Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Truck Full of Pumpkins Catches on Fire and Explodes on Florida Highway
(SAN ANTONIO, Fla.) — In an early Halloween highway horror, a truckload of burning pumpkins blocked traffic on a Florida interstate. Florida Highway Patrol Sgt. Steve Gaskins said in a news release that a tractor-trailer hauling pumpkins struck a guard rail on southbound Interstate 75 near Tampa early Friday, sparking a fire. The truck then exploded, spilling the burning pumpkins onto the highway. The 44-year-old woman who was driving the truck wasn’t injured in the crash. Gaskins says traffic on the interstate’s southbound lanes was backed up for several miles. He says the roadway will have to be repaved...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Florida onetime Source Type: news

Nanomedicine for safe healing of bone trauma: opportunities and challenges - Behzadi S, Luther GA, Harris MB, Farokhzad OC, Mahmoudi M.
Historically, high-energy extremity injuries resulting in significant soft-tissue trauma and bone loss were often deemed unsalvageable and treated with primary amputation. With improved soft-tissue coverage and nerve repair techniques, these injuries now p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Endologix wins refined CE Mark indications for Nellix stent graft
Endologix (NSDQ:ELGX) said today it won expanded CE Mark approval in the European Union for its Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing system with refined indications for use. The Irvine, Calif.-based company said that the refined indications for use were supported by clinical data and an independent clinical reviewer, and that the device met applicable safety and clinical performance requirements. “We are very pleased with the clinical outcomes generated by the Nellix EndoVascular Aneurysm Sealing System utilizing the refined IFU. The Nellix CE Mark with the refined IFU provides patients and physicians in Europe ...
Source: Mass Device - September 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Regulatory/Compliance Stent Grafts Vascular Endologix Source Type: news

Research Technician in Molecular and Cell Biology at Imperial College London
Salary: £27,190 -£29,250 per annumContract: Full Time Fixed Term up to four yearsCampus: Hammersmith Campus Closing Date: Tuesday 3 October 2017 (Midnight BST)A Research Technician position in Molecular and Cell Biology is available in the Department of Medicine, Imperial College London. You will work on a programme funded by a Wellcome Trust Joint Investigator Award entitled Cellular thyroid hormone availability: regulation of development and tissue repair, and pathogenesis of degenerative disease.&nb...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 21, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Childhood IBD linked to raised long-term risk of cancer
Excess risk of gastrointestinal cancer persists into adulthood, but absolute risk is small Related items fromOnMedica Sticky gel breakthrough in colitis treatment Gene variant linked to development of inflammatory disease Big fall in bowel cancer deaths Stem cells repair bowel disease Developing and using a tool to improve outcomes in colorectal cancer (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 21, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Plymouth girl, 11, nearly died from her burst appendix
Daizy Adams, from Plymouth, began having stomach pains before she went on holiday to Spain at the end of July. By August 15, she needed emergency surgery to repair her bowel. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Getting to the heart of the matter: Nanogels for heart attack patients
(American Chemical Society) Heart disease and heart-related illnesses are a leading cause of death around the world, but treatment options are limited. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that encapsulating stem cells in a nanogel could help repair damage to the heart. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The right way to repair DNA
(Salk Institute) Salk scientists discover that microprotein helps cells choose best path to repair genes and avoid cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Smokers who quit have metabolite levels that resemble those of nonsmokers
(American Chemical Society) Even after years of smoking, the body has a remarkable ability to repair itself. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, scientists report that certain metabolic changes occur soon after quitting, and these changes could help explain how some ill-effects of smoking might be reversible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hamas Takes a Step Away from Isolation, With a Long Way Left to Go
In the decade since the militant group Hamas waged civil war with its rival Fatah political party, the stateless Palestinians have been left without a unified voice on the world stage. Now, that might be about to change. Over the weekend Hamas took a step toward unity by agreeing to elections in Gaza and the West Bank, raising the prospect of reunification after ten years of squabbling and violence. Few think the political split is over for good, but Hamas’ move reflects a desire by the group to come in from the cold — and creates a chance to ease the plight of the 1.8 million Palestinians living under an Israe...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jared Malsin Tags: Uncategorized Middle East Source Type: news

Let The Sun Shine In On Health Care Costs
I recently blew a tire while out on a bike ride; I must have hit a rock or something. I looked up bike repair shops on Yelp (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UTHealth discovers how to train damaging inflammatory cells to promote repair after stroke
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Researchers at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth have discovered a way to turn neutrophils from toxic to helpful after a hemorrhagic stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Repair Flooded Car, Avoid Hurricane-Damaged Used Cars
Take the AARP Smart Driver online course. Those who own a flooded ... Get your newer safer vehicle with the AARP Auto Buying Program. Also of Interest. (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - September 15, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Mutational Signatures Can More Accurately ID MMR Deficiency
Mutational signatures better report mismatch repair deficiency than sequencing of MMR genes (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - September 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Pathology, Journal, Source Type: news

Endologix touts Japanese collab dev & distro deal, 1st-in-human Ovation Alto trial data
Endologix (NSDQ:ELGX) this week announced a joint R&D and exclusive distribution deal with Japan Lifeline and released case review results from the 1st-in-human use of its Ovation Alto stent graft designed for endovascular aneurysm repair. The Irvine, Calif.-based company said it inked a deal with Japan Lifeline to jointly invest in development, clinical research and commercialization of novel endovascular stent graft systems for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. Japan Lifeline will gain exclusive distribution rights to the systems in Japan, while Endologix said it will commercialize the system through its...
Source: Mass Device - September 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Clinical Trials Distribution Research & Development Stents Vascular Endologix Source Type: news

Do titanium dioxide particles from orthopedic implants disrupt bone repair?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers from the Mayo Clinic have proposed that negative cellular responses to titanium-based nanoparticles released from metal implants interfere in bone formation and resorption at the site of repair, resulting in implant loosening and joint pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Self-healing gold particles
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Self-healing materials are able to repair autonomously defects, such as scratches, cracks or dents, and resume their original shape. For this purpose, they must be composed of several components whose combined properties result in the desired characteristics. Scientists of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology now discovered that also tiny particles of pure gold have surprising self-healing capacities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Temple scientists land $11.6M grant to explore heart repair & regeneration
The National Institutes of Health has awarded scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University a $11.6 million grant to explore the development of stem cell-based treatments for heart repair and regeneration. The project, funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the NIH, is aimed at better understanding the regenerative capabilities of stem cell-derived microvesicles known as exosomes. Gene-editing company taking on HIV raises $10M Raj Kishore, a professor… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

5 People Die in Florida Nursing Home That Lost Power During Irma
(HOLLYWOOD, Fla.) — Florida residents struggling to put their lives back together in Hurricane Irma’s wake fell victim to new hazards, including oppressive heat, brush-clearing accidents, house fires and deadly fumes from generators. Five residents of a Hollywood nursing home that lost power in the storm died, authorities said Wednesday. They gave no immediate details on the cause. Police and fire crews began evacuating Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills after the deaths there. In the Miami area, a Coral Gables apartment building was evacuated after authorities determined a lack of power made it unsafe fo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Florida hurricane irma onetime Source Type: news

Immunotherapy treatment option for selected breast cancer patients, genetic study suggests
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) Immunotherapy drugs could help some breast cancer patients based on the genetic changes in their tumors, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators find. Published today in Cancer Research, scientists identify particular genetic changes in a DNA repair mechanism in breast cancer. The results open up the possibility to another therapy option for around 1,000 breast cancer patients in the UK, who could benefit from existing drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A hair-trigger for cells fighting infection
(Babraham Institute) In response to infection the immune system produces unique antibodies to target each illness. To make these new antibodies, cells in the immune system must intentionally damage their own genes, meaning they run the risk of becoming cancer cells. New research from the Babraham Institute reveals how a proteins called Tia1 acts as a hair-trigger for DNA repair, allowing the immune system to walk the line between health and harm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

$11.6 million NIH grant supports Temple's exploration of new possibilities in heart repair
(Temple University Health System) The incidence of heart disease is on the rise, and new therapeutic strategies are needed. Stem cell-based approaches, which can potentially preserve or even regenerate heart muscle cells damaged by ischemia, are especially promising. Thanks to an $11.6-Million Program Project Grant from the National Institutes of Health, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University scientists are poised to explore new possibilities in stem cell-based treatments for heart repair and regeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FEMA: Hurricane Irma Destroyed One-Quarter of Homes in the Florida Keys
(KEY LARGO, Fla.) — Search-and-rescue teams made their way into the Florida Keys’ farthest reaches Tuesday, while crews labored to repair the single washed-out highway connecting the islands and rush aid to Hurricane Irma’s victims. Federal officials estimated one-quarter of all homes in the Keys were destroyed. Two days after Irma roared into the island chain with 130 mph winds, residents were allowed to return to the parts of the Keys closest to Florida’s mainland. But the full extent of the death and destruction there remained a question mark because communications and access were cut off in plac...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jason Dearen and Martha Mendoza / AP Tags: Uncategorized Florida natural disaster onetime Source Type: news

The Internet Is Terrified the New iPhone 8 Will Break
Seconds after Apple unveiled its next generation of iPhones at Tuesday’s big Apple Event, the inevitable hot takes from tech fans started rolling in. One thing that sets the new iPhone 8 and 8 Plus apart is the switch to a seamless glass panel on both the front and back of the phone. (Technically, this is meant to assist in the new wireless charging functionality.) While aesthetically beautiful in its simplicity, the updated design element quickly lead some to shudder with fear. Anyone who’s dealt with a shattered iPhone screen can testify to the emotional spectrum a cracked screen can elicit, from annoyance, t...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raisa Bruner Tags: Uncategorized Apple iPhone iPhone 2017 technology viral Source Type: news

Hurricane Irma ’s Damage Could Cost Us $300 Million, Antigua and Barbuda PM Says
The cost of rebuilding the Caribbean island of Barbuda left in ruins by Hurricane Irma could be as much as $300 million, the Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda has warned. He urged the international community to come to the aid of islands severely hit by the Category 5 storm. “We require probably about $250-300 million,” Prime Minister Gaston Browne told TIME in an interview in Antigua on Tuesday. “The extent of the damage is beyond the means of these islands … Global human cooperation is an absolute necessity.” The dual-island state of Antigua and Barbuda was one of the first places where...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John / Antigua Tags: Uncategorized antigua and barbuda hurricane irma Source Type: news

CollPlant raises $5m in private placement
Regenerative medicine company CollPlant said today it inked a $5 million private placement deal to support its plant-based rhCollagen technology for tissue repairs. As part of the private placement round, Israel-based CollPlant said it will pursue an up-listing of its ADSs on the Nasdaq exchange following the 1st phase of the transaction closing, which is slated for mid-September. “We are pleased to have signed a definitive agreement with this US investor. This transaction, once closed, and in combination with potential, additional funds from current investors, will increase our financial stability and allow us ...
Source: Mass Device - September 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Regenerative Medicine CollPlant Source Type: news

First Use of Cadaver Nerves to Repair Corneal Anesthesia Shows Promise
Treatment TermsCorneal disease Overview A new, minimally invasive procedure that replaces damaged corneal nerves with a donor nerve restores feeling in the cornea and halts progressive eye damage caused by a condition known as corneal anesthesia. The use of the donor nerve, an advance pioneered at Duke, may help people recover faster after surgery and could impact how other chronic eye conditions are treated. Content Blocks Header What Is Corneal Anesthesia? ContentCorneal anesthesia -- the medical term is neurotrophic keratopathy -- is a potentially devastating condition that can arise after certain viral infections...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Bayer offloads Multi Vendor Service radiology service and repair biz
Bayer (ETR:BAYN) has reportedly sold its Multi Vendor Service medical device repair business to private investors who plan to merge it with 2 other firms to form a new company based in Pittsburgh, Penn., according to a Pennsylvania Post-Gazette report. Bayer’s MVS provides service and repairs for radiology devices, covering ultrasound probes, magnetic resonance imaging coils and other related devices, according to the paper. The business was previously part of Bayer’s radiology unit in Pittsburgh, according to the report, and will be combined with Tulsa, Okla.-based Westco Inc. and Denver-based MD MedTech....
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Mergers & Acquisitions Ultrasound Bayer innovatusimaging Source Type: news

Villafa ña-founded artificial vessel developer Medical 21 looks to raise $15m
St. Jude Medical founder Manny Villafaña’s newest medtech play, Medical 21, is looking to raise $15 million in an equity round of funding, according to an SEC filing posted recently. The company is developing an artificial blood vessel as an alternative to harvesting blood vessels for coronary artery bypass surgeries, and has already begun animal testing of the technology, according to a Twin Cities Business report. Bypass surgeries, which are performed over 500,000 times a year in the US, require surgeons to harvest blood vessels from a patient’s body to be stitched into the heart to repair the circulat...
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular medical21 Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How do muscles work?
Find out how muscles move, how they repair themselves after injury, and why scientists say that antioxidants after exercise might not be good after all. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sports Medicine / Fitness Source Type: news

Mainstay Medical taps ex-NuVasive COO Hannon for CEO | Personnel Moves, Sept. 7, 2017
Mainstay Medical (EPA:MSTY) said this week that it tapped former NuVasive Inc. (NSDQ:NUVA) president & COO Jason Hannon to succeed Peter Crosby as CEO, effective Oct. 9. Crosby, recruited in 2009 to lead the company and its development of the Reactiv8 neurostimulation device for treating chronic pain, is slated to act as a consultant for Mainstay through 2020. “Mainstay has made tremendous progress since the founding of the company in 2008 under Mr. Crosby’s leadership, and as we move forward to the next phase we are delighted that Jason is joining as our new CEO. Jason’s broad medical devic...
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Wall Street Beat AdvaMed avitamedical Axonics Modulation Technologies lightmed Mainstay Medical Monarch Medical qholding venturemed Source Type: news

CWRU researcher receives NIH grant to expand countermeasures against chemical threats
(Case Western Reserve University) Kurt Lu, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, has received a five year, $3.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to expand countermeasures against chemical threats, including mustard gas and mustard-related compounds. The molecular action of mustard on DNA leads to strand breaks and eventual cell death. The goal of the grant is to augment the body's immune system after exposure, reducing skin swelling and pain as well as enhancing tissue repair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mitochondria for plasma membrane repair
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wong, W. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Hope for Kevin ’s heart: Five-year-old shines after novel treatment for Ebstein’s anomaly
As the lights dimmed and Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” blasted from loudspeakers, Kevin Nolan III took to the stage for his very first dance recital. Sporting striped pants, a turquoise bow tie and a black top hat, Kevin joined his class in performing two hip-hop jazz routines to a packed house. Kevin’s mood was perfectly in step with the song’s lyrics. “He had so much fun,” says Kevin’s mom, Laura. “He said he can’t wait to get on stage again.” While a first dance recital is a big deal for any 5-year-old, it’s especially poignant for Kevin, who was diagn...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 6, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Pedro del Nido Dr. Wayne Tworetsky Ebstein's anomaly Fetal Cardiology Program Source Type: news

NYIT biologist receives NIH support for bone-healing research
(New York Institute of Technology) The United States' National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) Professor of Life Sciences Michael Hadjiargyrou, Ph.D., a multi-year grant to study a newly discovered musculoskeletal specific gene, Mustn1, and to determine its role in cartilage regeneration and skeletal repair. Hadjiargyrou's research will also begin to elucidate a new and as yet uncharacterized protein family important for cartilage and bone biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanoparticles limit damage in spinal cord injury
(Northwestern University) After a spinal cord injury, significant secondary nerve damage is caused by inflammation and internal scarring that inhibits the ability of the nervous system to repair itself. A biodegradable nanoparticle injected after a spinal cord trauma prevented the inflammation and internal scarring that inhibits the repair process, reports a new study. Mice with a spinal cord injury receiving the nanoparticle injection were able to walk better after the injury than those that didn't receive it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mitochondrial redox signaling enables repair of injured skeletal muscle cells
Strain and physical trauma to mechanically active cells, such as skeletal muscle myofibers, injures their plasma membranes, and mitochondrial function is required for their repair. We found that mitochondrial function was also needed for plasma membrane repair in myoblasts as well as nonmuscle cells, which depended on mitochondrial uptake of calcium through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Calcium uptake transiently increased the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which locally activated the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RhoA, triggering F-actin accumulation at the site of injury and f...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Horn, A., Van der Meulen, J. H., Defour, A., Hogarth, M., Sreetama, S. C., Reed, A., Scheffer, L., Chandel, N. S., Jaiswal, J. K. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Ca2+ and mitochondrial ROS: Both hero and villain in membrane repair
Membrane repair is a symphony of signaling, conducted principally by the steep influx of Ca2+ through an injured membrane. In this issue of Science Signaling, Horn et al. reveal unique interplay between Ca2+ influx and mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species (mtROS) to enhance actin-mediated wound closure for survival of injured mammalian muscle and nonmuscle cells. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Cooper, S. T. Tags: STKE Focus Source Type: news

NIEHS trainee Sara Andres transitions to academia
The McMaster University assistant professor will use her expertise in DNA repair to study antibiotic resistance in bacteria. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - September 2, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Video: Mitral valve repair surgery
Mitral valve repair surgery can help fix a leaky mitral valve. Watch this video to see how doctors can do the surgery. (Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brasseler USA ® Introduces Expanded Handpiece Repair Service
(Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 29, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Would YOU eat chocolate enriched with olive oil?
Researchers from the University of Pisa found the unusual combination significantly raises endothelial progenitor cell levels, which are critical for blood vessel repair and function. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Obese people lack cells with satiety hormones
This report by Swiss doctors is in the journal Scientific Reports. Surgical weight-loss procedures can repair this disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 29, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Faulty DNA repair depresses neural development
(Osaka University) Osaka University researchers discover DNA polymeraseβ (Polβ) deficiency in neural stem cells affects neuronal survival and neural network in the developing brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regentis Biomaterials wins extended CE Mark for GelrinC
Regentis Biomaterials said today it won expanded CE Mark approval in the European Union for its GelrinC hydrogel-based resorbable treatment for focal cartilage defects in the knee, covering GelrinC products manufactured using denatured human fibrinogen. The approval expands on previous approvals clearing versions of the device manufactured using denatured bovine-sourced fibrinogen, the Israel-based company said. GelrinC is administered as a liquid to fill varying sizes and shapes of defects, Regentis said, and converts to a solid implant after exposure to ultra-violet light. The GelrinC implant is designed to naturall...
Source: Mass Device - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Orthopedics Regulatory/Compliance Regentis Biomaterials Source Type: news

Opioids Overprescribed After Hernia Repair Opioids Overprescribed After Hernia Repair
Patients used fewer opioid tablets than prescribed after inguinal hernia surgery, and many used none, a study found. The results prompted the surgeons to prescribe fewer opioids after the procedure.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: General Surgery News Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. on the FDA ’s new policy steps and enforcement efforts to ensure proper oversight of stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine
One of the most promising new fields of science and medicine is the area of cell therapies and their use in regenerative medicine. These new technologies, most of which are in early stages of development, hold significant promise for transformative and potentially curative treatments for some of humanity ’s most troubling and intractable maladies. Recent advances in our basic knowledge of the pathways involved in tissue damage and regeneration have combined with remarkable progress in adult stem cell biology to put us at a genuine inflection point in the history of medicine. The prospect of clinic al tissue repair st...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - August 28, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. on the FDA ’ s new policy steps and enforcement efforts to ensure proper oversight of stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine
One of the most promising new fields of science and medicine is the area of cell therapies and their use in regenerative medicine. These new technologies, most of which are in early stages of development, hold significant promise for transformative and potentially curative treatments for some of humanity ’ s most troubling and intractable maladies. Recent advances in our basic knowledge of the pathways involved in tissue damage and regeneration have combined with remarkable progress in adult stem cell biology to put us at a genuine inflection point in the history of medicine. The prospect of clinical tissue repair st...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - August 28, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

It's not a rat's race for human stem cells grafted to repair spinal cord injuries
(University of California - San Diego) More than one-and-a-half years after implantation, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the San Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center report that human neural stem cells (NSCs) grafted into spinal cord injuries in laboratory rats displayed continued growth and maturity, with functional recovery beginning one year after grafting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cronin's Office Hours, August edition: 4 startups in Capital Factory's accelerator
The ventures comprised a company that delivers ready-made $5 meals, a business that has developed an app to reduce communication errors among medical teams caring for patients, an operation that's created an app to facilitate problem-solving in the field for home-repair technical experts such as electricians and plumbers and a maker of software that translates sign language into audio and vice-versa. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 25, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mike Cronin Source Type: news