What is coronavirus, what are its symptoms and how worried should we be?
What symptoms are related to the Covid-19 virus from Wuhan in China, how is it spread and when should you call a doctor?Nine schools in East Sussex testing staff or pupils for coronavirusHow to protect yourself from coronavirus infectionExplainer: could the coronavirus mutate if a vaccine can ’t be found in time?Latest updatesIt is a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. Many of those initially infected either worked or frequently shopped in the Huanan seafood wholesale market in the centre of the Chinese city, which also sold live...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley, Hannah Devlin and Martin Belam Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Medical research Science Microbiology World news China Asia Pacific Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Angola: Angola Receives 140,000 Doses of Rabies Vaccine
[ANGOP] Luanda -The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry received today a donation of 140,000 doses of vaccines to combat animal rabies in the country, in an initiative of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIA). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 12, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

It ’s Not Too Late to Prepare for COVID-19
By Dr. Lisa Stone, Epidemiology Adviser ; Robert Salerno, Director, Global Health Security Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama, June 6, 2018, as part an Emerging Infectious Diseases Training Event (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen).February 11, 2020A disease spillover event, when a virus moves from animal to human hosts, can cause significant human illness. The coronavirus (COVID-19) seems to have spilled over sometime in late 2019, at a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, leading to more than 40,000 confirmed cases and at least 910 reported deaths&nbs...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Infectious Diseases Global Health Security Source Type: news

Coronavirus Researchers Are Using High-Tech Methods to Predict Where the Virus Might Go Next
As the deadly 2019-nCov coronavirus spreads, raising fears of a worldwide pandemic, researchers and startups are using artificial intelligence and other technologies to predict where the virus might appear next — and even potentially sound the alarm before other new, potentially threatening viruses become public health crises. “What we’re doing currently with Coronavirus is really trying to get an understanding of what’s happening on the ground through as many sources as we can get our hands on,” says John Brownstein, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV coronavirus MSFTAI2019 onetime Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

Merck to streamline business, separate into two companies
Merck& Co. Inc. unveiled plans Wednesday to spin off products from its women ’s health and biosimilars businesses, along with certain legacy brands, into a new independent and publicly traded company. Going forward, Merck (NYSE: MRK) will focus on its oncology, vaccines, hospital medicine and animal health segments. Merck expects the spinoff to be completed by the first half of 2021. The pharmaceutical giant anticipates cost savings of more than $1.5 billion — primarily in areas such as manufacturing… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 5, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Merck to streamline business, separate into two companies
Merck& Co. Inc. unveiled plans Wednesday to spin off products from its women ’s health and biosimilars businesses, along with certain legacy brands, into a new independent and publicly traded company. Going forward, Merck (NYSE: MRK) will focus on its oncology, vaccines, hospital medicine and animal health segments. "Over the past several years, we have purposefully shi fted the focus of our efforts and resources to our best opportunities for growth," said Merck Chairman and CEO Kenneth C. Frazier,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 5, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Why We Are So Ill-Prepared for A Possible Pandemic Like Coronavirus
We were surprised in 2002 when a new coronavirus called SARS emerged from southern China and spread to 17 countries, causing more than 8,000 disease cases and nearly 800 deaths. We were surprised in 2009 when a new H1N1 influenza strain emerged in Mexico and caused worldwide panic. We were surprised in 2014 when Ebola virus broke out in three West African countries, with nearly 30,000 cases and more than 11,000 deaths. And here we are now, facing the 2019-nCoV coronavirus outbreak, on the verge of becoming a worldwide pandemic, wthin China reporting over 20,000 cases and nearly 500 deaths. Three years ago in a book, Deadl...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael T. Osterholm and Mark Olshaker Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

First childhood flu helps explain why virus hits some people harder than others
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Janssen to Highlight Depth of Solid Tumor Portfolio at ASCO GU
RARITAN, N.J., February 3, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today multiple data presentations from a robust solid tumor portfolio that will be featured at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary (ASCO GU) Cancers Symposium, taking place February 13-15 in San Francisco. Company-sponsored data presentations will include clinical results for ERLEADA® (apalutamide) and niraparib in prostate cancer; and BALVERSA™ (erdafitinib) in bladder cancer. “We are committed to improving outcomes in patients with prostate and bladder cancer where high unmet...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

UN Staffers Rattled by Deadly Coronavirus Pandemic
By Thalif DeenUNITED NATIONS, Feb 3 2020 (IPS) With over 37,500 staffers in its global Secretariat payroll, the United Nations has gone high alert as the deadly coronavirus continues to take a heavy toll worldwide. The 39-storeyed Secretariat building is perhaps the only sprawling office space in New York city where thousands of staffers and diplomats from 193 countries either work or meet under one roof — along with hundreds of journalists and representatives of civil society organizations (CSOs). Patricia Nemeth, President of the UN Staff Union (UNSU) in New York, told IPS that staff members have “expressed...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Thalif Deen Tags: Asia-Pacific Featured Global Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Wuhan Coronavirus Could Test the Trump Administration ’s Ability to Respond to a Crisis. Experts are Worried
As a new strain of coronavirus moves from the Wuhan province of China to other parts of the world, including the United States, public health leaders are advising government officials to embrace a deliberate, measured response. But with President Donald Trump at the helm of an often unpredictable administration, infectious disease and epidemic experts tell TIME they’re concerned about which officials will have the President’s ear, and how the Commander-in-Chief will manage his Twitter presence during a potential pandemic. On Friday, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced that, against the advi...
Source: TIME: Health - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease White House Source Type: news

Coronavirus Spread Now a Global Emergency Declares World Health Organization
Passengers wear face masks while riding the subway in Shenzhen, China. Credit: UN News/Jing Zhang.By External SourceUNITED NATIONS, Jan 31 2020 (IPS) The rise in new coronavirus cases outside China, now constitutes a global health emergency, the World Health Organization’s Emergency Committee declared on Thursday, calling on all countries to take urgent measures to contain the respiratory disease. Latest WHO figures state there are more than 7,800 confirmed cases globally, with 7,736 confirmed in China, and a further 12,167 suspected cases inside the country where the outbreak began in Wuhan, a city of around 11...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Coronavirus Source Type: news

A Timeline of How the Wuhan Coronavirus Has Spread —And How the World Has Reacted
A new virus has emerged from central China, infecting thousands with severe respiratory illness and killing dozens. Health officials, doctors and researchers are scrambling to contain the outbreak. As of publication, there are over 8,200 confirmed cases globally, and over 170 deaths attributed to the infection, the vast majority in China. Zoom into and hover over the maps below for details on those confirmed cases. ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getElementById('wpcom-iframe-40912b510be4a8082d91a09078e8890d') if ( iframe ) { iframe.onload = function() { iframe.cont...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lon Tweeten, Emily Barone and Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Source Type: news

How Long Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Last? Experts Are Scrambling to Find Out
As a novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV continues to spread throughout China and to countries across the world, the big question is: How long will the outbreak last—and how bad will it get? While some doctors have made predictions and outbreaks of similar coronaviruses like severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) provide clues, the short, if unsatisfying, answer is that no one is exactly sure. “There is no scientist nor sage on the planet that will tell you when the peak of this epidemic will occur,” said Dr. Michael Ryan, executive director of the World Heal...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Viral Outbreaks Are Here to Stay. This is How Humans Will Fight Back
The year of the rat is off to an ominous start. “We just stay home and don’t go out,” says Mr. Dong. The 33-year-old researcher, who provided only one name, has no other options. He, his wife and their 3-month-old daughter live in Wuhan, the epicenter of an unfolding global health crisis. They’re treating the forced time at home as a holiday, though he says, “this is different than any of them before.” Families like his huddle in their homes, fearful that if they venture out, they will get sick. Since the first cases of a previously unknown pneumonia-like illness emerged in December, Wuh...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park and Charlie Campbell Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Wuhan Coronavirus Infections Have Now Surpassed the Official Number of SARS Cases in China
Chinese officials confirmed Wednesday that the number of people infected by a new form of coronavirus in the country has reached 5,974, a total that surpasses the official cases tallied on the mainland during an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and 2003. SARS infected 5,237 people in mainland China, and killed almost 800 people across the world. The new SARS-like form of coronavirus has killed 132 people in China. The disease, which is believed to have originated in a seafood market in the Chinese central city of Wuhan, has also spread to other countries, including the U.S., where five cases hav...
Source: TIME: Health - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sanya Mansoor and Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized China Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news

Coronavirus Death Toll Rises to 80 as U.S. Prepares to Evacuate Americans From Wuhan
(BEIJING) — A new viral illness being watched with a wary eye around the globe accelerated its spread in China with 80 deaths so far, while the U.S. Consulate in the city at the epicenter announced it will evacuate its personnel and some other Americans aboard a charter flight. China’s health minister said the country was entering a “crucial stage” as “it seems like the ability of the virus to spread is getting stronger.” Ma Xiaowei declined to estimate how long it would take to bring the situation under control, but said travel restrictions and other strict measures should bring results...
Source: TIME: Health - January 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ken Moritsugu / AP Tags: Uncategorized China Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news

How To Protect Yourself Against The Deadly Coronavirus
(CNN) — What started as a mystery virus last month in Wuhan, China, has now killed more than two dozen people and infected hundreds more around the world. In the U.S., the first cases of Wuhan coronavirus were confirmed this week — a man in his 30s who is under observation in Washington state and a Chicago woman in her 60s — stoking fears of an outbreak in this country, though health officials say the risk for Massachusetts residents getting the virus is low. So what are officials doing in the U.S., and how can you minimize your risk? What airports are doing Passengers from Wuhan to the United States &mda...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN Coronavirus Source Type: news

The Wuhan Coronavirus Is Spreading Fast. Will Doctors Be Able to Find a Treatment Before the Outbreak Ends?
Cases of a novel pneumonia-like illness that originated in Wuhan, China in December have now been confirmed in South Korea, Thailand, Japan, Taiwan, Macau—and, as of Jan. 21, the U.S. The virus’ geographic reach, as well as its newly discovered ability to spread via person-to-person contact, has health officials worried about the prospect of globals spread. As health officials scramble to learn more about the virus and is origins, researchers are simultaneously turning to the question of how to develop a vaccine or therapy that could help contain transmission worldwide—a feat that experts say is technical...
Source: TIME: Health - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Kenya: Sh92 Million Runs to Waste as Vaccine Expires
[Nation] Tax payers have lost Sh92 million after a new foot-and-mouth disease vaccine that had been manufactured by the veterinary agency expired following a tug-of-war between senior government officials and the corporation over a benchmarking trip. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 22, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Logan Airport Not Currently Screening Passengers For Coronavirus
BOSTON (CBS/CNN) – A new Chinese coronavirus, a cousin of the SARS virus, has infected more than 200 people since the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December. Boston’s Logan Airport is not currently screening passengers for the illness, a spokesman for Customs and Border Protection told WBZ-TV. That’s because there are no direct flights to Boston from that region. Additional health screening for coronavirus is in place at JFK Airport in New York, San Francisco International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport. The agency said the CDC has determined that coronavirus presents a low risk to the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Coronavirus Logan Airport Source Type: news

This Year ’s Flu Season Got Off to a Strange Start. What Does That Mean for the Months Ahead?
Flu season is always unpredictable. Different viral strains circulate each year, which makes forecasting the disease’s spread—and formulating the annual flu vaccine—an educated guessing game. Even so, the 2019-2020 flu season has been particularly unusual. Influenza B, the viral strain that usually circulates toward the end of flu season, instead emerged first this year, shifting usual transmission patterns. A vaccine mismatch and reduced immunity to influenza B may have contributed to the early and severe start of this flu season. What does that mean for the months ahead? TIME asked Lynnette Brammer, an ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Smithfield Foods taps Montco animal health firm to save its bacon
MBF Therapeutics Inc., a Montgomery County company developing DNA-based immunotherapeutic vaccines for animals, has signed an agreement with Smithfield Foods to collaborate on new swine vaccines. Their goal is to develop swine vaccines with the potential to reduce the use of antibiotics in pork production and chronic disease in pigs by eliciting responses in both T-cells and B-cells. Vaccine candidates will be based on MBF's proprietary gene-based, T-cell directed vaccine platform and nove l calcium… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Smithfield Foods taps Montco animal health firm to save its bacon
MBF Therapeutics Inc., a Montgomery County company developing DNA-based immunotherapeutic vaccines for animals, has signed an agreement with Smithfield Foods to collaborate on new swine vaccines. Their goal is to develop swine vaccines with the potential to reduce the use of antibiotics in pork production and chronic disease in pigs by eliciting responses in both T-cells and B-cells. Vaccine candidates will be based on MBF's proprietary gene-based, T-cell directed vaccine platform and nove l calcium… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 10, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Botswana: Department Vaccinates Cattle in High Risk Areas
[Botswana Daily News] Maun -Efforts by Department of Veterinary Services to vaccinate cattle in areas prone to Foot and Mouth disease (FMD) in Ngamiland district are not yielding expected results as farmers fail to bring animals for vaccination in large numbers due to drought. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 6, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Medical Alert: Animal URINE called "urea" is found in today’s dirty vaccines, including the Varicella immunization jab
(Natural News) Some people put their full faith in American vaccines. They get every vaccine they’re told to get by doctors and the CDC. If there’s a scary outbreak on TV, they’ll run to the first 24-hour clinic or their pediatrician and get the booster jab for that infectious disease or new influenza combination of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

TB Vaccine More Powerful When Given Intravenously
THURSDAY, Jan. 2, 2020 -- The tuberculosis (TB) vaccine is far from infallible, but new animal research suggests the problem is not the vaccine but how it is delivered. When given to monkeys intravenously rather than as an injection, the vaccine... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 2, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Changed route of immunization dramatically improves efficacy of TB vaccine
NIH scientists report results from animal study. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - December 31, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Possible dementia vaccine closer after mice studies
(Flinders University) A vaccine to ward off dementia may proceed to clinical trials after successful animal testing. The US-led research is looking to develop effective immunotherapy via a dual vaccine to remove 'brain plaque' and tau protein aggregates linked to Alzheimer's disease. It is showing success in begenic mice models, supports progression to human trials in years to come. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH-developed Zika vaccine improves fetal outcomes in animal model
Zika virus is primarily transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - December 19, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH-developed Zika vaccine improves fetal outcomes in animal model
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) An experimental Zika vaccine lowered levels of virus in pregnant monkeys and improved fetal outcomes in a rhesus macaque model of congenital Zika virus infection, according to a new study in Science Translational Medicine. Scientists developed the experimental vaccine and currently are evaluating it in a Phase 2 human clinical trial. The vaccine uses a small circular piece of DNA, or plasmid, containing genes that encode Zika virus surface proteins to induce an immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 19, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A vaccine against chronic inflammatory diseases
Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's Disease and ulcerative colitis, are linked to abnormalities of the gut microbiota in humans and in animals. Patients generally present reduced bacterial diversity in their intestinal flora along with excessive levels of bacteria that express a protein called flagellin, which favors their mobility. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - December 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

A vaccine against chronic inflammatory diseases
(INSERM (Institut national de la sant é et de la recherche m é dicale)) In animals, a vaccine modifying the composition and function of the gut microbiota provides protection against the onset of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and certain metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity. This research was conducted by the team of Beno î t Chassaing, Inserm researcher at Institut Cochin (Inserm/CNRS/Universit é de Paris), whose initial findings have been published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Safer viruses for vaccine research and diagnosis
(University of Queensland) A new technology to produce safer 'hybrid' viruses at high volumes for use in vaccines and diagnostics for mosquito-borne diseases has been developed at The University of Queensland.Researchers from UQ and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have exploited the benign characteristics of the Binjari virus - inert to humans - to produce 'dangerous looking' mosquito-borne viruses such as Zika and dengue, but which cannot grow in humans or animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 11, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Immune system can be coaxed into selecting key antibodies to fight HIV
(Duke University Medical Center) Researchers have cleared a major obstacle in the development of an HIV vaccine, proving in animal models that effective, yet short-lasting antibodies can be coaxed into multiplying as a fighting force against the virus (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 5, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Simulating amino acid starvation may improve dengue vaccines
(Cornell University) In a new paper in Science Signaling, researchers at the University of Hyderabad in India and the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine show that a plant-based compound called halofuginone improves the immune response to a potential vaccine against dengue virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stop pharmaceutical residue from seeping into the environment, urges OECD
Too little being done to protect people and animals from subsequent harms or assess risks posed, says report Related items fromOnMedica Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? Doctors welcome drop in Scotland ’s alcohol consumption RCGP backs O ’Neill’s call for investment in new antimicrobials Doctors urge government to act on rising alcohol impact It ’s the end of the world as we know it, and I feel fine (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 15, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

As swine fever fries China vaccine sales, Boehringer rewrites prescription for recovery
Germany's Boehringer Ingelheim, the global No. 2 in animal health, is having to rebuild itself in China after a deadly pig disease decimated sales of unrelated mainstay vaccines, bringing write-offs and leaving it facing a three-year slog to recovery. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Free vaccines for dog and cat owners in Lawrence Weston
A free vaccination programme for dogs and cats has been organised by a student-led organisation from the Bristol Veterinary School. The Bristol Paws Project, which aims to help owners and pets that may not otherwise be able to afford veterinary treatments, organised a free vaccination drive last month, and the second set of vaccines will be administered tomorrow [Wednesday 6 November]. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Student life, Public engagement; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School; Press Release Source Type: news

Measles Makes Your Immune System Forget How to Fight Other Diseases
Not so long ago, coming down with measles was seen almost as a rite of passage. Before measles vaccination began in the U.S. in the early 1960s, millions of Americans, many of them children, contracted the virus each year—forcing them to weather a flu-like illness and telltale skin rash, but also bestowing lifelong immunity. As a result, some Americans still view measles as relatively harmless—which, in addition to a dangerous uprising of anti-vaccine sentiment, has led some parents to decline shots for their children, contributing to a resurgence of preventable illness in the U.S. and overseas. A pair of relat...
Source: TIME: Health - October 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study Infectious Disease Research Source Type: news

Human Health Is in the Hands of Bacteria
In the beginning, there were single-cell bacteria. They were the only life on earth for billions of years, then larger cells evolved, then multicellular organisms, and then plants and animals. But the bacteria never went away, and all organisms, including us humans, have had to learn to live with them. Today, the lessons they are teaching us could change the trajectory of human health for generations. When bacteria were first discovered more than three centuries ago, most attention was on the ones we fought, which caused diseases like cholera, typhoid and tuberculosis. Through vaccines and antibiotics, we have made amazing...
Source: TIME: Health - October 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Martin J. Blaser Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news

Centre likely to cap veterinary drug prices
Centre is mulling to cap the prices of a new catalogue of veterinary drugs and vaccines in a bid to boost the Prime Minister's new initiative to control livestock diseases. The move could impact companies in the animal healthcare business in India. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - October 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Massachusetts Man Who Helped With Baby Raccoons May Need Rabies Treatment
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — New Hampshire health officials are requesting the public’s help in finding a man from Massachusetts to assess his risk for rabies after he came into contact with baby raccoons. Health officials say the man was in Conway at about 5 p.m. on Sept. 20 and stopped to help someone remove two baby raccoons on Route 16 between North Bald Hill Thorn Hill roads. The raccoons were brought to a wildlife rehabilitation center, where one died and was identified to have rabies. The other didn’t have rabies. Health officials said Friday the man, who drove a dark pickup truck with oversized tires and ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Offbeat Syndicated CBSN Boston New Hampshire News Rabies raccoons Source Type: news

India mulls radical change for faster vaccine availability
Halving time for approval, sidestepping animal testing of vaccines is on the cards. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - October 9, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Needle-free patch could 'protect against flu as effectively as a traditional vaccine'
Scientists from the University of Rochester gave the patch (pictured, alongside a traditional vaccine) to mice for between 18 and 36 hours. The animals 'initiated a robust immune response'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Rabies Exposures from Fox Bites and Challenges to Completing Postexposure Prophylaxis After Hurricane Irma - Palm Beach County, Florida, August-September 2017
Because of difficulties caused by Hurricane Irma, three patients in Palm Beach County, Florida experienced modifications to their rabies vaccination schedules. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - September 12, 2019 Category: American Health Tags: Animal-Related Diseases Immunization Schedules MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Pre-exposure prophylaxis PReP Rabies Rabies Vaccine Source Type: news

UCLA-led research reveals potential treatments for deadly tropical disease
Melioidosis is a tropical disease that claims an estimated 90,000 lives worldwide each year. There is no vaccine, and current treatments are hampered by the ability of the bacterium that causes the disease to resist even the strongest antibiotics.Hardy and lethal, that bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a potential bioweapon.UCLA-led research has identified two compounds that, based on tests on human cells and on mice, show potential for treating melioidosis. One is a widely used drug already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an antifu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Antigenic and Genetic Characteristics of Zoonotic Influenza A Viruses and Development of Candidate Vaccine Viruses for Pandemic Preparedness: September 2019
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 9/2019. This nine-page document summarizes the genetic and antigenic characteristics of recent zoonotic influenza viruses and related viruses circulating in animals that are relevant to candidate vaccine virus updates. Zoonotic influenza viruses continue to be identified and evolve both genetically and antigenically, leading to the need for additional candidate vaccine viruses for pandemic preparedness purposes. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - September 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news