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Adolescents' motives for selling sex in a welfare state - a Swedish national study - Fredlund C, Dahlstr öm O, Svedin CG, Wadsby M, Jonsson LS, Priebe G.
In addition to money or other compensation, other motives for selling sex may be important in a welfare country such as Sweden. The aim of this study was to carry out an exploratory investigation of adolescents' motives for selling sex in a population-base... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Cell types underlying schizophrenia identified
(Karolinska Institutet) Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and University of North Carolina, USA, have identified the cell types underlying schizophrenia in a new study published in Nature Genetics. The findings offer a roadmap for the development of new therapies to target the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advanced biofuels can be produced extremely efficiently, confirms industrial demonstration
(Chalmers University of Technology) Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed new technologies that can be used to convert industrial plants to produce fossil-free heat, electricity, fuel, chemicals and materials. The technical potential is enormous -- using only Sweden's currently existing power plants, renewable fuels equivalent to 10 percent of the world's aviation fuel could be produced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How intestinal worms hinder tuberculosis vaccination
(PLOS) New research in mice suggests that chronic infection with intestinal worms indirectly reduces the number of cells in lymph nodes near the skin, inhibiting the immune system's response to the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine for tuberculosis. Xiaogang Feng of Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Excess heat from a data center re-purposed to warm people's homes in Stockholm
(Natural News) Data centers, which are typically used to handle data when people access online services or the internet in general, can generate a lot of heat in their operations. All the excess heat from them usually just gets wasted, but now a Swedish firm has a plan to finally put them to good use.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sweden stands up for open access – cancels agreement with Elsevier
Large science publisher Elsevier does not meet the requirements of Swedish universities and research institutes. In order to take steps towards the goal of immediate open access by 2026 set by the Swedish Government, the Bibsam Consortium has after 20 years decided not to renew the agreement with the scientific publisher Elsevier. To be able to make the necessary transition from a subscription-based to an open access publishing system the Bibsam Consortium requires: Immediate open access to all articles published in Elsevier journals by researchers affiliated to participating organisations Reading access for participating...
Source: News from STM - May 16, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Attentive adults increase children's ability to empathise
(Lund University) For human beings to function socially, they need to be able to perceive, understand, and talk about others' mental states, such as beliefs, desires and intentions. There is no consensus among researchers as to when children develop this ability. Previous research indicates that it emerges around the age of four, but research at Lund University in Sweden shows that children can demonstrate this ability earlier - within social situations that they experience together with an engaged adult. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Too much or too little? A short-term longitudinal study of youth's own economic resources and risk behaviour - Plenty S.
This study examined socioeconomic differences in risk behaviours according to youth-oriented measures of economic resources. Using a representative sample of Swedish adolescents (n  = 3,939, 51% females), the associations that youth's own economy shared... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Snorers suffer from nerve and muscle damage in the palate
(Umea University) People who snore may have extensive tissue damage in the nerves and muscles of the soft palate. This can in turn create problems with swallowing and contribute to development of sleep apnea. Treatment strategies aimed at early intervention to stop snoring might have beneficial effects in healing or preventing development of sleep apnea. These findings are explained in a new dissertation at Ume å University, Sweden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eco-friendly water treatment works best with experienced bacterial flora
(Lund University) Sustainable, biological filters called slow sand filters have been used to filter drinking water since the 1800s. They don't use any chemicals, create no waste and use very little energy. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that not only are the older filters more efficient cleaners -- they could be making a comeback soon with the help of new technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Keeping Up With the Royals - Celebrity Photos
From British Queen Elizabeth II to Victoria, the Crown Princess of Sweden, we begin to take a photographic tour of the royals who live and rule today. ... Sign up for the AARP Lifestyle Newsletter ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - May 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Experience of data collection in support of the assessment of global progress in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 - a Swedish pilot study - Johansson M.
Most countries collect loss and damage data after disasters for learning purposes and in support of future preventive work. The lack of international standards and sharing principles implies heterogeneous data sets, thus presenting a challenge to the devel... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Birth Factors Mostly Explain England's Child Mortality Rate
WEDNESDAY, May 9, 2018 -- Birth characteristics largely explain the higher child mortality in England versus Sweden, according to a study published online May 3 in The Lancet. Ania Zylbersztejn, Ph.D., from the Farr Institute of Health Informatics... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Creative people more at risk of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, huge study finds
A King's College study of Swedish medical records found those who studied subjects like music, drama or art at university have more psychiatric conditions than the general public. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low Health Literacy Tied to Worse Postoperative Recovery, QOL Low Health Literacy Tied to Worse Postoperative Recovery, QOL
In patients undergoing same-day surgery, low functional health literacy is associated with poorer postoperative recovery and lower health-related quality of life, researchers in Sweden say.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Eating Nuts Linked to Lower Odds of Having AFib
In a large study, Swedish researchers found that eating nuts three or more times a week was associated with an 18% lower chance of having AFib. It also helped cut the odds of heart failure. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Children's rights and violence: a case analysis at a Swedish boarding school - Francia G, Edling S.
Drawing on the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the article highlights various conceptions of violence at a Swedish boarding school and is based on a critical discourse analysis of different educational and media documents. The investigation indicate... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Safe and unsafe drinking situations through children's eyes: comparing recalled childhood emotions regarding family members' drinking from Italy and Scandinavia - T örrönen J, Rolando S.
This article examines how people in childhood responded emotionally to family members' drinking in Finland, Italy, and Sweden. The data consist of retrospective childhood memories told and shared in a focus group context. The results suggest that in the Me... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Amoral, im/moral and dis/loyal: children's moral status in child welfare - Knezevic Z.
This article is a discursive examination of children's status as knowledgeable moral agents within the Swedish child welfare system and in the widely used assessment framework BBIC. Departing from Fricker's concept of epistemic injustice, three discursive ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Unique study concludes that migratory birds move away from diseases to raise their young
(Natural News) Swedish researchers have found that European migratory songbirds leave their warm but disease-laden homes in the tropics to raise their vulnerable young in the healthier environs of Europe. This way, according to an article on ScienceDaily, their species could make do with less robust but also less costly immune systems. The University of Lund researchers came across... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

All by myself: the joys of being single
Christina Patterson used to be ashamed about being single, but after hearing others ’ stories, that feeling has goneFor most of my adult life, I have been ashamed of being single. At weddings, I have felt my smile crack. I once walked out of a friend ’s book launch when he gave a speech about finding the love of his life. I felt sick with envy, physically sick. But when I got home, what I felt most of all was shame. I didn’t understand why my friends had managed to succeed in an area where I had so spectacularly failed.When I was a child, I thought it was easy. You fell in love, you got married in a lovel...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Christina Patterson Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Women Relationships Source Type: news

UK under 5 death rate is among Europe's worst as youngsters twice as likely to die than the Swedish
British youngsters under five are 50 per cent more likely to die than those in Sweden, according to a damning report. The rate is also around 25 per cent higher than in France, Germany, Italy and Spain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flockmate or loner? Identifying the genes behind sociality in chickens
(Link ö ping University) Five genes that affect sociality-related behavior in chickens have been identified by researchers at Link ö ping University in Sweden. Several of the genes have been previously linked to nervous system function or behavior. The new study, which is published in Genetics, is the first that assigns these genes a role in sociality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Weekday for operation does not affect survival from lung cancer
(Karolinska Institutet) The day of the week on which a patient has a lung cancer operation has no significance for their survival. This has been demonstrated by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, in a new study published in the journal Chest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Evacuation of Swedish survivors after the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami: the survivors' perspective and symptoms of post-traumatic stress - Gudmundsdottir R, Hultman CM, Valdimarsd óttir U.
AIMS: Following the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami, Swedish authorities received public criticism for slow implementation of rescue work. Meanwhile, data are scarce on survivors' perspectives and potential mental health symptoms associated with timing of eva... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Biomarkers can predict diabetes diagnosis 20 years in advance
A new Swedish study finds that patients who pay attention to certain biological markers of overall health can predict their likelihood of getting type 2 diabetes 20 years in advance and make the lifestyle changes necessary to prevent it.   The study, published in the online journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, found that body mass index, fasting triglycerides and fasting glucose numbers are reliable indicators of whether people would develop the disease. “The results of the present study… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Biomarkers can predict diabetes diagnosis 20 years in advance
A new Swedish study finds that patients who pay attention to certain biological markers of overall health can predict their likelihood of getting type 2 diabetes 20 years in advance and make the lifestyle changes necessary to prevent it.   The study, published in the online journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, found that body mass index, fasting triglycerides and fasting glucose numbers are reliable indicators of whether people would develop the disease. “The results of the present study… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Skeletons tell story of 'truly horrifying' fifth-century massacre
About 1,500 years ago, something terrible happened at Sandby borg, a ringfort on the beautiful island of Öland, off Sweden's southeast Baltic coast. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plogging fitness trend sees runners picking up litter
Joggers are picking up litter in a fitness trend that has come to the UK from Sweden. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An exploratory study of long-haul truck drivers' secondary tasks and reasons for performing them - Iseland T, Johansson E, Skoog S, Daderman AM.
Research on drivers has shown how certain visual-manual secondary tasks, unrelated to driving, increase the risk of being involved in crashes. The purpose of the study was to investigate (1) if long-haul truck drivers in Sweden engage in secondary tasks wh... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Are damselflies in distress?
(Science in Public) Damselflies are evolving rapidly as they expand their range in response to a warming climate, according to new research led by Macquarie University researchers in Sydney. The study, published in Molecular Ecology today, investigated the genetics of an insect's capacity to adapt and survive in a changing world by looking at the blue-tailed damselfly (Ischnura elegans) in Sweden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sweden reveals why a "cashless" society may not be such a good idea after all
(Natural News) Is it possible for a society to function properly without the use of any cash? Sweden could have the answer to this question and more, as the country has had a good run of using digital payment systems so far, and many Swedish establishments have helped cashless payment methods almost become status quo.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Open Access References: Spring 2018
This report a summary of barriers and strategies to the uptake of CER/PCOR and future perspectives on the field. Carer experience of end-of-life service provision: a social network analysis Rosemary Leonard, et. al. in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care. To identify the position of formal service providers in the networks of those providing end-of-life care in the home from the perspective of the informal network. (Source: Society for Participatory Medicine)
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - April 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Danny van Leeuwen Tags: General Newsletter Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Experimental glue could soon fix broken bones
Currently, fixing bone fractures is no easy feat in the absence of a suitable adhesive. But researchers from Sweden may have just solved this problem. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bones / Orthopedics Source Type: news

More cases of cancer can be discovered early at a health center
(University of Gothenburg) Considerably more cases of suspected cancer can today be identified early within primary care. Partly based on symptoms but also statistics on the patients' visits to health centres, indicates research from Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

You Asked: Is Listening to Music Good For Your Health?
If you’re looking for an easy way to transform your mood, cue the music. Studies have shown that music can buoy your mood and fend off depression. It can also improve blood flow in ways similar to statins, lower your levels of stress-related hormones like cortisol and ease pain. Listening to music before an operation can even improve post-surgery outcomes. How can music do so much good? Music seems to “selectively activate” neurochemical systems and brain structures associated with positive mood, emotion regulation, attention and memory in ways that promote beneficial changes, says Kim Innes, a professor ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

When politics affects demography: How Erdogan has brought 10 percent more children to Turkey
(Bocconi University) Politics, and in particular the Islamist AKP party, played a decisive role in the reversal of demographic decline in Turkey since the early 2000s, through the provision of local welfare policies directed to families. The effects of the Turkish policies are surprisingly similar to Swedish welfare, but in a completely different setting. The study rules out alternative explanations based on an increase in religiosity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are changes in drinking related to changes in cannabis use among Swedish adolescents? A time series analysis for the period 1989-2016 - Gripe I, Danielsson AK, Ramstedt M.
AIMS: To examine if changes in alcohol consumption are associated with changes in cannabis use among Swedish adolescents in a period of diverging trends, and to investigate if cannabis and alcohol act as complements or substitutes. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICI... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The Swedish school attack in Trollh ättan - Erlandsson Å, Reid Meloy J.
This is a case report of the offender and offense characteristics of a targeted attack on a Swedish school using a sword, with a particular focus upon the offender's history, the relationship between mental disorder and ideology, and whether or not it was ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Swedish archaeologists uncover brutal 5th century massacre
A three-year dig has uncovered the shocking violence with which the inhabitants of the coastal village of Sandby Borg were struck downArchaeologists in Sweden have uncovered startling evidence of a massacre more than 1500 years ago, when the inhabitants of a small village were struck down in their houses or as they fled along the street, and their bodies left to rot where they fell – with their treasures including beautiful jewellery and Roman gold coins.At Sandby Borg on the shore of Öland island, off the south-east coast of Sweden, there was no escape. In one house an old man was smashed on the skull so that h...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Science Sweden Europe Source Type: news

How the World ’s First Loneliness Minister Will Tackle ‘the Sad Reality of Modern Life’
Tracey Crouch knows what it’s like to feel frighteningly alone. After giving birth to her first child, Freddie, in 2016, the British lawmaker says that despite having a “network of friends, family and a wonderful partner,” she began feeling cut off from the world. It wasn’t a new sensation; Crouch says she also suffered from depression six years earlier, when she first became a member of parliament. It felt like she was “in a very dark place, a very lonely place” she recalls. Crouch’s experiences may inform her new role as the country’s first Minister for Loneliness, a role c...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John / London Tags: Uncategorized loneliness public health tracey crouch Source Type: news

Men with prostate cancer could be treated in just two and a half weeks
The treatment would cut the number of sessions patients need to seven, one every other day, compared to the 39 needed at present, a study in Sweden and Denmark suggested. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating more fish could prevent Parkinson's disease
(Chalmers University of Technology) Parvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson's disease. A new study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shines more light on the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People who follow the Paleo diet should consume more fish to truly eat like a caveman, study finds
(Natural News) Researchers at Lund University in Sweden uncovered what cave dwellers ate in southern Scandinavia during the Paleolithic period. In their study, they found that a large part of the Stone Age people’s diet was composed of fish. The researchers – who are osteologists, in particular – combined chemical analyses of human bones from more... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to make a robot that will build your Ikea furniture
Here ’s one way to tackle the dreaded task of assembling your Ikea furniture: Get a robot to do it for you.With some off-the-shelf robotics hardware and a substantial amount of programming, researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore built a machine capable of assembling the Swedish... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

How A Swedish City Is Bridging The Gap Between Social And Healthcare For The Elderly
Coordinating social and healthcare for the elderly its a critical challenge. Every country faces roadblocks that prevent efficient delivery of care for young and old alike. But local innovations can deliver remarkable results. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: William A. Haseltine, Contributor Source Type: news

NuvoAir to launch its updated smart, wireless spirometer for home use
Stockholm, Sweden-based respiratory monitor maker NuvoAir (formerly Pond Healthcare Innovation) has unveiled the newest version of its home-use spirometer. Dubbed the Air Next, the small and portable device is connected to users ’ smartphones or tablets via Bluetooth LE. In contrast, the company’s previous offering, the Air Smart Spirometer, required a hard connection through a device’s audio jack. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - April 18, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Similarity between high-risk atherosclerotic plaque and cancer cells discovered
(Lund University) New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that inflammatory, unstable atherosclerotic plaque has a metabolism that differs from that of stable plaque -- and is similar to that of cancer cells. Future research will therefore investigate whether cancer drugs could potentially be used to treat cardiovascular disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AstraZeneca to invest $90 million in India over next 5 years
The announcement follows the signing of a bilateral innovation partnership for a sustainable future between Sweden and India. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Utilization of psychiatric care and antidepressants among people with different severity of depression: a population-based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden - Sun Y, Moller J, Lundin A, Wong SYS, Yip BHK, Forsell Y.
PURPOSE: To identify how severity of depression predicts future utilization of psychiatric care and antidepressants. METHODS: Data derived from a longitudinal population-based study in Stockholm, Sweden, include 10443 participants aged 20-64  years... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news