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Medical Terrorists at Large! NMA panel suggests no American has the right to refuse experimental vaccinations and children must be held down by police while injected
(Natural News) Are you ready for your front door to be kicked in by a CDC swat team and your children to be held down at gunpoint while being injected with the latest experimental vaccines for anthrax, zika, ebola, HPV, measles, chicken pox, swine flu, influenza, and whatever else they think up this year? The... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The risk of type 1 diabetes not increased by swine flu vaccine Pandemrix
A study in children published inDiabetologiareports that Pandemrix increased neither the risk of developing autoantibodies against insulin-producing beta cells nor the occurrence of type 1 diabetes.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 10, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

An Upbeat Mood May Boost Your Flu Shot ’ s Effectiveness
Older people who are in a good mood when they get a flu shot have a better immune response. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Swine Influenza Psychology and Psychologists Immune System Source Type: news

Puzzling study prompts call to examine flu vaccine and miscarriage
A puzzling study of U.S. pregnancies found that women who had miscarriages between 2010 and 2012 were more likely to have had back-to-back annual flu shots that included protection against swine flu. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Study: Women Who Had Miscarriages Were More Likely To Have Received Flu Shots
NEW YORK (AP) — A puzzling study of U.S. pregnancies found that women who had miscarriages between 2010 and 2012 were more likely to have had back-to-back annual flu shots that included protection against swine flu. Vaccine experts think the results may reflect the older age and other miscarriage risks for the women, and not the flu shots. Health officials say there is no reason to change the government recommendation that all pregnant women be vaccinated against the flu. They say the flu itself is a much greater danger to women and their fetuses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reached out to a do...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Flu Vaccine Miscarriage Source Type: news

Study prompts call to examine flu vaccine and miscarriage
A puzzling study of U.S. pregnancies suggests that women who received yearly vaccinations against swine flu between 2010 and 2012 had more miscarriages than others (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

AAP: Still a'No' to FluMist for Upcoming Flu Season
(MedPage Today) -- This year's influenza A (H1N1) strain differs from 2016-2017 vaccine (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - September 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Painless' flu vaccine skin patch shows promise
Conclusion Further testing in larger trials needs to be done to be sure these initial results hold true and that the vaccine patch is safe and effective. This is the first time these flu microneedle patches have been tested on humans, and the study was relatively small, with only 100 participants. But if the results are confirmed, this new method of delivering the flu vaccination could make a big difference. The patches could have several main advantages over traditional injections: they may be preferred by people who dislike needles and avoid vaccination because of the fear of pain it may be quicker and easier to admi...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Swine flu Source Type: news

Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccines Composition and Lot Release
Vaccine lot release information updated on 3/3/2010. (Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 31, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccines Descriptions and Ingredients
(Source: What's New at CBER)
Source: What's New at CBER - May 31, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: news

Pandemic Alert: How Lessons From China Can Help Us Rethink Urgent Health Threats
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Frog slime could protect us against future flu epidemic
Conclusion This study has identified a substance in the mucus secreted by a south Indian frog which can kill certain types of flu virus. Researchers often turn to natural substances with known health-giving properties to find potential new drugs for humans. For example, aspirin was developed based on a compound found in willow bark – which had been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years. Some other drugs – such as some chemotherapy and anticlotting drugs – have also been developed from chemicals found in plants. By isolating the substances that have an effect the researchers can make sure...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

Narcolepsy More Prevalent in Influenza-vaccinated Youth in Norway Narcolepsy More Prevalent in Influenza-vaccinated Youth in Norway
Norwegian registry data confirm reports of an association between vaccination during the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic and subsequent development of narcolepsy in young people, according to researchers.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - March 31, 2017 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Why flu shots fail even when the match is right
In 2009, two flu vaccines manufactured by the same company did not equally protect against the circulating H1N1 flu virus. A study published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine examines the question: Why did one vaccine offer 35% less protection against the flu? (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccines do work for pandemic flu
Vaccine against swine flu in 2009 prevented infections and hospitalisations Related items fromOnMedica Tamiflu reduced risk of death in H1N1 influenza pandemic Nasal spray flu vaccine for children proving effective Antenatal flu drugs not linked to newborn risks Flu jab linked to fewer hospitalisations World ‘not prepared’ for Zika and Ebola (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 13, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

In a bad flu season, high-dose flu vaccine appeared better at preventing deaths in seniors
Older adults are at high risk for serious complications from flu and account for a majority of flu-related deaths and hospitalizations. H3N2 influenza viruses typically hit this age group particularly hard and have been associated with higher mortality than infections by H1N1 or influenza B viruses. During the 2012-2013 season, when H3N2 viruses were dominant, high-dose flu vaccine was 36 percent more effective at preventing deaths in the Medicare beneficiaries studied, compared to standard-dose vaccine. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

In a bad flu season, high-dose flu vaccine appeared better at preventing deaths in seniors
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Older adults are at high risk for serious complications from flu and account for a majority of flu-related deaths and hospitalizations. H3N2 influenza viruses typically hit this age group particularly hard and have been associated with higher mortality than infections by H1N1 or influenza B viruses. During the 2012-2013 season, when H3N2 viruses were dominant, high-dose flu vaccine was 36 percent more effective at preventing deaths in the Medicare beneficiaries studied, compared to standard-dose vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

British high court awards massive payout to child who was permanently damaged by the swine flu vaccine... government tried to suppress the truth for years
(Natural News) A young man from the U.K. who was seriously injured after being vaccinated for swine flu during the fake pandemic of 2009 has finally received the payout he was due from the British government. For years the government tried to cover up the truth about the deadly vaccine, known as Pandemrix, which caused... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ministers lose fight to stop payouts over swine flu jab narcolepsy cases
Dozens of children who developed sleep disorder after getting vaccine could get compensation after high court rulingDozens of children who developed narcolepsy as a result of a swine flu vaccine could be compensated after the high court rejecteda government appeal to withhold payments.Six million people in Britain, and more across Europe, were given the Pandemrix vaccine made by GlaxoSmithKline during the 2009-10 swine flu pandemic, but the jab was withdrawn after doctors noticed asharp rise in narcolepsy among those who received it.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Vaccines and immunisation Swine flu Health Society World news UK news Source Type: news

Meet Anne Schuchat, The Pro-Vaccine Researcher Who Just Took Over The CDC
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can a flu shot wear off if you get it too early? Perhaps, scientists say
By Helen Branswell It can be jarring to see placards advertising "Flu Shots Today" in late July or early August in 80-degree weather. But those signs may be more than just an unwelcome reminder that summer's days are numbered. Mounting scientific evidence is raising questions about whether vaccinating people that early may actually be undermining the effectiveness of the nation's massive flu vaccination program. Studies from the US and Europe have detected a steady decline in vaccine protection in the months after vaccination. The most recent research, published just last month by scientists from the Centers f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aethlon ’ s blood filtration device as broad countermeasure for infectious diseases
In the midst of a devastating global crisis 2 years ago, a Ugandan physician was infected with Ebola in Sierra Leone as he was treating patients. He was hospitalized at the Frankfurt University Hospital and 12 days later he was unconscious, suffering from multiple organ failure. By the time Aethlon Medical (NSDQ:AEMD) got permission to use its Hemopurifier device, the doctor required mechanical ventilation, continuous dialysis and vasopressor medications. After almost 7 hours of treatment with the single cartridge blood filtration device, the patient’s viral load dropped from 400,000 virus copies per milliliter ...
Source: Mass Device - November 18, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Blood Management Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Research & Development Aethlon Medical Inc. MassDevice Q&A Source Type: news

First time flu infection may affect lifetime immunity
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

State Fairs, Swine Flu, and the Next Flu Pandemic
Do you know how flu pandemics get their names? Find out here, as well as how the CDC is working hard to prevent the next one. (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - November 9, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Terry Brenneman, MD Tags: Vaccines Source Type: news

Zika's Rapid Rise and the Limp Global Response Reveal Dire Global Health Challenges
With cases rising in Florida, Singapore, Vietnam and Trinidad and Tobago, the Zika virus pandemic is raising public concern in regions across the globe, including the U.S., where about 80 percent of Americans are aware of it but only 40 percent understand how it is actually transmitted. This raises a host of questions not only about the clinical and epidemiological scope of the outbreak, but also about the ability of citizens, public health authorities and politicians at all levels to adequately deal with it.  So far, the response has been slow and the challenge remains serious and unpredictable. We need to understand...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What 1989 And The Golden Girls Tell Us About Medicine Today
Today, 1989 may be most associated with Taylor Swift: It is the album that won her a second Grammy for Album of the Year. Not only that, it happens to be the year Swift was born--such a long, long time ago! People under 35 have no personal memory of 1980s pop culture, which is ironic since Swift's album in part pays homage to it. In the real 1989 (no offense to Swift and the 10 co-producers who made the album), all sorts of revolutions took place: Mr. Gorbachev tore down that pesky wall, for example. America's greatest antagonist, the Soviet Union, collapsed in 1989. Brazil conducted its first democrat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Swine Flu Vaccine Safe in Early Pregnancy Swine Flu Vaccine Safe in Early Pregnancy
Population-based study is the first to compare outcomes in exposed, unexposed siblings and finds no increased risk for birth defects associated with the H1N1 vaccine.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

H1N1'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk
Swedish study finds that babies born to women who got the shot had no overall higher odds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Birth Defects, H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu), Immunization (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H1N1 'Swine Flu' vaccine unlikely to raise birth defect risk
HealthDay News Swedish researchers report that the vaccine against the H1N1 " swine flu " strain of influenza doesn't seem to have a link to birth defects. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H1N1 'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk
Swedish study finds that babies born to women who got the shot had no overall higher odds (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H1N1 Vaccine in Pregnancy: No Increase in Overall Congenital Malformations (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD Receipt of the H1N1 influenza vaccine during pregnancy is not associated with increased risk for overall congenital malformations in offspring, according to an … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - September 19, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

H1N1'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk
MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 -- Swedish researchers report that the vaccine against the H1N1 " swine flu " strain of influenza doesn't seem to have a link to birth defects. One obstetrician who reviewed the research said the findings should ease concerns... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 19, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Contraceptive pills not proven to protect against the flu
Conclusion These are interesting scientific findings but they have limited implications. Animal studies are useful for giving an indication of how biological processes may work in humans but we're not identical. Then the scenarios tested here – the progesterone, or the flu injection – can be taken as representative of real-life in humans. For one thing all the mice had surgery to remove their ovaries before being infected. It makes sense that the mice that had been given some additional recovery boost in the form of hormone replacement may have been in a better health state than those left hormone deplete...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

Is The Shocking News of the Sugar Industry's Influence Over Harvard Researchers Really Shocking?
Hey, Sugar, pay no attention to the man behind the curtain. Today, the Journal of the American Medical Association dropped an alleged bombshell when it disclosed that the sugar industry lobby influenced research on coronary heart disease by effectively bribing Harvard researchers to promote the theory that dietary fat, and not sugar, causes heart disease. The story is trending on Facebook at this very moment, and the JAMA Facebook post states that "Policymaking committees should consider giving less weight to food industry-funded studies, and include mechanistic and animal studies as well as studies appraising the ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

[Perspective] Zika vaccine trials
Promising data for candidate vaccines against Zika virus infection reported by Abbink et al. (1) on page 1129 of this issue raise hopes that one or more Zika virus vaccines may soon be ready for efficacy trials. Recent years have seen a barrage of emerging infectious diseases, including those caused by new pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus, and those that are newly salient because of increased geographic spread, higher incidence, or genetic change, such as influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, Ebola virus, and Zika virus. Developing effective vaccines is a central goal for such pathogens. Authors: Mar...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 8, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Marc Lipsitch Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: news

How Effective is Oseltamivir?
Discussion Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) is an oral neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza viruses types A and B. It first came on the market in Switzerland in 1999 and currently is used around the world along with other neuraminidase inhibitors to treat seasonal and pandemic influenza. Oseltamivir is easily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and circulates to the liver where it is converted to its active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC). In adults approximately 75% of the oral medication is converted and it then travels to the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Unchanged oseltamivir is eliminated in the urine. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 5, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Pregnant women to serve as human guinea pigs for experimental Zika vaccine
(NaturalNews) Researchers from MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) have developed a brand new vaccine – in just seven days, believe it or not – that they claim is capable of treating everything from Ebola and H1N1 influenza, to the newest villain on the block:... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Engineers design programmable RNA vaccines
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT engineers have designed programmable RNA vaccines that could be rapidly manufactured and deployed. The vaccines have been shown effective against Ebola, H1N1 influenza, and Toxoplasma gondii, in tests in mice. They could also be useful against other infectious diseases and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

A bummer for kids: Nasal flu vaccine not effective
Follow me at @drClaire Every year, many of my patients have been able to skip the needle — and still get vaccinated against the flu. That was the great thing about the nasal spray version of the flu vaccine, known as the LAIV (live attenuated influenza vaccine): kids scared of needles could get a squirt up each nostril and be all set. This coming flu season, everyone is getting the shot. It turns out that the nasal spray just didn’t work that well. Despite studies from the 2002-2003 and 2004-2005 flu seasons that seemed to show that the nasal spray actually worked better than the shot in children ages 2-8 years...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - June 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Infectious diseases Parenting Prevention Source Type: news

Well: Sorry, Kids: Flu Shots Work Better Than Nose Spray
FluMist does not work against the H1N1 strain, which has been circulating more widely in recent years and causes the most serious disease in children. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Children and Childhood Influenza Vaccination and Immunization Family Featured Live Source Type: news

Well: Flu Shots Protect Babies, Too
Here’s one more reason pregnant women should get a flu shot: It not only protects mothers, but a large study suggests it prevents flu in the infant, too. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - May 3, 2016 Category: Nutrition Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Epidemics Influenza Pregnancy and Childbirth Swine Influenza Vaccination and Immunization Women and Girls Family Featured Parenting Source Type: news

There Is An Optimal Time Of Day To Get A Flu Shot, Study Suggests
There is an optimal time of the day to get a flu shot: the morning, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Birmingham and published in the journal Vaccine. In the study, senior citizens who got their flu vaccines in the mornings produced higher levels of antibodies to certain flu strains than those who got their shots in the afternoon. This is especially important for people over 65, who are more likely to have weaker immune systems than the general population and are more likely to be hospitalized and die from the flu. If the effect is confirmed in wider studies, giving seniors a shot in the m...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Zika Virus Lesson? A New Approach Is Needed to Combat Pandemics
The Zika virus attracted many headlines this winter, but a recent admission by the chief medical officer at a leading vaccine manufacturer -- that the world is ill-prepared to deal with pandemic outbreaks -- underscores a fundamental problem. To ensure safety and efficacy, the federal government's regulatory approval process for new vaccines may extend development timelines for years. So when The New York Times reports that "eighteen organizations are working on developing a vaccine for the Zika virus," it is likely that those companies will labor for a very long time. Vaccinations rightly require stri...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Rise of Zika
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog, Medical Discovery News Have you noticed in the past few years, we seem to be continuously assaulted by microbial menaces? Some years back it was SARS, which set off a global panic. People were screened for fevers at many major international airports. Then came the West Nile virus, which started from a single case in New York and in a matter of years marched across the U.S. Who can forget the avian flu or swine flu, which happened around the same time? More recently, the MERS virus has emerged, with outbreaks in the Arabian Peninsula and then whole villages in Korea. We are just now ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Rise of Zika
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog, Medical Discovery News Have you noticed in the past few years, we seem to be continuously assaulted by microbial menaces? Some years back it was SARS, which set off a global panic. People were screened for fevers at many major international airports. Then came the West Nile virus, which started from a single case in New York and in a matter of years marched across the U.S. Who can forget the avian flu or swine flu, which happened around the same time? More recently, the MERS virus has emerged, with outbreaks in the Arabian Peninsula and then whole villages in Korea. We are just now...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New vaccine may prevent multiple strains of the flu
Stephen FellerATHENS, Ga., March 29 (UPI) -- Scientists developed a vaccine for H1N1 influenza that protects against pandemic and seasonal strains of the virus, they report in a new study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New flu vaccine protects against multiple strains including H1N1
Researchers have announced the development of a vaccine that protects against multiple strains of both seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza in mouse models. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

UGA, Sanofi Pasteur develop new vaccine for H1N1 influenza
(University of Georgia) Researchers at the University of Georgia and Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today the development of a vaccine that protects against multiple strains of both seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza in mouse models. They published their findings in the Journal of Virology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 29, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sanofi Pasteur uses novel technology for development of a 2nd-gen influenza vaccine
(Sanofi Pasteur) Sanofi Pasteur announces published data on a vaccine strategy that elicited a broadly-reactive response against seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in mice. The article, entitled 'Design and characterization of a computationally optimized broadly reactive hemagglutinin vaccine for H1N1 influenza viruses,' appears in the current issue of the Journal of Virology. Sanofi Pasteur is presenting the data tomorrow, March 30, at the 2016 World Vaccine Congress being held in Washington, DC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 29, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This 1976 vaccine scandal will DISTURB you ... but has anything changed?
(NaturalNews) A great philosopher once said: "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Those words are worth keeping in mind as the media barrages us with yet another round of swine flu panic.The swine flu "outbreak" of 2009, which many now consider to have... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news