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Experts Concerned About Effectiveness Of This Year ’ s Flu Vaccine
(CNN) — Last year’s seasonal flu vaccine effectiveness was just 42%, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated. Even if vaccinated, people had inadequate protection against the flu. This limited effectiveness was due to a mutation that occurred in the influenza A (H3N2) vaccine strain, according to a study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This vaccine mutation resulted from an egg-based manufacturing process commonly used today. This year’s flu vaccine may also be imperfect, said Scott Hensley, author of the new study and an associate profe...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Flu Flu Vaccine Local TV Source Type: news

Potent peptidic fusion inhibitors of influenza virus
We report here on the design and structural characterization of potent peptidic inhibitors of influenza hemagglutinin. The peptide design was based on complementarity-determining region loops of human broadly neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (FI6v3 and CR9114). The optimized peptides exhibit nanomolar affinity and neutralization against influenza A group 1 viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and avian H5N1 strains. The peptide inhibitors bind to the highly conserved stem epitope and block the low pH–induced conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. These peptidic compounds ...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kadam, R. U., Juraszek, J., Brandenburg, B., Buyck, C., Schepens, W. B. G., Kesteleyn, B., Stoops, B., Vreeken, R. J., Vermond, J., Goutier, W., Tang, C., Vogels, R., Friesen, R. H. E., Goudsmit, J., van Dongen, M. J. P., Wilson, I. A. Tags: Biochemistry, Epidemiology r-articles Source Type: news

Swine flu may double risk for type 1 diabetes
Norwegians infected with the H1N1 influenza virus were twice as likely to develop type 1 diabetes, according to findings presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting.Healio (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 20, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Emergency Response and Recovery: Pandemic, Infectious Diseases, and Biological Hazards
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 08/28/2017 This Web page provides information and links about emergency response to pandemics and infectious diseases, specifically the 2016 Zika virus outbreak, and the 2009 H1N1 outbreak. It provides information about new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid funding to health departments in American Samoa, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Florida to help combat the Zika virus. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - September 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Study links swine flu to increased risk for type 1 diabetes
Young people who've been infected with the H1N1 swine flu virus may be at increased risk for type 1 diabetes, a new study suggests. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could Swine Flu Be Linked to Type 1 Diabetes?
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 13, 2017 -- Young people who've been infected with the H1N1 swine flu virus may be at increased risk for type 1 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from all the 2.28 million people aged 30 and younger in... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History
Join the National Library of Medicine, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) through a grant to Virginia Tech, for this exciting opportunity! On January 29-30, 2018, NLM will host Viral Networks: An Advanced Workshop in Digital Humanities and Medical History, bringing together scholars from various fields of medical history whose innovative research shows promise through the use of methods, tools, and data from the digital humanities. Viral Networks will combine a face-to-face workshop with structured virtual-editing activities to produce and advance the innovative scholarship of the participant...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Data Science Education News from NLM/NIH Technology Source Type: news

AAP: Still a'No' to FluMist for Upcoming Flu Season
(MedPage Today) -- This year's influenza A (H1N1) strain differs from 2016-2017 vaccine (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - September 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rs 50 lakh: What H1N1 costs some patients
An Alibaug family is staring at a hospital cost of more than Rs 25 lakh after their daughter needed over a month of intensive care to beat the virus. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Have Fun At the Fair, but Don't Pet the Pigs
Vet reminds fair-goers these animals can transmit swine flu Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Animal Diseases and Your Health, H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Myanmar H1N1 swine flu death toll rises to 10
YANGON (Reuters) - Four more people have died in an outbreak of H1N1 influenza in Myanmar, a health official said on Monday, taking the death toll in the latest outbreak to 10 as the government stepped up public awareness campaigns about the swine flu virus. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Myanmar tracks spread of H1N1 as outbreak claims sixth victim
YANGON (Reuters) - Six people have died in an outbreak of H1N1 influenza largely hitting Myanmar's biggest city, Yangon, a health official said on Thursday, amid government efforts to track the spread of the virus known as swine flu. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Myanmar officials say 3 die of swine flu
Health officials in Myanmar say the H1N1 virus, also known as swine flu, has killed three people out of 13 confirmed cases this month (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

H1N1 virus infects 13 in Myanmar, suspected of killing one
YANGON (Reuters) - Myanmar called for calm on Monday after 13 people were confirmed to have contracted H1N1 influenza and a boy had died with flu-like symptoms, raising fears of a new outbreak of a virus also known as swine flu. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Two H1N1 flu cases suspected at Myanmar hospital
YANGON (Reuters) - A hospital in Myanmar's biggest city, Yangon, is treating two patients suspected to have contracted H1N1 influenza, a doctor said on Monday, as the government began responding to a potential new outbreak of the virus known as swine flu. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

'Painless' flu vaccine skin patch shows promise
Conclusion Further testing in larger trials needs to be done to be sure these initial results hold true and that the vaccine patch is safe and effective. This is the first time these flu microneedle patches have been tested on humans, and the study was relatively small, with only 100 participants. But if the results are confirmed, this new method of delivering the flu vaccination could make a big difference. The patches could have several main advantages over traditional injections: they may be preferred by people who dislike needles and avoid vaccination because of the fear of pain it may be quicker and easier to admi...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Swine flu Source Type: news

Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccines Composition and Lot Release
Vaccine lot release information updated on 3/3/2010. (Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 31, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccines Descriptions and Ingredients
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 31, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Community Mitigation Guidelines to Prevent Pandemic Influenza-United States, 2017
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 04/21/2017 These guidelines, updated in April 2017, replace the 2007 Interim Pre-pandemic Planning Guidance: Community Strategy for Pandemic Influenza Mitigation in the United States-Early, Targeted, Layered Use of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions (NPIs). Several new elements have been incorporated into the 2017 guidelines, including to support updated recommendations on the use of NPIs, the latest scientific evidence available since the influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 pandemic has been added. A summary of lessons learned from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response is presented to underscore the...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Pandemic Alert: How Lessons From China Can Help Us Rethink Urgent Health Threats
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Frog slime could protect us against future flu epidemic
Conclusion This study has identified a substance in the mucus secreted by a south Indian frog which can kill certain types of flu virus. Researchers often turn to natural substances with known health-giving properties to find potential new drugs for humans. For example, aspirin was developed based on a compound found in willow bark – which had been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years. Some other drugs – such as some chemotherapy and anticlotting drugs – have also been developed from chemicals found in plants. By isolating the substances that have an effect the researchers can make sure...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

Disease Burden Growing as Vector Insects Adapt to Climate Change
Dry drains will reduce the numbers of mosquitoes breeding, but now the Aedes aegypti mosquito is going underground to breed underground in available water and flying to feed. Credit: Zadie Neufville/IPSBy Zadie NeufvilleKINGSTON, Jamaica, Apr 18 2017 (IPS)There were surprised gasps when University of the West Indies (UWI) Professor John Agard told journalists at an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) meeting in late November 2016 that mosquitoes were not only living longer, but were “breeding in septic tanks underground”.For many, it explained why months of fogging at the height of Zika and Chikung...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Zadie Neufville Tags: Caribbean Climate Wire Climate Change Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Projects Water & Sanitation Chagas Disease Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) mosquitoes Zika Virus Source Type: news

Narcolepsy More Prevalent in Influenza-vaccinated Youth in Norway Narcolepsy More Prevalent in Influenza-vaccinated Youth in Norway
Norwegian registry data confirm reports of an association between vaccination during the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic and subsequent development of narcolepsy in young people, according to researchers.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - March 31, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Novel drug delivery beats swine flu at gene level
Scientists have elaborated a new approach to deliver anti-viral RNAi to target cells against H1N1 influenza virus infection. Drug encapsulating via a combination of layer-by-layer technique and sol-gel chemistry allows beating swine flu at the gene level. The first test showed an 80% drop in virus protein synthesis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why flu shots fail even when the match is right
In 2009, two flu vaccines manufactured by the same company did not equally protect against the circulating H1N1 flu virus. A study published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine examines the question: Why did one vaccine offer 35% less protection against the flu? (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccines do work for pandemic flu
Vaccine against swine flu in 2009 prevented infections and hospitalisations Related items fromOnMedica Tamiflu reduced risk of death in H1N1 influenza pandemic Nasal spray flu vaccine for children proving effective Antenatal flu drugs not linked to newborn risks Flu jab linked to fewer hospitalisations World ‘not prepared’ for Zika and Ebola (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 13, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Dampened immunity during pregnancy promotes evolution of more virulent flu
During pregnancy, a mother's immune system is suppressed to protect the fetus, which is perceived as a foreign body because it is genetically different. A study in mice found that suppressed immunity during pregnancy creates a window of opportunity for the H1N1 influenza virus to infect the mother and to rapidly, within a few days, mutate into a more virulent strain. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 8, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dampened immunity during pregnancy promotes evolution of more virulent flu: Mouse study
(Cell Press) During pregnancy, a mother's immune system is suppressed to protect the fetus, which is perceived as a foreign body because it is genetically different. A study in mice found that suppressed immunity during pregnancy creates a window of opportunity for the H1N1 influenza virus to infect the mother and to rapidly, within a few days, mutate into a more virulent strain. The findings appear in Cell Host& Microbe on March 8. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 8, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

In a bad flu season, high-dose flu vaccine appeared better at preventing deaths in seniors
Older adults are at high risk for serious complications from flu and account for a majority of flu-related deaths and hospitalizations. H3N2 influenza viruses typically hit this age group particularly hard and have been associated with higher mortality than infections by H1N1 or influenza B viruses. During the 2012-2013 season, when H3N2 viruses were dominant, high-dose flu vaccine was 36 percent more effective at preventing deaths in the Medicare beneficiaries studied, compared to standard-dose vaccine. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In a bad flu season, high-dose flu vaccine appeared better at preventing deaths in seniors
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Older adults are at high risk for serious complications from flu and account for a majority of flu-related deaths and hospitalizations. H3N2 influenza viruses typically hit this age group particularly hard and have been associated with higher mortality than infections by H1N1 or influenza B viruses. During the 2012-2013 season, when H3N2 viruses were dominant, high-dose flu vaccine was 36 percent more effective at preventing deaths in the Medicare beneficiaries studied, compared to standard-dose vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medical allocations to persons with special needs during a bioterrorism event - Brannen DE, Branum M, Pawani S, Miller S, Bowman J, Clare T.
After the bioterrorism-anthrax attacks of 2001, public health officials were tasked with planning population-wide medicine dispensing. This planning started with assumptions and then evaluations of seasonal immunization clinics. Research on the 2009 H1N1 p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Emergency Preparedness: Influenza and Viruses
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 01/12/2017 This resource provides guidance for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services surveyors, providers, and suppliers for national preparedness on disease control, including outbreaks of viruses such as Ebola. Influenza such as the H1N1 pandemic, Zika virus, and other diseases have reemphasized the need for disease control, prevention, and preparedness. This page provides links to a variety of resources related to viruses and diseases that may assist providers and suppliers in their planning and preparedness. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medic...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Antivirals Underused for Children Hospitalized With Influenza Antivirals Underused for Children Hospitalized With Influenza
Antiviral medications are underused for children hospitalized with influenza, according to a study covering 46 children's hospitals during the 2007-2015 influenza seasons and the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Meet Anne Schuchat, The Pro-Vaccine Researcher Who Just Took Over The CDC
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can a flu shot wear off if you get it too early? Perhaps, scientists say
By Helen Branswell It can be jarring to see placards advertising "Flu Shots Today" in late July or early August in 80-degree weather. But those signs may be more than just an unwelcome reminder that summer's days are numbered. Mounting scientific evidence is raising questions about whether vaccinating people that early may actually be undermining the effectiveness of the nation's massive flu vaccination program. Studies from the US and Europe have detected a steady decline in vaccine protection in the months after vaccination. The most recent research, published just last month by scientists from the Centers f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

​CDC chief to resign day of Trump inauguration
Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Atlanta-based U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will hand in his resignation Jan. 20, the day of President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration, according to Reuters. Obama appointed Frieden, a former New York City health commissioner, in 2009. Frieden has since overseen worldwide outbreaks of the Ebola and Zika viruses. "We've dealt with Ebola, H1N1 influenza, MERS, fungal meningitis. We're dealing now with influenza and drug-resistant bacteria,"… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 5, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ellie Hensley Source Type: news

​CDC chief to resign day of Trump inauguration
Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Atlanta-based U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will hand in his resignation Jan. 20, the day of President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration, according to Reuters. Obama appointed Frieden, a former New York City health commissioner, in 2009. Frieden has since overseen worldwide outbreaks of the Ebola and Zika viruses. "We've dealt with Ebola, H1N1 influenza, MERS, fungal meningitis. We're dealing now with influenza and drug-resistant bacteria,"… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 5, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Ellie Hensley Source Type: news

First time flu infection may affect lifetime immunity
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

How to Steward Medical Countermeasures and Public Trust in an Emergency: A Communication Casebook for FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and Its Public Health Partners
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Center for Health Security. 11/07/2016 This 124-page casebook provides the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other officials who deliver public health information with real world-inspired opportunities for reflective learning on the principles of effective medical countermeasure (MCM) emergency communication. It examines communication dilemmas about MCMs in the context of the 2015-215 Ebola outbreak, 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, 2009-10 H1N1 influenza pandemic, and 2001 anthrax letter attacks, recommending specific action items for the FDA to help mitigate comparable i...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

How to Steward Medical Countermeasures and Public Trust in an Emergency
This casebook provides the FDA and other officials who deliver public health information with real world inspired opportunities for reflective learning on the principles of effective MCM emergency communication. The casebook critically examined communication dilemmas about MCMs in the context of the 2015-215 Ebola outbreak, the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, the 2009-10 H1N1 influenza pandemic, and the 2001 anthrax letter attacks, recommending specific action items for the FDA to help mitigate comparable issues in the future. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - November 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Zika's Rapid Rise and the Limp Global Response Reveal Dire Global Health Challenges
With cases rising in Florida, Singapore, Vietnam and Trinidad and Tobago, the Zika virus pandemic is raising public concern in regions across the globe, including the U.S., where about 80 percent of Americans are aware of it but only 40 percent understand how it is actually transmitted. This raises a host of questions not only about the clinical and epidemiological scope of the outbreak, but also about the ability of citizens, public health authorities and politicians at all levels to adequately deal with it.  So far, the response has been slow and the challenge remains serious and unpredictable. We need to understand...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Swine Flu Vaccine Safe in Early Pregnancy Swine Flu Vaccine Safe in Early Pregnancy
Population-based study is the first to compare outcomes in exposed, unexposed siblings and finds no increased risk for birth defects associated with the H1N1 vaccine.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

H1N1'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk
Swedish study finds that babies born to women who got the shot had no overall higher odds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Birth Defects, H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu), Immunization (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H1N1 'Swine Flu' vaccine unlikely to raise birth defect risk
HealthDay News Swedish researchers report that the vaccine against the H1N1 " swine flu " strain of influenza doesn't seem to have a link to birth defects. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H1N1 'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk
Swedish study finds that babies born to women who got the shot had no overall higher odds (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H1N1 Vaccine in Pregnancy: No Increase in Overall Congenital Malformations (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD Receipt of the H1N1 influenza vaccine during pregnancy is not associated with increased risk for overall congenital malformations in offspring, according to an … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - September 19, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

H1N1'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk
MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 -- Swedish researchers report that the vaccine against the H1N1 " swine flu " strain of influenza doesn't seem to have a link to birth defects. One obstetrician who reviewed the research said the findings should ease concerns... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 19, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Contraceptive pills not proven to protect against the flu
Conclusion These are interesting scientific findings but they have limited implications. Animal studies are useful for giving an indication of how biological processes may work in humans but we're not identical. Then the scenarios tested here – the progesterone, or the flu injection – can be taken as representative of real-life in humans. For one thing all the mice had surgery to remove their ovaries before being infected. It makes sense that the mice that had been given some additional recovery boost in the form of hormone replacement may have been in a better health state than those left hormone deplete...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

[Perspective] Zika vaccine trials
Promising data for candidate vaccines against Zika virus infection reported by Abbink et al. (1) on page 1129 of this issue raise hopes that one or more Zika virus vaccines may soon be ready for efficacy trials. Recent years have seen a barrage of emerging infectious diseases, including those caused by new pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus, and those that are newly salient because of increased geographic spread, higher incidence, or genetic change, such as influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, Ebola virus, and Zika virus. Developing effective vaccines is a central goal for such pathogens. Authors: Mar...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 8, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Marc Lipsitch Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: news

How Effective is Oseltamivir?
Discussion Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) is an oral neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza viruses types A and B. It first came on the market in Switzerland in 1999 and currently is used around the world along with other neuraminidase inhibitors to treat seasonal and pandemic influenza. Oseltamivir is easily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and circulates to the liver where it is converted to its active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC). In adults approximately 75% of the oral medication is converted and it then travels to the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Unchanged oseltamivir is eliminated in the urine. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 5, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news