BD Scores a Victory in Bard & #039;s Hernia Mesh Case
Becton Dickinson, which acquired C.R. Bard at the end of 2017, scored a victory in New Jersey Superior Court this week. The court's appellate division refused to reinstate a product liability lawsuit involving Bard's 3DMax polypropylene mesh, which is used for hernia repair.  Plaintiff Kemuel Goodson was implanted with the product in 2006 and alleged that the mesh caused multiple complications that required extensive medical care, including several additional operations. Goodson claimed in his original complaint that defective design, negligence, and fraud and misrepresentation were to blame for the com...
Source: MDDI - March 21, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Design Source Type: news

Bard wins 3DMax hernia mesh appeal
The New Jersey Superior Court’s Appellate Division this week tossed a win to Becton Dickinson & Co.‘s (NYSE:BDX) C.R. Bard (NYSE:BCR), refusing to reinstate a hernia mesh product liability suit on grounds that expert witnesses couldn’t prove the design of the product was defective or that significant negligence occurred. In the case, plaintiff Kemuel Goodson claims that implantation of Bard’s 3DMax polypropylene mesh during a laparoscopic bilateral inguinal hernia repair in 2006 caused a number of different complications, including remaining pain and the removal of a testicle, and requ...
Source: Mass Device - March 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Legal News Surgical bectondickinson crbard Source Type: news

Things Are Finally Looking Up for Endologix
Endologix has had a rough couple of years, but things are finally beginning to look up for the Irvine, CA-based company. Earlier this month the company enrolled the first patient in a confirmatory study of its next-generation Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing system, an important step toward eventually getting that technology to the U.S. market. The good news continues this week with positive results from a pooled analysis of studies evaluating the company's Ovation product line. Ovation, a next-generation endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) system that uses polymer to help physicians create a customized seal between th...
Source: MDDI - March 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Wright Medical, KFx settle patent spat, ink licensing deal
KFx Medical said today it and Wright Medical (NSDQ:WMGI) agreed to dismiss patent litigation over rotator cuff repair patents between the companies and ink a licensing deal. Through the newly inked deal, Memphis, Tenn.-based Wright Medical and its affiliates will have the right to promote the use of products and techniques for knotless double row rotator cuff repair, which KFx owns the patent for, for the life of those patents. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. “We are proud to have our innovation recognized by Wright. Previously we announced our licensing agreements with Smith & Nephew, Inc., Mitek...
Source: Mass Device - March 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Orthopedics Patent Infringement KFx Medical wrightmedical Source Type: news

Abbott's MitraClip Therapy Receives National Reimbursement in Japan to Treat Patients with Mitral Regurgitation
National reimbursement adds the device into Japan's health insurance system, which enables greater access for patients MitraClip is a first-of-its-kind transcatheter mitral valve repair device that provides physicians with a minimally invasive way to re... Devices, Cardiology, Reimbursement Abbott, MitraClip, mitral regurgitation, mitral valve (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Baxter closes $153m hemostat, sealant asset buy from Mallinckrodt
Baxter (NYSE:BAX) said today that it closed the $153 million acquisition of hemostat and sealant assets from Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals (NYSE:MNK). Baxter announced in January its plan to acquire the stand-alone recombinant thrombin Recothrom and Preveleak surgical sealant for vascular reconstruction. “We are excited to add both Recothrom and Preveleak to our portfolio of hemostats and sealants to offer surgeons additional options that address different situations when intraoperative bleeding can occur,” advanced surgery president Wil Boren said in prepared remarks. “Our top priority righ...
Source: Mass Device - March 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Mergers & Acquisitions Surgical Vascular Wall Street Beat Baxter Mallinckrodt Source Type: news

HRD-positive breast cancer patients fare better with adjuvant AC chemotherapy
(SWOG) People with tough-to-treat triple negative breast cancer, whose tumors also don't allow for double-strand DNA repair, fare better when treated with a common adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy combination, according to results from a SWOG clinical trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10 Good and 10 Bad Things About Procrastination
“Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.” – Benjamin Franklin “There’s nothing to match curling up with a good book when there’s a repair job to be done around the house.” – Joe Ryan Everyone procrastinates. Some, in fact, are proficient at it. While I used to count myself in that category, I’ve made a conscious effort to change my ways in recent years and I must say I’ve been quite successful in the endeavor. Still, the urge to put off what must be done occasionally plagues me. So, I found the research on what’s good and what’s bad a...
Source: Psych Central - March 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety General Habits Happiness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Habit Change overwhelm Procrastination Source Type: news

Scott Kelly Spent a Year in Space and Now His DNA Is Different From His Identical Twin ’s
Astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent a full year in space as part of a groundbreaking NASA mission, is no longer an exact genetic match with his identical twin brother Mark Kelly, according to a new study. Scientists found that Scott Kelly, who set the record for most consecutive days spent in orbit, underwent an “unexpected” genetic change. Post-flight, NASA investigators found “hundreds of unique mutations.” Some involved the circulation of so-called cell-free DNA in the blood. Others involved changes in the epigenome — a sort of genetic control system that determines how genes are expressed. St...
Source: TIME: Science - March 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Flora Carr Tags: Uncategorized onetime space travel Source Type: news

Startup promises minimally invasive heart repair
(Harvard University) A minimally invasive surgical device to be commercialized by a newly launched startup could fundamentally transform the way doctors correct organ defects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does our body clock hold the key to developing new treatments for arthritis?
Most of us will have felt the temporary effects of a disrupted body clock, whether it’s caused by a long flight, a changing shift pattern or even just a few late nights. Butscientists all over the world now recognise the importance of our biological clocks to lifelong health and well-being.In 2014 Arthritis Research UK invested more than a million pounds into two five-year studies at the University of Manchester investigating how disruption to our daily circadian rhythms is linked to osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis. In this edition we’re reporting on how this exciting new research is building our unde...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 15, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Mutation dynamics and fitness effects followed in single cells
Mutations have been investigated for more than a century but remain difficult to observe directly in single cells, which limits the characterization of their dynamics and fitness effects. By combining microfluidics, time-lapse imaging, and a fluorescent tag of the mismatch repair system in Escherichia coli, we visualized the emergence of mutations in single cells, revealing Poissonian dynamics. Concomitantly, we tracked the growth and life span of single cells, accumulating ~20,000 mutations genome-wide over hundreds of generations. This analysis revealed that 1% of mutations were lethal; nonlethal mutations displayed a he...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robert, L., Ollion, J., Robert, J., Song, X., Matic, I., Elez, M. Tags: Evolution, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Does our body clock hold the key to developing new treatments?
Most of us will have felt the temporary effects of a disrupted body clock, whether it’s caused by a long flight, a changing shift pattern or even just a few late nights. Butscientists all over the world now recognise the importance of our biological clocks to lifelong health and well-being.In 2014 Arthritis Research UK invested more than a million pounds into two five-year studies at the University of Manchester investigating how disruption to our daily circadian rhythms is linked to osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis. In this edition we’re reporting on how this exciting new research is building our unde...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 15, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Are your computer screens causing dry eye problems? Eat more good fats to repair the lipid layer
(Natural News) Dry eyes, a condition where the eyes do not produce enough tears, is a modern-day scourge. Smartphones, computers and tablets for home and office work have doubled, even tripled, the time we spend in front of a screen that require us to stare at it for hours on end. This, in turn, forces... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Southern Research using new methods to combat prostate cancer
Southern Research scientists are currently investigating a protein and its potential role in combatting prostate cancer.   Research is focused on a protein called SPOP, and how it is mutated from interactions with the DNA damage response, in a network of cellular pathways that works nonstop in an attempt to repair damaged DNA strands and prevent potentially harmful changes.   The research is being funded by Southe rn Research, with a contribution from the Alabama Innovation Fund, an initiative… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 14, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

Southern Research using new methods to combat prostate cancer
Southern Research scientists are currently investigating a protein and its potential role in combatting prostate cancer.   Research is focused on a protein called SPOP, and how it is mutated from interactions with the DNA damage response, in a network of cellular pathways that works nonstop in an attempt to repair damaged DNA strands and prevent potentially harmful changes.   The research is being funded by Southe rn Research, with a contribution from the Alabama Innovation Fund, an initiative… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - March 14, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

Bolivian women weave devices to patch holes in hearts
(Reuters Health) - A team of Bolivian women are using indigenous Aymara weaving patterns to craft devices that can help repair heart defects, doctors involved in developing the device report in JAMA. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Medartis IPO funds slated to support expansion
Swiss medtech company Medartis is reportedly planning to expand into the U.S. market and continue investing in Germany with the funds from its recently-announced initial public offering. Medartis announced yesterday that its IPO could include up to 2.84 million new shares of common stock priced at 44 – 54 Swiss francs apiece. That would generate proceeds of 123.7 million francs – or nearly $131 million. Taking into account the 15% over-allotment option, Medartis could bring in 142.5 million francs, or $151 million. The company makes fixation products designed to treat small-bone fractures and osteotomies in the...
Source: Mass Device - March 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Implants Initial Public Offering (IPO) Orthopedics Wall Street Beat medartis Source Type: news

Anika CEO retires after two decades; president assumes corner office | Personnel Moves – March 13, 2018
Anika Therapeutics (NSDQ:ANIK) announced this month that CEO Charles Sherwood plans to retire after working for Anika for nearly twenty years. Joseph Darling, who has been Anika’s president since July 2017, will take his place in the corner office. Darling has previously served in executive leadership roles across an array of medtech companies like Abbott (NYSE:ABT), Baxter (NYSE:BAX) and Smith & Nephew (NYSE:SNN). “First, I would like to thank Chuck Sherwood for his close to two decades of commitment to Anika and for establishing Anika as a global innovator...
Source: Mass Device - March 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Wall Street Beat alucentmedical Anika Therapeutics Inc. BioTime BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc. Kala Pharmaceuticals medherant milestonescientific pertinaxpharma West Pharmaceutical Services Source Type: news

' Tummy Tuck' Relieved Postpartum Back Pain/Incontinence (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Abdominoplasty with rectus repair lessened post-op symptoms through 6 months (Source: MedPage Today Rheumatology)
Source: MedPage Today Rheumatology - March 12, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Vitamin D may accelerate muscle repair when combined with olive oil, according to new study
(Natural News) You are probably familiar with the bone-strengthening effects of vitamin D, but a new study reveals that the vitamin can also help to repair muscle fibers significantly when it is consumed along with extra virgin olive oil. Researchers from the University of Catania in Italy fed some rats a regular diet, while others... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Previous cortisone injections may increase risk of future rotator cuff repair
(American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine) Cortisone injections are a common nonsurgical approach to treating rotator cuff injuries. However, researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day in New Orleans suggest that individuals who receive injections less than six months before a rotator cuff repair may have an increased risk for revision rotator cuff repair. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Osteochondral allograft transplantation effective for certain knee cartilage repairs
(American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine) Isolated femoral condyle lesions account for 75 percent of the cartilage repair procedures performed in the knee joint, and physicians have a variety of techniques to consider as part of surgical treatment. Osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA) is a valuable and successful approach for this condition, as described by research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day in New Orleans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers rescue embryos from brain defects by re-engineering cellular voltage patterns
(Tufts University) Tufts University biologists have demonstrated for the first time that electrical patterns in the developing embryo can be predicted, mapped, and manipulated to prevent defects caused by harmful substances such as nicotine. The research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests that targeting bioelectric states may be a new treatment modality for regenerative repair in brain development and disease, and that computational methods can be used to find effective repair strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New funding for specialist arthritis research centres
Arthritis Research UK has announced new funding for three of its flagship research centres. Since launching in 2012, the centres, which specialise in adolescent rheumatology and osteoarthritis, have already laid the foundation for clinical advances. The new funding will run for five years and will help the researchers continue to explore how arthritis develops and potential ways to treat and prevent the condition.Arthritis Research UK supports exceptional research that aims to prevent the onset of arthritis, develop a cure for arthritis and transform the lives people living with the condition. As part of this, the charity ...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - March 8, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Paediatric retinal detachment: aetiology, characteristics and outcomes - McElnea E, Stephenson K, Gilmore S, O'Keefe M, Keegan D.
AIM: To provide contemporary data on the aetiology, clinical features and outcomes of paediatric retinal detachment. METHODS: A retrospective review of all those under 16y who underwent surgical repair for retinal detachment at a single centre betw... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Students to be stationed at Paralympic Winter Games prosthetic ‘ pit lane ’
Two PhD students from the University of Bristol will be travelling to South Korea this week [8 March] where they will be assisting within the Repair Service Centre at the Paralympic Winter Games. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Current students; Faculty of Science, School of Mathematics; Press Release Source Type: news

Stem Cell Vaccine Carries Potential as Mesothelioma Treatment
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine believe a patient-specific stem cell vaccine could become part of mesothelioma treatment — and possibly prevention — in the future. The belief stems from their recent study that demonstrated a consistent immunologic response with genetically-altered stem cells in laboratory mice carrying particular cancer cells. “This could potentially play a role for a large group of — if not all — cancers,” Dr. Joseph Wu, director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, told Asbestos.com. “We envision it potentially being used as a vacci...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 6, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Colorado woman finds confidence with jaw-breaking surgery
Lauren Whitt, 20, of Colorado needed a double jaw surgery to repair an enlarged chin in addition to making it difficult for her to eat, breath and speak, and she was mercilessly taunted by her classmates (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

After Many Missteps, Endologix Makes Progress on Nellix
Endologix just took a big step forward on what has been a long and winding road to FDA approval of its Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) system. The Irvine, CA-based company said the first patient was treated in its EVAS2 confirmatory clinical study of the device. The Nellix System was developed as an alternative treatment to traditional endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The system is designed to seal an entire aneurysm. Endologix originally planned to have FDA approval of the Nellix system by the end of 2016, but the company hit a speed bump about midway through that yea...
Source: MDDI - March 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Humans frozen by cryogenics could be revived using stem cells
EXCLUSIVE: Dennis Kowalski, President of the Michigan-based Cryonics Institute, has claimed scientists could revive a frozen human corpse by using stem cells to help repair damaged cells. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Terumo pays at least $20m for Medeon Biodesign ’ s XPro vascular closure device
Medeon Biodesign (TPEx:6499) said today that it agreed to sell its XPro suture-mediated vascular closure device to Terumo Corp. (TYO:4543) for $20 million up front, plus milestones. The XPro device is designed for vascular closure following transcatheter aortic valve replacement, endovascular aneurysm repair, thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair and percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty procedures. Medeon said it plans to continue working with Terumo on future technical, clinical and regulatory developments for the system. In May 2017 Medeon won approval in New Zealand for a clinical trial of the XPro s...
Source: Mass Device - March 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Mergers & Acquisitions Vascular Wall Street Beat Medeon Biodesign Terumo Source Type: news

Wounds From Military-Style Rifles? ‘ A Ghastly Thing to See ’
Trauma surgeons tell what it is really like to try to repair such devastating injuries. “ Bones are exploded, soft tissue is absolutely destroyed, ” one said. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA and C. J. CHIVERS Tags: School Shootings and Armed Attacks Firearms Florida Surgery and Surgeons Source Type: news

Wounds From Military-Style Rifles? ‘ A Ghastly Thing to See. ’
Trauma surgeons tell what it is really like to try to repair such devastating injuries. “ Bones are exploded, soft tissue is absolutely destroyed, ” one said. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA and C. J. CHIVERS Tags: School Shootings and Armed Attacks Firearms Florida Surgery and Surgeons Source Type: news

Mesh Bests Suture Repair for Small Umbilical Hernias Mesh Bests Suture Repair for Small Umbilical Hernias
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - March 2, 2018 Category: Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Darby Dental Supply Continues West Coast Expansion with Acquisition of SmartPractice ® Dental Supply Division
Jericho, NY (February 23, 2018)–Darby Dental Supply, one of the nation ’s largest dental distributors, announces its planned acquisition of the dental supply division of Phoenix-based SmartPractice.This acquisition and the resulting strategic partnership capitalize on each company ’s core competencies with Darby leveraging SmartPractice’s acclaimed glove expertise and manufacturing capabilities. SmartPractice’s supply and glove customer base will benefit from Darby’s expansive state-of-the-art distribution network, extended product lines, capital equipment, technology services, and equip...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - March 1, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Repair, stigmatisation or tolerance? Former girl soldiers' experience of their 'homecoming' - Tonheim M.
This paper examines how 12 former girl soldiers in eastern Congo experience their social reintegration back into their families and communities. A successful social reintegration process is conceptualised as one which involves repaired relationships charac... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Unlocking a cell's potential to regenerate the heart
(Gladstone Institutes) Inspired by fish or salamanders that have a remarkable ability to repair their own injured organs, scientists have been trying for years to find a way to get human adult cells to divide and regenerate tissue in a similar way. A team at Gladstone, led by Deepak Srivastava, finally developed the first reliable method to make adult cells divide and repair hearts damaged by heart attacks, at least in animal models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Plants fix DNA differently from animals
(Nara Institute of Science and Technology) p53 is a famous tumor suppressor in mammalian cells. The equivalent in plants is SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 (SOG1). Japanese scientists report that although the two factors interact with genes responsible for the cell cycle and DNA repair, SOG1 prefers genes regulating homologous recombination. Also, unlike p53, SOG1 has immune function. Because of its role in plant cell division and death, modulating SOG1 is expected to have implications in agriculture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences recalls Cardioband anchors
Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) last month recalled the anchors used with its Cardioband mitral valve repair device after receiving a pair of reports that the device came loose from the surrounding tissue. The Cardioband device, acquired in the $690 million buyout of Valtech Cardio last year, is designed to reshape the mitral valve using specially designed anchors. In a letter to physicians posted by German regulators Jan. 26, Edwards said a manufacturing tweak, although within its specs, was responsible for the issue. “Through the review of recent case reports, we have noted an increased number and rat...
Source: Mass Device - February 28, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiac Implants Recalls Regulatory/Compliance Replacement Heart Valves Edwards Lifesciences Source Type: news

You Asked: Is It Bad To Pick Your Nose?
Most agree that nose-picking is an unseemly habit. But a casual observation of drivers (who seem to think no one can see them through clear glass) suggests that a lot of people pick when they believe no one’s watching. Setting aside the shame of being busted knuckle-deep in nostril, can picking your nose hurt your health? “Probably the number-one thing we worry about is digital trauma, which is a fancy name for bleeding related to picking,” says Dr. Brett Comer, a head and neck surgeon and assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Kentucky. The skin on the inside of the nose is more delic...
Source: TIME: Health - February 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

More than just a cosmetic procedure -- 'tummy tuck' reduces back pain and incontinence
(Wolters Kluwer Health) In addition to restoring the pre-pregnancy shape of the abdomen, abdominoplasty ('tummy tuck') surgery with muscle repair can improve back pain and urinary incontinence after childbearing, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ® , the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SQI Test Detects Heart Attack Before It Happens
There isn't a  shortage in the number of companies developing tests for cancer detection. However, it’s a far different story when it comes to diagnostics for cardiovascular diseases. Two companies are bringing a huge spotlight to the space and have created a test that can predict a cardiac event. SQI Diagnostics and Predictive Health Diagnostics (PHD) announced the validation, commercial transition, and development of the PULS Cardiac Test. "This is a serum blood test for all those people who look healthy and have normal lipids, yet still go on to have a heart attack," Douglas Harrington, CE...
Source: MDDI - February 28, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Cardiovascular IVD Source Type: news

Novo to invest $165m in first ‘superbug’ venture fund
Repair Impact Fund will help start-ups develop treatment aimed at drug-resistant bacteria (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - February 28, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Tricuspid repair firm 4Tech taps ex-Boston Scientific execs for CEO, CMO | Personnel Moves for Feb. 27, 2018
4Tech said last week that it named a pair of BSX veterans as its new CEO and CMO, with onetime chief Mike Ennen stepping away for “family reasons.” Galway, Ireland-based 4Tech said former Boston transcatheter aortic valve GM Tom Fleming is slated to take the reins from Thoratec vet Ennen as president & CEO in March. The company, which is developing the TriClinch Coil transcatheter tricuspid valve repair device, also said that Dr. Keith Dawkins, Boston’s ex-global medical chief, was named CMO effective Feb. 22.  Z-Medica lures ex-Hologic COO Compton Z-Medica said it named former Hol...
Source: Mass Device - February 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Replacement Heart Valves Wall Street Beat 4Tech Check-Cap CHF Solutions Inc. imaginmedical imagionbiosystems Invacare LimFlow orthosalespartners personnel-moves Teleflex Source Type: news

Yale Medicine plastic surgeon helps repair self-esteem
In addition to repairing damaged tissue and reconstructing faces, Dr. Yan Ho Lee ’s work goes beyond appearance to help restore confidence in her patients. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Bloomberg: Feds investigating Atlanta's MiMedx Group over business practices
The feds are investing biomedical company MiMedx Group Inc. (Nasdaq: MDXG)  over a pair of business practices, according to Bloomberg News. Bloomberg, citing two sources it says are familiar with the matter, reported that the U.S. Justice Department is investigating whether the Marietta-based company overcharged government customers for its tissue-repair products. One em ployee told Bloomberg that Federal prosecutors are also looking into whether the company’s tissue-graft sales violated the False… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 26, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Eric Mandel Source Type: news