Injectable tissue patch could help repair damaged organs
(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science& Engineering) A team of U of T Engineering researchers is mending broken hearts with an expanding tissue bandage a little smaller than a postage stamp. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Simple protein called "cardiotrophin 1" found to trick the heart into thinking you've exercised like crazy, rapidly expanding heart function and repair
(Natural News) Health experts have recently identified a simple protein that coaxes the heart into growing in a healthy way and pumping more blood as it does during exercise. According to the scientists, a simple protein called cardiotrophin 1 (CT1) helped repair heart damage and improved blood flow in animal models of heart failure. The experts also... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene editing used to eliminate viruses in pigs
Researchers at Harvard and a private company used the precision gene editing tool Crispr-Cas9 and gene repair technology to deactivate 100 percent of the virus in a line of pig cells. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Influences Ventral and Inguinal Hernia Repair Outcomes? What Influences Ventral and Inguinal Hernia Repair Outcomes?
Dr Lowenfels comments on a study that investigated the reasons for recurrence of ventral and inguinal hernias.Medscape General Surgery (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: General Surgery Viewpoint Source Type: news

Abbott launches trial of transcatheter tricuspid repair device, eyes CE Mark
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today it enrolled the 1st patient in a clinical trial of a minimally invasive, clip-based transcatheter valve repair system for treating patients with severe tricuspid regurgitation, looking to eventually support CE Mark approval in the European Union. The 1st patient in the trial was enrolled at the Abbott Northwestern Hospital by Dr. Paul Sorajja of the Minneapolis Heart Institute, the Abbot Park, Ill.-based company said. The transcatheter tricuspid valve repair system is built off of technology which has been tested with the company’s MitraClip system, designed to treat mitral valv...
Source: Mass Device - August 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Replacement Heart Valves Abbott Source Type: news

Tissue Regenix closes $30m CellRight acquisition
Tissue Regenix (LON:TRX) said today it closed its $30 million (£23 million) acquisition of CellRight Technologies and its line of spinal surgery and orthopedic products. Leeds, England-based Tissue Regenix said it expects that the acquisition will increase its US sales by more than double while expanding the company’s presence in the US healthcare market. Tissue Regenix’s technology is designed to allow the body to regenerate tissue using a “scaffold” made of decellularized animal and human tissue. Tissue Regenix said that CellRight has developed technology for bone th...
Source: Mass Device - August 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Mergers & Acquisitions Regenerative Medicine CellRight Technologies Tissue Regenix Source Type: news

Abbott Leads Way in First Clinical Trial of Minimally Invasive Clip-based Repair System for Leaky Tricuspid Heart Valves
-Trial will study efficacy and safety of a new transcatheter clip-based repair system for tricuspid valve disease, an undertreated, life-altering condition (Source: Abbott.com)
Source: Abbott.com - August 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

In2Bones wins FDA nod for 2 foot repair systems
French orthopedic surgical device developer In2Bones said today that its US subsidiary received FDA clearance for its 5MS Fracture repair and CoLag locking compression screw systems. The company’s 5MS fracture repair system is a plate and screw system designed to treat fractures and deformities of the 5th metatarsal bone and features an array of anatomically contoured plates and fracture-specific screws. “Fractures of the 5th metatarsal are the most common in athletes of all skill levels. The 5MS system’s unique plantar fracture plate design may address many of the healing complications seen from oth...
Source: Mass Device - August 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Orthopedics Regulatory/Compliance In2Bones Source Type: news

This new nanochip technology can reprogram human cells
[Image from Ohio State University]Ohio State University researchers have developed a nanochip technology that they say can create any cell type for treatment within the human body. The new technology, called Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), can repair injured tissue and restore the function of aging tissue like organs, blood vessels and nerve cells. “By using our novel nanochip technology, injured or compromised organs can be replaced. We have shown that skin is a fertile land where we can grow the elements of any organ that is declining,” said Chandan Sen, director of Ohio State’s Center for Regenerative M...
Source: Mass Device - August 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Regenerative Medicine Research & Development cell conversion MedTech The Ohio State University Source Type: news

Electrical fields can heal brain damage: Here ’s how
[Image from Junfeng Feng/UC Davis]Electrical fields can guide neural stem cells into a specific location to repair brain damage, according to new research from the University of California at Davis. Min Zhao, a researcher at UC Davis, studies how electric fields can guide wound healing. His previous research has shown that electric fields are able to attract cells into wounds to heal the wounds. “One unmet need in regenerative medicine is how to effectively and safely mobilize and guide stem cells to migrate to lesion sites for repair,” said Zhao in a press release. “Inefficient migration of those cells t...
Source: Mass Device - August 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Neurological Research & Development MedTech University of California at Davis Source Type: news

UCLA Health hospitals place No. 1 in Los Angeles, No. 7 nationally in prominent ranking
UCLA Health hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica placed No. 1 in Los Angeles, No. 2 in California and No. 7 in the nation in the 2017 –18 U.S. News and World Report rankings.“UCLA Health is proud to be recognized for providing world-class treatment to patients from greater Los Angeles, across the state and around the globe,” said Johnese Spisso, president ofUCLA Health, CEO of UCLA Hospital System and associate vice chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences. “Our long-standing commitment to excellence ensures that our patients and their families receive the most compassionate, comprehensive care possible...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Fortimedix launches short instruments for SymphonX single-port platform
Fortimedix Surgical said today it launched a shorter set of instruments for its SymphonX single-port surgical platform in the US. The newly launched product line offers shorter instrumentation for use with the SymphonX surgical platform, a single-port system designed for microlaparoscopic surgical procedures, Fortimedix said. The instrument portfolio for the SymphonX system includes products for grasping, mobilizing, dissecting, retracting, cutting, cauterizing, ligating and suction and irrigation of tissues and vessels, the Netherlands-based company said. “This product line extension was developed in response to sur...
Source: Mass Device - August 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Surgical Fortimedix Source Type: news

Case Western Reserve University develops therapeutic to repair and regenerate tissue
(Case Western Reserve University) Rodeo Therapeutics, a new drug development company created by two highly regarded Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers, has raised $5.9 million to develop small-molecule drugs that promote the body's repair of diseased or damaged tissues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Manipulating brain network to change cognitive functions: New breakthrough in neuroscience
(ATR Brain Information Communication Research Laboratry Group) When an electric circuit breaks down, we can repair it by restoring connections in the circuit. Is it possible to restore the connections in our brain? And by doing so, is it possible to restore declining cognitive functions? Numerous regions of the brain are connected together and constitute a huge network. Researchers have developed a learning method to change cognitive function by manipulating connections in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dino Poop for Bone Repair: That's Improbable!
(MedPage Today) -- Also, robotic goosebumps (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - August 6, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Researchers successfully edit 1st human embryo with CRISPR
Scientists have successfully edited genes in a human embryo, correcting a disease-causing mutation to prevent the defect from being inherited. The groundbreaking process, covered in a paper published yesterday in Nature, was confirmed last week by the Oregon Health and Science University, which collaborated with the Salk Institute and Korea’s Institute for Basic Science on the task. To edit the genetic mutation, in this case for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, researchers used a technique known as CRISPR-Cas9. The CRISPR-Cas9 technique operates as a sort of ‘molecular scissors’ which can trim away unwanted p...
Source: Mass Device - August 3, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Biotech Research & Development Source Type: news

Gene-editing embryos is a laudable ambition
DNA repair can prevent disease without risk of embracing genetic enhancement (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - August 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Gene editing used to repair diseased genes in embryos
Conclusion Currently, genetically-inherited conditions like hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cannot be cured, only managed to reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death. For couples where one partner carries the mutated gene, the only option to avoid passing it onto their children is pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. This involves using IVF to create embryos, then testing a cell of the embryo to see whether it carries the healthy or mutated version of the gene. Embryos with healthy versions of the gene are then selected for implantation in the womb. Problems arise if too few or none of the embryos have the correct version of the...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Breakthrough: Gene editing repairs mutation in human embryos
For the first time, scientists have used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing on human embryos to repair a mutation that causes a deadly heart condition. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Breakthrough gene repair technique could fix disease-causing mutation
Scientists in the U.S. have successfully repaired a faulty gene in human embryos for the first time. Researchers used the powerful technology known as CRISPR to fix the DNA mutation that causes an inherited form of heart disease. Seventy-two percent of the resulting embryos were disease-free. Dr. David Agus joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss its potential and ethical concerns. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Geneticists Repair Mutation in Human Embryo
In 'first-of-its kind' procedure, scientists converted to normal a mutant gene involved in heart threat (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Book Review: Born Anxious
The story of Daniel P. Keating’s new book, Born Anxious: The Lifelong Impact of Early Adversity – and How to Break the Cycle begins from the day we are conceived. While previous research largely assumed that the year before a child is born didn’t have much impact on later life development, it is precisely this period, Keating argues, that creates the blueprint for how the child will respond to stress, interpret the intentions of others, manage relationships, learn and even raise children. When expecting mothers undergo a high degree of stress – whether it be from financial concerns, divorc...
Source: Psych Central - August 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anti-anxiety Book Reviews Personality Psychology Stress anxious Attachment Daniel P. Keating epigenetics Trauma Source Type: news

Geneticists Repair Mutation in Human Embryo
In 'first-of-its kind' procedure, scientists converted to normal a mutant gene involved in heart threat Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Genes and Gene Therapy (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene
In experimental embryos, scientists were able to repair the gene that causes a serious heart disorder. But more research is needed to confirm the method would produce healthy babies, they say.(Image credit: Courtesy of OHSU) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

OHSU scientist on his 'CRISPR' technology to repair genetic mutation in human embryos
OHSU scientists confirmed a report leaked last week that they used a gene-editing technique to correct a mutation in a human embryo and prevent it from being passed to future generations. Using the gene-editing tool CRISPR, they targeted a mutation in nuclear DNA that causes a common genetic heart disease that can lead to sudden cardiac death and heart failure. “We have to find the mutant gene and correct it,” said Shoukhrat Mitalipov, who directs the Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 2, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Geneticists Repair Mutation in Human Embryo
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 -- In a first-ever experiment, geneticists have successfully modified a human embryo to remove a mutation that causes a life-threatening heart condition. This is the first study to demonstrate that a gene-editing technique... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Early gene-editing success holds promise for preventing inherited diseases
(Salk Institute) Scientists achieve first safe repair of single-gene mutation in human embryos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA OKs Nivolumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer FDA OKs Nivolumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
The FDA has given accelerated approval to nivolumab for the treatment of microsatellite instability-high or mismatch repair deficient metastatic colorectal cancer.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

FDA OKs Nivolumab in Metastatic CRC Subtype FDA OKs Nivolumab in Metastatic CRC Subtype
The FDA has given accelerated approval to nivolumab for the treatment of microsatellite instability-high or mismatch repair deficient metastatic colorectal cancer.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - August 1, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

Missing signals lead to diabetic nerve injury
(Case Western Reserve University) Molecules that help cells communicate with each other--called cytokines--might be the key to repairing diabetic nerve damage, according to a new study published in Experimental Neurology. Diabetes devastates nerve cells, which can lead to poor circulation, muscle weakness, blindness, and other painful side effects. The new study showed diabetic mice can't repair nerve cells after damage due to low levels of specific cytokines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

News Analysis: How to Repair the Health Law (It ’ s Tricky but Not Impossible)
Stabilizing the market, lowering drug prices and expanding access to coverage would go a long way to easing millions of Americans ’ concerns. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: REED ABELSON, ABBY GOODNOUGH and KATIE THOMAS Tags: Health Insurance and Managed Care Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) Law and Legislation Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Medicaid Republican Party Democratic Party United States Politics and Government Source Type: news

Republicans Try to Regroup After Health Care Failure; Democrats Exult
After loss, Democratic leaders urge Republicans to negotiate with them to repair the Affordable Care Act. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MATT FLEGENHEIMER Tags: Politics and Government Health Insurance and Managed Care Schumer, Charles E Trump, Donald J Pelosi, Nancy Source Type: news

Stretchy glue inspired by slugs could be the future of sutures
  Inspired by slug slime, scientists have developed a flexible adhesive that sticks to wet surfaces. This stretchy glue can be attached to a beating, bleeding heart and could someday replace stitches in wound repair. Other commercially available glues create strong but inflexible bonds or stretchy but weak connections. The slug-inspired glue cements tightly and […]Related:New debate on antibiotics: Do you really need to take the full course?These experimental treatments target brain cancer like John McCain’sSperm concentration has declined 50 percent in 40 years in three continents (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers report regenerative effects of low-dose growth factors for bone defect healing
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers compared the effects of three bone growth factors to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)--the most commonly used agent for repair of large bone defects, which is not without risks at the doses required -- and showed significant bone-healing effects including the formation of new blood vessels at low doses relative to BMP2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Errors made by 'DNA spellchecker' revealed as important cause of cancer
(Center for Genomic Regulation) CRG scientists identify important processes that create mutations that cause cancer by studying the genomes of more than 1,000 tumors. Many mutations in human cancers are caused by mistakes made by a repair mechanism or 'DNA spellchecker' rather than the actual damage to DNA caused by the environment. Sunlight and alcohol consumption increase the rate at which this happens, resulting in more mutations in the most important parts of our genomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mismatch repair deficiency predicts response of solid tumors to PD-1 blockade
The genomes of cancers deficient in mismatch repair contain exceptionally high numbers of somatic mutations. In a proof-of-concept study, we previously showed that colorectal cancers with mismatch repair deficiency were sensitive to immune checkpoint blockade with antibodies to programmed death receptor–1 (PD-1). We have now expanded this study to evaluate the efficacy of PD-1 blockade in patients with advanced mismatch repair–deficient cancers across 12 different tumor types. Objective radiographic responses were observed in 53% of patients, and complete responses were achieved in 21% of patients. Responses we...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Le, D. T., Durham, J. N., Smith, K. N., Wang, H., Bartlett, B. R., Aulakh, L. K., Lu, S., Kemberling, H., Wilt, C., Luber, B. S., Wong, F., Azad, N. S., Rucki, A. A., Laheru, D., Donehower, R., Zaheer, A., Fisher, G. A., Crocenzi, T. S., Lee, J. J., Grete Tags: Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Tough adhesives for diverse wet surfaces
We report a bioinspired design for adhesives consisting of two layers: an adhesive surface and a dissipative matrix. The former adheres to the substrate by electrostatic interactions, covalent bonds, and physical interpenetration. The latter amplifies energy dissipation through hysteresis. The two layers synergistically lead to higher adhesion energies on wet surfaces as compared with those of existing adhesives. Adhesion occurs within minutes, independent of blood exposure and compatible with in vivo dynamic movements. This family of adhesives may be useful in many areas of application, including tissue adhesives, wound d...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Li, J., Celiz, A. D., Yang, J., Yang, Q., Wamala, I., Whyte, W., Seo, B. R., Vasilyev, N. V., Vlassak, J. J., Suo, Z., Mooney, D. J. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Integra LifeSciences slides on Q2 results
Integra LifeSciences (NSDQ:IART) shares are under pressure this morning after the medical device maker reported its second-quarter results and lowered its outlook for the rest of the year. Plainsboro, N.J.-based Integra posted profits of $10.8 million, or 14¢ per share, on sales of $282.2 million for the three months ended June 30, for a bottom-line slide of -15.1% on sales growth of 13.2% compared with Q2 2016. Adjusted to exclude one-time items, earnings per share were 45$, dead even with the consensus on Wall Street, where analysts were looking for sales of $283.7 million. “Profitability and cash flows were s...
Source: Mass Device - July 26, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: MassDevice Earnings Roundup Orthopedics Surgical Wall Street Beat Integra LifeSciences Corp. Source Type: news

Biomarkers for identifying tumor aggressiveness
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) Future early-stage colon cancer patients could benefit from specific genetic tests that forecast their prognosis and help them make the right decision regarding chemotherapy. Two of the biomarkers are the MACC1 gene, high levels of which promote aggressive tumor growth and the development of metastasis, and a defective DNA mismatch repair (dMMR) system, which plays a role in tumor formation. Life expectancy is longer for patients with dMMR tumors and with low MACC1 gene activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stanford researchers engineer 3-D hydrogels for tissue-specific cartilage repair
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Unlike the one-size-fits-all, homogeneous approach to tissue engineering for cartilage replacement, a new study reports the ability to encapsulate cartilage-forming chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells in 3-D hydrogels within a stiffness gradient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Surgery May Fix Tough-to-Treat Rotator Cuff Tears
TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 -- A new surgical procedure can help people with shoulder injuries once considered beyond repair, a small new study suggests. Out of 100 patients who had the surgery in the study, all 26 of those who had played sports before... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 25, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Zebrafish molecules could help repair damaged nerves
University of Edinburgh researchers say they have uncovered a 'vital mechanism' in the damaged spines of zebrafish that helps nerve connections to regrow (stock image) (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Chordee: Definition, surgery, and repair
Chordee is when the penis appears curved or bent. Learn about this condition, how it is diagnosed, and treatment options, including surgery. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Men's Health Source Type: news

Zebrafish study reveals clues to healing spinal cord injuries
(University of Edinburgh) Fresh insights into how zebrafish repair their nerve connections could hold clues to new therapies for people with spinal cord injuries. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have pinpointed key molecules that prompt damaged nerve fibres in the fish to regenerate themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking on the world: Lonnie Lu ’s experience with laryngeal cleft
Lonnie Lu and her mom at Boston Children’s Center for Airway Disorders. Not every little girl gets a visit from a Disney princess on her birthday, but Lonnie Lu received just such a surprise when Princess Elena stopped by her party last month. Her admiration may go beyond a love of colorful dresses. Minus one evil sorceress and an enchanted kingdom, the character’s tale of strength and resilience might as well be Lonnie Lu’s story, too. A mother’s intuition Now age 4, Lonnie Lu came into her parents Patti and Ricardo’s lives at 7 months old, when the couple decided to foster her and her older ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Airway Disorders Dr. Reza Rahbar laryngeal cleft Source Type: news

After bunion surgery, immediate x-rays predict recurrence risk
(Wolters Kluwer Health) For patients undergoing surgery to repair a bunion deformity of the foot, non-weight-bearing x rays taken immediately after surgery can provide a good estimate of the risk that the bunion will return over time, reports a study in the current issue of The Journal of Bone& Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Epigastric hernia: Causes, repair, and recovery
What is an epigastric hernia? Learn about the causes of an epigastric hernia, the symptoms, how it is diagnosed, and what to expect from surgery. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

How do open and arthroscopic approaches compare in the first 30 days following RCR?
Findings published online in the journal Arthroscopy assess risk of adverse events and return to the operating room (OR) during the initial 30-day postoperative period for patients undergoing open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (RCR).  (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - July 22, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Editors Choice News Source Type: news

Taking my own advice: When the professional becomes a parent
As a disability expert, my whole career has been spent giving parents advice. I’ve given advice on parenting, doctors, child development, school and resources to support them. I was confident working with families and helping them navigate the often crazy and overwhelming world of special needs. But when I was 34 weeks pregnant with my own child, I found myself on the other side of the situation. My husband and I learned that our son, Jack, would be born with a cleft palate and micrognathia, or an undeveloped lower jaw. The extent of these facial differences wouldn’t be known until he was born. We met with doct...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jennifer Ryan Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft lip and palate Dr. Carolyn Rogers Dr. Cory Resnick Pierre Robin sequence Source Type: news

High-dose vitamin D found to HEAL sunburns by activating skin repair genes... so why won't dermatologists recommend vitamin D?
(Natural News) The list of Vitamin D’s known health benefits continues to grow as scientists have now discovered it has the power to heal sunburned skin. In a new trial out of Case Western Reserve University that is the first of its kind, 20 participants were given a sunburn on their inner arm using a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news