Why COVID-19 Vaccines Need to Prioritize ‘ Superspreaders ’
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Why COVID-19 Vaccines Need to Prioritize ‘Superspreaders’ appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health COVID-19 Source Type: news

Maternal H1N1 Flu Vaccination Not Linked to Autism in Offspring
Prenatal exposure not associated with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, autistic disorder (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - September 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Infections, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Nursing, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

Maternal H1N1 Flu Vaccination Not Linked to Autism in Offspring
TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2020 -- Maternal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination during pregnancy is not associated with risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in offspring, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in the Annals of Internal... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 1, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Trump Undermines WHO, UN System
By Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Anis ChowdhuryKUALA LUMPUR and SYDNEY, Sep 1 2020 (IPS) After accusing the World Health Organization (WHO) of pro-China bias, President Donald Trump announced US withdrawal from the UN agency. Although the US created the UN system for the post-Second World War new international order, Washington has often had to struggle in recent decades to ensure that it continues to serve changing US interests. Jomo Kwame Sundaram Invisible virus trumps POTUS In early July, Washington gave the required one-year notice officially advising the UN of its intention to withdraw from the WHO, created by the US as t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Anis Chowdhury Tags: Crime & Justice Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies North America TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Exclusive: The Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

Exclusive: The Chinese Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Science - August 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

Exclusive: The Chinese Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

Leading in Time of COVID: A True Test of Leadership
By Folake OlayinkaAug 15 2020 (IPS) In 1918, the Spanish Flu, a deadly influenza caused by the H1N1 virus, decimated the world. Over the course of four successive waves, it infected 500 million people, about a third of the world’s population at the time, resulting in 50 million deaths. More recently between 2014 and mid-2016 , the Ebola virus epidemic was the most widespread outbreak of Ebola virus disease in history—causing devastating  loss of life and socioeconomic disruption in the West Africa region, mainly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. These outbreaks, as well as SARS and MERS, each have ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Folake Olayinka Tags: Democracy Headlines Health Source Type: news

NEVER FORGET: Swine flu vaccine rushed to market ended up paralyzing 500 Americans – Will the same or worse happen with the extremely rushed covid-19 jabs?
(Natural News) Are you ready for the Covid-Series of toxic inoculations that are more experimental than the actual genetically modified “viral beast” they concocted in a lab, then released in China? Are you ready to have human abortion cells injected into your muscle tissue, just to see what happens? What if you and any children... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Inside the Global Quest to Trace the Origins of COVID-19 —and Predict Where It Will Go Next
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Yuxi, Yunnan and Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Builds on Pandemic Flu Plan COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Builds on Pandemic Flu Plan
Developing a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and distribution plan is an'insurmountable task'but can be done with timely planning that builds on lessons learned during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines - June 26, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Coronavirus Vaccine: Here Are The Latest Developments
(CNN) — While coronavirus keeps spreading and killing with impunity, the world waits for a vaccine that could quash the pandemic. But details and timelines keep shifting. Here’s the latest on where we stand in the race for a vaccine: When will a Covid-19 vaccine be available to the public? No one’s sure yet, but the target is sometime in early 2021. Vaccines in development around the world are in various stages of testing. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he’s confident one of the vaccine candidates will be proven safe and effective by th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Closures Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Coronavirus Coronavirus Vaccine Moderna Therapeutics Source Type: news

Politics, Profits Undermine Public Interest in Covid-19 Vaccine Race
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, May 26 2020 (IPS) With well over five million Covid-19 infections worldwide, and deaths exceeding 340,000, the race for an effective vaccine has accelerated since the SARS-Cov-2 virus was first identified as the culprit. Expecting to score politically from being ‘first’ to have a vaccine, US President Trump’s Operation Warp Speed promises to get 300 million doses to Americans by January, after the November polls, following several failed attempts to monopolize vaccines being developed by European companies. Anis Chowdhury More than 115 vac...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

There Isn ’t a COVID-19 Vaccine Yet. But Some Are Already Skeptical About It
Amid the American flags, “Make America Great Again” hats and “freedom is essential” posters appearing at recent protests against coronavirus lockdowns in Sacramento, Calif., another familiar slogan has materialized: “We do not consent.” It’s long been a popular rallying cry among antivaccine activists, who claim without evidence that vaccines cause autism or other conditions. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, those activists have become intertwined with demonstrators who want businesses to reopen despite public health experts’ warnings. Offline, the “anti-vaxxers&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

To End this Pandemic We ’ll Need a Free Vaccine Worldwide
Until we end COVID-19 transmission across the planet, we are likely to keep getting multiple COVID-19 “waves”— that is, rolling, recurrent outbreaks. While no public health expert has a foolproof crystal ball, this scenario of repeated waves means that the likely contours of the next one to two years are now coming into clearer view. Right now, many countries including Italy, Spain, the United States, and the United Kingdom, are still struggling desperately to put out the initial fire. They are using suppression measures like stay-at-home orders as a fire extinguisher to smother transmission while urgentl...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

What Pregnant Women Should Know About Coronavirus
The risks, so far, seem no greater than for anyone else, but the research is thin and only applies to later stage of pregnancy. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: Women and Girls Pregnancy and Childbirth Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Babies and Infants Quarantines Epidemics Swine Influenza Vaccination and Immunization SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Breastfeeding American College of Obstetric Source Type: news

Blood Plasma Treatment for Coronavirus Set to Get Its First Trial Run in New York
The New York Blood Center (NYBC) is the first blood-gathering organization in the U.S. to collect plasma from COVID-19 patients to use as a possible treatment for the disease. Before antibiotics rendered the practice moot, it was common to treat infectious bacterial diseases by infusing the blood of recovered patients into those struggling with infection. That approach has also been tried against viral infections like H1N1 influenza, SARS and MERS, with inconsistent success. Some patients benefited, but other did not and doctors don’t have a clear understanding of why. But during an evolving pandemic like COVID-19, p...
Source: TIME: Health - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Bill Gates' home testing kits open the door for mass incarceration to martial law medical camps - Dave Hodges
(Natural News) In Part One of this series, I reviewed the documentation from 11 years ago which demonstrated how the globalists attempted to employ vaccine checkpoints on the roads and were attempting to make vaccines mandatory for the H1N1 vaccine. Before the dawn of Big Tech censorship, the alt media was able to rise up and stop... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trump ’s State of Emergency Is an Admission of Failure by the U.S. Government
President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency is designed to speed federal support to parts of America that are struggling to prepare for a coming surge of COVID-19 cases, unlocking $50 billion in aid, giving hospitals and doctors more freedom to handle a potential tsunami of sick patients and scrambling to make tests available. In a Rose Garden press conference Friday, Trump presented the emergency measures as proof that, “No nation is more prepared or more equipped to face down this crisis.” But for epidemiologists, medical experts and current and former U.S. public health officials, the ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: W.J. Hennigan Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

World Health Organization Declares COVID-19 a ‘Pandemic.’ Here’s What That Means
The World Health Organization (WHO) on March 11 declared COVID-19 a pandemic, pointing to the over 118,000 cases of the coronavirus illness in over 110 countries and territories around the world and the sustained risk of further global spread. “This is not just a public health crisis, it is a crisis that will touch every sector,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO director-general, at a media briefing. “So every sector and every individual must be involved in the fights.” An epidemic refers to an uptick in the spread of a disease within a specific community. By contrast, the WHO defines a pand...
Source: TIME: Health - March 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

President Trump on Vaccines: From Skeptic to Cheerleader
He once blamed vaccines for autism. Now he ’s demanding the quick development of one for the coronavirus, but shows limited understanding of the science. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jan Hoffman Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Autism Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Influenza Swine Influenza Measles Trump, Donald J Source Type: news

Why Coronavirus Testing Should Be Free For All Americans
When Osmel Martinez Azcue returned to the US after a trip to China and developed a flu-like illness, he did exactly the right thing. He went to a hospital in Miami to get tested for the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Thankfully, he was clear of the virus—it was regular, seasonal flu. But imagine his shock when the bill arrived for $3,270 and his insurance company said he’d have to pay $1,400 out of pocket. Stories like this one are playing out all across America. If any of the 28 million people without insurance develop symptoms and get coronavirus tests, they could face medical bills that could push the...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 health ideas Source Type: news

The old swine flu vaccine caused permanent brain damage; will the new coronavirus vaccine do the same thing?
(Natural News) Several years back when everyone was freaking out about the H1N1 swine flu, health authorities promised a “miracle” vaccine that, in the end, was shown to be far more dangerous than the swine flu itself because it caused permanent brain damage. Well, now this same situation is happening all over again with the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Pregnant Women Should Know About Coronavirus
The risks, so far, seem no greater than for anyone else, but the research is thin and only applies to later stage of pregnancy. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pregnancy and Childbirth Babies and Infants Women and Girls Vaccination and Immunization SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Epidemics Swine Influenza Lancet, The (Journal) Zhang, Wei World Health Organizat Source Type: news

How Can I Prevent Coronavirus? Should I Wear A Mask? And Other Questions
BOSTON (CBS) – The Centers for Disease control has cautioned that, based on current patterns, coronavirus is likely to become a global pandemic. With no approved vaccine or medication to treat it, that could ultimately result in overloaded healthcare systems. What is a pandemic? Simply put, a pandemic is a global, widespread outbreak of a new illness. Because it is new, people don’t have the ability to fight it and can be easily infected. The last pandemic to widely affect the United States was H1N1 flu in 2009. The worst pandemic in history was the Spanish flu outbreak in 1918 which killed 50 million people wo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated Local Coronavirus Source Type: news

Infant hip check is missing problems, study shows
‘Extra assessment and better training needed’ Related items fromOnMedica Under-fives must play more and spend less time sitting with screens Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers Pay more heed to parent concern over sick children Women with small babies can safely wait for labour (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 25, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Pulmonary surfactant-biomimetic nanoparticles potentiate heterosubtypic influenza immunity
Current influenza vaccines only confer protection against homologous viruses. We synthesized pulmonary surfactant (PS)–biomimetic liposomes encapsulating 2',3'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP), an agonist of the interferon gene inducer STING (stimulator of interferon genes). The adjuvant (PS-GAMP) vigorously augmented influenza vaccine–induced humoral and CD8+ T cell immune responses in mice by simulating the early phase of viral infection without concomitant excess inflammation. Two days after intranasal immunization with PS-GAMP–adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine, strong cross-p...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wang, J., Li, P., Yu, Y., Fu, Y., Jiang, H., Lu, M., Sun, Z., Jiang, S., Lu, L., Wu, M. X. Tags: Immunology, Microbiology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

It ’s Not Too Late to Prepare for COVID-19
By Dr. Lisa Stone, Epidemiology Adviser ; Robert Salerno, Director, Global Health Security Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama, June 6, 2018, as part an Emerging Infectious Diseases Training Event (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen).February 11, 2020A disease spillover event, when a virus moves from animal to human hosts, can cause significant human illness. The coronavirus (COVID-19) seems to have spilled over sometime in late 2019, at a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, leading to more than 40,000 confirmed cases and at least 910 reported deaths&nbs...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Infectious Diseases Global Health Security Source Type: news

Coronavirus: government announces new quarantine powers
Virus detection tests will be rolled out to laboratories across the UK Related items fromOnMedica NHS staff, patients and parents urged to get flu vaccine Parental confidence in immunisation programme ‘very high’ BMJ report questions swine flu jab transparency Flu vaccine delays 'likely' with no deal Brexit Prime minister issues call to action on MMR (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 10, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

Childhood Flu May Protect Against Future Flu
BOSTON (CBS) – Why do some people seem to fend off the flu better than others? A new study finds the type of flu you got as a child may help protect you against that same type as an adult. Researchers from UCLA and the University of Arizona looked at data from hospitals and doctors’ offices and found that people first exposed to a less severe strain of flu, called H1N1, during childhood, were less likely to be hospitalized if they encountered the same strain later in life. The same was true for those exposed to the more severe H3N2 strain early on. They were less likely to get really sick from that same strain...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall flu season Source Type: news

Why We Are So Ill-Prepared for A Possible Pandemic Like Coronavirus
We were surprised in 2002 when a new coronavirus called SARS emerged from southern China and spread to 17 countries, causing more than 8,000 disease cases and nearly 800 deaths. We were surprised in 2009 when a new H1N1 influenza strain emerged in Mexico and caused worldwide panic. We were surprised in 2014 when Ebola virus broke out in three West African countries, with nearly 30,000 cases and more than 11,000 deaths. And here we are now, facing the 2019-nCoV coronavirus outbreak, on the verge of becoming a worldwide pandemic, wthin China reporting over 20,000 cases and nearly 500 deaths. Three years ago in a book, Deadl...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael T. Osterholm and Mark Olshaker Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

First childhood flu helps explain why virus hits some people harder than others
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

First childhood flu helps explain why virus hits some people harder than others
Editor ’s note: This news release was updated March 3 to include a new link to the study about COVID-19 and to reflect that the study has been accepted by the journal eLife. The release was previously updated Feb. 5 to include new comments from Professor James Lloyd-Smith about screening practices use d by public health officials. Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to figh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Coronavirus now a public health emergency, says WHO
Two cases confirmed in England, but GP leaders remind people they are more likely to have flu than coronavirus Related items fromOnMedica Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers More action needed to treat TB Promise to end new HIV transmissions in England by 2030 Texting can improve flu jab uptake (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 31, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Is Now a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Here ’s What That Means
The World Health Organization (WHO) took the rare step Thursday of declaring a novel coronavirus outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC). But what does that actually mean? The WHO defines a PHEIC as an “extraordinary event” that “constitute[s] a public health risk to other States through the international spread of disease” and “potentially require[s] a coordinated international response.” Since that framework was defined in 2005—two years after another coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), spread through ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV public health Source Type: news

Tests for coronavirus conducted on 14 people in UK
WHO decides against declaring coronavirus an international public health emergency for the present Related items fromOnMedica UK measures in place to reduce the spread of coronavirus Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? £30 million to tackle antimicrobial resistance England to get a swine flu 'tzar' Health Secretary announces 'Don't panic' over swine flu, doc leaders urge (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 24, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

This Year ’s Flu Season Got Off to a Strange Start. What Does That Mean for the Months Ahead?
Flu season is always unpredictable. Different viral strains circulate each year, which makes forecasting the disease’s spread—and formulating the annual flu vaccine—an educated guessing game. Even so, the 2019-2020 flu season has been particularly unusual. Influenza B, the viral strain that usually circulates toward the end of flu season, instead emerged first this year, shifting usual transmission patterns. A vaccine mismatch and reduced immunity to influenza B may have contributed to the early and severe start of this flu season. What does that mean for the months ahead? TIME asked Lynnette Brammer, an ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Flu Vaccine ‘ Not A Very Good Match ’ For Strain That ’ s Tough On Children
(CNN) — This year’s flu vaccine is “not a very good match” for a common strain of the flu that’s especially tough on children, according to the nation’s top infectious disease doctor. “It’s not a very good match for B/Victoria,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, referring to the strain. “It’s not an awful match, but it’s not a very good match.” Children are particularly susceptible to influenza B/Victoria. Fauci said even though the match for B/Victoria isn’t great, a flu shot can...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Flu Vaccine Source Type: news

GPs are dealing with growing flu rates
GP consultation rates rise to 19 per 100,000 Related items fromOnMedica European countries losing fight against measles Debate over mandatory MMR vaccination Flu activity appears to be nearing its peak Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers Patients often avoid vaccinations due to fear of side effects (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 7, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

CDC Estimates 1,300 Flu Deaths In US This Season; Widespread Activity In Massachusetts
(CNN/CBS) — At least 1,300 people have died from the flu so far this season, according to a preliminary estimate released Friday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There have been at least 2.6 million flu illnesses and 23,000 flu-related hospitalizations, according to the analysis. So far this season, the CDC has received reports of 10 children who have died from the flu, four more than the week before. Experts have warned that flu is hitting the United States early this year, and there are concerns that this early season could mean a particularly severe season overall. Flu spread significantly in ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Flu Source Type: news

All primary pupils in London to be offered flu vaccine
NHS London says 3.2m people in the capital are eligible for free vaccination Related items fromOnMedica More powerful flu jab available for over 65s this winter BMJ report questions swine flu jab transparency Parental confidence in immunisation programme ‘very high’ Adjuvanted trivalent flu vaccine best option for over-65s Decision to give boys HPV jab will save thousands of lives (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - December 12, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Bird flu identified in Suffolk
27,000 chickens will be culled at a commercial chicken farm in Mid Suffolk where disease identified Related items fromOnMedica Pandemic flu death toll could be 15 times higher More investment needed to prevent new pandemics Texting can improve flu jab uptake Adjuvanted trivalent flu vaccine best option for over-65s UK population took fewest steps to prevent spread of swine flu (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - December 11, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

NHS staff, patients and parents urged to get flu vaccine
PHE tells GPs to call in all eligible children for nasal spray by early December, and to use injected vaccine if no spray available Related items fromOnMedica Adjuvanted trivalent flu vaccine best option for over-65s Parental confidence in immunisation programme ‘very high’ Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? Statins of small and uncertain benefit in primary prevention Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 26, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Benefits of exercise referral schemes not as large as hoped
Roll-out of schemes should be rethought to maximise effectiveness, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica Short intense exercise regimes may aid weight loss What promotes uptake and retention in group-based weight management services? New GP guidelines help patients and staff get fit GPs to spearhead swine flu mass vaccination NHS sets out H1N1 vaccination targets (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 20, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Warning on post-Brexit antibiotic use
Scientists fear mass medication of livestock if the UK diverges from EU rules Related items fromOnMedica Doctors can help overcome ‘vaccine hesitancy’ NHS review recommends making childhood vaccination more 'convenient' for parents Point-of-care diagnostics needed to curb antimicrobial resistance Swine flu hits youngest most but mortality greatest in elderly Expert questions US advice on influenza vaccines (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 19, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Government bans parallel export of MMR vaccine
MMR vaccine added to list of medicines that cannot be parallel exported from the UK to protect stock for private patients Related items fromOnMedica Hancock says compulsory vaccinations may be needed BMJ report questions swine flu jab transparency Parental confidence in immunisation programme ‘very high’ Routine child vaccination coverage rates fall HPV programme linked to dramatic fall in cervical disease (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 6, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Nearly all pre-school jab uptake targets missed in England
NHS reorganisation in 2013 may have had important role, says NAO report Related items fromOnMedica Parental confidence in immunisation programme ‘very high’ Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Decision to give boys HPV jab will save thousands of lives Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers US expert calls for mandatory vaccines (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 25, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news