Working with HTAs: It ’s Your Move
In June last year, the heads of European health technology assessment (HTA) bodies came together at a meeting facilitated by EUnetHTA (European Network for Health Technology Assessment) and the European Commission ’s Directorate General for Health and Food Safety.A key focus of the event was the creation of earlier and more engaging dialogue between pharma and HTA bodies. This is not surprising. As critical gatekeepers for new medicine seeking access to national markets, HTAs are playing central roles in moves to tighten control over drug spending across Europe. As part of this, bodies are going further than ever bef...
Source: EyeForPharma - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ross Davies Source Type: news

Value: A Balancing Act
There are perhaps few buzzwords bandied around in pharma circles as much in recent years as ‘value’. Companies are actively competing to stress value over volume and highlight their zealous efforts to go well ‘beyond the pill’ and deliver real value for every stakeholder in healthcare, from the patient up.A cynic might suggest that such talk is simply pharma marketing speak but, with ever-tightened purse strings, payers are demanding that pharma delivers on its promises, as they seek to understand how much bang for their buck they can expect when they purchase drugs.“We are over the tipping po...
Source: EyeForPharma - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ross Davies Source Type: news

The damning vaginal mesh dossier: The shocking failures behind the scandal
That failure of regulatory oversight is bad enough. But we can also reveal that the new evidence was tainted by a multi-million- dollar deal between that company and the Swedish doctor who invented TVT. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Epidemiology, treatment and mortality of trochanteric and subtrochanteric hip fractures: data from the Swedish fracture register - Mattisson L, Bojan A, Enocson A.
BACKGROUND: Hip fractures are a major worldwide public health problem and includes two main types of fractures: the intracapsular (cervical) and the extracapsular (trochanteric and subtrochanteric) fractures. The aim of this study on patients with trochant... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Short term risk of non-fatal and fatal suicidal behaviours: the predictive validity of the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale in a Swedish adult psychiatric population with a recent episode of self-harm - Lindh ÅU, Waern M, Beckman K, Renberg ES, Dahlin M, Runeson B.
BACKGROUND: The Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) is a relatively new instrument for the assessment of suicidal ideation and behaviour that is widely used in clinical and research settings. The predictive properties of the C-SSRS have mainly ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

3D mammography detected 34 percent more breast cancers in screening
(Lund University) After screening 15 000 women over a period of five years, a major clinical study in Sweden has shown that 3D mammography, or breast tomosynthesis, detects over 30 percent more cancers compared to traditional mammography - with a majority of the detected tumors proving to be invasive cancers. The extensive screening study was conducted by Lund University and Sk å ne University Hospital in Sweden, and the results are now published in the reputable journal Lancet Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Conference highlights good examples of climate change adaptation in Nordic region
(Link ö ping University) The Nordic countries have begun the job of adapting their societies to climate change. But a lot of work remains. To facilitate the exchange of experiences, and to learn more about climate change adaptation, a conference will be held from October 23 to 25 in Norrk ö ping, Sweden. The organisers are Link ö ping University, Norrk ö ping Municipality and Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Digital contraceptives and period trackers: the rise of femtech
With market predicted to be worth $50bn by 2025, is women ’s health no longer being overlooked by tech? Digital contraceptive techniques have been on the receiving end of bad press recently after Swedish company Natural Cycles was described as “misleading” by the UK’s advertising body, and a number of women complained about becoming pregnant while relying on the app.But that hasn ’t stopped the industry from thriving, with the launch ofMoody Month, which tracks hormones and menstrual cycles , andFlo Health, an ovulation calculator, being valued at $200m in the same week, suggesting there is st...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Isabel Woodford Tags: Apps Technology Life and style Reproduction Science Biology Pregnancy Health & wellbeing Family Parents and parenting NHS Society Technology startups Source Type: news

What Does It Take to Develop a VR Solution in Healthcare
Technology is changing the face of healthcare as we know it. Virtual and Augmented Reality that once were associated only with game and film industries are now becoming a real game-changer in healthcare. Gone are the days when students practiced on real patients. Today, VR and AR solutions can not only improve medical education and training but also provide profound patient treatment, medical rehabilitation, consultation, and diagnosis. What’s next? AR & VR in Healthcare: The Industry Landscape A recent report by Research and Markets states that augmented and virtual reality in the healthcare market ...
Source: MDDI - October 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Marta Hlova Tags: Digital Health Imaging Source Type: news

Risk factors for hospital readmission among Swedish older adults - Hallgren J, Aslan AKD.
The objectives were to analyze risk factors for readmission within 30  days from hospital discharge. METHODS: A prospective study wit... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Managing bullying in Swedish workplace settings: a concealed and only partially acknowledged problem - Strandmark K M, Rahm G, Rystedt I, Nordstr öm G, Wilde-Larsson B.
AIM: The purpose of this article was to explore workplace routines and strategies for preventing and managing bullying in the context of health and elderly care. BACKGROUND: Bullying is a serious problem in workplaces with consequences for the indi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

He's in a rush, she isn't: Reproductive strategy drives slower female aging
(Link ö ping University) The aging of males and females is influenced by how they choose to invest their available energy, according to a study of fruit flies carried out at Link ö ping University, Sweden. The results, published in The American Naturalist, support the idea that differences in strategy between the sexes to maximise the number of offspring contribute to differences in aging between males and females. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Weight-Loss Surgery Linked to Easier Deliveries
A new study of almost 6,000 women in Sweden found weight-loss surgery was tied to fewer cesarean sections, infections, tears, hemorrhages or post-term deliveries. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Irregular heartbeat may increase a person’s risk of dementia in later life
Researchers at the Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University in Sweden found that people with atrial fibrillation may experience a faster decline in thinking and memory skills. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

RaySearch, Canon sign collaboration pact
Canon Medical Systems and radiation therapy software developer RaySearch Laboratories...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Canon launches Healthy Sonographer Program RaySearch signs Swedish Cancer Institute Canon installs 1st MR Theater in U.S. RaySearch to highlight software upgrades at AAPM Canon makes 1st U.S. installation of 1.5T scanner RaySearch wins Canadian installation (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 10, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Hereditary melanoma effectively treated with immunotherapy
Individuals with an inherited form of melanoma responded well to immunotherapy in a small trial in Sweden. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Getinge Launches Maquet PowerLED II
Gothenburg, Sweden, Oct. 8, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Getinge is today announcing the launch of the Maquet PowerLED II Surgical Light. The Maquet PowerLED II Surgical Light brings best-in-class technology to surgical suites or Hybr... Devices, Surgery, Product Launch Getinge, PowerLED II, Surgical Light (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - October 8, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Assessing the Preparedness of the Health Care System Infrastructure in Six European Countries for an Alzheimer's Treatment
Researchers examined the health systems of France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom to determine whether they have the capacity to rapidly move a disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease from approval into widespread clinical use. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Assessing the pedestrian response to urban outdoor lighting: a full-scale laboratory study - Rahm J, Johansson M.
This study identifies and applies methods for evaluating the human response to pedestrian lighting applications intended for future use by the municipality of Malm ö, Sweden. The methods employed provide a supplementary perspective to that given by the pho... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Immunotherapy effective against hereditary melanoma
(Karolinska Institutet) Individuals with an inherited form of skin cancer often have a poor prognosis. The type of immunotherapy that was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is, however, particularly effective in this patient group, research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows. The study is published in the Journal of Medical Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How the Finnish lifestyle of getting drunk while wearing pants became the new hygge
Many of us are familiar with the idea of stripping to our pants, opening a beer and watching TV. But in Finland ‘Pantsdrunk’ has been elevated to an official activityIt ’s been a long day: one meeting after another. You leave your office, happy the working day is finally over. You could head out, network until the early hours, but somehow it doesn’t appeal. What you need, more than anything, is to relax and de-stress.You might be tempted to turn to the popular Scandinavian antidotes to stress,lagom andhygge. But are they really any good? Lagom, a Swedish word, can be translated as “in perfect ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Miska Rantanen Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Finland Books Culture Source Type: news

Physical function tests predict incident falls: a prospective study of 2969 men in the Swedish Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study - C öster ME, Karlsson M, Ohlsson C, Mellström D, Lorentzon M, Ribom E, Rosengren B.
AIMS: Falls are common in the elderly population, and fall-related injuries are a major health issue. We investigated the ability of simple physical tests to predict incident falls. METHODS: The Swedish Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Impulsive suicide attempts among young people-a prospective multicentre cohort study in Sweden - Beckman K, Lindh AU, Waern M, Stromsten L, Renberg ES, Runeson B, Dahlin M.
BACKGROUND: We aimed to compare the prevalence of impulsive suicide attempts (ISA) among young adults and those over 25 who present at hospital in connection with attempted suicide. We also aimed to identify factors associated with ISA in young adults and ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news

Constructing respectability from disfavoured social positions: exploring young femininities and health as shaped by marginalisation and social context. A qualitative study in Northern Sweden - Wiklund M, Ahlgren C, Hammarstr öm A.
BACKGROUND: Gender, class and living conditions shape health and illness. However, few studies have investigated constructs of femininity in relation to health and living conditions among young women who are unemployed and marginalised at an early age. ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Sweden's 'true queen', 8, pulls ancient sword from lake
Saga Nevecek discovers 1,500-year-old sword while skimming stonesAn eight-year-old girl has pulled a 1,500-year-old sword from a lake in southern Sweden.“I felt something with my hand and at first I thought it was a stick,” Saga Nevecektold the local V ärnamo Nyheter newspaper. “Then it had a handle that looked like it was a sword, and then I lifted it up and shouted: ‘Daddy, I found a sword!’”Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jon Henley Tags: Sweden Archaeology Heritage Culture Europe Science World news Source Type: news

This 8-Year-Old Girl Pulled a Pre-Viking-Era Sword From a Lake in Sweden
While swimming on her summer vacation, an eight-year-old girl wrested what she thought was a stick from a lake in Sweden. Instead, it turned out she had discovered a pre-Viking-era sword that archaeologists believe is over 1,000 years old. “It’s not every day that one steps on a sword in the lake!” Mikael Nordström from the Jönköpings Läns Museum told Swedish outlet The Local. According to the arts and cultural museum, the sword, which has preserved metal and wood around it, is about 33 inches long and believed to date back to the 5th or 6th century AD. “We are very keen to see ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized Archaeology onetime overnight Source Type: news

New function of a key component in the immune system discovered
(Lund University) The complement proteins that circulate in our blood are an important part of our immune system. They help identify bacteria, viruses and other harmful organisms, making it easier for our white blood cells to find and neutralise dangerous microbes. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered a previously unknown function of the central complement protein, C3, which describes how C3 regulates autophagy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Even light exercise might lessen severity of a future stroke
(Reuters Health) - People who regularly engage in light to moderate physical activity - like walking four hours a week or swimming two hours weekly - might have less severe strokes than individuals who aren't as active, a Swedish study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

High-risk HPV linked to improved survival in cervical cancer
(Karolinska Institutet) The presence of the human high-risk papillomavirus (HPV) in the diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer is linked to a greatly improved prognosis compared with if high-risk HPV cannot be identified in the tumour, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in the scientific journal PLOS Medicine. The researchers believe that high-risk HPV can be another important prognostic marker that can inform the choice of therapeutic strategy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Use of Evolution to Design Molecules Nets Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 3 Scientists
Frances H. Arnold of the U.S. received half the prize, while her compatriot George P. Smith and Gregory P. Winter of Britain shared the other half. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KENNETH CHANG Tags: Nobel Prizes Chemistry Swedish Academy Source Type: news

Female Nobel prize winner deemed not important enough for Wikipedia entry
Site moderator rejected submission for Donna Strickland, the first female physics winner in 55 years, in MarchWhen the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm announced theNobel prize for physics this week, anyone wanting to find out more about one of the three winners would have drawn a blank on Wikipedia.Related:Physics Nobel prize won by Arthur Ashkin, G érard Mourou and Donna StricklandContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Leyland Cecco in Toronto Tags: Nobel prizes Canada Gender Americas Science Science prizes World news People in science Source Type: news

Frances H Arnold, George P Smith and Gregory P Winter win Nobel prize in chemistry
Briton and two Americans honoured for using evolutionary principles to develop proteins that have been used in new drugs and medical treatmentsNobel prize in chemistry awarded for pioneering work on proteins – as it happenedThree scientists have won the Nobel prize in chemistry for their work in harnessing evolution to produce new enzymes and antibodies.British scientist Sir Gregory P Winter and Americans Frances H Arnold and George P Smith will share the 9m Swedish kronor ( £770,000) prize, awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Nobel prizes Chemistry World news People in science Science prizes Medical research Source Type: news

Nobel prize in chemistry awarded for pioneering work on proteins – live
Americans Frances H Arnold and George P Smith and Briton Gregory P Winter will share the prize of 9m Swedish kronor ( £770,000)Frances H Arnold, George P Smith and Gregory P Winter win Nobel prize in chemistry12.25pmBSTAnd there we have it: the Nobel science prizes are done for another year. Yes, the awards come in for a lot of stick, and much of it is justified. But they do force us to stand back and look at what scientists and engineers have achieved. On Monday, we saw the medicine prize awarded for checkpoint inhibitors, the radical new drugs that help direct the full force of the immune system on to cancer. On Tu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Nobel prizes Chemistry People in science Science prizes World news Medical research Source Type: news

3 Evolutionary Scientists Win Nobel Chemistry Prize
(STOCKHOLM) — Three researchers who “harnessed the power of evolution” to produce enzymes and antibodies that have led to a new best-selling drug and biofuels won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday. Frances Arnold of the California Institute of Technology was awarded half of the 9-million-kronor ($1.01 million) prize, while the other half will be shared by George Smith of the University of Missouri and Gregory Winter of the MRC molecular biology lab in Cambridge, England. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which chose the winners, said Arnold, 62, conducted the first directed evolution of enzym...
Source: TIME: Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: JIM HEINTZ and DAVID KEYTON / AP Tags: Uncategorized nobel prize onetime Source Type: news

Nobel Prize In Chemistry To Be Announced Wednesday
The Nobel Prize in chemistry, which honors researchers for advances in studying how molecules combine and interact, is being announced Wednesday by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Patients with diabetes are ‘up to 31 per cent more at risk of cancer’
Researches from Sweden and Manchester warned that diabetics are at a higher risk of developing cancer, and once they do they have far worse survival chance. For men the risk increases by 22%. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Physicist Donna Strickland on Her ‘Surreal’ Nobel Prize Win and the Challenges for Women in Science
Physicist Donna Strickland, a self-described “laser jock” who prefers to keep a low profile, won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday, becoming the third woman ever to do so — an achievement she described as “surreal.” “It’s hard for me to take it in right now,” Strickland tells TIME. “But I’m trying to enjoy it.” An associate professor at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, she spent the morning fielding emails from around the world, visiting with students who showed up at her door with congratulations, and discussing the Nobel Prize-winning resear...
Source: TIME: Science - October 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized Canada nobel prize onetime Science Source Type: news

Nobel Prize in Physics Goes To U.S., Canadian and French Scientists for Laser Breakthrough
(STOCKHOLM) — Three scientists from the United States, Canada and France won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for work with lasers described as revolutionary and bringing science fiction into reality. The American, Arthur Ashkin, entered the record books of the Nobel Prizes by becoming the oldest laureate at age 96. Donna Strickland, of the University of Waterloo in Canada, became the first woman to win a Nobel in three years and is only the third to have won the prize for physics. Frenchman Gerard Mourou of the Ecole Polytechnique and University of Michigan will share half of the 9 million kronor ($1.01 million) t...
Source: TIME: Science - October 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Keyton and Jim Heintz / AP Tags: Uncategorized nobel prize onetime Source Type: news

Scientists From U.S., Canada, France Split Nobel Prize In Physics For Laser Work
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences says American Arthur Ashkin has won half the prize, while Gérard Mourou of France and Donna Strickland of Canada share the remainder. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Sullivan Source Type: news

New Cancer Treatments Just Won Two Scientists a Nobel Prize. Here ’s How They Work
It wasn’t the Nobel Committee that reached James Allison first on Monday to inform him that he had won the coveted annual prize in Physiology or Medicine. It was his son who broke the news with a 5:30 am phone call. Minutes later, a Swedish reporter reached him before the committee could. “I was like, ‘Oh my God, it happened,’” Allison says to TIME. “I’m just in shock, I guess.” Allison, chair of immunology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, was awarded the Nobel for his discovery in 1994 in mice that led to an entirely new class of anti-cancer drugs called...
Source: TIME: Health - October 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

New Cancer Treatments Just Won 2 Scientists a Nobel Prize. Here ’s How They Work
It wasn’t the Nobel Committee that reached James Allison first on Monday to inform him that he had won the coveted annual prize in Physiology or Medicine. It was his son who broke the news with a 5:30 am phone call. Minutes later, a Swedish reporter reached him before the committee could. “I was like, ‘Oh my God, it happened,’” Allison says to TIME. “I’m just in shock, I guess.” Allison, chair of immunology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, was awarded the Nobel for his discovery in 1994 in mice that led to an entirely new class of anti-cancer drugs called...
Source: TIME: Health - October 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news

Orexo Internalizes Contract Field Force in the US to Further Strengthen the Commercial Organization
UPPSALA, Sweden, Oct. 1, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Orexo AB (publ) today announces that the field representatives in the contracted field force have been offered direct employment with Orexo US Inc. starting October 1, 2018. The de... Biopharmaceuticals, Drug Delivery, Distribution Orexo, Zubsolv (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - October 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded for Immune System Cancer Research
STOCKHOLM — The Nobel Prize in medicine was awarded Monday to two researchers from the United States and Japan for advances in discovering how the body’s immune system can fight off the scourge of cancer. The 9-million-kronor ($1.01 million) prize will be shared by James Allison of the University of Texas Austin and Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University. Their parallel work concerned proteins that act as brakes on the body’s immune system and it constitutes “a landmark in our fight against cancer,” said a statement from the Nobel Assembly of Sweden’s Karolinska Institute, which selects winner...
Source: TIME: Health - October 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Source Type: news

Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded for Immune System Cancer Research
STOCKHOLM — The Nobel Prize in medicine was awarded Monday to two researchers from the United States and Japan for advances in discovering how the body’s immune system can fight off the scourge of cancer. The 9-million-kronor ($1.01 million) prize will be shared by James Allison of the University of Texas Austin and Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University. Their parallel work concerned proteins that act as brakes on the body’s immune system and it constitutes “a landmark in our fight against cancer,” said a statement from the Nobel Assembly of Sweden’s Karolinska Institute, which selects winner...
Source: TIME: Science - October 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Source Type: news

Watch at Real.video as Paul Joseph Watson skewers Sweden for allowing radical leftist feminists to commit cultural suicide by handing over nation to Islamic "refugees"
(Natural News) The Scandinavian cesspool of leftism known as Sweden is systematically committing cultural suicide – and it’s all because of the radical feminists in charge who insist upon handing the country over to Islamic “refugees” from Africa and the Middle East who care nothing about the native culture, and who are raping and murdering... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Increased use of anti-clotting drugs tied to fewer strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation
(Reuters Health) - More patients with heart rhythm problems that put them at high risk for stroke are taking daily pills to prevent clotting - and they're having fewer strokes as a result, a Swedish study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Alzheimer's 'world first' as scientists discover how to destroy toxic particles
Cambridge University scientists along with a team in Sweden identified abnormal deposits called protein oligomers as the most likely cause of dementia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Talking about biological differences between men and women now gets you FIRED from academia
(Natural News) A professor of neuroscience at Lund University in Sweden is on the verge of being fired simply for stating that there are fundamental differences between males and females that are “biologically founded,” and that aren’t based on “social constructs alone.” According to Academic Rights Watch, a Swedish publication that publishes its articles in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news