Were You Born in an H1N1 Flu Year or an H3N2? It Matters
Knowing who is at a higher risk each year could help tailor pandemic and epidemic planning, the researchers say. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What ’s in a Name? Why WHO’s Formal Name for the New Coronavirus Disease Matters
On Tuesday, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared an official name for the new coronavirus disease: COVID-19 — making sure not to reference Wuhan, the central Chinese city where the virus originated. COVID-19 stands for Corona Virus Disease 19. “Having a name matters to prevent the use of other names that can be inaccurate or stigmatizing,” said Director-General of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “It also gives us a standard format to use for any future coronavirus outbreaks.” The WHO referenced guidelines set in 2015 that ensure the name does not refer to a geographical location, ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sanya Mansoor Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 onetime Source Type: news

It ’s Not Too Late to Prepare for COVID-19
By Dr. Lisa Stone, Epidemiology Adviser ; Robert Salerno, Director, Global Health Security Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama, June 6, 2018, as part an Emerging Infectious Diseases Training Event (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen).February 11, 2020A disease spillover event, when a virus moves from animal to human hosts, can cause significant human illness. The coronavirus (COVID-19) seems to have spilled over sometime in late 2019, at a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, leading to more than 40,000 confirmed cases and at least 910 reported deaths&nbs...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Infectious Diseases Global Health Security Source Type: news

Were You Born in an H1N1 Flu Year or an H3N2? It Matters
TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2020 -- The first type of influenza virus you're exposed to may set your lifetime ability to fight the flu. Researchers with McMaster University and University of Montreal found that being born in an H1N1 year or an H3N2 year... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 11, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Renowned HIV Researcher Frank Plummer Dies Suddenly at 67 Renowned HIV Researcher Frank Plummer Dies Suddenly at 67
The Canadian scientist's legacy also includes his leadership in combatting SARS, H1N1 flu, and Ebola. He discovered a group of women in Kenya who were regularly exposed to HIV but resistant.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Business of Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Business of Medicine Headlines - February 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: HIV/AIDS News Source Type: news

Childhood Flu May Protect Against Future Flu
BOSTON (CBS) – Why do some people seem to fend off the flu better than others? A new study finds the type of flu you got as a child may help protect you against that same type as an adult. Researchers from UCLA and the University of Arizona looked at data from hospitals and doctors’ offices and found that people first exposed to a less severe strain of flu, called H1N1, during childhood, were less likely to be hospitalized if they encountered the same strain later in life. The same was true for those exposed to the more severe H3N2 strain early on. They were less likely to get really sick from that same strain...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall flu season Source Type: news

Why We Are So Ill-Prepared for A Possible Pandemic Like Coronavirus
We were surprised in 2002 when a new coronavirus called SARS emerged from southern China and spread to 17 countries, causing more than 8,000 disease cases and nearly 800 deaths. We were surprised in 2009 when a new H1N1 influenza strain emerged in Mexico and caused worldwide panic. We were surprised in 2014 when Ebola virus broke out in three West African countries, with nearly 30,000 cases and more than 11,000 deaths. And here we are now, facing the 2019-nCoV coronavirus outbreak, on the verge of becoming a worldwide pandemic, wthin China reporting over 20,000 cases and nearly 500 deaths. Three years ago in a book, Deadl...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael T. Osterholm and Mark Olshaker Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

First childhood flu helps explain why virus hits some people harder than others
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A Bigger Impact in a Smaller World: The China Situation
People wear face masks in the waiting area at China's Shenzhen Bao'an International Airport. Credit: UN News/Jing ZhangBy Fairuz AhmedNEW YORK, Feb 3 2020 (IPS) We are now living in a hyper communicative world where news does travel faster than lightning. Boundaries, borders, geographical and time differences have become next to obsolete in today’s speed driven world. At any point in time people, news and local occurrences can influence internationally without much local isolation. Along with the advantages of technology, communications and connections world is also facing new challenges that are proportionally evolv...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fairuz Ahmed Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Population TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Xenophobia ‘Is A Pre-Existing Condition.’ How Harmful Stereotypes and Racism are Spreading Around the Coronavirus
As 10-year-old Connor and a friend played one recent day at recess, they were approached by a group of boys wanting to play a game — testing the boys for coronavirus. Connor, who is half-Chinese, and his friend, also Chinese, played along at first, but Connor’s mother Nadia Alam tells TIME that they quickly became uncomfortable and that the other boys wouldn’t stop, she says. “In this instance, I honestly don’t think the kids who targeted my son acted out of malice,” Alam said in an emailed statement to TIME. “They were acting out the fear and ignorance around them. My son was upse...
Source: TIME: Health - February 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV onetime Source Type: news

This Year ’s Flu Season Got Off to a Strange Start. What Does That Mean for the Months Ahead?
Flu season is always unpredictable. Different viral strains circulate each year, which makes forecasting the disease’s spread—and formulating the annual flu vaccine—an educated guessing game. Even so, the 2019-2020 flu season has been particularly unusual. Influenza B, the viral strain that usually circulates toward the end of flu season, instead emerged first this year, shifting usual transmission patterns. A vaccine mismatch and reduced immunity to influenza B may have contributed to the early and severe start of this flu season. What does that mean for the months ahead? TIME asked Lynnette Brammer, an ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Flu Vaccine ‘ Not A Very Good Match ’ For Strain That ’ s Tough On Children
(CNN) — This year’s flu vaccine is “not a very good match” for a common strain of the flu that’s especially tough on children, according to the nation’s top infectious disease doctor. “It’s not a very good match for B/Victoria,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, referring to the strain. “It’s not an awful match, but it’s not a very good match.” Children are particularly susceptible to influenza B/Victoria. Fauci said even though the match for B/Victoria isn’t great, a flu shot can...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Flu Vaccine Source Type: news

CDC Estimates 1,300 Flu Deaths In US This Season; Widespread Activity In Massachusetts
(CNN/CBS) — At least 1,300 people have died from the flu so far this season, according to a preliminary estimate released Friday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There have been at least 2.6 million flu illnesses and 23,000 flu-related hospitalizations, according to the analysis. So far this season, the CDC has received reports of 10 children who have died from the flu, four more than the week before. Experts have warned that flu is hitting the United States early this year, and there are concerns that this early season could mean a particularly severe season overall. Flu spread significantly in ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Flu Source Type: news

Benefits of exercise referral schemes not as large as hoped
Roll-out of schemes should be rethought to maximise effectiveness, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica Short intense exercise regimes may aid weight loss What promotes uptake and retention in group-based weight management services? New GP guidelines help patients and staff get fit GPs to spearhead swine flu mass vaccination NHS sets out H1N1 vaccination targets (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 20, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Influenza | Medscape Influenza | Medscape
Review in-depth clinical information, latest medical news, and guidelines on influenza virus and H1N1. Review management of flu symptoms using flu treatment for swine flu, bird flu, and other types of influenza. (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Resource Center Source Type: news

South Africa: 'There Is No Swine Flu Outbreak,' Says KZN Health MEC After Girl, 9, Dies
[News24Wire] KwaZulu-Natal Health MEC Nomagugu Simelane-Zulu has called for calm since a nine-year-old girl died after contracting H1N1, also known as swine flu, in Pietermaritzburg. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 26, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Exposure to 2009 pH1N1 Vaccine During Pregnancy Seems Safe
THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 -- Exposure to the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza vaccine in pregnancy is not associated with most negative health outcomes among offspring, according to a study published online July 10 in The BMJ. Laura K. Walsh, from... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Namibia: Seven Cases of Swine Flu Confirmed
[Namibian] Seven cases of H1N1 influenza (swine flu) have been confirmed in Windhoek, with four patients hospitalised, health executive director Ben Nangombe said yesterday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 27, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

This Past Flu Season Was the Longest in 10 Years, the CDC Says
The 2018-2019 flu season may not have been as severe as the one that came before it, but it set a record of its own, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) say. It was the longest in a decade, lasting 21 weeks. Fewer illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths were reported this year than during last year’s notoriously brutal flu season, earning the 2018-2019 season an overall severity rating of “moderate,” according to a new CDC recap. But the length and trajectory of the most recent flu season—which began in November, peaked in mid-February and trailed off in April—was unique, the C...
Source: TIME: Health - June 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Flu Season Isn ’t Over Yet — and More Serious Strains Are On the Rise, CDC Says
Flu season has been relatively mild in the U.S. this year. But even though it’s late in the season — flu activity tends to wrap up by May — influenza viruses are still circulating, according to a recent health alert from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). H3N2, an influenza strain known to cause more severe illnesses, is now making up a greater proportion of cases than it did early in the season, while lower-severity H1N1 and influenza B viruses are dropping off, the CDC says. Flu shots tend to protect against H1N1 and influenza B better than they do against H3N2. Given those trends, ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Reasonable Doubt: Don't Be Fooled by New Study: Tamiflu Still Pretty Worthless for H1N1
No abstract available (Source: Emergency Medicine News)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - April 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Reasonable Doubt Source Type: news

Pandemics and Emerging Diseases
Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Published: 3/28/2019. This web page provides pandemic influenza information in general, and specifically about 2009 H1N1 (Swine) Flu Virus (Biologics); Influenza Virus Vaccine, H5N1 (for National Stockpile); and Questions and Answers about H5N1 Influenza Virus Vaccine, manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur, Inc. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mother whose 5-year-old son died of flu was attacked by anti-vaxxer trolls
Joseph Marotta got the flu shot in 2009, but it didn't prevent that year's deadly H1N1 strain. He died at age five. His mother is nonetheless a tireless flu shot advocate, but gets trolled by anti-vaxxers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flu Season Is Still Going, A New More Severe Strain Now Circulating
H3N2 has overtaken H1N1 as the dominant circulating flu virus strain. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

CDC: Number of new flu cases down, but still high
The number of people who reported having the flu last week has gone down as reports of influenza A(H3)-associated illnesses outpaced those associated with A(H1N1). (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC: Flu Season May Not Have Peaked, Another Wave Of Severe Infections Underway
(CNN) — Flu activity remains high across the nation, and there’s a second wave of severe infections striking some states. There were as many as 26.3 million flu illnesses, 12.4 million medical visits and 347,000 flu hospitalizations between October 1 and March 2, according to the weekly flu report released Friday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “We’re still having flu. And we’re still seeing a steady stream of patients who are being admitted to hospital with influenza,” said Dr. William Schaffner, medical director of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Flu Source Type: news

Could CRISPR Diagnostics Provide a Valuable Weapon in the Fight against Pandemic Flu?
The flu season is up and running in the Northern Hemisphere, and early signs in both the United States and Europe are that the effects might not be quite as severe as the brutal 2017/18 season. The United States is predominantly seeing H1N1 circulating, while monitoring in Europe has identified co-circulation of H1N1 and H3N2—both varieties of Influenza A that should be covered by the seasonable vaccine. What if they weren’t though? Influenza A can be found in both human and animal populations, and it evolves rapidly through genetic mutation. Each year many humans rely on their country&a...
Source: MDDI - March 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Paul Wilkins Tags: IVD Source Type: news

CDC: Dangerous flu strain overtakes H1N1 this season
A stronger strain of the flu has begun sweeping the nation, as the number of deaths in various regions continue to rise, according to a report from the CDC on Friday. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More Severe Flu Strain Starts to Spread Widely
At the start of the flu season, the main strain was influenza A H1N1, but now a more severe strain, influenza A H3N2, accounts for nearly half of all the new cases, the CDC says. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Earlier Oseltamivir May Cut Death Risk in Influenza A/H3N2 (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- No effect on mortality was observed for H1N1 and influenza B patients (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - February 19, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

This Year ’ s Flu Shot Less Than 50% Effective, According To CDC
By Susan Scutti, CNN (CNN) — Don’t let your guard down: The US flu season is expected to continue for several more weeks, with activity across the nation now elevated, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. A flu shot is still recommended for those who have neglected to get one, but the CDC estimated this year’s vaccine’s overall effectiveness in preventing an infection at just 47%. The shot’s success varies based on your age, the CDC noted. Among children up to 17, its overall effectiveness against flu was 61%, while just 24% of adults 50 and older who received t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Flu Flu Shot Source Type: news

This Year ’s Flu Shot Was Far More Effective Than Last Year’s. Here’s Why
The 2018-2019 flu season has been a relatively mild one — and a pretty effective flu shot is part of the reason why. Mid-season estimates suggest that the flu shot has reduced the risk of illness by around 47% in vaccinated people, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released Thursday. During the severe 2017-2018 flu season, vaccine efficacy was estimated at just 36%. The difference is partly because the dominant influenza virus last year, H3N2, is known to cause more serious illnesses and to be less responsive to vaccination than other strains. This year, H1N1 — whic...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Superbugs, Anti-Vaxxers Make WHO ’ s List Of 10 Global Health Threats
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Mass vaccination for influenza a failed strategy, scientists admit... it simply doesn't reduce influenza-related hospital admissions at all
(Natural News) Mass vaccination against the pandemic influenza A/H1N1 infection fell short on expected results, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. Researchers examined a cohort of 388,069 patients younger than 65 years old, who were given the H1N1 vaccination between November 2009 and January 2010 when the transmission of pandemic influenza was... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adverse Birth Outcomes Up for Women With H1N1 Flu in ICU
FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 -- Pregnant women with 2009 H1N1 influenza admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) have an increased risk for adverse birth outcomes, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Birth Defects Research. Kim Newsome, M.P.H.,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The H1N1 strain of the swine flu is back — here's what you need to know
In 2009 we were hit with the H1N1 strain of the swine flu. It triggered widespread vaccinations. More than 120 people died in Ontario. And now it’s back. Dr. Bryna Warshawsky, a medical director with Public Health Ontario, tells us what we need to know about this year's strain. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Hamilton Source Type: news

Surveillance Report
Source: European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Published: 2019. This five-page report is based on data on zoonotic influenza for 2017 retrieved from Epidemic Intelligence on May 18, 2018. No human cases of avian influenza were reported in the European Union/European Economic Area. Sporadic cases were reported from Africa and Asia. Influenza viruses A(H1N1)v, A(H1N2)v, and A(H3N2)v of swine origin caused human cases in Switzerland and the United States. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Surveillance Report: Annual Epidemiological Report for 2017; Zoonotic Influenza
Source: European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Published: 2019. This five-page report is based on data on zoonotic influenza for 2017 retrieved from Epidemic Intelligence on May 18, 2018. No human cases of avian influenza were reported in the European Union/European Economic Area. Sporadic cases were reported from Africa and Asia. Influenza viruses A(H1N1)v, A(H1N2)v, and A(H3N2)v of swine origin caused human cases in Switzerland and the United States. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu Season Got Off to a Slow Start. But Now It ’s Widespread in Almost Half the Country
After a relatively slow start to flu season, influenza activity is now widespread in nearly half of U.S. states. Twenty-four states and Guam were reporting widespread influenza activity — meaning the virus has spread to many parts of the state, regardless of severity — as of Dec. 29, the latest date included in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) weekly flu report. Meanwhile, 19 states and New York City were reporting high levels of influenza-like illness activity, meaning a much higher-than-average proportion of doctor’s visits could be attributed to the flu. Nationally, about 4%...
Source: TIME: Health - January 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

FluMist Flopped for Kids During Recent Flu Seasons
(MedPage Today) -- Pooled data confirms vaccine's lower effectiveness, especially against H1N1 strain (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - January 7, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

WATCH: Conservative commentator Bre Payton dies shortly after flu diagnoses
In the wake of Payton's sudden death following a H1N1 flu and meningitis diagnosis, Dr. Edith Sanchez discusses how to protect yourself during flu season. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥18 Years Who Had an Influenza Vaccination in the Past 12 Months, by Diagnosed Diabetes Status and Age Group --- National Health Interview Survey, 2017
In 2017, among adults aged ≥18 years, those with a diagnosis of diabetes were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months than were those with a diagnosis of prediabetes (62.5% versus 56.1%); those with no diagnosed diabetes were the least likely to have had an influenza vaccination (40.1%). (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - December 13, 2018 Category: American Health Tags: Diabetes H1N1 Flu HIV/AIDS Influenza (Flu) Influenza Vaccination MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Zika Virus Tobacco Use Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Follow-Up on 11 Infants Born to Women with Evidence of Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy --- Los Angeles County, 2016
During 2016, 11 infants were born to women in Los Angeles County who met the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists case definition for confirmed (four infants) or probable (seven) Zika virus infection. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - December 13, 2018 Category: American Health Tags: H1N1 Flu HIV/AIDS Influenza (Flu) MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Zika Virus Tobacco Use Source Type: news

Influenza Activity --- United States, September 30--December 1, 2018
Influenza activity in the United States was low during October 2018, and, although it increased slowly during November, activity remains low across most of the country. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - December 13, 2018 Category: American Health Tags: H1N1 Flu HIV/AIDS Influenza (Flu) MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Tobacco Use Source Type: news

Most US Adults Have Not Gotten A Flu Shot For This Mild Season
(CNN) — Most US adults have not gotten a flu shot this season, according to a new survey from NORC, a research organization at the University of Chicago. As of mid-November, only 43% of surveyed people 18 or older said they had gotten vaccinated against the flu, according to NORC, which has conducted the National Immunization Survey for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since 2005. Another 14% who remain unvaccinated claim that they will get the shot, the survey indicates. Even if they do as they intend, that leaves considerably more than a third of adults (41%) who have not — and will not &mdas...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Flu Flu Shot Local TV Source Type: news

Compendium of Short Reports on Selected Outbreaks in the WHO (World Health Organization) African Region: 2016-2018
Source: World Health Organization, Regional Office for Africa. Published: 12/2018. This 96-page report is a collection of short reports on selected outbreaks that occurred in the World Health Organization (WHO) African Region between 2016 and 2018, and which were successfully controlled. This edition of the Compendium covers 19 outbreaks, which occurred in 15 countries, presented in chronological order. Outbreaks include Ebola virus disease in Democratic Republic of the Congo (Likati, May 2017), Marburg fever in Uganda, dengue fever in Senegal, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Mauritania, influenza A H1N1 in Ghana, Lass...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnant Women and Vaccines Against Emerging Epidemic Threats: Ethics Guidance for Preparedness, Research, and Response
Source: Wellcome Trust. Published: 9/2018. This 96-page guidance provides a roadmap for the ethically responsible, socially just, and respectful inclusion of the interests of pregnant women in the development and deployment of vaccines against emerging pathogens. It discusses how recent epidemics, including Zika virus, Lassa Fever, Ebola, and H1N1 influenza, have highlighted the ways in which infectious disease outbreaks can severely affect the health interests of pregnant women and their offspring. It specifies 22 concrete recommendations, organized around three key areas: public health preparedness, R&D, and vaccine...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Critical Role EMS Plays in Fighting the Flu
Influenza has been impacting public health on a global scale since the beginning of recorded history. Influenza, also known as the “flu,” has numerous organizations committed to public health research, developing vaccines, and educating on best practices to prepare for the upcoming flu season. By gaining an understanding of the flu through history, virology, and how it impacts our society, we can have a better appreciation for the commitment that’s involved with combating the flu. What Is Influenza (and What’s Not)? The eyes of an epidemiologist can twitch for a variety of reasons, one of them being...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - November 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Morgan K. Anderson, MPH Tags: Exclusive Articles Operations Source Type: news

Pandemrix Vax for 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Tied to More Adverse Events
(MedPage Today) -- But not enough information to establish causation (Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary)
Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary - September 21, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news