gresh, L., Halloran, M. E., Mercado, J. C., Kuan, G., Gordon, A., Balmaseda, A., Harris, E. Tags: Epidemiology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

UCLA helps many to live long and prosper
In Westwood, more than 100 faculty experts from 25 departments have embarked on anall-encompassing push to cut the health and economic impacts of depression in half by the year 2050. The mammoth undertaking will rely on platforms developed by the new Institute for Precision Health, which will harness the power of big data and genomics to move toward individually tailored treatments and health-promotion strategies.On the same 419 acres of land, researchers across the spectrum, from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside, are ushering in a potentially game-changing approach to turning the body ’s immune defenses a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Experts Concerned About Effectiveness Of This Year ’ s Flu Vaccine
(CNN) — Last year’s seasonal flu vaccine effectiveness was just 42%, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated. Even if vaccinated, people had inadequate protection against the flu. This limited effectiveness was due to a mutation that occurred in the influenza A (H3N2) vaccine strain, according to a study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This vaccine mutation resulted from an egg-based manufacturing process commonly used today. This year’s flu vaccine may also be imperfect, said Scott Hensley, author of the new study and an associate profe...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Flu Flu Vaccine Local TV Source Type: news

Meet the Heroic Animals That Went Into Space Before Humans
The First Space Pioneers Bettmann Archive Animals were every bit as heroic as the first human astronauts By Jeffrey Kluger Animals have long been the science community’s shock troops—the first to hit the beaches when a new frontier of knowledge is being claimed. Those soldiers hardly volunteered for the misison: The thousands of monkeys and mice that were used as test subjects for Jonas Salk’s first polio vaccine were conscripted for the job, whether they wanted to do it or not. That doesn’t diminish their profound contribution to scientific knowledge—indeed, it enlarges it. The same is tru...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: animals belka ham Laika NASA space strelka Source Type: news

A Promising Experimental Vaccine Could One Day Be A Universal Flu Shot
Animal experiments showed that it protected them from typically lethal doses of the flu. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clarivate Analytics & Chinese Academy of Sciences announce annual report identifying 100 hottest and 43 emerging areas in global scientific research
This report reveals that based on the 143 Research Fronts, the USA is still leading global research followed by China in second place ahead of the UK and Germany. China is most prolific in chemistry, materials science, mathematics, computer science and engineering, and is leading the rest of the world in terms of research in mathematics, computer science and engineering. Twenty noteworthy topics among the 100 hottest Research Fronts are: Hot Research Fronts Field of Science Research on genome editing in plants and the utility in crops Agricultural, Plant and Animal Sciences Regulation mechan...
Source: News from STM - November 2, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Promising Pneumonia Vaccine Under Development
Animal tests showed an immune response to 72 of the 90 - plus known strains of S. pneumoniae (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - November 2, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Family Medicine, Infections, Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Newly discovered molecule may hold promise in HIV vaccine
A new HIV vaccine candidate is showing effectiveness in animal studies in stimulating an immune response against sugars that form a shield around HIV. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New molecule shows promise in HIV vaccine design
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland and Duke University have designed a novel protein-sugar vaccine candidate that, in an animal model, stimulated an immune response against sugars that form a protective shield around HIV. The molecule could one day become part of a successful HIV vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robotic cats purr-fect fit for Greater Cincinnati retirement community
The Knolls of Oxford has acquired two robotic cats, which purr, meow and blink their eyes as they provide companionship to the retirement community ’s residents in assisted living or skilled nursing.  Live animals aren’t permitted in those sections of the Butler County community because of concerns about allergies, pet messes, vaccinations and other issues.  But residents can spend time with the battery-powered toy animals at their disc retion. The cats have built-in sensors that respond to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - October 24, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Barrett J. Brunsman Source Type: news

Marburg Haemorrhagic Fever
World Health Organization. 10/2017 This fact sheet provides information about Marburg hemorrhagic fever, also called Marburg virus disease, which is a severe, often fatal illness in humans. It discusses transmission, symptoms, persistent virus in people recovering from Marburg virus disease, diagnosis, treatment and vaccines, Marburg in animals, prevention and control, and controlling infection in healthcare settings. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Innovation for Climate-Smart Agriculture Key to Ending Hunger in Kenya
Vaccination of live stock in Samburu County, Kenya. Credit: @FAO/LUIS TATOBy Siddharth ChatterjeeNAIROBI, Kenya , Oct 23 2017 (IPS)Some parts of Kenya are reeling from the effects of probably the worst drought in the last 20 years. With nearly 3.4 million people food insecure, Kenya’s food security prognosis looks gloomy, with climate change and natural resource depletion set to pose even greater risks in the long term. Rising temperatures and unpredicatble rainy seasons could destroy crop yield gains made in the recent past, and the threats of extreme weather such as flooding, drought and pests becoming more real. T...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Siddharth Chatterjee Tags: Africa Aid Climate Change Combating Desertification and Drought Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Gender Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Natural Resources Poverty & SDG Source Type: news

Namibia:Pet Owners Urged to Vaccinate Animals Against Rabies
[New Era] Windhoek -The Ministry of Health and Social Services has urged pet owners to vaccinate their animals against rabies. Public relations officer in the Health Ministry Manga Libita said there is a shortage of anti-rabies vaccine in the country at present and that is the case globally. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 19, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Novel reagent detects memory immune response in vaccinated animals
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers have developed a novel reagent capable of detecting rare, antigen-specific B cells that indicate successful vaccination in veterinary animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanopatch tops needles, syringes as delivery system for polio vaccine in animal study
A microscopic vaccine delivery platform developed by researchers at the University of Queensland has proven a more effective way to deliver a polio virus vaccine compared to needles and syringes in an animal model. “Polio was one of the most dreaded childhood diseases of the 20th century, resulting in limb disfigurement and irreversible paralysis in tens of millions of cases,” Paul Young, head of UQ’s school of chemistry & molecular biosciences, said in prepared remarks. “This most recent study showed the Nanopatch enhanced responses to all three types of inactivate...
Source: Mass Device - October 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development universityofqueensland Source Type: news

The World Is Running Out of Much Needed New Antibiotics
Posters: Misuse of antibiotics and risks. Credit: WHOBy Baher KamalROME, Oct 4 2017 (IPS)The world is running out of new antibiotics to combat the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance, a new specialised report warns ahead of this year’s World Antibiotic Awareness Week, adding that most of the drugs currently in the clinical pipeline are modifications of existing classes of antibiotics and are only short-term solutions. The latest World Health Organization (WHO) report on this issue “Antibacterial agents in clinical development – an analysis of the antibacterial clinical development pipeline, includi...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Plague Fact Sheet
World Health Organization. 04/2017 This fact sheet provides information about plague, an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, a zoonotic bacteria, usually found in small mammals and their fleas. It is transmitted between animals from their fleas. The fact sheet discusses signs and symptoms, where plague is found, diagnosing plague, treatment, prevention, vaccination, managing plague outbreaks, and surveillance and control. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists ignored fatal results of TB vaccine, went ahead with trials on human babies
(Natural News) While testing on animals is an undoubtedly detestable practice, it still pales in comparison to testing on human babies. Especially when the product in question has already been shown to kill primates, our close genealogical relatives. But for Big Pharma and other vaccine-pushers, human life is of little consequence — even when talking... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New study funded points to unexpected benefits of rabies vaccination in dogs
(Morris Animal Foundation) The rabies vaccine is extremely effective at preventing this fatal disease in dogs, but new research, funded by Morris Animal Foundation, shows the vaccine may have a positive impact on overall canine health as well, and is associated with a decrease in death from all causes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Boehringer Ingelheim beefs up St. Joe manufacturing after merger
After closing its mega-merger with Merial this year, Boehringer Ingelheim slowly began ramping up its animal health manufacturing in St. Joseph. The company confirmed that it would increase production capacity as it transfers products from its former Fort Dodge, Iowa, facility. Elanco U.S. Inc. acquired the facility from Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health in 2016, as well as a portfolio of its vaccine products, for $885 million as part of Boehringer Ingelheim’s acquisition of Merial. The St.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Fighting HIV on Multiple Fronts Might Lead to Vaccine
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 -- A combination antibody strategy could be the key to halting the spread of HIV, according to results from two promising animal studies. Two separate research groups completely protected their own sets of lab monkeys from... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Techweek KC animal health panel: How tech for Fido can help humans
From better vaccines to data-tracking wearables for dogs, a growing portion of Kansas City tech companies are devoting time to improving the health of pets and livestock. This year’s Techweek KC brought together industry executives from three fast-growing companies for a discussion on the importance of innovation in animal health. “The companies within this region are developing groundbreaking innovations every day that not only are keeping our pets healthy, b ut are also making sure our food… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - September 14, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

FDA Clears Immune Globulin Kedrab for Rabies Treatment FDA Clears Immune Globulin Kedrab for Rabies Treatment
The plasma-derived human rabies immune globulin should be given immediately after contact with a rabid or possibly rabid animal, concurrently with a full course of rabies vaccine.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Alert Source Type: news

University spin out company addresses new vaccines
(University of Plymouth) The University of Plymouth has launched a new spin out company which will address new vaccines for diseases which spread from animals to humans and for use in infection control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 8, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Could cows be the clue that leads to an HIV vaccine?
Conclusion This early stage research on cows indicates that they had a broad and quick immune response to HIV infection when given a specific vaccine. Because the immune proteins produced in cows are able to neutralise many different strains of HIV virus, the authors suggest this potentially gives them an edge over the human proteins that have been looked at so far. As always with animal studies it is important to remember that what works in cows might not work in the same way in humans. Many drug studies that appear promising at first, fall at the first hurdle once humans are involved. The study was also carried out on ju...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Source Type: news

Cow antibodies yield important clues for developing a broadly effective AIDS vaccine
(International AIDS Vaccine Initiative) As outlined in a study published today in Nature, lead author Devin Sok, Director, Antibody Discovery and Development at the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), reports the elicitation of powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies in cows in a matter of weeks - a process that usually takes years in humans. The unexpected animal model is providing clues for important questions at a moment when new energy has infused HIV vaccine research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New animal models for hepatitis C could pave the way for a vaccine
(Rockefeller University) In the rats that roam New York City's streets and tunnels, scientists have found a virus that resembles hepatitis C. They have used it to create the first animal model of the human disease, a breakthrough that potentially could yield a much-needed vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mouse models of acute and chronic hepacivirus infection
An estimated 71 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The lack of small-animal models has impeded studies of antiviral immune mechanisms. Here we show that an HCV-related hepacivirus discovered in Norway rats can establish high-titer hepatotropic infections in laboratory mice with immunological features resembling those seen in human viral hepatitis. Whereas immune-compromised mice developed persistent infection, immune-competent mice cleared the virus within 3 to 5 weeks. Acute clearance was T cell dependent and associated with liver injury. Transient depletion of CD4+ T cells before infectio...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Billerbeck, E., Wolfisberg, R., Fahnoe, U., Xiao, J. W., Quirk, C., Luna, J. M., Cullen, J. M., Hartlage, A. S., Chiriboga, L., Ghoshal, K., Lipkin, W. I., Bukh, J., Scheel, T. K. H., Kapoor, A., Rice, C. M. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

WHO (World Health Organization) Advisory Committee on Variola Virus Research: Report of the Eighteenth Meeting
World Health Organization. 05/2017 This 58-page report summarizes the 18th meeting of the Advisory Committee on Variola Virus Research, held on November 2-3, 2016. The Advisory Committee reviewed the implications for its upcoming work in light of the 69th World Health Assembly's decision to have a substantive agenda item at the 72nd World Health Assembly in May 2019 on the destruction of smallpox virus stocks. It was also updated on continuing research projects using live variola virus for the development of diagnostic tests, animal models, smallpox vaccines, and antiviral and therapeutic agents. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Li...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - July 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Three-Zone Biosecurity Offers New Hope to Indonesian Farmers
James McGrane, FAO ECTAD Indonesia Team Leader, at his office in Jakarta. Credit: Kanis Dursin/IPSBy Kanis DursinJAKARTA, Indonesia, Jul 10 2017 (IPS)Poultry farmer Bambang Sutrisno Setiawan had long heard about biosecurity but never gave serious thought to it, even when the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 forced him to cull thousands of his layer chickens in 2003 and 2009.Eighteen years into the business, however, Bambang, who is called Ilung by friends, is now converting his second farm into a three-zone biosecurity poultry with a strong conviction that it is the only way to save his business amid continued threat...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kanis Dursin Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Projects avian flu biosafety Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Improving the lives of rural populations: better nutrition & agricultu Source Type: news

Antibodies halt placental transmission of CMV-like virus in monkeys
(Duke University Medical Center) Researchers from Duke University School of Medicine and Tulane National Primate Research Center report findings in monkeys that demonstrates a CMV vaccine approach that appears to be capable of protecting the animal's fetus from infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Jinyu Bio-technology Research Facility, Kansas
China's largest animal vaccine company Jinyu Bio-technology unveiled plans to establish its first US-based vaccine research lab and office facility in May 2017. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - June 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Discovering the early age immune response in foals
(Cornell University) Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered a new method to measure tiny amounts of antibodies in foals, a finding described in the May 16 issue   of PLOS ONE. The methodology will help understand how fast a foal starts producing its own antibodies, which in turn will help optimize recommendations for young horse vaccination schedules, said Dr. Julia Felippe, associate professor of large animal medicine, and research associate Rebecca Tallmadge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Painless' flu vaccine skin patch shows promise
Conclusion Further testing in larger trials needs to be done to be sure these initial results hold true and that the vaccine patch is safe and effective. This is the first time these flu microneedle patches have been tested on humans, and the study was relatively small, with only 100 participants. But if the results are confirmed, this new method of delivering the flu vaccination could make a big difference. The patches could have several main advantages over traditional injections: they may be preferred by people who dislike needles and avoid vaccination because of the fear of pain it may be quicker and easier to admi...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Swine flu Source Type: news

Cholesterol-lowering jab 'shows promise' for heart disease
Conclusion This mouse study evaluated the potential of the AT04A vaccine to lower cholesterol levels and potentially reduce or prevent heart disease. The results were promising, showing that mice given the vaccine produced antibodies against the enzyme that stops LDL cholesterol being cleared from the body. This resulted in reduced total and LDL blood cholesterol levels, as well as reduced atherosclerosis. No major safety concerns or side effects were reported. Following this research, AT04A has now moved on to a phase I clinical trial. A small number of people will be given the vaccine to see if it's safe for use in huma...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner on opioid drugs with abuse-deterrent properties
Last month, I asked my colleagues at the FDA to identify what additional and more forceful steps the FDA can take, on top of the vigorous work the agency is already doing, to address the crisis of opioid addiction. Everyone at the FDA is committed to focusing on all aspects of the epidemic. The new policy steps that we announced included the formation of a steering committee to examine additional regulatory and policy actions that we can take to combat this crisis. This steering committee will place particular emphasis on evaluating efforts we can take to reduce the number of new cases of addiction. The FDA is committed to...
Source: Mass Device - June 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog FDA Voice Source Type: news

Using Viruses to Boost Mesothelioma Immunotherapy
Immunotherapy through clinical trials is becoming a promising treatment option for some mesothelioma patients. Checkpoint inhibitor drugs, such as Keytruda, already have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as first-line treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), edging immunotherapy drugs closer to becoming a viable second-line therapy for other thoracic cancers, including pleural mesothelioma. However, overall response to immune therapies remains relatively low. Researchers across the country are striving to enhance responsiveness to immunotherapy drugs. Leading that trend is viroimmunotherapy, or t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 6, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Biomedicines checkpoint blockade Checkpoint inhibitor drugs clinical trials for mesothelioma Dr. Alexander Dash Dr. Manish Patel FDA approval Keytruda immune response cancer immunotherapy response mesothelioma intratumoral injections k Source Type: news

Antibodies from Ebola survivor could lead to treatments and vaccines
Antibodies from an Ebola survivor protected animals from deadly ebolaviruses and could help inform the development of potential treatments and vaccines. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - June 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'All Scientific Hands On Deck' To End The Opioid Crisis
By Nora Volkow (Director, NIDA) and Francis Collins (Director, NIH) In 2015, 2 million people had a prescription opioid use disorder and 591,000 suffered from a heroin use disorder; prescription drug misuse alone cost the nation $78.5 billion in health care, law enforcement, and lost productivity. But while the scope of the crisis is staggering, it is not hopeless. We understand opioid addiction better than many other drug use disorders; there are effective strategies that can be implemented right now to save lives and to prevent and treat opioid addiction. At the National Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, GA las...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH scientists find real-time imaging in mice a promising influenza study tool
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Real-time imaging of influenza infection in mice is a promising new method to quickly monitor disease progression and to evaluate whether candidate vaccines and treatments are effective in this animal model, according to scientists from NIAID. They evaluated the live imaging system as a potential alternative to traditional methods of assessing investigative influenza vaccines and treatment in mice, which can be time consuming and require more study animals for valid statistical comparison. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 30, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rabies vaccine to be air dropped by helicopter over parts of Northeast Ohio
(Natural News) The World Health Organization (WHO) describes rabies as a “fatal zoonotic disease, transmitted to humans through contact (mainly bites and scratches) with infected animals.”  This condition kills 55,000 people worldwide every year, with nearly 100 percent of fatal cases occurring in Asia and Africa. Worldwide, another ten million people are exposed yearly, but, according to the Center for Disease... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Discover First Human Antibodies That Work Against All Ebolaviruses
May 18, 2017—(BRONX, NY)—After analyzing the blood of a survivor of the 2013-16 Ebola outbreak, a team of scientists from academia, industry and the government has discovered the first natural human antibodies that can neutralize and protect animals against all three major disease-causing ebolaviruses. The findings, published online today in the journalCell, could lead to the first broadly effective ebolavirus therapies and vaccines. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - May 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pandemic Alert: How Lessons From China Can Help Us Rethink Urgent Health Threats
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Potential Zika virus vaccine
Preclinical research results in animal models demonstrate favorable outcomes in developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne Zika virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Entrepreneur: Hiring C-level expertise
Meeting the cancer moonshot is no easy task, but with the right team, Gary Wood hopes to accomplish this through his Olathe-based immunotherapy startup. TVAX Biomedical uses a two-pronged approach — cancer vaccine and white blood cells — to target numerous types of tumors, including brain and kidney cancer. He has spun off an animal health company that uses similar methods to target canine cancers. Wood started TVAX in 2004, based on 25 years ’ work in the University of Kansas pathology department.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 10, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Stem cell vaccine found to increase immune responses, inhibit tumors in animal models
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have found that a cancer stem cell vaccine, engineered to express a pro-inflammatory protein called interleukin-15 (IL-15) and its receptor (IL-15Ralpha), caused T cell production in animal models and enhanced immune responses against tumors. This T cell production showed a cellular immune response that could lead to new immunotherapy treatments for cancer with improved side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CCNY, TechnoVax translational research leads to potential Zika virus vaccine
(City College of New York) Preclinical results of research by City College of New York scientists and TechnoVax, Inc. in animal models demonstrate favorable outcomes in developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The results were announced by Tarrytown, New York-based TechnoVax, a biotechnology developer of novel vaccines whose proprietary virus-like particle (VLP) is the center of the research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The World Is Not Ready for the Next Pandemic
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news

He Was Searching For Intersexual Pigs And Ended Up Finding The World's Rarest Dog
Twenty years after beginning his quest to find what’s been called the world’s rarest canine species, James “Mac” McIntyre was vindicated. There on his camera screen were the images he’d been waiting years for. The New Guinea highland wild dog — an animal once feared extinct — was alive and well, his pictures showed. “I squealed like a girl,” the 62-year-old said earlier this month, speaking from his Florida home. “It was emotionally such a tremendous moment. It was justification for all the work I’ve done.” How McIntyre ended up finding the New Guinea ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news