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Results of global fats and carbs study not very relevant for UK

Conclusion The results of the study have been presented in the media as if they overturn all current dietary guidelines. In the UK at least, that is completely misleading. The study results support the UK guidelines, having found that people who get around 50% of their calories from carbohydrates and 35% from fat, as recommended by Public Health England, were likely to live the longest. There are some limitations to the study, not least that observational studies cannot prove cause and effect. For example, the very low fat and high carbohydrate levels of diets found among some participants in the study might simply represent poverty – rice, flour and sugar tend to be much cheaper than animal products such as butter and meat. It's not a surprise that people living on diets where most of their energy comes from nutrient-poor sources, such as white rice, are likely to live shorter lives. However, this does not apply widely in the UK. The researchers may have a point that global guidelines for diet need to be revised in the light of these international findings, particularly in parts of the world where under-nutrition is more of a problem than obesity. However, UK guidelines are already in line with the study findings. For more information about a healthy diet, see the Eatwell Guide. Links To The Headlines Eating a low-fat diet 'increases your risk of dying young by 25%'. The Sun, August 29 2017 Low-fat diets could increase the risk of an early death: Major study challen...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Long-term exposure to NO2 and road traffic noise was associated with higher risk of heart failure, mainly among men, in both single- and two-pollutant models. High exposure to both pollutants was associated with highest risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1272 Received: 25 October 2016 Revised: 09 August 2017 Accepted: 09 August 2017 Published: 26 September 2017 Address correspondence to M. Sørensen. Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Telephone: +45 35257626. Email: mettes@cancer.dk Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, the analyses do not permit us to predict the trajectory that maximum lifespans will follow in the future, and hence provide no support for their central claim that the maximum lifespan of humans is "fixed and subject to natural constraints". This is largely a product of the limited data available for analysis, owing to the challenges inherent in collecting and verifying the lifespans of extremely long-lived individuals. A reply from Jan Vijg's research group The authors of the accompanying comment disagree with our finding of a limit to human lifespan. Although we thank them for a...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The question of whether someone can be "fat but fit" has been much debated. If you're obese but exercise, eat well and don't have metabolic risk factors, the theory goes, you could be just as healthy as someone of recommended weight. This study suggests that may not be true. It is definitely worth adopting a healthy lifestyle, whatever your weight. The study found that, the more metabolic risk factors people had, the more likely they were to develop heart disease, cardiovascular disease and so on. Metabolic risk factors do make a difference. But in this large study, on average, people who wer...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Obesity Source Type: news
‘Metabolically healthy obese’ are 50% more likely to suffer heart disease than those of normal weight, finds University of Birmingham studyPeople who are obese run an increased risk of heart failure and stroke even if they appear healthy, without the obvious warning signs such as high blood pressure or diabetes, according to a major new study.The findings, presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Porto, Portugal, may be the final death knell for the claim that it is possible to be obese but still metabolically healthy – or “fat but fit” – say scientists.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Obesity Health Heart attack Diabetes Research Education Society UK news Source Type: news
This report captures the state of the research community in a nutshell: progress in the sense that ever more scientists are willing to make the treatment of aging the explicit goal of their research, but, unfortunately, there is still a long way to go in improving the nature of that research. It is still near entirely made up of projects that cannot possibly produce a robust and large impact on human life span. The only course of action likely to extend life by decades in the near future is implementation of the SENS vision for rejuvenation therapies - to repair the molecular damage that causes aging. Everything else on th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion This study paints a more complicated picture than the "Pint a day keeps the doctor away" story proffered by The Sun. It seems to confirm the findings of other studies, which have shown that non-drinkers tend to have a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than people who drink moderately. It suggests that some cardiovascular diseases (mainly those directly affecting the heart) seem to have a stronger link to a possible protective effect from alcohol than other vascular diseases, such as mini-strokes and bleeding in the brain. However, this can't be concluded with certainty due to the study design. We ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news
Avoiding hypertension, obesity and diabetes has long-term preventive benefits Related items fromOnMedica Chronic heart failure – a review and update Lifestyle factors biggest cause of heart disease risk variation 'Health anxiety' may raise heart disease risk High-quality carbs and unsaturated fats lower heart risks Diabetes, stroke and heart attack cut life expectancy
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Veterans are more likely to report very good or excellent health than their civilian counterparts, so they may not realize that they’re also at greater risk than civilians for some long-term health problems. Of course, many veterans have acute physical health problems, like wounds and amputations, and trauma-based mental health issues like depression and PTSD. Indeed, mental health issues affect 30 percent of Vietnam veterans, 20 percent of Iraqi veterans and about 10 percent of Gulf War and Afghanistan veterans. Less known are some of the ordinary, chronic conditions that disproportionately affect ser...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
In conclusion, we found that IS status was associated with a significant increase in Hannum DNA methylation, likely as a consequence of the accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors, and near signification with Horvath method. Patients with IS were biologically older than controls, a difference that was more obvious in young stroke. This could open up the possibility of useful new biomarker of stroke risk. Latest Headlines from Fight Aging! A Profile of Kelsey Moody and Ichor Therapeutics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/09/a-profile-of-kelsey-moody
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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