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Another Eclipse Is Coming This Week. Here ’s What to Know About the Partial Solar Eclipse
The second solar eclipse in six months is coming later this week. The partial solar eclipse will be visible in Antarctica and a sliver of southern South America, experts say. Skygazers in Uruguay, Argentina, southern Chile, far western Paraguay, far southern Brazil and Antarctica can see the celestial event on Thursday, Feb. 15 for up to about two hours, according to Ernie Wright, a programmer in the Scientific Visualization Studio at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. While a partial solar eclipse is not nearly as remarkable as a total solar eclipse, keen spectators wearing the proper protective eyewear will be abl...
Source: TIME: Science - February 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Yellow Fever Cases in Brazil Raise Concern in Latin America Yellow Fever Cases in Brazil Raise Concern in Latin America
The outbreak of yellow fever in Brazil is a cause for concern in the region and in neighboring countries, such as Argentina.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Missed the ‘Super Blue Blood Moon’ Eclipse? Here Are All the Other Eclipses Coming Up in 2018
Stargazers came out in droves to enjoy the “super blue blood moon” eclipse early on Wednesday morning — “super” because the moon was at its closest point to Earth in its orbit, “blue” because it’s the second full moon in a calendar month, and “blood” because the eclipse made it appear red. This was the first such triple-threat moon visible in the U.S. since 1866, USA Today reports — but if you missed it, there are plenty more eclipses to catch this year, of both solar and lunar varieties. Here’s what to look out for: February 15: Partial Solar Eclipse...
Source: TIME: Science - January 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Begley Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime Source Type: news

Psychological violence against women: what factors increase the risk of this kind of intimate partner abuse? - Safranoff A.
Using data from Argentina's National Study on Violence Against Women [Estudio nacional sobre violencias contra las mujeres] carried out in 2015, the article identifies the risk factors that increase women's vulnerability to psychological abuse. FIN... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news

FRAX intervention and assessment thresholds for seven Latin American countries
(International Osteoporosis Foundation) Newly published Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX ® ) -based intervention thresholds for the following seven Latin American countries represent a substantial advance in the detection of individuals at high risk of fracture: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico and Venezuela. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Don't step on my heels: Scientists teach robots how to respect personal space
(Chinese Association of Automation) Robots have a lot to learn about humans, including how to respect their personal space. Scientists at the National University of San Juan, Argentina are giving mobile robots a crash course in avoiding collisions with humans. Using impedance control, the researchers aimed to regulate the social dynamics between the robot's movements and the interactions of the robot's environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Debate on Glyphosate Use Comes to a Head in Argentina
Academics discuss the impacts on health and the environment of the use of glyphosate in Argentine agriculture, during a Dec. 6 conference at the University of Buenos Aires. Concern about this topic is now on the country’s public agenda. Credit: Daniel Gutman / IPSBy Daniel GutmanBUENOS AIRES, Dec 8 2017 (IPS)In and around the city of Rosario, where most of Argentina’s soybean processing plants are concentrated, a local law banned the use of glyphosate, the most widely-used herbicide in Argentina. But two weeks later, producers managed to exert enough pressure to obtain a promise that the ban would be overturned...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Daniel Gutman Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories Source Type: news

Factors associated with postpartum depression in women from low socioeconomic level in Argentina: a hierarchical model approach - Pham D, Cormick G, Amyx MM, Gibbons L, Doty M, Brown A, Norwood A, Daray FM, Althabe F, Beliz án JM.
PURPOSE: to estimate the prevalence of depression at 4-week postpartum using the Edinburgh postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) in women who delivered in a public maternity hospital in Argentina. METHODS: This prospective cohort study was carried out... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

FOXTROT ™ NC PTCA Balloon Catheter Gains Regulatory Approval in Argentina
(Source: Microport News Release)
Source: Microport News Release - November 24, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

One in 10 children work, UN agency reports at start of conference to end underage labour
An estimated 152 million children around the world work, a practice that the international community at a United Nations co-organized conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina, is trying to eliminate. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychiatric comorbidities and suicidality among patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders in Argentina - Fern ández VC, Alonso N, Melamud L, Villa AM.
This study aimed to evaluate the psychopathological profile, presence... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Argentine Judge Refuses To Recognize Ecuadorian Award In Lago Agrio Case
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - A judge in Argentina on Oct. 31 rejected and refused to recognize a $9.5 billion judgment against Chevron Corp. for remediation damages, which was handed down in an Ecuadorian court in a case brought by an attorney representing a group of residents who contend that the company injured them while conducting oil operations in the Lago Agrio region of Ecuador (Aguinda Salazar Maria, et al. v. Chevron Corporation, No. 97260/2012, Nat. Civ. Ct. No. 61, Buenos Aires, Argentina). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - November 8, 2017 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

From Buenos Aires to Boston for pediatric stroke care
Twice a year, Osvaldo and Sol board a plane in Buenos Aires, Argentina. For a week or more, they leave behind their home, their friends, their jobs — and, sometimes, their two daughters, Ines and Clara. But what waits for them, a continent away, is worth it. In Boston, they say, they have found expert care for their son, Francisco. “Francisco was perfectly fine when he was born,” says Sol. “But two days later, we were having trouble waking him up.” Although initially doctors assured the family that his behavior was normal, they quickly transferred him to the neonatal intensive care unit when h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Cameron Trenor Dr. Michael Rivkin International Health Services physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Pedestrian crossing behavior, an observational study in the city of Ushuaia, Argentina - Po ó FM, Ledesma RD, Trujillo R.
The objective of the present research was to exp... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Global Campaign to Smoke Out Tobacco Firms from UN Body
A cigarette vendor in Manila sells a pack of 20 sticks for less than a dollar. Credit: Kara Santos/IPSBy Thalif DeenUNITED NATIONS, Oct 19 2017 (IPS)The world’s tobacco companies – which have been widely ostracized in the UN system – may be ousted from one of their last fortified strongholds in the United Nations: the International Labour Organization (ILO). A letter signed by nearly 200 public health organizations and labour rights groups worldwide is calling on the Governing Body of the Geneva-based UN agency to expel tobacco companies from its subsidiary membership.“Tobacco companies victimize fa...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Thalif Deen Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

WhatsApp streamlines heart attack care in Argentina
Argentinian ambulance doctors are using WhatsApp to fasttrack their patients ’ care. Study data presented at the Argentine Congress of Cardiology’s 2017 conference suggests that using the free messaging app to send diagnostic electrocardiograms (ECGs) directly to a hospital’s catheterization lab allowed heart attack patients to bypass the emergency department and reduc e mortality. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - October 19, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

WhatsApp use by Argentina ambulances associated with faster heart attack treatment
(European Society of Cardiology) WhatsApp use by ambulance doctors in Argentina was associated with faster treatment of heart attack and lower mortality in an observational study presented today at the Argentine Congress of Cardiology (SAC 2017). The free messaging application was used to send diagnostic electrocardiograms (ECGs) directly to hospital catheterisation (cath) laboratories, enabling patients to bypass the emergency department. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cochrane launches new centre for best available healthcare evidence in Argentina
Cochrane is delighted to announce the official launch of  Cochrane Argentina, a new Cochranecentre with a vision to increase the use of best evidence to inform healthcare decision making throughout Argentina.Cochrane Argentina consists of three institutions working in collaboration: Instituto de Efectividad Cl ínica y Sanitaria (IECS, Buenos Aires), Instituto Universitario Hospital Italiano (IUHI, Buenos Aires) and Centro Rosarino de Estudios Perinatales (CREP, Santa Fe).Cochrane Argentina will promote evidence-based decision making in health care by supporting and training new local authors of Cochra...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - October 6, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

The prosecution of sexual and gender crimes in the national courts of Argentina - Montanez PS, Waisman V, Yoshida K.
This article provides an analysis of a number of judgments which feature sexual and gender crimes in domestic prosecutions in Argentina. The authors analyze eleven decisions where individuals have been convicted of these crimes and argue that two major lin... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Steven Tyler Cancels Aerosmith Tour to ‘Immediately’ Deal With Medical Issue
(BOSTON) — Aerosmith singer Steven Tyler says he has returned to the United States for medical care and the band is canceling the last four shows of its tour in South America. Tyler said on social media Tuesday that he flew back to the U.S. on Monday night after a show in Sao Paulo, Brazil. He says he is “not in a life threatening condition” but needs to deal with a medical issue “immediately” to maintain future scheduled performances. The band has canceled two shows this month, in Curitiba, Brazil, and Santiago, Chile, and two shows next month, in Rosario, Argentina, and Monterrey, Mexico. Ty...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized celebrities onetime Source Type: news

Mercury Mining Awaits International Control in Mexico
Artisanal gold mining in Latin America uses mercury, a practice that should be modified in countries that have ratified the international Minamata Convention for the control of this toxic metal. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPSBy Emilio GodoyMEXICO CITY, Sep 26 2017 (IPS)For environmentalist Patricia Ruiz the only word that comes to mind is “devastating,” when describing the situation of mercury mining in her home state of Querétaro in central Mexico.“There are a large number of pits (from which the mercury is extracted), and there are the tailing ponds containing mining waste, all of which drains i...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emilio Godoy Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources Regional Categories gold mining mercury Mexico Minam Source Type: news

20 Hotels You Didn ’t Know Were Owned by Celebrities
This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adeline Duff/ Travel + Leisure Tags: Uncategorized celebrities onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Any type of physical exercise is good for the heart
Conclusion This study shows that all physical activity, in any form, is good for us. This includes both recreational and non-recreational activities. Don't be misled by some of the media: non-recreational activities like housework are not "better" than recreational activities like playing sports or going to the gym. The fact that reduced risk was seen with non-recreational activity across all countries, but only seen with recreational activity in high-income countries was probably just because fewer people in lower-income countries play sports or go to the gym. The researchers estimate that 8% of all deaths and...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

The Essentials of Life Now in One Hot Springs Spot
After a decade of work and planning, Amy Thomas has realized her dream of opening a business in downtown Hot Springs — actually, three businesses: the Argentinian Coffee & Wine Bar; Oxy-Zen, what may be Arkansas’ only oxygen bar; and Thai-Me Spa, a day spa. (Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care)
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - September 18, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

‘I Said Goodbye to Everything.’ What It Was Like to Live Through Hurricane Irma
It’s just after dawn on Saturday and Miami Beach is empty. There are no tourists picking their way to the surf, no cheery hotel lights, no thumping music from car radios. The air is gauzy. Everything is a ghostly metallic gray. It’s 14 hours before Hurricane Irma, the biggest storm ever recorded in the Atlantic, is supposed to pass through this spot. The National Weather Service warns it could be the most powerful hurricane in living memory. The Big One everyone’s been waiting for. It could be catastrophic in its devastation, the governor says. The mayor of Miami-Dade County opens a record number of shelt...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Haley Sweetland Edwards / Miami Tags: Uncategorized Florida hurricane irma Source Type: news

Health systems in low income countries - four new overviews
Four new Cochrane EPOC  overviews of reviews show reliable evidence on the effects of different ways of organising, financing, and governing health systems in low-income countries and identify important evidence gaps.Links to the new overviews in the Cochrane Library:Delivery arrangments |Financial arrangements |Governance arrangements |Implementation strategiesStrengthening health systems in low-income countries is key to achieving universal health coverage and achieving the health-related Sustainable Development Goals. Achieving these goals requires informed decisions about health systems. Systematic reviews on...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 13, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

NSF announces 14 new PIRE awards to support scientific collaboration in 24 countries
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is pleased to announce 14 new Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) awards, totaling more than $66 million over the next five years. The awards will fund 14 lead U.S. institutions and U.S. partner institutions for collaborative projects involving international partners in 24 countries: Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Cuba, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Malawi, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243068&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - September 12, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hurricane Irma Starts Raking Miami
At the Aloft Hotel in Doral, Fla., the mood among the guests awaiting Hurricane Irma’s arrival was solemn but calm on Sunday. The Category 4 hurricane made landfall at 10 a.m. Sunday morning in Cudjoe Key, just north of Key West, according to Miami-Dade County spokesman Mike Hernandez. By 11:30, the storm had crossed though the Keys and was headed north toward heavily populated swaths of South Florida. Its power was already becoming apparent in the Miami area. Outside the thick glass windows of the Aloft, tropical-force winds raked through the industrial neighborhood, ripping the fronds off palm trees, uprooting stre...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Haley Sweetland Edwards Tags: Uncategorized Florida hurricane irma Source Type: news

U.S. FDA Approves Chemo Group's Benznidazole to Treat Children with Chagas Disease
WASHINGTON D.C., BUENOS AIRES, Argentina, MADRID and GENEVA, August 31, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- On August 29th, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Chemo Research's New Drug Application (NDA) for benznidazole. Th... Biopharmaceuticals, FDA Chemo Group, benznidazole, Chagas disease (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - August 31, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Results of global fats and carbs study not very relevant for UK
Conclusion The results of the study have been presented in the media as if they overturn all current dietary guidelines. In the UK at least, that is completely misleading. The study results support the UK guidelines, having found that people who get around 50% of their calories from carbohydrates and 35% from fat, as recommended by Public Health England, were likely to live the longest. There are some limitations to the study, not least that observational studies cannot prove cause and effect. For example, the very low fat and high carbohydrate levels of diets found among some participants in the study might simply repres...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Nature fights back: Elephant tramples big game hunter to death
(Natural News) An Argentinian hunter has recently been attacked and killed by an elephant at a private game farm in Namibia, PJ Media reported online. According to the report, Jose Monzalvez and four other trophy hunters traveled to the private game farm in pursuit of elephants. The report noted that the hunting party was tracking an elephant... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Responsible ownership of dogs and human health in neighborhoods of San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina - Garibotti G, Zachar ías D, Flores V, Catriman S, Falconaro A, Kabaradjian S, Luque ML, Macedo B, Molina J, Rauque C, Soto M, Vazquez G, Vega R, Viozzi G.
Human relationship with dogs associates with numerous and varied benefits on human health; however, it also presents significant risks. The goal of this study was to describe demographic parameters and characteristics of dog ownership with possible implica... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

A Total Solar Eclipse Will Make History as It Sweeps Across America
Millions of Americans will turn their eyes skyward Monday as a total solar eclipse sails across the country from coast to coast for the first time, turning day into night in more than a dozen states. It’s the first total solar eclipse that will be seen in no other country but the U.S. since the nation’s birth in 1776. Dubbed “The Great American Eclipse,” it is also the first one visible from the contiguous U.S. since 1979. The rare phenomenon happens when the moon passes directly between the sun and the Earth and completely covers the entire face of the sun. All of North America will see the moon pa...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized eclipse onetime space space 2017 Source Type: news

Firefighter ™ PTCA Balloon Catheter Gains Regulatory Approval in Argentina
(Source: Microport News Release)
Source: Microport News Release - August 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

Here ’s Where You Can See Every Total Solar Eclipse for the Next 50 Years
A total solar eclipse will obscure the sun in parts of 14 states across the U.S. on Aug. 21, a rare event that’s been called the “Great American Eclipse.” You can find a detailed map showing the path of the eclipse here. But if you live in a place that won’t see the total eclipse or even a partial eclipse, don’t worry: It won’t be the last time the U.S. — and the rest of the world — will get a chance to see the moon block the sun in the coming decades. The next total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. will take place in seven years, and even before then total eclipses will take ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized eclipse onetime space 2017 Source Type: news

This Newly Discovered Dinosaur Makes T. Rex ‘Look Like a Dwarf’
(WASHINGTON) — A study proclaims a newly named species the heavyweight champion of all dinosaurs, making the scary Tyrannosaurus rex look like a munchkin. At 76 tons (69 metric tons), the plant-eating behemoth was as heavy as a space shuttle. The dinosaur’s fossils were found in southern Argentina in 2012. Researchers who examined and dated them said the long-necked creature was the biggest of a group of large dinosaurs called titanosaurs. “There was one small part of the family that went crazy on size,” said Diego Pol of the Egidio Feruglio paleontology museum in Argentina, co-author of the study p...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized dinosaurs onetime Science Source Type: news

Stinging caterpillars from the genera Podalia, Leucanella and Lonomia in Misiones, Argentina: a preliminary comparative approach to understand their toxicity - Quintana MA, Sciani JM, Auada AVV, Mart ínez MM, Sánchez MN, Santoro ML, Fan HW, Peichoto ME.
Dermal contact with Lepidoptera specimens at their larval stage (caterpillar) may cause systemic and/or local envenomation. There are multiple venomous species of them in Argentina, but their overall venom composition is poorly known. Lately, several cases... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Non-Human Animals and Insects Source Type: news

The Biotech industry is taking over the regulation of GMOs from the inside.
(Natural News) The British non-profit GMWatch recently revealed the agribusiness takeover of Conabia, the National Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology of Argentina. Conabia is the GMO assessment body of Argentina. According to GMWatch, 26 of 34 its members were either agribusiness company employees or had major conflicts of interest*. (Article by Jonathan Latham, PhD republished from Independentsciencenews.org)... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New analysis of rare Argentinian rat unlocks origin of the largest mammalian genome
(McMaster University) New biological information gleaned from the red vizcacha rat, a native species of Argentina, demonstrates how genomes can rapidly change in size.Researchers from McMaster University set out to study this particular species because its genome, or its complete set of DNA, is the largest of all mammals, and appears to have increased in size very rapidly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nutrition Market in Brazil: Growth Against the Odds
Until the recession of 2014, Brazil saw a sustained period of strong growth in the functional foods and nutritional supplements market, albeit from a low base. The wealth gap was closing and a burgeoning, better-educated middle class with a rising disposable income was increasingly interested in nutrition products, both as lifestyle accessory and aid to healthier, longer lives.While growth was tempered by the deep recession that hit the country two years ago – and restrictive government regulations remained an ongoing challenge – the recession is now (slowly) easing and optimism about the Brazilian market is fa...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 19, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Marc Yates Source Type: news

Americans Claim Gluten Sensitivity More Than Others
CHICAGO— Avoiding gluten is a worldwide phenomenon, but the reasons why people do so vary, a new study finds. And in the United States, it’s more common for people to say that they avoid the protein because they have a gluten sensitivity, compared with other countries. In the study, the researchers looked at the relative rates of the two main reasons that people give for avoiding gluten: that they have celiac disease and that they have a gluten sensitivity. People with celiac disease can’t digest gluten normally. When they eat it, the protein prompts the immune system to attack the small intestine, leadin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Among bodies: reflections on ethnographic work and the repercussions of exhumations and identifications of the disappeared of the last military dictatorship in Argentina - Panizo L.
This article will investigate the process of confronting death in cases of the disappeared of the last military dictatorship in Argentina. Based on the exhumation and identification of the body of a disappeared person, the article will reflect on how the p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Personal distance: why Russian life has no room for privacy
A survey into how different countries view ideal personal space suggests Russians like to keep things close. Could language and communal living have something to do with it?Why do Russians have no sense of personal space? Astudy by the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology surveyed 9,000 people from a series of countries in order to calculate an international scale of personal space. Dubbed “the space invaders”, the Russians came out of it looking either extremely needy or extremely squashed.The study was an attempt to test theories about temperature and conversation distance. Some sociologists be...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Viv Groskop Tags: Psychology Science Russia Europe Source Type: news

High frequency of illegal drug use influences condom use among female transgender sex workers in Argentina: impact on HIV and syphilis infections - Avila MM, Dos Ramos Far ías MS, Fazzi L, Romero M, Reynaga E, Marone R, Pando MA.
The high prevalence of HIV and syphilis found among female transgender sex workers (FTSWs) in Argentina calls for the study of factors leading to negative health consequences. Given the particular characteristics observed in this population (high marginali... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Argentina lawmakers approve cannabis oil for medicinal use
BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) - Argentina gave final legislative approval on Wednesday to a bill legalizing cannabis oil for medicinal use and permitting the federal government to grow marijuana for research and therapeutic purposes. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Mortality trends in young people aged 1-24 years: Argentina, 1947-2012 - Di Cecco V, Alazraqui M, Spinelli H.
BACKGROUND: Global mortality trends highlight changing patterns in young people, especially young men, yet little evidence of long-term trends is available in Argentina. OBJECTIVE: Given the lack of published evidenced within the country, this work... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

In rough times, some reasons for optimism: lessons from Latin America on REDD+
This article provides a summary of some important emerging lessons to date on REDD+ from the Latin American region. REDD+ has already proven to be successful, but under certain conditions A number of lessons on REDD+ can be learnt from the agreement between Norway and Brazil. First, REDD+ can achieve measurable results. While the deforestation trend in the Latin American country picked up a bit recently, the decrease from historical deforestation trends is clear. Second, a minimum level of readiness is required. Brazil had the in-house capacities on policy design, policy implementation, monitoring, and enforcement. If the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Addressing the arsenic in Argentinian groundwater
Many areas worldwide struggle with high levels of arsenic in the water supply. Scientists from Argentina - where several regions are affected - are collaborating with European colleagues to find solutions in the context of an EU-funded project. Together, they intend to develop a low-cost system to produce safe drinking water for people and livestock. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 7, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

Smoking rises in Argentina heart attack patients as cigarettes'among cheapest in world '
Levels of smoking are rising in heart attack patients in Argentina, according to a study. The findings coincide with a 100% increase in affordability in the last decade, which have made cigarettes among the cheapest in the world. Researchers also report improved treatment for heart attacks but no decrease in mortality. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Smoking rises in Argentina heart attack patients as cigarettes 'among cheapest in world'
(European Society of Cardiology) Levels of smoking are rising in heart attack patients in Argentina, according to a study presented today at the Argentine Congress of Cardiology (SAC 2016). The findings coincide with a 100 percent increase in affordability in the last decade, which have made cigarettes among the cheapest in the world. Researchers also report improved treatment for heart attacks but no decrease in mortality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news