Cell Repair Blocker Promising in Breast Cancer (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- PARP inhibitor delays progression in advanced disease (Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN)
Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN - December 8, 2017 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

Taurine lends hand to repair cells damaged in multiple sclerosis
(Scripps Research Institute) New research suggests that administering taurine, a molecule naturally produced by human cells, could boost the effectiveness of current multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences raises 2017 outlook, details 2018 goals
Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) today raised its outlook for the rest of this year and set its goals for the coming year, saying it expects to post earnings growth of about 12% on a roughly 9% sales gain in 2018 and pledging “aggressive” investment in R&D. The Irvine, Calif.-based heart valve maker, which yesterday acquired mitral valve repair developer Harpoon Medical for $100 million in cash plus another $150 million in potential milestones, released the numbers at its annual investor conference in New York City. For 2017, Edwards upped the forecast for adjusted earnings per share to $3.65 t...
Source: Mass Device - December 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Replacement Heart Valves Wall Street Beat Edwards Lifesciences Source Type: news

Mechanism identified behind enzyme involved in liver and other human cancers
(Uppsala University) To understand what has gone wrong when cancer occurs and to create new possibilities for treatment, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms behind what is happening at the cellular level. New research, which is now published in the journal Molecular Cell, explains how the motor of an enzyme in DNA damage repair is switched on and off and how these processes might go awry in cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences acquires mitral repair dev Harpoon Medical for $100 million
Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) said today it acquired mitral valve repair developer Harpoon Medical for $100 million in cash, with the potential for an additional $150 million in milestone payments over 10 years. Harpoon is developing a system designed to enable echo-guided repair of mitral valve regurgitation through the stabilization of prolapse leaflets to restore coaptation and valve function. The device is currently investigational, though Harpoon is hopeful it will receive CE Mark approval in the European Union in the near future. “We believe the addition of Harpoon Medical’s technology and talented ...
Source: Mass Device - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Mergers & Acquisitions Replacement Heart Valves Edwards Lifesciences Harpoon Medical Source Type: news

Edwards Buys Harpoon for up to $250 Million
Edwards Lifesciences may be best known for its leadership in transcatheter valve therapies, but the company appears to be turning to its surgical valve portfolio as part of its growth strategy for the coming year. The company's acquisition of Harpoon Medical, announced Wednesday afternoon, is the first major indicator of this shift. Harpoon is developing beating-heart repair technology for degenerative mitral regurgitation (DMR). Edwards paid $100 million up front for Harpoon and agreed to pay up to $150 million more in milestone payments over the next 10 years. The company has had an eye on Harpoon since 2015 wh...
Source: MDDI - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Smith & Nephew closes $210m Rotation Medical buy
Smith & Nephew (NYSE:SNN) said today that it closed the $210 million acquisition of Rotation Medical and its regenerative shoulder repair treatment. The deal called for the British orthopedics and wound care giant to pay $125 million in up-front cash, with another $85 million on the line over the next five years in financial milestones. Plymouth, Minn.-based Rotation’s bioinductive implant is designed to induce new tissue growth after a patient suffers a rotator cuff tendon tear. The device won FDA clearance in March 2014. Today Smith & Nephew said filing is being prepared for CE Mark appr...
Source: Mass Device - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Mergers & Acquisitions Orthopedics Regenerative Medicine Wall Street Beat rotationmedical Smith & Nephew Source Type: news

Finding long strands of RNA in skin development and disease
(Case Western Reserve University) Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered how unusually long pieces of RNA work in skin cells. The RNA pieces, called 'long non-coding RNAs' or 'lncRNAs,' help skin cells modulate connective tissue proteins, like collagen, and could represent novel therapeutic targets to promote skin repair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function
(Houston Methodist) Houston Methodist is making mini brains from human stem cells, putting researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury or disease of the brain and spinal cord. Researchers have developed a new system to reduce the time it takes to grow these brain models, which will give them the ability to screen drugs and study what's behind disease-causing mutations more quickly. The findings appear Dec. 12 in Stem Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Polyganics wins $1m grant for dura sealant patch study
Polyganics said last week it was awarded a $1.4 million (EU €1.2 million) grant from the European Fund for Regional Development to support clinical validation of its dura sealant patch. The Dura patch is a dressing sealant composed of bioresorbable polymers designed to be suitable for the resealing of the dura outer membrane surrounding the brain after brain surgery to minimize leakage of of cerebrospinal fluid, the Netherlands-based company said. “We are hugely appreciative to the EU, as well as the city and province of Groningen for their support in progressing the device into the next phase of its develo...
Source: Mass Device - December 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Neurological Research & Development Polyganics Source Type: news

Rotation Medical touts consistent healing, tear mitigation in rotator cuff study
This study shows that the Bioinductive Implant not only repairs the tear and increases tendon thickness, but it also prevents tear progression. In addition, because the native tendon footprint remains intact around the location of the defect, the Bioinductive Implant may accelerate rehabilitation and recovery as compared with more conservative postoperative management when partial thickness lesions are taken down and repaired as full thickness tears,” lead investigator Dr. Theodore Schlegel of the Steadman Hawkins Clinic Denver said in a prepared statement. Results indicated significant improvement in clinical scores...
Source: Mass Device - November 30, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Orthopedics rotationmedical Source Type: news

New 'Patch' May Repair Damaged Hearts
Title: New 'Patch' May Repair Damaged HeartsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/29/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/30/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - November 30, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Scientists visualize structure of key DNA repair component with 'near-atomic resolution'
(University of Science and Technology of China) A protein known as an ATR kinase activates the cell's built-in repair system at the first hint of DNA damage. Chinese scientists have now imaged the protein at unprecedented resolution, and are beginning to understand its response to DNA damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 30, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fibralign closes syndicate funding round from AngelMD
Fibralign has recently closed a syndicate funding round coordinated by investment and networking platform AngelMD to support its Nanoweave 3D scaffolding tech and medical devices using the technology. The Union City, Calif.-based company’s first product is the BioBridge collagen matrix, which is an implantable, biocompatible and biodegradable surgical mesh with 510(k) clearance for use in surgery to “reinforce and repair soft tissue where weakness and deficiencies exist,” the company said. Fibralign is currently exploring use of the device to treat patients who suffer from secondary lymphedema. &ldqu...
Source: Mass Device - November 29, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Regenerative Medicine Fibralign Source Type: news

New'Patch' May Repair Damaged Hearts
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 -- A patch that might one day help repair heart attack damage has been developed by researchers. The patch, which consists of fully functioning artificial human heart muscle, is large enough to cover damage typically caused... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Trust faces £48m repair bill for PFI hospital
A trust faces a £48m repair bill to make one of its hospitals safe because of loopholes in the drafting of its private finance initiative contract, Department of Health documents reveal. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - November 29, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

HKUST researchers reveal new insights into the control of cellular scaffold
(Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) HKUST researchers made a breakthrough in understanding how the organization of microtubule cytoskeleton is controlled, revealing an aspect ofγTuRC's regulation and demonstrated a previously unknown function of PolD1, a conserved protein that is widely recognized for its role in DNA replication and repair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 29, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lauren ’s life after transplant: Proving the impossible possible
I was born on January 29, 1992 with a birth defect called gastroschisis, which meant that my intestines extended outside my body through a small hole in my abdominal wall. I received a liver, small and large bowel transplant in December of 1992, just before my first birthday. Though I was transplanted in Pennsylvania, I have been cared for by the brilliant team at Boston Children’s Hospital ever since. When I was first recovering in Pennsylvania, my parents were told that I would never be able to swim in the ocean because I would have to have a central line in for the rest of my life. Well, to that person I would lik...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 28, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lauren Ainsworth Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories gastroschisis multivisceral transplant Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

EPA Grants New England Schools $631K for Asbestos Control
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it awarded a total of $631,000 this year to five New England state agencies to ensure schools properly manage asbestos-containing materials. Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island each received between $100,000 and $166,000 from the government agency, depending on the amount of initiatives they are committed to in accordance with the EPA’s Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA). AHERA requires public school districts and nonprofit private schools to inspect their schools for asbestos-containing materials and prepare management...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 28, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Tags: AHERA asbestos abatement Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act asbestos in schools Bridgette Hoskie Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Connecticut Department of Public Health Dunn Environmental Group EFI Global Emily Figdor en Source Type: news

Heterotopic Ossification During a Ventral Hernia Repair Heterotopic Ossification During a Ventral Hernia Repair
In this report, a case of heterotopic ossification is observed in a patient who presented for ventral hernia repair.ePlasty, Open Access Journal of Plastic Surgery (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Beating heart patch is large enough to repair the human heart
(Duke University) Duke University engineers have developed a 'heart patch' that is just as strong and electrically active as healthy adult cardiac tissue and large enough to cover the damage caused by most heart attacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

British health watchdog recommends vaginal mesh ban
A British health watchdog reportedly plans to recommend that the National Health Service there ban vaginal mesh implants to treat pelvic organ prolapse, citing “serious but well-recognized safety concerns.” In recommending that the implants be limited to research use only, the U.K.’s National Institute for Health & Care Excellence said “evidence of long-term efficacy [for implants treating organ prolapse] is inadequate in quality and quantity,” according to the BBC. Randomized, controlled trials “showed no added benefit of using mesh compared with native tissue repair,” ac...
Source: Mass Device - November 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Gynecological Pelvic Mesh Lawsuits U.K. National Institute for Health & Care Excellence (NICE) Source Type: news

3D-printed implants and scaffold technology – how bioengineering innovation could treat and prevent osteoarthritis
The need for new and effective ways to treat and preventosteoarthritis has never been more urgent. Demand for total joint replacements is rising every year, and expected to double by 2030, placing a huge strain on the NHS. Meanwhile, those living with the pain of early stage osteoarthritis or at risk of developing it due to injury face limited treatment options.That’s why Arthritis Research UK is investing in innovative research dedicated to developing medical technologies which could provide an answer. By 'medical technologies' we mean cutting-edge medical devices, orthotics, implants and imaging techniques, harness...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - November 24, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

RNA editing with CRISPR-Cas13
Nucleic acid editing holds promise for treating genetic disease, particularly at the RNA level, where disease-relevant sequences can be rescued to yield functional protein products. Type VI CRISPR-Cas systems contain the programmable single-effector RNA-guided ribonuclease Cas13. We profiled type VI systems in order to engineer a Cas13 ortholog capable of robust knockdown and demonstrated RNA editing by using catalytically inactive Cas13 (dCas13) to direct adenosine-to-inosine deaminase activity by ADAR2 (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA type 2) to transcripts in mammalian cells. This system, referred to as RNA Editing fo...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Cox, D. B. T., Gootenberg, J. S., Abudayyeh, O. O., Franklin, B., Kellner, M. J., Joung, J., Zhang, F. Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Suture Anchor Repair for Ruptured Deltoid Ligament Suture Anchor Repair for Ruptured Deltoid Ligament
Is deltoid ligament reconstruction using suture anchor fixation an effective treatment strategy in pronation ankle injuries?Current Orthopaedic Practice (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

Endovascular Repair of Ruptured AAA Improves Midterm Survival Endovascular Repair of Ruptured AAA Improves Midterm Survival
Endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm was linked to reduced mortality at 3 years, improved early quality of life, and reduced costs compared with open surgery in the IMPROVE trial.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Diabetes drug helps repair UV-damaged DNA in cells of 'Moon children'
(CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) The severe and debilitating genetic disease Xeroderma pigmentosum impedes cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Scientists from CeMM found a drug approved for diabetes treatment to alleviate the impact of the gene defect in cell culture, which led to the discovery of a previously unknown DNA repair mechanism. The study was published in Molecular Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UofL researchers discover key signaling protein for muscle growth
(University of Louisville) Researchers at University of Louisville have discovered the importance of a well-known protein, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), in the development and regeneration of muscles. Ashok Kumar, Ph.D., professor and distinguished university scholar in UofL's Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, led a team of researchers who have described the protein's critical role in the growth and repair of skeletal muscles, both in post-natal development and in the regeneration of injured adult muscles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is There Hope for an Endologix Comeback?
A year ago, Endologix CEO John McDermott walked into the VEITHsymposium at the New York Hilton-Midtown, saw the look on the face of his head of regulatory and clinical affairs as he approached the Endologix booth, and knew something was wrong. Sure enough, FDA had just asked Endologix to provide two-year patient follow-up data from its EVAS-FORWARD study of the Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) system. "So that night we worked through the night to get out our press release first thing the next morning to inform the world that there was going to be pushback in the timeline and the clinical requirements,&...
Source: MDDI - November 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics. The agreement comes after a strategic collaboration between the companies that allows Skyline to reach more markets. The joint venture leverages the Helomics D-Chip platform to develop and market new approaches for personalized cancer diagnostics and care. 2.&...
Source: Mass Device - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) mHealth (Mobile Health) Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Research & Development Helomics InnerScope iReliev LensAR Inc. Source Type: news

World Antibiotic Awareness Week
Professor Dame Sally Davies, England's Chief Medical Officer, recently warned that the world could face a  " post-antibiotic apocalypse.” She urged that, unless action is taken to halt the practices that have allowed antibiotic resistance to spread and ways are found to develop new types of antibiotics, we could return to the days when simple wounds, infections or routine operations, are life-threatening. To mark   World Antibiotic Awareness Week, 12th-18th November 2018,  we are highlighting Cochrane  evidence which supports decision-making in the appropriate use of antibiotics.&nb...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 16, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Danny ’s journey to a biventricular heart
The first hint that something wasn’t quite right with Danny Sanchez-Garcia’s heart came at his mom’s six-month prenatal visit. “There was a little blip on the ultrasound, but then it was gone on the next one, so they didn’t think it was anything and I didn’t worry any more about it,” says Danny’s mom, Cynthia. Cynthia was overjoyed when Danny was born at her local hospital seeming perfectly healthy. But as the hospital staff monitored Danny overnight, they noticed his oxygen level was lower than normal and decided to run more tests. His doctors believed the tests pointed to a...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 15, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Biventricular Repair Complex Biventricular Repair Program congenital heart valve program double outlet right ventricle Dr. Christopher Baird Dr. Roger Breitbart ECMO Pulmonary atresia tetra Source Type: news

The Controversy in Treating Partners of Sex Addicts
In “From Victimhood to Victorhood” (published in the May/June 2015 issue of The Therapist), Alex Katehakis writes that a “major shift has occurred in treating partners of sex addicts”. The shift she describes is towards the Relational Trauma (RT) Model, in which practitioners emphasize that partners’ relational bonds are damaged by betrayal, as precipitated by the discovery of sexual acting out — not a historical and ongoing pattern of destructive or self-defeating behavior by non-acting out partners, as implied by the so-called co-addict model, previously espoused by writers like Stepha...
Source: Psych Central - November 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Graeme Daniels, MFT Tags: Addictions Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships & Love Sexuality Substance Abuse Trauma Addiction Recovery co-addict model co-addiction Codependency Enabling Hypervigilance Impulsive Behavior Infidelity love addiction lying r Source Type: news

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (Symptoms, Repair, Surgery, Survival Rate)
Title: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (Symptoms, Repair, Surgery, Survival Rate)Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 12/31/1997 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/15/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - November 15, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

MMR/MSI Testing in Colorectal Cancer'Alarmingly' Low MMR/MSI Testing in Colorectal Cancer'Alarmingly' Low
Testing for mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency is suboptimal despite endorsement and well-established guidelines. Will that change now that immunotherapy is approved?Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Surgeons repair spina bifida in fetus for first time in Canada, hospitals say
For the first time in Canada, a team of surgeons has successfully performed in-utero surgery to repair a form of spina bifida, two Toronto hospitals say. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Surgeons repair spina bifida in fetus for 1st time in Canada, hospitals say
For the first time in Canada, a team of surgeons has successfully performed in-utero surgery to repair a form of spina bifida, two Toronto hospitals say. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Short Takes
The 2017 meeting of the AIBS Council of Member Societies and Organizations, Engaging Policymakers: Opportunities for Biological Sciences Organizations, will be held in Washington, DC, on 4 December 2017. AIBS Council Representatives may now register for the meeting. Sam Clovis has withdrawn his nomination to serve as the Department of Agriculture's chief scientist. Clovis is a former Trump campaign official who was recently questioned by the Mueller investigation about what he knew about campaign team members' contacts with Russia. One former campaign aide, George Papadopoulos, has pled guilty to lying to the FBI. Email...
Source: Public Policy Reports - November 14, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Use of MMR Deficiency Testing in Younger CRC Patients Is Low
Just 43.1 percent underwent mismatch repair deficiency of DNA testing (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - November 13, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine, Oncology, Pathology, Radiology, Surgery, Journal, Source Type: news

World Antibiotic Awareness Week
Professor Dame Sally Davies, England's Chief Medical Officer, recently warned that the world could face a  " post-antibiotic apocalypse.” She urged that, unless action is taken to halt the practices that have allowed antibiotic resistance to spread and ways are found to develop new types of antibiotics, we could return to the days when simple wounds, infections or routine operations, are life-threatening. To mark   World Antibiotic Awareness Week, 13th-19th November,  we are highlighting Cochrane  evidence which supports decision-making in the appropriate use of antibiotics. Pr...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 13, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Don't get injured at night... Researchers discover cell repair driven by circadian rhythm; wounds heal 60% faster during the day
(Natural News) Are you scheduled for some kind of surgery in the near future? You might want to request that it take place in the daytime. A recent study by researchers from the U.K.’s Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology, published in the journal Translational Medicine, has found that wounds inflicted during the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New York Times (NYT) article looks at OA risk after knee ligament tear and ACL reconstruction
An article in The New York Times (NYT) discusses anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair and an increased likelihood of developing osteoarthritis (OA). (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - November 11, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Editors Choice News Source Type: news

Sapien Valve Works in'No-Option' Secondary MV Disease Sapien Valve Works in'No-Option' Secondary MV Disease
When standard valve surgery had been ruled out, transcatheter repair of two atypical forms of hard-to-treat secondary mitral disease usually restored valve function, with good clinical outcomes.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Reena ’s story: A bright future with short bowel syndrome
She’s just 16, but Reena Zuckerman knows exactly what she wants to be doing in another 10 years. “My dream is to play on the press team in the annual Women’s Congressional Softball Game,” says the aspiring political journalist. Since 2009, the event has pitted members of Congress against the press corps, raising nearly a million dollars for charity. “When I’m not doing schoolwork or watching TV, I’m listening to political podcasts and NPR,” Reena confesses. It’s an impressive goal, but one that’s no doubt attainable for this driven teen, who’s been pushing h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Tom Jaksic G-tube short bowel syndrome (SBS). volvulus Source Type: news

Urgent news about syndrome zero
I have urgent news. I consider this to be the biggest health crisis of all time. As a matter of fact, it’s a rapidly growing pandemic spreading around the world. When we look at the rate of new incidences, it’s only a matter of time before every man, woman and child on the planet will be affected. But what’s truly alarming is that it’s at the very root of every chronic disease plaguing our modern world. Cancer Heart disease Diabetes Obesity Alzheimer’s I named this emerging new threat Syndrome Zero. And while mainstream medicine has yet to connect the dots like I have, evidence that supports...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - November 7, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Natural Cures Alzheimer's Cancer Chronic diseases diabetes heart disease obesity Syndrome Zero Source Type: news

Impact of BMI on Open Ventral Hernia Repair Impact of BMI on Open Ventral Hernia Repair
Dr Lowenfels comments on a study examining the relationship between obesity and complications after open ventral hernia repair, published in Surgery.Medscape General Surgery (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: General Surgery Viewpoint Source Type: news

Endoscopic management of penetrating urethral injury after an animal attack - Reed A, Evans GH, Evans J, Kelley J, Ong D.
BACKGROUND: Initial management of urethral injury remains controversial concerning the use of suprapubic urinary diversion and delayed repair, primary open realignment, and primary endoscopic realignment. To our knowledge, we present the first reported cas... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Japan clears Abbott ’ s Mitraclip
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today it won approval from Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for its MitraClip transcatheter mitral valve repair device, cleared for indications of treating people with mitral regurgitation. Currently, standard of care treatment for mitral regurgitation in Japan is limited to open-heart surgery and medication, Abbott said. Clearance of the catheter-based MitraClip system adds a minimally-invasive treatment option not previously available in the region, the company added. The MitraClip is designed to be delivered to the heart through a blood vessel in the leg, securing portions...
Source: Mass Device - November 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Catheters Regulatory/Compliance Replacement Heart Valves Abbott Source Type: news

Abbott's MitraClip Approved as First Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Device in Japan
First minimally invasive device to treat people in Japan with common leaky heart valve for whom surgery is too risky More than 50,000 patients worldwide have been treated with the MitraClip therapy ABBOTT PARK, Ill., Nov. 6, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales... Devices, Interventional, Cardiology, Regulatory Abbott, MitraClip, Mitral Valve Repair, mitral regurgitation (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - November 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news