Experts question industry-funded study showing benefits of Tamiflu
Meta-analysis shows it shortens symptom duration and curbs complication riskRelated items from OnMedicaDrug giant agrees to release all Tamiflu trial dataSpending watchdog criticises government over TamifluClinical confirmation of H7N9 virus resistance to TamifluTamiflu reduced risk of death in H1N1 influenza pandemicExperts call for Tamiflu use to be reviewed (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 30, 2015 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Could brain protein help people 'sleep off' the flu?
Conclusion This complex study suggests the AcPb protein is playing a role in regulating normal sleep and the response to flu infection in mice. At this stage, the implications of this research for humans are unclear, as differences between the species may mean the results would not be exactly the same in humans. While The Telegraph suggests this "could finally lead to an effective treatment for the [flu], which until now has eluded experts", we are a long way off knowing whether this is the case. What the researchers have shown – in mice – is if you remove this protein, mice don...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Medication Heart/lungs Swine flu Source Type: news

H1N1 Swine Flu Fatal Cluster and Spread In Libya
The commentary discusses the H1N1pdm09 cases in Tripoli and Tobruk, Libya. (12/29/14 02:15) (Source: Recombinomics)
Source: Recombinomics - December 29, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Emergency Department Visits and Hospital Inpatient Stays for Seasonal and 2009 H1N1 Influenza, 2008-2009
Compares ED visits and hospitalizations for influenza in a typical year, 2008, with 2009's H1N1 pandemic. Includes data by location of the patient's residence, for urban and rural areas. -- Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (Source: Rural publications via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Rural publications via the Rural Assistance Center - December 10, 2014 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Pregnant Egyptian woman dies of H1N1 swine flu: health ministry
CAIRO (Reuters) - An Egyptian woman who was six months pregnant has died of H1N1 swine flu, five days after being admitted to hospital, a health ministry spokesman said on Sunday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

ACIP: LAIV Preferential Use Recommendation to Be Reviewed Further
Participants at the Oct. 29-30 meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices reviewed data suggesting the live attenuated influenza vaccine was not effective against the influenza A (H1N1) virus in children during the 2013-14 flu season. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - November 10, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Donna Altenpohl on Ebola
Ebola response is a model of collaboration The constant stream of photos and reports about Ebola from West Africa tragically illustrate the speed at which disease can spread, devastating communities and reshaping daily life. GSK is working with many partners at an unprecedented speed and with passionate focus to try to develop a vaccine to limit the total number of deaths from this epidemic and future outbreaks. While the current crisis is our focus, there also are lessons for the future: US health and security can be threatened by events half a world away and the global community is not fully prepared for such disease out...
Source: PHRMA - October 30, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Emily Source Type: news

Living With a Degree of Risk: Time for Action at Home
(Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What I Am Really Afraid of... And It's Not Ebola
The Ebola epidemic, like SARS, MERS, and H1N1 before it, shines a sudden and intense spotlight on the public health system. From our highest ranking government officials to the frontline workers who are responsible for disinfecting homes and interviewing contacts, every decision, action, and outcome is scrutinized and criticized. Under normal circumstances, the public health system is working to ensure that the places we live, work, and play are safe and that we are generally free to go about our lives without worrying that we'll get sick from the food we eat or the water we drink. When there is an infectious disease ou...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New viral mutation made middle-aged adults more susceptible to last year's flu
A possible explanation for why middle-aged adults were hit especially hard by the H1N1 influenza virus during the 2013-2014 influenza season has been uncovered by scientists. Their findings offer evidence that a new mutation in H1N1 viruses potentially led to more disease in these individuals. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 21, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

New viral mutation made middle-aged adults more susceptible to last year's flu
(The Wistar Institute) A team of scientists, led by researchers at The Wistar Institute, has identified a possible explanation for why middle-aged adults were hit especially hard by the H1N1 influenza virus during the 2013-2014 influenza season. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offer evidence that a new mutation in H1N1 viruses potentially led to more disease in these individuals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 21, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to Protect Pregnant Women From the FluHow to Protect Pregnant Women From the Flu
Dr Rasmussen is coauthor of a new editorial published in NEJM that reviews lessons learned from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. CDC Expert Commentary (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - October 10, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health Expert Interview Source Type: news

Vaccination, Early Flu Treatment Critical for Pregnant WomenVaccination, Early Flu Treatment Critical for Pregnant Women
Pregnant women who developed 2009 H1N1 influenza were sicker and their infants had worse outcomes, an analysis of data from the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and the 2013-2014 flu season has shown. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

TGen and NAU patent for new pandemic flu test is approved
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) The federal government has awarded a patent to the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Northern Arizona University (NAU) for a test that can detect -- and assist in the treatment of -- the H1N1 pandemic flu strain. TGen and NAU initially developed this precise, genomics-based test during a significant global swine flu outbreak in 2009. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Virological penicillin': Plant MIR2911 directly targets influenza A viruses
(Nanjing University School of Life Sciences) In a new study, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University present an extremely novel finding that a plant microRNA, MIR2911, which is enriched in honeysuckle, directly targets influenza A viruses (IAV) including H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9. Drinking of honeysuckle soup can prevent IAV infection and reduce H5N1-induced mice death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Collaboration needed to wipe out rabies
Medics and vets must work together on preventionRelated items from OnMedicaCoronavirus ‘not yet reached pandemic potential’Tamiflu reduced risk of death in H1N1 influenza pandemicUN describes Ebola as ‘threat to peace and security’Global effort to fight Ebola threat - stepped upMore investment needed to prevent new pandemics (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 29, 2014 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

US ready for a pandemic? Investigation says no
A federal investigation has found that the DHS is totally "ill-prepared" for something like the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic -- or something worse, such as a global Ebola outbreak or the 1918 flu pandemic that killed an estimated 21.5 million people, according to a report released by the Office of the Inspector General on Monday. (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - September 9, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What is Gianotti-Crosti Syndrome?
Discussion Infectious exanthams are usually considered when rashes are bilateral, symmetric and relatively widespread. They usually involve the trunk too and have associated systemic symptoms. Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (GCS) or acropapular dermatitis of childhood is often misdiagnosed because it doesn’t follow these rules. A discussion of common viral exanthams can be reviewed here and a differential diagnosis of rashes by pattern and distributions can be reviewed here. Dr. Ferdinando Gianotti came from a poor family, underwent several personal tragedies, but entered medicine and created the first department of pedia...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 8, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

WSU flu outbreak provides rare study material
(Washington State University) Five years ago this month, one of the first US outbreaks of the H1N1 virus swept through the Washington State University campus, striking some 2,000 people. A university math and biology professor has used a trove of data gathered at the time to gain insight into how only a few infected people could launch the virus's rapid spread across the university community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 26, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Watch a Science Cop Take on Donald Trump
The Ebola outbreak that is causing such fear and suffering in Africa is a very real and very deadly thing. But the fact is that the nature of the Ebola virus is such that it stands a very low chance of ever causing a pandemic like AIDS or H1N1. That hasn’t stopped America’s great foghorn—Donald Trump—and others like him from spreading all kinds of misinformation about the disease, warning people that patients should not be brought to the U.S. and that flights from West Africa should be stopped, otherwise we face an American epidemic. But Trump and his ilk are committing a science crime—the cri...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Lester Tags: Uncategorized Disease global health Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Scientists retract narcolepsy study linked to GSK vaccine
LONDON (Reuters - Scientists who believed they had started to decipher links between a GlaxoSmithKline H1N1 pandemic flu vaccine and the sleep disorder narcolepsy have retracted a study after saying they cannot replicate their findings. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

US scientist Professor Yoshihiro Kawaoka's mutated H1N1 flu virus 'poses a threat to human population if it should escape,' says critic
One of the world’s leading vaccine experts has questioned the scientific rationale behind controversial research on the 2009 strain of pandemic flu virus undertaken by Professor Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - July 6, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Controversial American scientist Yoshihiro Kawaoka criticised over safety levels of research into pandemic H1N1 flu virus
Senior scientists have criticised an American university for allowing controversial research on enhancing a pandemic strain of flu virus to be undertaken in a laboratory with a relatively low level of biosecurity. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - July 2, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Scientist recreates H1N1 flu virus RESISTANT to vaccine
Dr Yoshihiro Kawaoka, professor of virology at University of Wisconsin at Madison, has tweaked the 2009 strain of pandemic influenza to make it resistant the human immune system's antibodies. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 2, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New analysis of 'swine flu' pandemic conflicts with accepted views on how diseases spread
(University of Cambridge) New analysis of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in the US shows that the pandemic wave was surprisingly slow, and that its spread was likely accelerated by school-age children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 1, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FDA Approval Pushes Novartis Into 21st Century Vaccine Development
In 2009, the world experienced a global threat in the form of H1N1. Despite a prompt response to the need for a vaccine in the United States, it was still not available until six months later and not enough doses were even produced to cover all Americans. During the year-long battle with the deadly virus, the CDC estimates between 8,870 and 18,300 people died due to H1N1-related complications. In the world of influenza vaccine production using chicken eggs, the response experienced during the H1N1 outbreak is not uncommon. Is this the best our industry can do? At the 2013 ISPE Biotechnology Symposium, Scott Billman, direc...
Source: Pharmaceutical Online News - June 18, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What Are Precautions for Someone Traveling to the Middle East About the Risk of MERS?
Discussion Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a respiratory illness cause by a coronavirus called MERS-CoV. It was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. People with confirmed cases of MERS have developed severe respiratory illness that includes acute onset of cough, shortness of breath, and fever. Other symptoms include gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea. Pneumonia is common, and patients may progress to respiratory failure. Other end organ failure has occurred, particularly kidney failure and septic shock. The death rate is up to ~30% currently. People with compromised immune systems are more at risk. T...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 16, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

A Brief Introduction to Influenza A Virus in Swine
Influenza A viruses (IAV) of the Orthomyxoviridae virus family cause one of the most important respiratory diseases in pigs as well as humans. Repeated outbreaks and rapid spread of genetically and antigenically distinct IAVs represent a considerable challenge for animal production and public health. This overlap between human and animal health is a prime example of the “One Health” concept. Although only subtypes of H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 are endemic in swine around the world, considerable diversity can be found not only in the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes, but in the other 6 genes as well. Hu...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - June 6, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flu Season Wrap-Up: Less Illness and Death than Last Season (FREE)
By Cara Adler Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH, and William E. Chavey, MD, MS Influenza A H1N1 viruses predominated during this past flu season for the first time since the … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - June 6, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

People Under 65 Hard Hit by Flu This Year
H1N1 strain predominated in season that peaked early; CDC recommends inclusion of H1N1 in next year's vaccine Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Flu, H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MeSH On Demand
This article had previously been indexed for MEDLINE with the following MeSH terms: Clinical Pharmacy Information Systems/standards* Data Display Decision Support Systems, Clinical/standards* Group Processes Hospitals, Teaching Humans Medication Errors/statistics & numerical data* Medication Systems, Hospital* Questionnaires Risk Assessment User-Computer Interface MeSH on Demand meanwhile came up with the following after processing the article abstract:  Anti-Bacterial Agents  Focus Groups  Hospitals, Teaching  Humans  Internship and Residency  Male  Medical Errors  Medical Or...
Source: Dragonfly - May 29, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Mahria Lebow Tags: News from NLM Technology Source Type: news

Vaccine dangers: The facts don't lie
(NaturalNews) Do you remember the 2009 "Swine Flu Pandemic" - which supposedly threatened millions of unvaccinated people? Naturally, if we ask the pharmaceutical industry, the Swine Flu vaccination campaign was a 'huge success'. Unfortunately, according to the National 2009 H1N1... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Earlier Vaccination in Flu Pandemic Would Save Lives and Dollars (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman In a severe flu pandemic, vaccinating individuals by 4 to 6 months into the pandemic — rather than by 9 months, as seen in the 2009 H1N1 pandemic — is necessary to … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 20, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Tamiflu: drugs given for swine flu 'were waste of £500m'
Drug Tamiflu does nothing to halt the spread of influenza and Government wasted nearly £500?million stockpiling it over swine flu pandemic, study finds (Source: The Telegraph : Swine Flu A H1N1)
Source: The Telegraph : Swine Flu A H1N1 - May 13, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: influenza drugs pandemic tamiflu swine flu Source Type: news

Solving the Mystery Flu That Killed 50 Million People
MoreCalifornia Bill Banning ‘Affluenza’ Defense Is Nixed7 Ebola Patients in Guinea Fight Off the Disease4 Diseases Making a Comeback Thanks to Anti-VaxxersYears ago the environmental historian Alfred Crosby was at Washington State University, where he was teaching at the time, when on a whim he decided to pick up an old almanac from 1917. (This is apparently the kind of thing historians like to do in their spare time.) He looked up the U.S. life expectancy in that year—it was about 51 years. He turned to the 1919 almanac, and found about the same figure. Then Crosby picked up the almanac from 1918. The U....
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 29, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Bryan Walsh Tags: Uncategorized 1918 pandemic avian flu bird flu death rates H1N1 H5N1 H7N9 health immune system influenza Spanish flu Source Type: news

Fears Rise Over MERS Outbreak While Saudis Fumble
The sudden spike in cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in Saudi Arabia came soon after camel racing events at the Jenadriyah Festival in Riyadh. That suggested the surge in the incurable coronavirus, which resembles pneumonia but is fatal to one in three who contract it, confirmed what scientists already knew of the disease: that camels seem to be reservoirs for the virus, and transmit it to humans more easily than humans do to one another. MoreSaudi Arabia Confirms 20 New Cases of Deadly MERS VirusMERS Death Toll Climbs as Man Killed By Virus in Saudi ArabiaMen Charged With Toppling Ancient Rock Formation...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 22, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Karl Vick Tags: Uncategorized bird glue coronavirus H1N1 MERS middle east respiratory syndrome SARS Saudi Arabia Source Type: news

Influenza, bacterial superinfections reviewed in journal
An expert has analyzed the epidemiology and microbiology of co-infections during the 1918, 1957 and 1968 pandemics, as well as more recent 2009 novel H1N1 pandemic, and published a review on this analysis. Specifically, the co-pathogenesis reviewed is characterized by complex interactions between co-infecting pathogens and the host, leading to the disruption of physical barriers, dysregulation of immune responses and delays in a return to homeostasis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 17, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

McCullers reviews influenza, bacterial superinfections in Nature Reviews Microbiology
(Le Bonheur Children's Hospital) Le Bonheur Children's Hospital Pediatrician-in-Chief Jon McCullers, M.D., was recently invited to submit a review in the April issue of Nature Reviews Microbiology, one of the world's foremost scientific publications. Dr. McCullers, a world-renowned infectious disease specialist, and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, analyzed the epidemiology and microbiology of co-infections during the 1918, 1957 and 1968 pandemics, as well as more recent 2009 novel H1N1 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 17, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Younger Adults Hit Hardest This Flu Season
Although H1N1 strain predominates, previous exposure prevented pandemic Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Flu, H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - April 15, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pill to beat flu is a step closer
Scientists in Montreal, Canada found that by blocking a molecule called PGE2, mice survived lethal doses of H1N1, also known as swine flu. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 10, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers find that influenza has an Achilles' heel
(Cell Press) Flu epidemics cause up to half a million deaths worldwide each year, and emerging strains continually threaten to spread to humans and cause even deadlier pandemics. A new study reveals that a drug that inhibits the molecule PGE2 increases survival rates in mice infected with a lethal dose of the H1N1 flu virus. The findings pave the way for a needed therapy that is highly effective against the flu virus and potentially other viral infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Experts call for Tamiflu use to be reviewed
Large analysis says Tamiflu has small benefit and increased risksRelated items from OnMedicaQuestions remain about effectiveness of Tamiflu, experts warnClinical confirmation of H7N9 virus resistance to TamifluDrug giant agrees to release all Tamiflu trial dataSpending watchdog criticises government over TamifluTamiflu reduced risk of death in H1N1 influenza pandemic (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 10, 2014 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Tamiflu - Oral Anti-Viral Treatment Agent
Tamiflu or oseltamivir is a prescription drug used for prophylaxis and treatment of flu caused by influenza virus types A (H1N1) and B. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - April 10, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Sea otters can get the flu, too: Human H1N1 pandemic virus infected Washington State sea otters
Northern sea otters living off the coast of Washington state were infected with the same H1N1 flu virus that caused the world-wide pandemic in 2009, according to a new study. The researchers discovered antibodies for the 2009 H1N1 flu virus in blood samples from 70 percent of the sea otters studied. None of the otters were visibly sick, but the presence of antibodies means that the otters were previously exposed to influenza. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 9, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sea otters can get the flu, too
(United States Geological Survey) Northern sea otters living off the coast of Washington state were infected with the same H1N1 flu virus that caused the world-wide pandemic in 2009, according to a new US Geological Survey and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 8, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tamiflu® reduces risk of death by 25% in adults hospitalised with H1N1 pandemic influenza
Adults hospitalised with H1N1 influenza during the 2009-2010 pandemic were 25% less likely to die from the disease if they were given antiviral drugs called neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) such as Tamiflu®, according to a large meta-analysis involving more than 29 000 patients from 38 countries, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal. The findings also indicate that treatment within 2 days of flu symptoms developing halved the risk of death compared with later treatment or no treatment."Many governments have stockpiles of Tamiflu that are close to expiry. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Roche-backed study finds Tamiflu saved lives in flu pandemic
LONDON (Reuters) - Using Roche's medicine Tamiflu saved lives during the H1N1 swine flu pandemic four years ago, according to a new scientific study published on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 19, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Neuraminidase Inhibitors Linked to Lower Mortality Risk During 2009 Flu Pandemic (FREE)
By Kelly Young Use of neuraminidase inhibitors was associated with reduced mortality among hospitalized patients during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, according to an industry-funded meta-analysis in the Lancet Respiratory Medicine.Researchers used patient-level … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 19, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Tamiflu reduced risk of death in H1N1 influenza pandemic
Hospitalised patients who took Tamiflu were 25 % less likely to dieRelated items from OnMedicaSpending watchdog criticises government over TamifluDrug giant agrees to release all Tamiflu trial dataSwine flu jab very effectiveSwine flu deaths cut by blood oxygenationPandemic flu death toll could be 15 times higher (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 19, 2014 Category: UK Health Source Type: news