Lessons from the last pandemic point the way toward universal flu vaccines
(University of Chicago Medical Center) A new study from the University of Chicago and Scripps Research Institute shows that during the last great pandemic--2009's H1N1 influenza pandemic--people developed strong, effective immune responses to stable, conserved parts of the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Broadly neutralizing antibodies against pandemic flu point to new vaccine targets
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A new study reveals that B cells can produce antibodies against the H1N1 influenza virus that also neutralize various other influenza strains, marking a development that could inform research into potential universal flu vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 2, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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This brief examines the U.S. COVID-19 pandemic experience to date and analyzes two prior vaccination programs: for flu in 2019 and for H1N1 in 2009–2010.        (Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Newsroom)
Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Newsroom - May 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Will Trust in the Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Recover? Europe ’s AstraZeneca Experience Suggests Not
When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended stopping use of the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine on April 13, they declared the action a “pause”—a brief intermission as the government investigates a possible link between the vaccine and blood clots in a small number of recipients. The agencies may lift that recommendation as soon as this week, and vaccination with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna shots has continued. However temporary it might be, a recent YouGov/Economist survey suggests that the J&J pause has already hurt U.S. pu...
Source: TIME: Health - April 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Doctor communication key to pandemic vaccine adoption
(Washington State University) People who talk with their doctors are more likely to get vaccinated during a pandemic, according to a study of evidence collected during the " swine flu, " the last pandemic to hit the U.S. before COVID-19. Researchers surveyed patients about the vaccine for the H1N1 virus (swine flu). They found that doctor-patient communication helped build trust in physicians, leading to more positive attitudes toward the vaccine--and it correlated to people actually getting vaccinated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Another Covid-19 Threat: Health Care Workers Under Attack
A healthcare worker at a testing facility collects samples for the coronavirus at Mimar Sinan State Hospital, Buyukcekmece district in Istanbul, Turkey. Credit: UNDP Turkey/Levent KuluBy Joe Amon and Christina WillePHILADELPHIA, US, Mar 3 2021 (IPS) In the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, at a certain hour of the evening, people in cities around the world opened their windows or stood on their rooftops and banged pots and rang bells. As the coronavirus spread and the number of deaths mounted, it was a moment for people distancing themselves from others to show solidarity and appreciation for the heroic work of health...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joe Amon and Christina Wille Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Vaccine development software shows promise in influenza effort, could help defeat coronavirus
A novel computer algorithm that could create a broadly reactive influenza vaccine for swine flu also offers a path toward a pan-influenza vaccine and possibly a pan-coronavirus vaccine as well, according to a new paper published in Nature Communications. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 3, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Vaccine shows signs of protection against dozen-plus flu strains
(University of Nebraska-Lincoln) A vaccine candidate developed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has demonstrated promising signs of protection against more than a dozen swine flu strains -- and more than a leading, commercially available vaccine. Its success in experiments involving swine suggests that its design could also fast-track efforts to develop a vaccine that protects people against many common strains of influenza. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 2, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vaccine development software shows promise in influenza effort, could help defeat coronavirus
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) A novel computer algorithm that could create a broadly reactive influenza vaccine for swine flu also offers a path toward a pan-influenza vaccine and possibly a pan-coronavirus vaccine as well, according to a new paper published inNature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 1, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New research finds drive-through mass-vaccination clinics could alter COVID-19 trajectory
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Policymakers at all levels of government are racing to vaccinate hundreds of millions of people to save lives and blunt the deadly COVID-19 pandemic. New research published in the INFORMS Journal on Applied Analytics provides a simulated model for drive-through clinics that can be used for mass COVID-19 vaccinations based on the successful use of such a clinic to address H1N1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

After weeks of frustrating delays, Cincinnati company administers its first Covid-19 vaccines
“In 2009, during the H1N1 scare we were able to move very quickly, which obviously is the trick. The quicker we get people vaccinated, the quicker we get back to some semblance of normal.” (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Liz Engel Source Type: news

Should Someone With Asthma Get a COVID-19 Vaccine Before Someone With Cancer? The Next Big Challenge in the Vaccine Rollout
In an ideal world, there would be enough vaccines to inoculate everyone who wanted to get immunized against COVID-19. People would get their shots on a first come, first serve basis, we’d achieve herd immunity in a matter of months and COVID-19 would become a soon-distant memory. But with some 240 million people over age 16 who need a COVID-19 vaccine (and two doses at that), and just over 42 million administered by early February, supply is far below demand, and will likely remain that way for months to come, despite vaccine makers pushing production lines as hard as they can. As the U.S. works through the vaccine ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

A Look at Past Vaccine Drives: Smallpox, Polio and the Swine Flu
As governments begin rolling out the biggest vaccine drives in history, a look at mass vaccination campaigns of the past offers insight into mistakes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jenny Gross Tags: Smallpox Vaccination and Immunization Swine Influenza Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Source Type: news

Five Past Vaccine Drives and How They Worked
As governments begin rolling out the biggest vaccine drives in history, a look at mass vaccination campaigns of the past offers insight into mistakes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jenny Gross Tags: Smallpox Vaccination and Immunization Swine Influenza Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Source Type: news

The U.S. Fumbled Its Early Vaccine Rollout. Will the Biden Administration Put America Back on Track?
On a frigid morning in January, Trudy Ronnel settled into her favorite sofa chair at the Westminster Place senior-living community in Evanston, Ill., pulled down the neckline on her red blouse and braced herself for a shot she’d anticipated for almost a year. At 92 years old, with multiple medical conditions, she spent most of 2020 fearful of contracting the COVID-19 plague that ravaged the world outside her first-floor window. To protect herself, for the past few months she’d avoided Westminster’s communal rooms, which had provided a means to stay active and engaged but risked becoming a pathogenic petri...
Source: TIME: Health - January 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: W.J. Hennigan, Alice Park and Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Vice President Pence, Wife Karen, Surgeon General get COVID-19 Vaccines
By ZEKE MILLER and JILL COLVIN Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence was vaccinated for COVID-19 on Friday in a live-television event aimed at reassuring Americans the vaccine is safe. In remarks after his shot, Pence called the speed with which the vaccine was developed “a medical miracle.” “The American people can be confident: we have one and perhaps within hours two” safe vaccines,” Pence said, referring to expected FDA approval for Moderna’s vaccine. Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine was the first to be approved. “Building confidence in the ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Vice President Pence, Wife Karen, Surgeon General get COVID-19 Vaccines
By ZEKE MILLER and JILL COLVIN Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence was vaccinated for COVID-19 on Friday in a live-television event aimed at reassuring Americans the vaccine is safe. In remarks after his shot, Pence called the speed with which the vaccine was developed “a medical miracle.” “The American people can be confident: we have one and perhaps within hours two” safe vaccines,” Pence said, referring to expected FDA approval for Moderna’s vaccine. Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine was the first to be approved. “Building confidence in the ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Vice President Pence, Wife Karen, Surgeon General get COVID-19 Vaccines
By ZEKE MILLER and JILL COLVIN Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence was vaccinated for COVID-19 on Friday in a live-television event aimed at reassuring Americans the vaccine is safe. In remarks after his shot, Pence called the speed with which the vaccine was developed “a medical miracle.” “The American people can be confident: we have one and perhaps within hours two” safe vaccines,” Pence said, referring to expected FDA approval for Moderna’s vaccine. Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine was the first to be approved. “Building confidence in the ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Vice President Pence, Wife Karen, Surgeon General get COVID-19 Vaccines
By ZEKE MILLER and JILL COLVIN Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence was vaccinated for COVID-19 on Friday in a live-television event aimed at reassuring Americans the vaccine is safe. In remarks after his shot, Pence called the speed with which the vaccine was developed “a medical miracle.” “The American people can be confident: we have one and perhaps within hours two” safe vaccines,” Pence said, referring to expected FDA approval for Moderna’s vaccine. Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine was the first to be approved. “Building confidence in the ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Vice President Pence, Wife Karen, Surgeon General get COVID-19 Vaccines
By ZEKE MILLER and JILL COLVIN Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence was vaccinated for COVID-19 on Friday in a live-television event aimed at reassuring Americans the vaccine is safe. In remarks after his shot, Pence called the speed with which the vaccine was developed “a medical miracle.” “The American people can be confident: we have one and perhaps within hours two” safe vaccines,” Pence said, referring to expected FDA approval for Moderna’s vaccine. Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine was the first to be approved. “Building confidence in the ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Vice President Pence, Wife Karen, Surgeon General get COVID-19 Vaccines
By ZEKE MILLER and JILL COLVIN Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence was vaccinated for COVID-19 on Friday in a live-television event aimed at reassuring Americans the vaccine is safe. In remarks after his shot, Pence called the speed with which the vaccine was developed “a medical miracle.” “The American people can be confident: we have one and perhaps within hours two” safe vaccines,” Pence said, referring to expected FDA approval for Moderna’s vaccine. Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccine was the first to be approved. “Building confidence in the ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

What Makes COVID-19 Different From the Flu?
Living through the COVID-19 pandemic is hard. TIME’s advice column is here to help. Trying to decide if that dinner party is safe to attend? Fighting through your quarantine fatigue? Our health reporters will consult experts who can help find a safe and practical solution. Send us your pandemic dilemmas at covidquestions@time.com, and we will choose some to answer in a column on TIME.com. Today, Judy Jones from Missouri asks: Please help. I have a few friends who refuse to take the risks of COVID-19 seriously. They claim that it is no worse than the flu, and that there have always been a certain amount of deaths each...
Source: TIME: Health - December 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

Emergency Considerations in COVID-19 Vaccine Administration
Conclusion The joint response of science and medicine to develop safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been brisk and productive. Distribution efforts will now be the next step in limiting the breadth of this pandemic. EMS agencies will play a key role in some areas in the administration of vaccinations for their communities. The authors suggest that to better clarify the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, EMS systems must maintain a log of the type and incidence of adverse events following vaccine administration, EMS responses to the adverse events, as well as those patients’ outcomes from this manageme...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus Exclusives EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

Emergency Considerations in COVID-19 Vaccine Administration
Conclusion The joint response of science and medicine to develop safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been brisk and productive. Distribution efforts will now be the next step in limiting the breadth of this pandemic. EMS agencies will play a key role in some areas in the administration of vaccinations for their communities. The authors suggest that to better clarify the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, EMS systems must maintain a log of the type and incidence of adverse events following vaccine administration, EMS responses to the adverse events, as well as those patients’ outcomes from this manageme...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus Exclusives EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

Emergency Considerations in COVID-19 Vaccine Administration
Conclusion The joint response of science and medicine to develop safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been brisk and productive. Distribution efforts will now be the next step in limiting the breadth of this pandemic. EMS agencies will play a key role in some areas in the administration of vaccinations for their communities. The authors suggest that to better clarify the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, EMS systems must maintain a log of the type and incidence of adverse events following vaccine administration, EMS responses to the adverse events, as well as those patients’ outcomes from this manageme...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus Exclusives EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

Emergency Considerations in COVID-19 Vaccine Administration
Conclusion The joint response of science and medicine to develop safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been brisk and productive. Distribution efforts will now be the next step in limiting the breadth of this pandemic. EMS agencies will play a key role in some areas in the administration of vaccinations for their communities. The authors suggest that to better clarify the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, EMS systems must maintain a log of the type and incidence of adverse events following vaccine administration, EMS responses to the adverse events, as well as those patients’ outcomes from this manageme...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus Exclusives EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

Emergency Considerations in COVID-19 Vaccine Administration
Conclusion The joint response of science and medicine to develop safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been brisk and productive. Distribution efforts will now be the next step in limiting the breadth of this pandemic. EMS agencies will play a key role in some areas in the administration of vaccinations for their communities. The authors suggest that to better clarify the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, EMS systems must maintain a log of the type and incidence of adverse events following vaccine administration, EMS responses to the adverse events, as well as those patients’ outcomes from this manageme...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus Exclusives EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

Emergency Considerations in COVID-19 Vaccine Administration
Conclusion The joint response of science and medicine to develop safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been brisk and productive. Distribution efforts will now be the next step in limiting the breadth of this pandemic. EMS agencies will play a key role in some areas in the administration of vaccinations for their communities. The authors suggest that to better clarify the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, EMS systems must maintain a log of the type and incidence of adverse events following vaccine administration, EMS responses to the adverse events, as well as those patients’ outcomes from this manageme...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus Exclusives EMS EMT Paramedic Source Type: news

1976 U.S. swine flu vaccination program may offer lessons for COVID-19 pandemic
The U.S. vaccination program of 1976, though it was cut short, may offer some lessons as governments around the world prepare to inoculate the public at large. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - December 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Japan Should Lead Charge for Equitable Access to COVID-19 Vaccines
Credit: United NationsBy Cecilia RussellJOHANNESBURG, South Africa, Nov 20 2020 (IPS) Japan should step up and play a role as a global facilitator for equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines, Dr Daisaku Higashi said at a recent Japan Parliamentarians Federation for Population (JPFP) study meeting. The country should use the credibility developed in the post-Second World War era as a country with expertise in peacebuilding to ensure that developing countries are included in the vaccines’ rollout. Higashi, a renowned commentator from Sophia University, warned that only an international effort could solve the problems ca...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Cecilia Russell Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) Source Type: news

Echoes of a pandemic: Experts fear lessons from the 2009 H1N1 vaccine drive are being ignored
Federal officials have been urging state and local health departments to heed those lessons, even as they warn that the immunization program ahead will be far more complex. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - November 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Frances Stead Sellers Source Type: news

The Covid Pandemic: Broadening the Discourse
Thailand’s COVID-19 response an example of resilience and solidarity: a UN Resident Coordinator’s BlogBy Asoka BandarageCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka, Nov 10 2020 (IPS) SARS-CoV-2, the corona virus that causes COVID-19, has been spreading exponentially across the world over the last ten or so months. As of November 6th, according to the Center for Systems Science at Johns Hopkins University, there have been 49,195,581 cases of COVID-19, including 1,241,031 deaths. More than a third of the global population has been placed on lockdown. The global economy is experiencing the deepest global recession since World War 2 and m...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Asoka Bandarage Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

You Can Now Get a COVID-19 Vaccine in China. That Might Not Be a Good Thing
Li Shurui didn’t hesitate. Faced with putting his life on hold indefinitely or the risk of catching COVID-19 by returning to university in the U.K., the 22-year-old business student decided to roll up his sleeve and receive an experimental coronavirus vaccine. Two injections of CoronaVac made by SinoVac (otherwise known as Beijing Kexing Bioproducts) cost 2,000 rmb ($300) at the private Taihe Hospital in the Chinese capital. The treatment still hasn’t passed final (Stage 3) clinical trials but is already being offered to the public on a first come, first served basis. Anyone can turn up, pay their money and get...
Source: TIME: Health - October 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized China COVID-19 feature overnight Source Type: news

U.K. Plans ‘Challenge Trials,’ Which Will Intentionally Give People COVID-19 to Test Vaccines
On Oct. 20, researchers at the Imperial College of London announced plans for the first human challenge study of COVID-19, which involves deliberately infecting volunteers with the virus that causes the disease, in order to test the effectiveness of vaccines. The strategy is controversial, as researchers have to weigh the risks of infection against the benefits of learning how well the various vaccine candidates can fight that infection. The strongest argument in favor of the studies has to do with time. If cases of COVID-19 are waning, then the likelihood that people who are vaccinated would get exposed to and potentially...
Source: TIME: Science - October 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U.K. Plans ‘Challenge Trials,’ Which Will Intentionally Give People COVID-19 to Test Vaccines
On Oct. 20, researchers at the Imperial College of London announced plans for the first human challenge study of COVID-19, which involves deliberately infecting volunteers with the virus that causes the disease, in order to test the effectiveness of vaccines. The strategy is controversial, as researchers have to weigh the risks of infection against the benefits of learning how well the various vaccine candidates can fight that infection. The strongest argument in favor of the studies has to do with time. If cases of COVID-19 are waning, then the likelihood that people who are vaccinated would get exposed to and potentially...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Why COVID-19 Vaccines Need to Prioritize ‘ Superspreaders ’
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Why COVID-19 Vaccines Need to Prioritize ‘Superspreaders’ appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health COVID-19 Source Type: news

Maternal H1N1 Flu Vaccination Not Linked to Autism in Offspring
Prenatal exposure not associated with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, autistic disorder (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - September 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Infections, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Nursing, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

Maternal H1N1 Flu Vaccination Not Linked to Autism in Offspring
TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2020 -- Maternal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination during pregnancy is not associated with risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in offspring, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in the Annals of Internal... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 1, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Trump Undermines WHO, UN System
By Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Anis ChowdhuryKUALA LUMPUR and SYDNEY, Sep 1 2020 (IPS) After accusing the World Health Organization (WHO) of pro-China bias, President Donald Trump announced US withdrawal from the UN agency. Although the US created the UN system for the post-Second World War new international order, Washington has often had to struggle in recent decades to ensure that it continues to serve changing US interests. Jomo Kwame Sundaram Invisible virus trumps POTUS In early July, Washington gave the required one-year notice officially advising the UN of its intention to withdraw from the WHO, created by the US as t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Anis Chowdhury Tags: Crime & Justice Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies North America TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Exclusive: The Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

Exclusive: The Chinese Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Science - August 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

Exclusive: The Chinese Scientist Who Sequenced the First COVID-19 Genome Speaks Out About the Controversies Surrounding His Work
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news

Leading in Time of COVID: A True Test of Leadership
By Folake OlayinkaAug 15 2020 (IPS) In 1918, the Spanish Flu, a deadly influenza caused by the H1N1 virus, decimated the world. Over the course of four successive waves, it infected 500 million people, about a third of the world’s population at the time, resulting in 50 million deaths. More recently between 2014 and mid-2016 , the Ebola virus epidemic was the most widespread outbreak of Ebola virus disease in history—causing devastating  loss of life and socioeconomic disruption in the West Africa region, mainly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. These outbreaks, as well as SARS and MERS, each have ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Folake Olayinka Tags: Democracy Headlines Health Source Type: news

NEVER FORGET: Swine flu vaccine rushed to market ended up paralyzing 500 Americans – Will the same or worse happen with the extremely rushed covid-19 jabs?
(Natural News) Are you ready for the Covid-Series of toxic inoculations that are more experimental than the actual genetically modified “viral beast” they concocted in a lab, then released in China? Are you ready to have human abortion cells injected into your muscle tissue, just to see what happens? What if you and any children... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Inside the Global Quest to Trace the Origins of COVID-19 —and Predict Where It Will Go Next
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Yuxi, Yunnan and Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Builds on Pandemic Flu Plan COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Builds on Pandemic Flu Plan
Developing a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and distribution plan is an'insurmountable task'but can be done with timely planning that builds on lessons learned during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines - June 26, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Coronavirus Vaccine: Here Are The Latest Developments
(CNN) — While coronavirus keeps spreading and killing with impunity, the world waits for a vaccine that could quash the pandemic. But details and timelines keep shifting. Here’s the latest on where we stand in the race for a vaccine: When will a Covid-19 vaccine be available to the public? No one’s sure yet, but the target is sometime in early 2021. Vaccines in development around the world are in various stages of testing. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he’s confident one of the vaccine candidates will be proven safe and effective by th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Closures Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Coronavirus Coronavirus Vaccine Moderna Therapeutics Source Type: news

Politics, Profits Undermine Public Interest in Covid-19 Vaccine Race
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, May 26 2020 (IPS) With well over five million Covid-19 infections worldwide, and deaths exceeding 340,000, the race for an effective vaccine has accelerated since the SARS-Cov-2 virus was first identified as the culprit. Expecting to score politically from being ‘first’ to have a vaccine, US President Trump’s Operation Warp Speed promises to get 300 million doses to Americans by January, after the November polls, following several failed attempts to monopolize vaccines being developed by European companies. Anis Chowdhury More than 115 vac...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

There Isn ’t a COVID-19 Vaccine Yet. But Some Are Already Skeptical About It
Amid the American flags, “Make America Great Again” hats and “freedom is essential” posters appearing at recent protests against coronavirus lockdowns in Sacramento, Calif., another familiar slogan has materialized: “We do not consent.” It’s long been a popular rallying cry among antivaccine activists, who claim without evidence that vaccines cause autism or other conditions. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, those activists have become intertwined with demonstrators who want businesses to reopen despite public health experts’ warnings. Offline, the “anti-vaxxers&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news