The Omicron Wave Is Receding But the Pandemic Is Far From Over
The U.S. has experienced a brutal winter wave of COVID-19, driven by the highly transmissible Omicron variant. Daily deaths are higher today than they were during the peak of last fall’s Delta wave, and have plateaued at about 2,500 per day. Many hospitals are still under huge strain and are postponing elective surgeries to free up beds for patients with COVID-19. Daily cases have been higher than during the Delta surge, despite multiple eager predictions in the past that we had reached herd immunity and that the pandemic was over. Nevertheless, there are promising signs that we are turning a corner. New daily cases ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey, Abraar Karan and Ranu Dhillon Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Influenza A H1N1 Monovalent Vaccine (Influenza A H1N1 Monovalent Vaccine) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - November 3, 2021 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

COVID-19 Is Now the Deadliest Pandemic in American History
COVID-19 has now killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 Spanish flu pandemic did — approximately 675,000. The U.S. population a century ago was just one-third of what it is today, meaning the flu cut a much bigger, more lethal swath through the country. But the COVID-19 crisis is by any measure a colossal tragedy in its own right, especially given the incredible advances in scientific knowledge since then and the failure to take maximum advantage of the vaccines available this time. “Big pockets of American society — and, worse, their leaders — have thrown this away,” medical historian ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carla K. Johnson / Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

COVAX Was a Great Idea, But Is Now 500 Million Doses Short of Its Vaccine Distribution Goals. What Exactly Went Wrong?
In January 2020, world leaders and industry titans gathered in Switzerland for the World Economic Forum’s annual Davos conference. Much of the conversation centered around the mysterious new coronavirus that had emerged in Wuhan, China, a month earlier, and had at that point infected nearly 300 people in four countries. Two of the conference’s attendees were Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and Dr. Richard Hatchett, CEO of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI). Over scotch and nachos one night, Berkley and Hatchett got to talking about worst-case scenarios. “&lsquo...
Source: TIME: Health - September 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

The FDA ’s New Guillain-Barre Warning For the J & J Vaccine Reflects a Small Increased Risk of the Illness
As millions of people get vaccinated against COVID-19, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are closely monitoring reports of side effects and adverse events among people getting immunized. On July 12, the FDA added a warning about the risk of Guillain-Barre to the single-dose Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Anyone who receives the shot moving forward will get an updated fact sheet informing them of the small but increased risk. There have not been significant reports of the syndrome linked to the two other vaccines authorized in the U.S., made by Pfize...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Vaccines grown in eggs induce antibody response against an egg-associated glycan
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Researchers have found that viral vaccines grown in eggs, such as the H1N1 flu vaccine, produce an antibody response against a sugar molecule found in eggs, which could have implications for the effectiveness of these vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 1, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Lessons from the last pandemic point the way toward universal flu vaccines
(University of Chicago Medical Center) A new study from the University of Chicago and Scripps Research Institute shows that during the last great pandemic--2009's H1N1 influenza pandemic--people developed strong, effective immune responses to stable, conserved parts of the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Broadly neutralizing antibodies against pandemic flu point to new vaccine targets
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A new study reveals that B cells can produce antibodies against the H1N1 influenza virus that also neutralize various other influenza strains, marking a development that could inform research into potential universal flu vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 2, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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This brief examines the U.S. COVID-19 pandemic experience to date and analyzes two prior vaccination programs: for flu in 2019 and for H1N1 in 2009–2010.        (Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Newsroom)
Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Newsroom - May 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Will Trust in the Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Recover? Europe ’s AstraZeneca Experience Suggests Not
When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended stopping use of the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine on April 13, they declared the action a “pause”—a brief intermission as the government investigates a possible link between the vaccine and blood clots in a small number of recipients. The agencies may lift that recommendation as soon as this week, and vaccination with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna shots has continued. However temporary it might be, a recent YouGov/Economist survey suggests that the J&J pause has already hurt U.S. pu...
Source: TIME: Health - April 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Doctor communication key to pandemic vaccine adoption
(Washington State University) People who talk with their doctors are more likely to get vaccinated during a pandemic, according to a study of evidence collected during the " swine flu, " the last pandemic to hit the U.S. before COVID-19. Researchers surveyed patients about the vaccine for the H1N1 virus (swine flu). They found that doctor-patient communication helped build trust in physicians, leading to more positive attitudes toward the vaccine--and it correlated to people actually getting vaccinated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Another Covid-19 Threat: Health Care Workers Under Attack
A healthcare worker at a testing facility collects samples for the coronavirus at Mimar Sinan State Hospital, Buyukcekmece district in Istanbul, Turkey. Credit: UNDP Turkey/Levent KuluBy Joe Amon and Christina WillePHILADELPHIA, US, Mar 3 2021 (IPS) In the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, at a certain hour of the evening, people in cities around the world opened their windows or stood on their rooftops and banged pots and rang bells. As the coronavirus spread and the number of deaths mounted, it was a moment for people distancing themselves from others to show solidarity and appreciation for the heroic work of health...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joe Amon and Christina Wille Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Vaccine development software shows promise in influenza effort, could help defeat coronavirus
A novel computer algorithm that could create a broadly reactive influenza vaccine for swine flu also offers a path toward a pan-influenza vaccine and possibly a pan-coronavirus vaccine as well, according to a new paper published in Nature Communications. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 3, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Vaccine shows signs of protection against dozen-plus flu strains
(University of Nebraska-Lincoln) A vaccine candidate developed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has demonstrated promising signs of protection against more than a dozen swine flu strains -- and more than a leading, commercially available vaccine. Its success in experiments involving swine suggests that its design could also fast-track efforts to develop a vaccine that protects people against many common strains of influenza. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 2, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vaccine development software shows promise in influenza effort, could help defeat coronavirus
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) A novel computer algorithm that could create a broadly reactive influenza vaccine for swine flu also offers a path toward a pan-influenza vaccine and possibly a pan-coronavirus vaccine as well, according to a new paper published inNature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 1, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news