Smith & Nephew CEO Bohuon to retire | Personnel Moves – Oct. 10, 2017
Smith & Nephew (NYSE:SNN) said today that its current CEO Olivier Bohuon has announced his intention to retire by the end of 2018 and that the company has begun a search for a new chief exec. Bohuon joined the company in 2011, and has overseen a significant rise in share value with the company since taking the corner office. “Since I joined the company in 2011, we have transformed Smith & Nephew into a more focused, efficient and innovative business and I am proud of the value we have created for all of our stakeholders. Looking ahead to the next long-term phase of growth, I have decided to announce...
Source: Mass Device - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Invacare Mainstay Medical Nuvasive prometrika royalphilips Smith & Nephew transmed7 Source Type: news

Medtronic wins expanded FDA nod for Endurant II stent graft
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said today it won expanded FDA approval for its Endurant II and IIs stent graft systems designed to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms, now indicated for use in combination with the Heli-FX EndoAnchor system to treat patients with short, hostile aortic neck anatomies. Prior to receiving the clearance, patients with short infra-renal necks were classified as ineligible for endovascular aneurysm repair, the Fridley, Minn.-based company said. Medtronic estimates that 10-13% of AAA patients have AAA proximal neck anatomies of lower than or equal to 10mm. “Due to the complex and hostile proximal ao...
Source: Mass Device - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Stents Vascular Medtronic Source Type: news

Baby was born with her intestines on the OUTSIDE  
Ava-Rose Nightingale, from Carmarthen in Wales, was born with gastroschisis, which caused her intestines to grow outside her body due to her abdominal wall not forming before birth. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When the brain's wiring breaks
(University of North Carolina Health Care) Among all the bad things that can happen to the brain when it is severely jolted - in a car accident, for example - one of the most common and worrisome is axon damage. Axons are the long stalks that grow out of the bodies of neurons. When the brain receives a strong blow, axons can break or swiftly degenerate. UNC's Anne Taylor and colleagues have revealed new molecular details of this and a path toward repair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meeting an Unmet Need: Surgical Implant that Grows with a Child
A novel growth-accommodating implant could revolutionize cardiac repair (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - October 10, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Meeting an Unmet Need: Surgical Implant that Grows with a Child
A novel growth-accommodating implant could revolutionize cardiac repair (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - October 10, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Meeting an Unmet Need: Surgical Implant that Grows with a Child
A novel growth-accommodating implant could revolutionize cardiac repair (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - October 10, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

A Special Delivery for Women in Mali
October 09, 2017New hospital equipment and supplies will help health workers give comfort and care to women in need.Health workers and local government officials gathered to welcome an unprecedented special delivery in Koulikoro and Kayes regions in Mali this summer: essential hospital equipment and supplies worth over US$200,000.It ’s the first time this volume of new surgical equipment and supplies has been delivered to health facilities here. And what arrived wasn’t just a donation—it was a targeted contribution of the most-needed medical supplies identified by the health centers themselves.We think th...
Source: IntraHealth International - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

A Special Delivery for Mali's Moms
October 09, 2017New hospital equipment and supplies will help health workers give comfort and care to women in need.Health workers and local government officials gathered to welcome an unprecedented special delivery in Koulikoro and Kayes regions in Mali this summer: essential hospital equipment and supplies worth over US$200,000.It ’s the first time this volume of new surgical equipment and supplies has been delivered to health facilities here. And what arrived wasn’t just a donation—it was a targeted contribution of the most-needed medical supplies identified by the health centers themselves.We think th...
Source: IntraHealth International - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Can the U.S. repair its health care while keeping its innovation edge?
Naturally, the innovation rewarded by the U.S. health care system doesn ’t stay in the U.S. It’s enjoyed worldwide, even though other countries pay a lot less for it. So it’s also reasonable to debate whether it’s fair for the United States to be the world’s subsidizer of health care innovation. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 9, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: By Aaron E. Carroll and Austin Frakt Source Type: news

The New Health Care: Can the U.S. Repair Its Health Care While Keeping Its Innovation Edge?
The two are not mutually exclusive, but harm to innovation in America could harm other nations, too. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: AARON E. CARROLL and AUSTIN FRAKT Tags: Medicine and Health Innovation United States Economy Health Insurance and Managed Care Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Clinical Trials Economics (Theory and Philosophy) Source Type: news

The Surgical Glue That Can Repair An Injury In 60 Seconds
A new tissue glue derived from proteins naturally present in the human body can seal wounds in 60 seconds, after exposure to ultraviolet light. It may hold promise for use in the operating room, as well as on the battlefield and emergency departments. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 8, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD, Contributor Source Type: news

Stop Your Body Attacking Itself
Modern medicine has no cure for autoimmune diseases — and, sadly, most doctors don’t understand them. I’m talking about disorders like rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, lupus, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis (MS) and more. In all, there are about 80 autoimmune diseases affecting organs throughout the body. They occur when your own immune system becomes overactive and attacks your body instead of diseases and foreign invaders. The standard mainstream treatment for most autoimmune disorders relies on Big Pharma drugs that cover up symptoms or suppress your immun...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Out From Under the FDA ’s Heel
A medical revolution is happening as we speak… And the great state of Texas is leading the charge. It started because people like you finally got fed up with the chokehold the FDA has on medicine. Let me explain… The FDA is controlled by bureaucrats who were hired from Big Pharma and the medical establishment. They refuse to approve life-saving therapies without years of tightly controlled clinical trials. In the meantime, real people are suffering. And even dying. But Texas is on track to become the first state to explicitly back stem cell therapies. And it’s about time states took this power away from...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Fitness Health Source Type: news

The Sweet Way to Heal Your Wounds
We enjoy outdoor activities. My family will be coming over this year and I will fire up the grill for a delicious BBQ grass-fed beef. We’ll play games like badminton and horseshoes. Now while these games can be fun, they can lead to cuts and bruises. I want to aim you with an unconventional solution for those wounds.  For years now, sugar’s been a dirty word. It’s been blamed for everything from obesity, heart disease and diabetes to tooth decay and acne. But there’s something they don’t know.  Sugar’s better for you than all those artificial sweeteners and substitutes out th...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Review: A Heroine for Our Times in Jennifer Egan ’s Manhattan Beach
Jennifer Egan joined the who’s who of American letters in 2011 when she won a Pulitzer for A Visit From the Goon Squad, an interlinked-story-collection-as-novel that bucked more than a few conventions. Her new novel Manhattan Beach is more conventional in that it’s a linear, historical narrative set circa World War II. It’s a less inventive book, but many readers will find it more satisfying. Manhattan Beach, named for the neighborhood in Brooklyn, begins when Anna Kerrigan is almost 12 years old, tagging along with her father to a mysterious man’s seaside home. Already there is a plucky danger abou...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Begley Tags: Uncategorized Books Source Type: news

Healing molecule discovery could reduce limb amputations for diabetes patients
According to research published inAntioxidants and Redox Signalling, a molecule that is part of the body’s tissue repair system could help treat non-healing wounds and injuries, such as diabetic foot.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 5, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Visualizing the function and fate of neutrophils in sterile injury and repair
Neutrophils have been implicated as harmful cells in a variety of inappropriate inflammatory conditions where they injure the host, leading to the death of the neutrophils and their subsequent phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages. Here we show that in a fully repairing sterile thermal hepatic injury, neutrophils also penetrate the injury site and perform the critical tasks of dismantling injured vessels and creating channels for new vascular regrowth. Upon completion of these tasks, they neither die at the injury site nor are phagocytosed. Instead, many of these neutrophils reenter the vasculature and have a preprogra...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wang, J., Hossain, M., Thanabalasuriar, A., Gunzer, M., Meininger, C., Kubes, P. Tags: Immunology reports Source Type: news

An Ape and a Hernia Repair: Anesthesiology News Report
(MedPage Today) -- Also, the pros of using multiple nerve blocks for TKA (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Outfox Your “ Aging ” Gene
Some people just seem to have all the luck when it comes to getting old. Like my 83-year-old patient who drinks a little too much Scotch, but still has a 3-handicap in golf. Or the 108-year-old who goes through a gallon of ice cream every week. If you ask them how they do it, they’ll give credit to their good genes… and there is some truth to it. We all have something called a FOXO3 gene. It helps protect us against aging. German researchers at the Christian-Albrechts University studied the FOXO3 gene in 380-plus centenarians, more than 600 people in their 90s, and more than 700 people between the ages of...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Health Nutrition longevity Source Type: news

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry Has Been Awarded to Three Scientists For Developments in Electron Microscopy
Three researchers based in the U.S., U.K. and Switzerland have won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developments in electron microscopy. The 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York’s Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, Britain. The Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences said Wednesday their method, called cryo-electron microscopy, allows researchers to “freeze biomolecules” mid-movement and visualize processes they have never previously seen.” The development, it...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Chemistry nobel prize onetime Source Type: news

Research proves bioengineering as viable alternative to open fetal repair for spina bifida
(Children's Hospital Colorado) Researchers from Children's Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus recently discovered a promising alternative to open fetal surgery for spina bifida repair. The team, led by Ahmed Marwan, MD, has developed an alternative approach to current in utero treatment for spina bifida: a minimally-invasive repair using a bioengineered material -- a reverse thermal gel (RTG) -- to cover the neural tube defects (NTD) at an earlier gestational age than traditional treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists uncover new method for tissue regeneration
Researchers from the University of Birmingham have discovered a new method to mimic the body's natural healing process to repair damaged tissue. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hip pain in young athletes: Q & A with a sports medicine specialist
When your child plays a sport, it’s often hard to tell where everyday aches and pains end and a potentially serious injury begins. Bumps and bruises are anything but rare in contact sports, and muscle soreness can be a common complaint for any young athlete — especially given the rigor of youth athletics these days. So how do you know when your child’s hip pain is due to an actual injury? Dr. Mininder Kocher, orthopedic surgeon and Associate Director of the Sports Medicine Division at Boston Children’s Hospital, helps answer parents’ questions about hip pain in young athletes. What are s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 3, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Connor Ertz Tags: Ask the Expert Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program Division of Sports Medicine Dr. Mininder Kocher FAI femoracetabular impingement hip dysplasia hip impingement labral tear Source Type: news

'CRISPR-Gold' fixes Duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation in mice
(University of California - Berkeley) Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have engineered a new way to deliver CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology inside cells and have demonstrated in mice that the technology can repair the mutation that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a severe muscle-wasting disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Papers of note in Nature 549 (7673)
This week’s articles highlight the role of vitamin C in hematopoietic cells; a source of maternal inflammation that contributes to neurodevelopmental defects; the blocking of a niche factor that promotes the growth of gliomas; and a protein that influences DNA repair pathway choice. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - October 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: VanHook, A. M. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

MRI Shows Bone Repair in Treated Spine Disease (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Structural lesions improved with etanercept in nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - October 2, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Surgery Bests Transcatheter Repair for Paravalvular Leaks (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- But higher technical success comes at the cost of more in-hospital adverse events (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - October 2, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Nobel prize for medicine awarded for insights into circadian rhythm
Three researchers identified gene that controls biological clocks and explained how it works Related items fromOnMedica Scientists identify body clock mechanism Poor quality sleep linked to heart disease Do night shifts hinder body ’s ability to repair DNA? Long working hours linked to heightened irregular heart rhythm risk E-books 'disrupt circadian rhythms' (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 2, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Sept. 29, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From EOI getting FDA clearance to Sanuwave’s new joint venture agreement, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. EOI wins FDA nod for FLXfit15 expandable cage EOI announced in a Sept. 28 press release that it has received FDA 510(k) clearance for its FLXfit 15. The clearance will help enhance the company’s FLXfir 3D expandable cage system and help expand the surgeon’s flexibility and capability by offering different length options. 2. ivWatch inks distribution deal with Terumo ivWatch has recently signed a licensing...
Source: Mass Device - September 29, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Business/Financial News Clinical Trials Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Cefaly EOI ivwatch Lombard Medical MedTech Mortise Medical Mundimed Sanuwave Terumo Varian Medical Systems Source Type: news

Neil Gorsuch Is Already Acting Like He ’s Been on the Supreme Court for Years
In its new term beginning October 2, the Supreme Court will consider many pressing questions. Can a baker refuse to make a cake for a gay wedding? Can states redraw districts to help a political party? And, does Justice Neil Gorsuch talk too much? Gorsuch has proven himself to be a forceful and dynamic presence on the bench, a jurist who cements the Court’s conservative tilt, infuriates liberals—not least because of the circumstances by which he got there—and breaks custom with his uncommon assertiveness. Considering Gorsuch in his robes is to grapple with what legacy President Trump will leave on the hig...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tessa Berenson Tags: Uncategorized justice Neil Gorsuch Supreme Court Source Type: news

FDA Warns of Uptick in Endoleaks With Endovascular Grafts FDA Warns of Uptick in Endoleaks With Endovascular Grafts
Recent data suggest an increase in type IIIa and IIIb endoleaks with endovascular graft systems used for endovascular abdominal aortic and aortoilliac aneurysm repair, the FDA warns.News Alerts (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Alert Source Type: news

'Chemical surgery' used to mend harmful mutations in human embryos
Scientists have used the technique, also known as ‘base editing’, for the first time in human embryos to change a single letter in a faulty geneResearchers in China have used a procedure described as “chemical surgery” to mend harmful mutations in human embryos for the first time.The scientists found that it was possible to repair a faulty gene that gives rise to a serious blood disorder called beta-thalassemia which can be caused by one misspelling in the DNA code.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Embryos Biology Source Type: news

ZATT (ZNF451)-mediated resolution of topoisomerase 2 DNA-protein cross-links
Topoisomerase 2 (TOP2) DNA transactions proceed via formation of the TOP2 cleavage complex (TOP2cc), a covalent enzyme-DNA reaction intermediate that is vulnerable to trapping by potent anticancer TOP2 drugs. How genotoxic TOP2 DNA-protein cross-links are resolved is unclear. We found that the SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) ligase ZATT (ZNF451) is a multifunctional DNA repair factor that controls cellular responses to TOP2 damage. ZATT binding to TOP2cc facilitates a proteasome-independent tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) hydrolase activity on stalled TOP2cc. The ZATT SUMO ligase activity further promotes TD...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Schellenberg, M. J., Lieberman, J. A., Herrero-Ruiz, A., Butler, L. R., Williams, J. G., Munoz-Cabello, A. M., Mueller, G. A., London, R. E., Cortes-Ledesma, F., Williams, R. S. Tags: Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

‘We’re Waiting.’ Puerto Rico Tries to Recover With Little Help From U.S. Government
MONTEBELLO, Puerto Rico (AP) — Relatives helped Maribel Valentin Espino find shelter when Hurricane Maria roared through her community in northern Puerto Rico. Neighbors formed volunteer brigades to cut fallen trees and clear twisty mountain roads after the storm had passed. Now, friends and a local cattle ranch provide the water they need to survive in the tropical heat. Valentin and her husband say they have not seen anyone from the Puerto Rican government, much less the Federal Emergency Management Agency, since the storm tore up the island Sept. 20, killing at least 16 people and leaving nearly all 3.4 million pe...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ben Fox and Danica Coto / AP Tags: Uncategorized Hurricane Maria onetime Puerto Rico Source Type: news

Conventus Orthopaedics Appoints Richard Mott to its Board of Directors
MINNEAPOLIS, Sept. 27, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Conventus Orthopaedics, a medical device company revolutionizing fracture repair surgery, today announced that Richard Mott has been appointed to its Board of Directors, effective im... Devices, Orthopaedic, Personnel Conventus Orthopaedics, periarticular fracture (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 27, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Experience Journal: Jake is charting new waters with HLHS
Jake Pickles was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a serious congenital heart defect that causes parts of the left heart to be underdeveloped. As an infant and toddler, Jake had three open-heart surgeries to repair his heart. Now 22, Jake is one of the oldest patients to survive with HLHS. This makes his prognosis uncertain. At some point in the future, he may need a heart transplant or more procedures. But Jake and his close-knit family try not to dwell on this uncertainty. Instead, they live with gratitude and hope. “I’m just planning as if there’s nothing wrong,” says Jake. &ldquo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories congenital heart defect Heart Center hypoplastic left heart syndrome Source Type: news

Equifax CEO Richard Smith Ousted Following Massive Data Breach
(NEW YORK) — Credit reporting agency Equifax is ousting CEO Richard Smith in an effort to clean up the mess left by a damaging data breach that exposed highly sensitive information about 143 million Americans. The shake-up announced Tuesday comes after Equifax disclosed that hackers exploited a software flaw that the company didn’t fix to heist Social Security numbers, birthdates and other personal data that provide the keys to identify theft. Smith will also step down from the chairman post. He had been Equifax’s CEO since 2005. Paulino do Rego Barros Jr. was named interim CEO, while board member Mark Fe...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Equifax onetime Source Type: news

Mortise Medical Receives FDA Clearance for LigaMetrics(TM) Suture Anchor System
LOGAN, Utah, Sept. 26, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Mortise Medical, a start-up medical device company focused on advanced soft tissue repair systems for ankle injuries, announces that it has recently received FDA 510(k) clearance for... Devices, Surgery, FDA Mortise Medical, LigaMetrics, Suture Anchor, knotless suture (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 26, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Nanogels help repair the heart
New technique stimulates cell regeneration in cardiac tissue without triggering an inflammatory response. (Source: Nanotechweb.org News)
Source: Nanotechweb.org News - September 26, 2017 Category: Nanotechnology Authors: Belle Dum é Source Type: news

Towns Forced to Evacuate After Guajataca Dam Fails in Puerto Rico
(SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico) — A failing dam prompted emergency evacuations of two towns in northwest Puerto Rico on Friday as the U.S. territory struggled with flooding, an island-wide power blackout and other dangers in Hurricane Maria’s wake. The National Weather Service in San Juan said Friday that the northwestern municipalities of Isabela and Quebradillas, home to some 70,000 people, were being evacuated with buses because the nearby Guajataca Dam was failing. Details remained sketchy about the evacuation with communications hampered after the storm. The 345-yard (316-meter) dam holds back a manmade lake cover...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Danica Coto / AP Tags: Uncategorized Hurricane Maria onetime Puerto Rico Source Type: news

Truck Full of Pumpkins Catches on Fire and Explodes on Florida Highway
(SAN ANTONIO, Fla.) — In an early Halloween highway horror, a truckload of burning pumpkins blocked traffic on a Florida interstate. Florida Highway Patrol Sgt. Steve Gaskins said in a news release that a tractor-trailer hauling pumpkins struck a guard rail on southbound Interstate 75 near Tampa early Friday, sparking a fire. The truck then exploded, spilling the burning pumpkins onto the highway. The 44-year-old woman who was driving the truck wasn’t injured in the crash. Gaskins says traffic on the interstate’s southbound lanes was backed up for several miles. He says the roadway will have to be repaved...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Florida onetime Source Type: news

Nanomedicine for safe healing of bone trauma: opportunities and challenges - Behzadi S, Luther GA, Harris MB, Farokhzad OC, Mahmoudi M.
Historically, high-energy extremity injuries resulting in significant soft-tissue trauma and bone loss were often deemed unsalvageable and treated with primary amputation. With improved soft-tissue coverage and nerve repair techniques, these injuries now p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Endologix wins refined CE Mark indications for Nellix stent graft
Endologix (NSDQ:ELGX) said today it won expanded CE Mark approval in the European Union for its Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing system with refined indications for use. The Irvine, Calif.-based company said that the refined indications for use were supported by clinical data and an independent clinical reviewer, and that the device met applicable safety and clinical performance requirements. “We are very pleased with the clinical outcomes generated by the Nellix EndoVascular Aneurysm Sealing System utilizing the refined IFU. The Nellix CE Mark with the refined IFU provides patients and physicians in Europe ...
Source: Mass Device - September 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Regulatory/Compliance Stent Grafts Vascular Endologix Source Type: news

Research Technician in Molecular and Cell Biology at Imperial College London
Salary: £27,190 -£29,250 per annumContract: Full Time Fixed Term up to four yearsCampus: Hammersmith Campus Closing Date: Tuesday 3 October 2017 (Midnight BST)A Research Technician position in Molecular and Cell Biology is available in the Department of Medicine, Imperial College London. You will work on a programme funded by a Wellcome Trust Joint Investigator Award entitled Cellular thyroid hormone availability: regulation of development and tissue repair, and pathogenesis of degenerative disease.&nb...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 21, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Childhood IBD linked to raised long-term risk of cancer
Excess risk of gastrointestinal cancer persists into adulthood, but absolute risk is small Related items fromOnMedica Sticky gel breakthrough in colitis treatment Gene variant linked to development of inflammatory disease Big fall in bowel cancer deaths Stem cells repair bowel disease Developing and using a tool to improve outcomes in colorectal cancer (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 21, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Plymouth girl, 11, nearly died from her burst appendix
Daizy Adams, from Plymouth, began having stomach pains before she went on holiday to Spain at the end of July. By August 15, she needed emergency surgery to repair her bowel. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Smokers who quit have metabolite levels that resemble those of nonsmokers
(American Chemical Society) Even after years of smoking, the body has a remarkable ability to repair itself. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, scientists report that certain metabolic changes occur soon after quitting, and these changes could help explain how some ill-effects of smoking might be reversible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The right way to repair DNA
(Salk Institute) Salk scientists discover that microprotein helps cells choose best path to repair genes and avoid cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Getting to the heart of the matter: Nanogels for heart attack patients
(American Chemical Society) Heart disease and heart-related illnesses are a leading cause of death around the world, but treatment options are limited. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that encapsulating stem cells in a nanogel could help repair damage to the heart. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news