EMA OKs Third-Generation Transplant for Knee Cartilage Repair EMA OKs Third-Generation Transplant for Knee Cartilage Repair
The patient's cartilage cells are cultured in the lab without an artificial scaffold. The cells grow their own matrix before they're transplanted back into a worn-out knee.International Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics News Alert Source Type: news

California robot repair facility gets DeSoto County incentives
A local board approved property tax incentives for a public company with operations in the Mid-South. The DeSoto County Board of Supervisors approved 10-year partial property tax incentives for Intuitive Surgical Inc (NYSE: ISRG) on May 15. The company leases warehouse space in Hillwood's DeSoto Trade Center at 710 Venture Drive in Southaven. The location opened in 2016 and currently employees 40. In December, the board approved the company for a Free Port Warehouse tax exemption. Governing authorities… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elle Perry Source Type: news

California robot repair facility gets DeSoto County incentives
A local board approved property tax incentives for a public company with operations in the Mid-South. The DeSoto County Board of Supervisors approved 10-year partial property tax incentives for Intuitive Surgical Inc (NYSE: ISRG) on May 15. The company leases warehouse space in Hillwood's DeSoto Trade Center at 710 Venture Drive in Southaven. The location opened in 2016 and currently employees 40. In December, the board approved the company for a Free Port Warehouse tax exemption. Governing authorities… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 19, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elle Perry Source Type: news

Repair as Viable Option in Ulnar Collateral Ligament Tears
No abstract available (Source: Lippincott's Bone and Joint Newsletter)
Source: Lippincott's Bone and Joint Newsletter - May 19, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: CME Article Source Type: news

Rotation Medical release initial results for ‘ bioinductive ’ shoulder implant
Rotation Medical touted initial data today from the Rebuild registry of its bioinductive implant at the annual meeting of the Arthroscopy Association of North America. Interim results from the 1st 200 patients demonstrated significantly less post-operative pain and use of narcotics in patients who received the bioinductive implant, as well as less sling time, faster return to function and better overall shoulder rating. Patients in the registry reported feeling better 6 months after receiving the implant than those who received traditional treatment did at 2 years. The registry is slated to follow up to 300 patients. &ldqu...
Source: Mass Device - May 18, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Implants Orthopedics Rotation Medical Inc. Source Type: news

Spark completes FDA application for gene therapy candidate to repair vision loss
Spark Therapeutics said Thursday it has completed its rolling submission of its biologics license application for its lead gene therapy candidate, voretigene neparvovec, with the Food and Drug Administration. If approved, voretigene neparvovec is in position to become the first gene therapy in the United States for a genetic disease. Spark (NASDAQ: ONCE), a company spun out of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, is developing the gene therapy as a one-time treatment for patients with vision… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Viking army camp uncovered by archaeologists in England
Thousands of Vikings established a camp in Lincolnshire as they prepared to conquer ninth century England, archaeologists have discovered. Vikings used camp in winter to repair ships, melt down stolen loot, trade and play games. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Engineering heart valves for the many
Medical researchers announced today a cross-institutional team effort to generate a functional heart valve replacement with the capacity for repair, regeneration, and growth. The team is also working towards a GMP-grade version of their customizable, scalable, and cost-effective manufacturing process that would enable deployment to a large patient population. In addition, the new heart valve would be compatible with minimally invasive procedures to serve both pediatric and adult patients. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Engineering heart valves for the many
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the University of Zurich announced today a cross-institutional team effort to generate a functional heart valve replacement with the capacity for repair, regeneration, and growth. The team is also working towards a GMP-grade version of their customizable, scalable, and cost-effective manufacturing process that would enable deployment to a large patient population. In addition, the new heart valve would be compatible with minimally invasive procedures to serve both pediatric and adult patients. (Sou...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

411 on Hernia Repair Without Mesh: General Surgery News Report
(MedPage Today) -- Also, chance patient feedback (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - May 17, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Deficiencies in repair of DNA identified in many types of solid tumors
A new investigation of more than 48,000 stored tumor samples finds evidence of a key deficiency in a repair mechanism designed to keep DNA from being mutated and causing cancer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Forging A Connection Between Health Care And Infrastructure
America faces two enormous domestic challenges–  the cost of health care and the need for infrastructure improvement – which are seen as separate when they should be viewed as interrelated. Such a connection would enable the nation to save money and live in better health, while making both systems more sustainable. The costs are extraordinary. According to the Congressional Budget Office, U.S. spending (public and private) on health care totaled $2.9 trillion in 2014. The infrastructure repair backlog is $4.6 trillion, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). Yet we can anticipate even ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Gruber Foundation awards $1.5 million in prizes to three top scientists
The Gruber Foundation will award $1.5 million to an astronomer who explores populations of distant stars, a biologist who investigates how cells repair damaged DNA, and a neuroscientist who studies the formation of synapses that facilitate sight, the foundation announced May 17. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - May 17, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

Deficiencies in repair of DNA identified in many types of solid tumors
(Georgetown University Medical Center) A new investigation of more than 48,000 stored tumor samples finds evidence of a key deficiency in a repair mechanism designed to keep DNA from being mutated and causing cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Gruber Foundation awards $1.5 million in prizes to 3 top scientists
(Yale University) The Gruber Foundation will award $1.5 million to an astronomer who explores populations of distant stars, a biologist who investigates how cells repair damaged DNA, and a neuroscientist who studies the formation of synapses that facilitate sight, the foundation announced May 17. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chloe ’s smile: Moving the needle on Williams syndrome research
“Because of your smile, you make life more beautiful.” ~ Thich Nhat Hanh Her wide, warm smiles are generous. Even strangers can’t resist smiling back. “Chloe loves people and relationships,” says her mom, Johanna. “She can completely change a person’s demeanor with one of her incredible smiles.” Now, Chloe’s powerful smile is bringing together supporters and scientists to advance research on Williams syndrome, the rare neurodevelopmental disorder she was born with 11 years ago. What is Williams syndrome? Williams syndrome is a genetic condition that affects 1 in 10,000 ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Research and Innovation Dr. Amy Roberts Dr. James Lock Dr. Leslie Smoot Heart Center Williams syndrome Source Type: news

Arthritis cure? New procedure could REPAIR knee joints
ARTHRITIS often affects the knee joints, making it hard for sufferers to do everyday activities. But a new treatment could reverse the damage. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Weekly steroids strengthen and repair muscles
(Northwestern University) In a surprising finding, weekly doses of glucocorticoid steroids, such as prednisone, help speed recovery in muscle injuries, reports a new study. The weekly steroids also repaired muscles damaged by muscular dystrophy. When given daily over long periods, prednisone can cause muscle wasting. But the once weekly doses of the steroid increased proteins that stimulate muscle repair. The studies were conducted in mice, with broad implications for humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cyber attack: GPs working hard to provide "business-as-usual"
GPs and practice staff worked over the weekend to repair infected systems Related items fromOnMedica Cutting smoking rates could save NHS £67m a year NHS waiting times hit five-year high, report shows NHS trust faces prosecution over teenager's death Labour will scrap NHS hospital parking charges Pay cap on NHS staff must be lifted, says NHS Providers (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - May 16, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Poststroke Human Brain Tissue Contains Multipotent Stem Cells Poststroke Human Brain Tissue Contains Multipotent Stem Cells
Brain tissue from elderly stroke patients contains multipotent stem cells that might contribute to neural repair, researchers from Japan report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - May 15, 2017 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Stem cell transplants may advance ALS treatment by repair of blood-spinal cord barrier
Researchers show that bone marrow stem cell transplants helped improve motor functions and nervous system conditions in mice with the disease Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier. The researchers say the results of their experiment are an early step in pursuing stem cells for potential repair of the blood-spinal cord barrier, which has been identified as key in the development of ALS. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stem cell transplants may advance ALS treatment by repair of blood-spinal cord barrier
(University of South Florida (USF Health)) Researchers at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla., show in a new study that bone marrow stem cell transplants helped improve motor functions and nervous system conditions in mice with the disease Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier. The researchers say the results of their experiment are an early step in pursuing stem cells for potential repair of the blood-spinal cord barrier, which has been identified as key in the development of ALS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AUA: Prostate Cancer Studies Highlight DNA Repair Gene Involvement
Two new studies presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association offer an improved understanding of some genetic underpinnings of prostate cancer. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - May 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: Genitourinary Cancers News Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Fix that achy knee by injecting it with your own BELLY FAT
Early research was carried out on 20 patients with osteoarthritis and presented at the International Cartilage Repair Society meeting in Sorrento last September. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Combination of ASCs and rBMP-12 may help speed healing of repaired tendons
Findings from a canine study published online in CORR suggest that an application of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs) and bone morphogenetic protein-12 (rBMP-12) may help accelerate healing in the proliferative stage of tendon repair.  (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - May 13, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Editors Choice News Source Type: news

Spectranetics touts 100% survival rate in Bridge occlusion balloon study
Spectranetics (NSDQ:SPNC) today released data from a late breaking clinical trial of its Bridge occlusion balloon designed to reduce blood loss due to superior vena cava tears during lead extraction procedures, touting a 100% survival rate amongst patients treated with the balloon. The company presented 1-year clinical experience data from the study today at the Heart Rhythm Society’s 38th Annual Scientific Sessions. The Colorado Springs, Colo.-based company’s Bridge balloon is designed to reduce blood loss in the event of a tear and to provide a “bridge” to surgical intervention. The stud...
Source: Mass Device - May 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Catheters Clinical Trials Spectranetics Corp. Source Type: news

Final FY17 Appropriations: National Nuclear Security Administration
The final appropriations agreement for fiscal year 2017 increases the National Nuclear Security Administration ’s budget by 3.3 percent, slightly more than the requested amount. Much of the boost goes toward addressing the agency’s backlog of infrastructure repair and recapitalization, an issue Congress has highlighted in recent hearings. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - May 12, 2017 Category: Physics Authors: mambrose Source Type: news

Integra LifeSciences launches SurgiMend(R) MP Collagen Matrix for Hernia Repair
SurgiMend MP is a collagen matrix for soft tissue reconstruction, featuring a highly macroporous design PLAINSBORO, N.J., May 12, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Integra LifeSciences Holdings Corporation (Nasdaq:IART), a leading globa... Devices, Surgery, Product Launch Integra LifeSciences, SurgiMend MP, collagen matrix, hernia repair (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 12, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

VFIS Announces ESO Drone Coverage at No Extra Cost
YORK, Pa. – With the ability to deliver real time, high definition, infrared video while reaching inaccessible or dangerous areas, the use of drones in the emergency services industry is ever increasing. While this technology may help keep first responders from unnecessary danger, ESOs now face the risk of both liability and financial issues. VFIS recently announced that as of June 1, clients will automatically receive drone coverage as part of their policy at no extra cost. Coverage includes repair or replacement, general and excess liability for drones that are owned, operated, rented or loaned to the ESO. “W...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - May 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: VFIS Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

VFIS Announces ESO Drone Coverage at No Extra Cost
YORK, Pa. – With the ability to deliver real time, high definition, infrared video while reaching inaccessible or dangerous areas, the use of drones in the emergency services industry is ever increasing. While this technology may help keep first responders from unnecessary danger, ESOs now face the risk of both liability and financial issues. VFIS recently announced that as of June 1, clients will automatically receive drone coverage as part of their policy at no extra cost. Coverage includes repair or replacement, general and excess liability for drones that are owned, operated, rented or loaned to the ESO. “W...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - May 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: VFIS Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms advances with new research
We humans like to think our DNA is well-protected in the nucleus of each cell. But it's a hard life for the hard-working genetic code, explains a new report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New CollPlant division focuses on 3D bioprinting
[Image courtesy of CollPlant]Regenerative medicine company CollPlant said Thursday that it has created a new division to focus on collagen-based bioprinting. CollPlant has been utilizing its proprietary plant-based rhCollagen technology for tissue repair. The new division will further develop collagen-based bioink for use in 3D printers creating organs and tissues. The Ness Ziona, Israel–based company says it has 3D bioprinting collaborations with several large international companies. “Over the last several months, we have substantially ramped up our activities in the 3D printing field leveraging biologic...
Source: Mass Device - May 11, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Biotech News Well Regenerative Medicine Research & Development Wound Care 3D printing bioinks bioprinting CollPlant MedTech Source Type: news

Knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms advances with new paper from Mayo Clinic scientists
(Mayo Clinic) We humans like to think our DNA is well-protected in the nucleus of each cell. But it's a hard life for the hard-working genetic code. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Guidelines Say No to Most'Keyhole' Knee Surgeries
WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 -- " Keyhole " arthroscopic surgery should rarely be used to repair arthritic knee joints, a panel of international experts says in new clinical guidelines. Clinical trials have shown that keyhole surgery doesn't help people... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 10, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for May 9, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. 10 new crowdfunded health devices that will intrigue you With crowdfunding websites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, companies can obtain the funding for ideas they want to come to life (even potato salad parties), with the prom...
Source: Mass Device - May 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Nurses Have A Message For Congress: We Won't Accept 'Lord Of The Flies' Health Care
As scores of red-clad registered nurses stride through the halls of Congressional office buildings this week, they’ll have some other people on their minds. The postal worker who told us his wife was diagnosed with breast cancer and whose disability coverage expired after six months and had to cover thousands of dollars more out of pocket for her treatment. The 57-year-old California contractor who now pays $22,000 a year for health insurance for himself and his wife. “I’m OK with paying high insurance premiums if it helps provide health care for others, but I am mad as hell at the prospect of paying even...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The effect of subcritical bone loss and exposure on recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair in intercollegiate American football - Dickens JF, Owens BD, Cameron KL, Deberardino TM, Masini BD, Peck KY, Svoboda SJ.
BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the optimal method of stabilization (arthroscopic or open) in collision athletes with anterior shoulder instability. PURPOSE: To examine the effect of "subcritical" bone loss and football-specific exposure on th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Conventus Orthopaedics raises $20m
Conventus Orthopaedics said today it closed a $20 million round of financing to support its Conventus Cage implant device designed for 3D fixation and fracture repair. The Conventus Cage is designed to allow for a “less invasive” reliable 3D fixation for treating proximal humerus, distal radius and proximal radius fractures, the company said. The round was led by Deerfield Management and was funded entirely by the Minneapolis-based company’s existing ownership syndicate. “The Cage is the future of fracture repair.  We are pleased that our investor syndicate, led by Deerfield, share th...
Source: Mass Device - May 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Orthopedics Conventus Orthopaedics Source Type: news

Conventus Orthopaedics Raises $20 Million to Fund Revolutionary Cage(TM) Extremity Fracture Repair Therapy
Funding will be used to commercialize the proximal humerus fracture repair therapy and develop future Cage™ extremity fracture repair indications MINNEAPOLIS, May 9, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Conventus Orthopaedics, Inc., a medi... Devices, Orthopaedic, Venture Capital Conventus Orthopaedics, Conventus Cage, intramedullary implant (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cancer cells shown to co-opt DNA'repair crew'
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In experiments with human colon cancer cells and mice, a team led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have evidence that cancer arises when a normal part of cells' machinery generally used to repair DNA damage is diverted from its usual task. The findings, if further studies confirm them, could lead to the identification of novel molecular targets for anticancer drugs or tests for cancer recurrence, the investigators say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fixing broken hearts through tissue engineering
The third annual Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering Symposium met at the University of Alabama at Birmingham last month, a gathering of noted physicians and scientists who share the goal of creating new tissues and new knowledge that can prevent or repair heart disease and heart attacks. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

FDA labels Medtronic HVAD splice kit recall as Class 1
The FDA today labeled a select recall of Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) HeartWare Splice Kits designed to repair the driveline of its Ventricular Assist Device over electrical and pump stop issues as Class I. Class I recall designations, the agency’s most serious classification of recall, are used when there is a reasonable probability that product use could cause serious adverse health consequences or death. The splice kit is intended to repair the HVAD driveline, which connects the heart pump to an external controller which regulates the speed and function, if there is an electrical break, according to the FDA release. The r...
Source: Mass Device - May 4, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Recalls Medtronic Source Type: news

Scientists find cells responsible for testicle repair in study with mice
A new study by researchers at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, has shed light on the mechanisms behind cell repair that could lead to preserved fertility. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Step by step: Sloane ’s incredible journey with laryngeal cleft
Like most first graders, Sloane has a jam-packed schedule, filled with fun activities such as dancing, ice skating and playing tennis. But every now and then, this busy girl needs to take a break, even if that simply means taking her time to sip a glass of water. “I remind her that, sometimes, she needs to slow down,” says her mom, Tarra.Resisting the urge to rush has been a familiar theme for Sloane and her parents ever since she was born — although, ironically, she arrived in a hurry. Tarra had experienced a placental abruption, requiring an emergency C-section. Things only got more complicated. After T...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 4, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Airway Disorders Dr. Reza Rahbar laryngeal cleft Source Type: news

Sperm study reveals testes cells that may offer fertility hope
(University of Edinburgh) Scientists have discovered a tiny group of cells that is critical to repairing damage to the testes. Blocking the cells prevents repair to tissue involved in producing healthy sperm, the research has found. The findings shed light on mechanisms of cell repair and could help scientists develop ways to preserve fertility, which may benefit boys receiving cancer therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Integration of CpG-free DNA induces de novo methylation of CpG islands in pluripotent stem cells
CpG islands (CGIs) are primarily promoter-associated genomic regions and are mostly unmethylated within highly methylated mammalian genomes. The mechanisms by which CGIs are protected from de novo methylation remain elusive. Here we show that insertion of CpG-free DNA into targeted CGIs induces de novo methylation of the entire CGI in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). The methylation status is stably maintained even after CpG-free DNA removal, extensive passaging, and differentiation. By targeting the DNA mismatch repair gene MLH1 CGI, we could generate a PSC model of a cancer-related epimutation. Furthermore, we succes...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Takahashi, Y., Wu, J., Suzuki, K., Martinez-Redondo, P., Li, M., Liao, H.-K., Wu, M.-Z., Hernandez-Benitez, R., Hishida, T., Shokhirev, M. N., Esteban, C. R., Sancho-Martinez, I., Belmonte, J. C. I. Tags: Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Carrying Savanna through her journey with cloacal malformation
When two-year-old Savanna Bluford enters Boston Children’s Colorectal and Pelvic Malformation Center, she quickly gravitates toward the waiting room’s interactive light board. Sporting pigtails, sparkly sneakers and an angelic smile, the playful toddler’s attention quickly turns to her doctor — the Center’s Co-Director Dr. Belinda Dickie. The two light up with smiles and exchange hugs as if old friends — and that, they are. Savanna was born in South Carolina with a rare and complex birth defect affecting the gastrointestinal, urological and reproductive systems. The condition, called cov...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 3, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Belinda Dickie cloacal malformation Colorectal and Pelvic Malformation Center Leonel Rodriguez Source Type: news

6 Things About Loss That This Widow Wishes You Knew
While it doesn’t make headlines like some awareness days, May 3 has been proclaimed National Widows Day. A faith-based Kansas City nonprofit called Wednesday Widows is behind the day, which began in 2014. The rest of the year, each Wednesday, this group sends handymen and hand-holders to the homes of grieving widows and widowers who need help.  It’s great that so many people have adopted widows like me as a cause, but if a well-intentioned do-gooder called me up with an offer to repair my screens or fix my leaky toilet, I’d likely hang up on them.  Why? Because that’s not wh...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First evidence of ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells in post-stroke human brain
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers have shown that following a stroke-induced ischemic injury to the human brain, stem cells are produced that have the potential to differentiate and mature to form neurons that can help repair the damage to the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Weight loss can slow down knee joint degeneration
Being overweight or obese can place extra pressure on joints and cartilage Related items fromOnMedica Your problem: what should I look for when examining a knee? Exercise could be as effective as surgery for knee damage Obesity strongly linked to heightened risk of certain cancers EU must do more to tackle obesity ‘epidemic’ First successful repair of damaged knee cartilage using nasal cells (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - May 3, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news