Crisis standards of care implementation at the state level in the United States - Margus C, Sarin RR, Molloy M, Ciottone GR.
INTRODUCTION: In 2009, the Institute of Medicine published guidelines for implementation of Crisis Standards of Care (CSC) at the state level in the United States (US). Based in part on the then concern for H1N1 pandemic, there was a recognized need for ad... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Why COVID-19 Vaccines Need to Prioritize ‘ Superspreaders ’
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Why COVID-19 Vaccines Need to Prioritize ‘Superspreaders’ appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health COVID-19 Source Type: news

Maternal H1N1 Flu Vaccination Not Linked to Autism in Offspring
Prenatal exposure not associated with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, autistic disorder (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - September 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Infections, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Nursing, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

Maternal H1N1 Flu Vaccination Not Linked to Autism in Offspring
TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2020 -- Maternal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination during pregnancy is not associated with risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in offspring, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in the Annals of Internal... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 1, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Trump Undermines WHO, UN System
By Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Anis ChowdhuryKUALA LUMPUR and SYDNEY, Sep 1 2020 (IPS) After accusing the World Health Organization (WHO) of pro-China bias, President Donald Trump announced US withdrawal from the UN agency. Although the US created the UN system for the post-Second World War new international order, Washington has often had to struggle in recent decades to ensure that it continues to serve changing US interests. Jomo Kwame Sundaram Invisible virus trumps POTUS In early July, Washington gave the required one-year notice officially advising the UN of its intention to withdraw from the WHO, created by the US as t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Anis Chowdhury Tags: Crime & Justice Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies North America TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Leading in Time of COVID: A True Test of Leadership
By Folake OlayinkaAug 15 2020 (IPS) In 1918, the Spanish Flu, a deadly influenza caused by the H1N1 virus, decimated the world. Over the course of four successive waves, it infected 500 million people, about a third of the world’s population at the time, resulting in 50 million deaths. More recently between 2014 and mid-2016 , the Ebola virus epidemic was the most widespread outbreak of Ebola virus disease in history—causing devastating  loss of life and socioeconomic disruption in the West Africa region, mainly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. These outbreaks, as well as SARS and MERS, each have ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Folake Olayinka Tags: Democracy Headlines Health Source Type: news

Excess Mortality During Peak of 1918 Flu Similar to COVID - 19 in NYC
Incidence rate ratio for all - cause mortality 0.70 during peak of 1918 H1N1 flu, early COVID - 19 (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - August 14, 2020 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Family Medicine, Infections, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, Pathology, Pediatrics, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Excess Mortality During Peak of 1918 Flu Similar to COVID-19 in NYC
FRIDAY, Aug. 14, 2020 -- Excess mortality during the peak of the 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic was comparable to that seen early in the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak in New York City, according to a research letter published online Aug. 13 in JAMA... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What We Learned About Paid Sick Leave in the U.S. From the H1N1 Outbreak
The last time the U.S. experienced a pandemic, advice to working Americans was similar to the message officials are sharing today—stay home. Similar to today’s COVID-19 outbreak, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic laid bare issues of inequality in the U.S., including disparities in paid sick leave. In 2009, the federal government did not have a federal paid sick leave policy, and it still doesn’t today, forcing U.S. workers to make the impossible choice between financial and personal health. But there are important lessons we can learn from the past, says Keshia Pollack Porter, director of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg...
Source: TIME: Health - August 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized Brief COVID-19 News Desk Source Type: news

Inside the Global Quest to Trace the Origins of COVID-19 —and Predict Where It Will Go Next
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Yuxi, Yunnan and Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

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Chinese researchers have discovered a new type of virus in pigs that can infect humans and is capable of causing a pandemic, according to a new study. The disease, which researchers called the G4 virus, is genetically descended from the H1N1 swine flu. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Say New Strain of Swine Flu Virus Is Spreading to Humans in China
A new study warns that the strain of H1N1, common on China ’s pig farms since 2016, should be “urgently” controlled to avoid another pandemic. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mike Ives Tags: China Pigs Swine Influenza Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Source Type: news

New Swine Flu Poses Possible Pandemic Risk
The G4 virus is genetically descended from the H1N1 swine flu that caused a pandemic in 2009, CNN reported. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - June 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New swine flu with pandemic potential identified by China researchers
G4 strain has already infected 10% of industry ’s workers in China but no evidence yet that it can be passed from human to humanResearchers in China have discovered a new type of swine flu that is capable of triggering a pandemic, according to a study in the US science journal PNAS, although experts said there is no imminent threat.Named G4, it is genetically descended from the H1N1 strain that caused a pandemic in 2009.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Swine flu World news Health China Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Builds on Pandemic Flu Plan COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Builds on Pandemic Flu Plan
Developing a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and distribution plan is an'insurmountable task'but can be done with timely planning that builds on lessons learned during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines - June 26, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Homeless people are more likely to be put on ventilators for respiratory infections than non-homeless
FINDINGSResearchers from UCLA, Harvard Medical School and the University of Tokyo found that during   a recent six-year period, homeless people in New York state were more likely to hospitalized and treated with mechanical ventilators for respiratory infections than people who are not homeless.Of 20,000 patients hospitalized for influenza at 214 New York hospitals between 2007 and 2012, the study found,  6.4% were homeless, and nearly all of the homeless people were seen in just 10 of the hospitals. The gap between homeless and non-homeless hospitalizations was particularly wide during 2009’s H1N1 infl...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

H1N1 Fast Facts
Read Fast Facts from CNN about the H1N1 influenza virus, also known as swine flu. There was a global outbreak which lasted from 2009 to 2010. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DoD Funds Clinical Trial of Seraph Blood Filter to Treat COVID-19
The Department of Defense is funding a clinical trial of a COVID-19 treatment using ExThera Medical’s Seraph 100 Blood filter. The device was selected to be in the multi-center randomized clinical trial because it showed encouraging preliminary results in critically ill COVID-19 patients at a military hospital in the U.S. and 14 other hospitals in Europe. Investigators at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda will run the trial of the Martinez, CA-based company’s device. Initial reports indicate Seraph 100 stabilizes blood pressure and inflammatory biomarkers that correlate with ...
Source: MDDI - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: COVID-19 Business Source Type: news

‘We Know What Is Best for Us.’ Indigenous Groups Around the World Are Taking COVID-19 Responses Into Their Own Hands
When Eric Freeland, 34, started coughing at the end of March, he didn’t think much of it. But when his symptoms grew worse, Freeland’s mother began to worry. Freeland is a Native American living with his family in the Navajo Nation in the southwestern U.S., where access to healthcare is limited. He is also diabetic, putting him at greater risk to the coronavirus. When Freeland’s breathing became short and stuttered, his mother drove him to the nearest hospital where within minutes of arriving, he lost consciousness. He awoke three weeks later, hooked up to a ventilator, from a medically induced coma. &l...
Source: TIME: Health - May 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mélissa Godin Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news

Politics, Profits Undermine Public Interest in Covid-19 Vaccine Race
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, May 26 2020 (IPS) With well over five million Covid-19 infections worldwide, and deaths exceeding 340,000, the race for an effective vaccine has accelerated since the SARS-Cov-2 virus was first identified as the culprit. Expecting to score politically from being ‘first’ to have a vaccine, US President Trump’s Operation Warp Speed promises to get 300 million doses to Americans by January, after the November polls, following several failed attempts to monopolize vaccines being developed by European companies. Anis Chowdhury More than 115 vac...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

COVID-19 Severity in Pregnancy Appears Lower Than H1N1
Single case reports describe harrowing births and outcomes for women with COVID-19, but preliminary data suggest that overall, pregnant women do as well as the general public when it comes to COVID-19. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

COVID-19 Severity in Pregnancy Appears Lower Than H1N1 COVID-19 Severity in Pregnancy Appears Lower Than H1N1
Single case reports describe harrowing births and outcomes for women with COVID-19, but preliminary data suggest that overall, pregnant women do as well as the general public when it comes to COVID-19.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - May 19, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

There Isn ’t a COVID-19 Vaccine Yet. But Some Are Already Skeptical About It
Amid the American flags, “Make America Great Again” hats and “freedom is essential” posters appearing at recent protests against coronavirus lockdowns in Sacramento, Calif., another familiar slogan has materialized: “We do not consent.” It’s long been a popular rallying cry among antivaccine activists, who claim without evidence that vaccines cause autism or other conditions. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, those activists have become intertwined with demonstrators who want businesses to reopen despite public health experts’ warnings. Offline, the “anti-vaxxers&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Lessons learned during H1N1 guide Ottawa's response to COVID-19 in First Nations
The federal government is looking to hire paramedics who can fly up to remote First Nations in case there’s a surge of COVID-19 cases, and officials say it’s evidence of a different approach to Indigenous health care than during the H1N1 outbreak. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news

Pediatric coronavirus disease (COVID-19) x-ray, CT in review of new lung disorders
(American Roentgen Ray Society) Although the clinical symptoms of SARS, H1N1, MERS, EVALI, and COVID-19 may be nonspecific, some characteristic imaging findings are emerging, says the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). Careful evaluation of the distribution, lung zone preference, and symmetry of the abnormalities with an eye for a few unique differentiating imaging features can allow radiologists to offer a narrower differential diagnosis in pediatric patients, leading to optimal patient care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Beat the Common Cold
Researchers in Canada and China are testing a powerful immune booster that provides broad-spectrum protection against the common cold and a number of viruses including SARS, Ebola and H1N1. They’re currently running clinical trials to prove its effectiveness against coronavirus. I’m talking about quercetin – a powerful antioxidant that is already available as a supplement. Previous research shows that quercetin’s antiviral capacity works in three ways. Quercetin can: Stop the virus from infecting cells Reduce the reproduction of cells that are already infected And reduce infected cells resistance t...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 6, 2020 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr.A.Sears Tags: Health Source Type: news

Strong Data Systems Are Crucial during Coronavirus
By Katherine Seaton, Editorial OfficerMay 04, 2020Data systems are crucial for health care all the time, but during a natural disaster, war, or pandemic like COVID-19, functioning data systems can mean the difference between life and death.Data help us know what the health needs are, what capabilities each nearby hospital and clinic has, and where health workers should be deployed. Essential for responding to a pandemic, these data help monitor the spread and intensity of disease and help everyone, not just health workers, understand its severity and impact on society.If the systems are operating smoothly, we don’t...
Source: IntraHealth International - May 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Digital Health Health Workforce & Systems Source Type: news

New Acquisition Could Give Abiomed Access to Help COVID-19 Patients
Abiomed, maker of the Impella heart pump, could have the chance to reach some COVID-19 patients with its latest acquisition. The Danvers, MA-based company said it acquired Breethe, a developer of an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system for an undisclosed sum. Breethe has applied for a 510K clearance of the ECMO system. The Baltimore, MD-based company’s technology has the potential to serve the needs of patients whose lungs can longer provide sufficient oxygenation, including patients suffering from cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest or respiratory failure such as due to ARDS, H1N1, SARS, or COVID-19....
Source: MDDI - May 1, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: COVID-19 Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Factors that influence whether healthcare workers follow infection prevention and control guidelines for respiratory infectious diseases
Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new respiratory infectious disease that has spread quickly throughout the world. Healthcare workers treating patients with COVID-19 are at risk of infection themselves through droplets from coughs, sneezes or other body fluids from infected patients and contaminated surfaces.This review is one of a series of rapid reviews that Cochrane contributors have prepared to inform the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this Cochrane review of qualitative research ( “qualitative evidence synthesis”) is to explore factors that influence whether healthcare workers follow infection prevention and...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 20, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

We Need to Rethink Our Food System to Prevent the Next Pandemic
Once a dangerous new pathogen is out, as we are seeing, it can be difficult if not impossible to prevent it going global. One as contagious as SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to infect the whole of humanity. Eighty per cent of cases may be benign, but with such a large pool of susceptible hosts, the numbers who experience severe illness and die can still be shockingly high. So the only sensible answer to the question, how do we stop this from happening again, is: by doing all we can to prevent such pathogens infecting humans in the first place. And that means taking a long, hard look at our relationship with the natural world...
Source: TIME: Health - April 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Seasonal Human Influenza A(H3N2) and Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Reassortant Infection - Idaho, 2019
This report describes CDC's first detection of this type of seasonal human influenza A(H3N2) and influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 reassortment. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - April 9, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: H1N1 Flu H3N2v Influenza MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Source Type: news

Coronavirus developments: JoCo's first test kits | Stimulus check benefit | Gun sales are booming
Nationwide, COVID-19 has now killed more people in five weeks than H1N1 did from April 2009 to April 2010, The Kansas City Star reports. To date, 12,722 people have died in the U.S. from COVID-19, which is the disease caused by a strain of coronavirus. Missouri reported 315 new COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in the state to 3,037. According to the Star, 53 people have died. In Kansas, 27 people have died and 900 people have tested positive for COVID-19,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Leslie Collins Source Type: news

COVID-19: Can We Really Learn from Past Outbreaks?
Source: Johns Hopkins University. Published: 4/8/2020. This 45-minute webinar, part of the COVID-19 and Humanitarian Settings series, features panelists who discuss various lessons emerging from past global outbreaks of infectious disease through multiple perspectives and disciplines. From severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2005, to H1N1 in 2009, to the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, each major outbreak has marked a milestone in the history of infectious diseases. They discuss what information has surfaced from these challenges to inform efforts to strengthen governance and response in today ’s COVID...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Photos from the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic
After World War I, something much more deadly arrived on America's shores: the H1N1 influenza virus, known as the Spanish flu. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus: Country Comparisons are Pointless Unless We Account for These Biases in Testing
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Coronavirus: Country Comparisons are Pointless Unless We Account for These Biases in Testing appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Coronavirus Source Type: news

Letters to the Editor: Where was Congress after SARS, H1N1 and other disease outbreaks?
Members of Congress cannot pretend that the COVID-19 pandemic came out of nowhere. Why wasn't our federal government prepared? (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - April 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Confronting COVID-19: My Experience On The Front Line
I was on the front lines for AIDS, SARS, MERS, H1N1, GHB, bioterror, designer drugs, disasters, and mass shootings. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 2, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Richard Klasco, Contributor Source Type: news

The Doc Leading San Diego County's'Decisive' COVID-19 Response The Doc Leading San Diego County's'Decisive' COVID-19 Response
Dr George Yphantides knows first-hand the grim effects of a pandemic, having lost his father to the H1N1 swine flu onset in 2009. Now, the San Diego County CMO is tackling coronavirus head-on.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Deep learning helps CT better quantify COVID-19
Conclusions […..............We demonstrate the anti-IAV activity of WEPO [Portulaca] and strongly recommend the use of WEPO, as an herbal regimen, to prevent and treat H1N1 infection at an early stage]   Advice to my patients:   If you wish you can use portulaca [as mother tincture in wintertime as it grows only as avegetable during the summer months]   Take 30-40 drops if you have/ had a flu, on top of everything else you are doing. [children: 1 year 1/4 dose,3 years 1/3 dose.7 years 1/2 dose,13 years 3/4 dose, between these ages interpolate, anyhow Portulaca is not toxic] Don't take in pregnancy wit...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 2, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Ethical Standards for Research During Public Health Emergencies: Distilling Existing Guidance to Support COVID-19 R & D
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 4/2020. Since the 2003 outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic, and the 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, authoritative guidance has been produced on how to conduct ethical research during emergencies. To ensure ethical research during the COVID-19 outbreak, this four-page document summarizes the key universal ethical standards. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 Death Rate Drops, Still Deadly to Seniors
The infection is still much deadlier than the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic, and the risk rises sharply with age, the researchers say. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H1N1 hit northern Manitoba First Nations hard — some worry COVID-19 will do the same
Leaders in some crowded remote Manitoba First Nations are worried about the potential rapid spread of the coronavirus in their communities, which don't have proper access to clean water. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news

You ’ve Tested Positive for COVID-19. Who Has a Right to Know?
A novel social ritual is emerging along with the novel coronavirus: sharing the news that one has COVID-19. Actor Tom Hanks did it on Twitter with folksy fatalism and a promise that he and his wife, actor Rita Wilson, who also tested positive, would follow the advice of medical professionals. Actor Daniel Dae Kim did it in a lengthy straight-to-camera video, which included admonishments against Asian-American racism that has spread along with the virus. Non-celebrities have shared stories through interviews and social media, including oxygen-tank selfies. As the number of confirmed cases mounts, along with the likelihood ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katy Steinmetz Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

You ’ve Tested Positive for COVID-19. Who Has a Right to Know?
A novel social ritual is emerging along with the novel coronavirus: sharing the news that one has COVID-19. Actor Tom Hanks did it on Twitter with folksy fatalism and a promise that he and his wife, actor Rita Wilson, who also tested positive, would follow the advice of medical professionals. Actor Daniel Dae Kim did it in a lengthy straight-to-camera video, which included admonishments against Asian-American racism that has spread along with the virus. Non-celebrities have shared stories through interviews and social media, including oxygen-tank selfies. As the number of confirmed cases mounts, along with the likelihood ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katy Steinmetz Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Blood Plasma Treatment for Coronavirus Set to Get Its First Trial Run in New York
The New York Blood Center (NYBC) is the first blood-gathering organization in the U.S. to collect plasma from COVID-19 patients to use as a possible treatment for the disease. Before antibiotics rendered the practice moot, it was common to treat infectious bacterial diseases by infusing the blood of recovered patients into those struggling with infection. That approach has also been tried against viral infections like H1N1 influenza, SARS and MERS, with inconsistent success. Some patients benefited, but other did not and doctors don’t have a clear understanding of why. But during an evolving pandemic like COVID-19, p...
Source: TIME: Health - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Clinical Guidance and Coronavirus: Deploying a Mass Casualty Mindset to Stay Ahead of “The Curve”
Source: World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM). Published: 3/24/2020. This one-hour, 25-minute webinar provides clear and concrete clinical applications of the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 guidelines, as well as those of various emergency management/critical care professional societies for front-line practitioners. It examines lessons learned from the Ebola, SARS, H1N1, H5N1, and MERS outbreaks; Las Vegas Shooting; and Military Mass Casualty Management. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Transportation and COVID-19 – Practices from Other Disease Outbreaks
Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Transportation Research Board (TRB). Published: 3/23/2020. This one-hour, 31-minute webinar identifies a holistic approach that transportation and health agencies may take to contain and manage the COVID-19 outbreak. Presenters discussed their experiences with other outbreaks such as H1N1 (2009 – a.k.a. “swine flu”) and avian influenza. They identified challenges COVID-19 has presented in their transportation systems and what their agencies are doing to adapt and mitigate risks for those at greatest risk of contracting the illness. (Vide...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pandemic Preparedness in the Workplace and the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Published: 3/21/2020. This technical assistance document provides information about Titles I and V of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act and pandemic planning in the workplace. It was originally issued in 2009, during the spread of H1N1 virus, and has been re-issued on March 21, 2020, to incorporate updates regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. It identifies established ADA principles that are relevant to questions frequently asked about workplace pandemic planning. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disa...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - March 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC: Child deaths from flu highest since 2009
More children across the United States have died from the flu so far this winter than in any year since the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, the the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news