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The Medical Emergency Of Otto Warmbier
All that the doctors who treated Cincinnati, Ohio resident Otto Warmbier knew is what they had seen or maybe read in the news. They knew he had just been released on June 13 from imprisonment in North Korea where he had been held by for more than 17 months. He had been sentenced in March 2016 to 15 years of hard labor for allegedly removing a propaganda poster from a wall at a Pyongyang hotel where he had been staying. The University of Virginia honors student had been visiting the authoritarian state during a five-day trip with a group called Young Pioneer Tours, which is a group out of China – an important note. Ot...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early Loop Diuretic Tx Tied to Lower Mortality in Heart Failure
Early - treatment group had significantly lower in - hospital mortality even after adjustment (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - June 22, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Impedimed wins CE Mark for Sozo monitoring system
Australian medtech developer ImpediMed said today it won CE Mark approval in the European Union for its Sozo bioimpedance spectroscopy platform. The Sozo system is designed to non-invasively measure and monitor fluid status and body composition using the company’s L-Dex lateral lymphedema assessment system. With the clearance, the Sozo platform is indicated for use as a bioimpedance spectroscopy platform for use in hospitals, clinics and in patient’s homes under a clinician’s direction, the company said. “Obtaining CE Mark for multiple indications for the Sozo platform is a pivotal regulat...
Source: Mass Device - June 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Diagnostics Regulatory/Compliance ImpediMed Source Type: news

How Robust Are Clinical Trials in Heart Failure? How Robust Are Clinical Trials in Heart Failure?
The authors propose an additional, easy to understand metric--the'fragility index'--to improve the statistical significance and robustness of heart failure RCTs.European Heart Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Medtronic touts cost, treatment data on CRT devices
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) today touted data showing that a pair of algorithms improved treatment and lowered costs for patients treated with its cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. The Fridley, Minn.-based medical device giant said its AdaptivCRT and EffectiveCRT algorithms lowered costs and improved therapy delivery in heart failure patients with atrial fibrillation. Results from 1 of 3 analyses presented at the European Heart Rhythm Assn. Europace Cardiostim conference in Vienna this week showed that the AdaptivCRT program cut the lifetime cost of treatment by an average of €1,055 (about $1,174) in 3 Eur...
Source: Mass Device - June 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Cardiac Rhythm Management Medtronic Source Type: news

Medtronic touts retrospective data in Reactive ATP therapy AF study
This study does exactly that. It helps us understand how Reactive ATP impacts the burden of persistent atrial fibrillation in a larger and more varied group of patients than we might normally be able to study within the constraints of a controlled trial,” cardiac rhythm and heart failure division chief medical officer Dr. Rob Kowal said in a prepared statement. Last week, Medtronic said its nano-sized Micra pacemaker will be heading into space as part of a Nebraska high school student’s science project. The post Medtronic touts retrospective data in Reactive ATP therapy AF study appeared first on MassDevic...
Source: Mass Device - June 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Medtronic Source Type: news

‘Broken heart’ syndrome: THIS is how stress can cause long-term damage to YOUR heart
HEART failure caused by severe stress might cause more damage to the heart muscle than previously believed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hi-tech vest may help keep heart failure patients out of hospital
(MediaSource) About 5.7 million adults in the US suffer from heart failure, and because of a dangerous buildup of fluid in their lungs, more than half of those patients end up back in the hospital within six months. But researchers say a high-tech vest can help doctors monitor a heart patient's symptoms remotely, which may prevent the need for rehospitalization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Risk Factors Explain Most Heart Failure Risk in Incident A - Fib
Four modifiable factors account for most of the population attributable risk of heart failure in women (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - June 16, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Heart failure: Stem cell therapy may worsen heart damage
For heart failure patients, research suggests that using cardiac stem cells for autologous stem cell therapy may exacerbate heart tissue damage. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stem Cell Research Source Type: news

How creative FDA regulation led to first-in-the-world approval of a cutting-edge heart valve
Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D., Director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health By: Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D., and Bram Zuckerman, M.D. Nearly six years ago FDA approved an artificial transcatheter heart valve (THV) to treat patients having severe symptoms and life-threatening heart problems such as fainting, chest pain, heart failure, irregular heart rhythms, or cardiac arrest, because one of the valves in their heart (the aortic valve) was no longer working properly and they were too sick for surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has revolutionized the treatment of these patients.  But the U...
Source: Mass Device - June 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog FDA Voice Source Type: news

​Multimillion-dollar gift to boost research at Christ Hospital
A $2 million donation from a foundation established by a Greater Cincinnati businessman and his wife will enable Christ Hospital to create an endowed chair at its Heart and Vascular Center. The gift from the Frank and Margo Homan Family Foundation will support the work of Dr. Eugene Chung, a heart failure specialist who is executive medical director of Christ Hospital Cardiovascular Physicians. Frank Homan, who owned Auto-Vehicle Parts Co. for nearly 60 years and also was a real est ate developer,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 16, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Barrett J. Brunsman Source Type: news

​Multimillion-dollar gift to boost research at Christ Hospital
A $2 million donation from a foundation established by a Greater Cincinnati businessman and his wife will enable Christ Hospital to create an endowed chair at its Heart and Vascular Center. The gift from the Frank and Margo Homan Family Foundation will support the work of Dr. Eugene Chung, a heart failure specialist who is executive medical director of Christ Hospital Cardiovascular Physicians. Frank Homan, who owned Auto-Vehicle Parts Co. for nearly 60 years and also was a real est ate developer,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 16, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Barrett J. Brunsman Source Type: news

Cells to Society: Policy / International Achievement / Research News
This study examined whether Get Busy Get Better—a 10-session, home-based behavioral intervention—enhanced positive appraisals of life, and in turn, mediated treatment effects on depressive symptoms in older African American men.     Read more   Pediatrics ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - June 15, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

With Better Stroke Prevention in Afib, Attention Turns to HF Risk (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Risk factors for heart failure ID'd in women with atrial fibrillation (Source: MedPage Today State Required CME)
Source: MedPage Today State Required CME - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Traditional treatment is better for iron-deficiency anaemia in children
Ferrous sulfate was more effectively than iron polysaccharide complex Related items fromOnMedica UK toddlers ’ diet 'cause for concern’ The importance of tackling iron deficiency in heart failure patients The investigation and management of microcytic anaemia Iron deficiency anaemia: how far should we investigate? (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - June 14, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Beta - Blockers Cut Mortality for Patients in Sinus Rhythm
Drop in mortality for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction regardless of heart rate (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - June 13, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Upstate earns top achievement awards for stroke and heart failure care
American Heart Association, in conjunction with the American Stroke Association, recognize Upstate efforts in this area after rigorous review. (Source: SUNY Upstate Medical)
Source: SUNY Upstate Medical - June 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in Elderly HF Patients Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in Elderly HF Patients
This study investigated the efficacy and safety of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in older heart failure patients with both reduced and preserved ejection fraction.Age and Ageing (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

What are Indications for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)?
DiscussionObstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is defined as a “disorder of breathing during sleep characterized by prolonged partial upper airway obstruction and/or intermittent complete obstruction (obstructive apnea) that disrupts normal ventilation during sleep and normal sleep patterns.” It is different than primary snoring which is snoring without apnea, sleep arousals, or problems with gas exchange. OSAS symptoms include snoring (often with snorts, gasps or pauses), disturbed sleep (often frequent arousals) and daytime neurobehavioral problems. Sleepiness during the day can occur but is less common in...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Congestive heart failure: Symptoms, treatment, and prevention
Congestive heart failure makes it difficult for the heart to pump blood through the body, causing the other organs to receive less blood than they require. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Natriuretic Peptides as Predictors of Mortality in Acute HF Natriuretic Peptides as Predictors of Mortality in Acute HF
This study suggests that NT-proBNP may be a valuable tool for prognostic mortality risk stratification in elderly patients hospitalized with acutely decompensated heart failure.Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Longevity of Ovarian Function and Risk for Heart Failure Longevity of Ovarian Function and Risk for Heart Failure
Dr Andrew Kaunitz discusses hormone receptor therapy in menopausal women and the relationship between ovarian function duration and risk for heart failure.Medscape Ob/Gyn (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health Commentary Source Type: news

Economic Evaluation of Quality Improvement Interventions Designed to Prevent Hospital Readmission. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Systematic review (50 studies) found that, when using such interventions, readmissions declined by 12.1% among patients with heart failure, and 6.3 % among general populations with a saving of $972 per patient with HF and loss of $169 per patient among general populations. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eko Devices wins FDA nod for portable cardiac monitor
Eko Devices said today that its Duo portable cardiac device won FDA clearance. The hand-held system combines a digital stethoscope with an electrocardiogram to give cardiologists insight into their patients’ daily cardiac function. The Duo device wirelessly pairs with Eko’s app to allows for remote monitoring and diagnosis by a healthcare practitioner. “Eko Duo’s consumer-friendly design can help transform how clinicians monitor heart health in-person or virtually,” Dr. John Chorba, a cardiologist at UC San Francisco, said in prepared remarks. “We need powerful tools which heart failure ...
Source: Mass Device - June 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiovascular Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Patient Monitoring Regulatory/Compliance ekodevices Source Type: news

FDA approves valve-in-valve procedures for Edwards Lifesciences Sapien 3 TAVR
The FDA yesterday expanded the indication for the Sapien 3 replacement heart valve made by Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) to include valve-in-valve procedures for aortic and mitral valve patients who are too sick for surgery. The federal safety watchdog said the expansion is the 1st approval for a transcatheter valve replacement for valve-in-valve procedures when the original surgically implanted valves fail. The procedure involves inserting the Sapien 3 device inside the failed or failing valve. “For the 1st time, a regulatory agency is approving a transcatheter heart valve as a valve-in-valve treatme...
Source: Mass Device - June 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Replacement Heart Valves Wall Street Beat Edwards Lifesciences Source Type: news

Pfizer receives FDA Fast Track designation for tafamidis for transthyretin cardiomyopathy
Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Fast Track designation to tafamidis, the company's investigational treatment for transthyretin cardiomyopathy (TTR-CM). This rare disease is associated with progressive heart failure and is universally fatal.(1,2,3) Currently in Phase 3 clinical development for TTR-CM, tafamidis is being evaluated for its potential to reduce mortality and cardiovascular-related hospitalizations.(4) (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Pfizer Business and Industry Source Type: news

Iron Therapy in Patients With HF and Iron Deficiency Iron Therapy in Patients With HF and Iron Deficiency
Iron deficiency is common in heart failure patients, but supplementation needs to be addressed differently than in healthy patients. What are the options?American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Safety of gene transfer to treat heart failure supports further clinical development
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Based on the encouraging safety data that has emerged from multiple clinical trials that used different gene transfer approaches to improve heart function in patients suffering from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, researchers conclude that this therapeutic strategy can be advanced with acceptable risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sleep apnoea in expectant mothers presents risk to newborns
Study suggests greater adverse neonatal outcomes Related items fromOnMedica New implantable device may curb sleep apnoea in heart failure patients Poor quality sleep linked to heart disease Sleep apnoea linked to earlier cognitive impairment Sleep apnoea might increase risk of atrial fibrillation Oral device improves sleep apnoea and related symptoms (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - June 5, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

New guidelines for in-flight emergencies, proposed
All planes should carry defibrillators, say experts Related items fromOnMedica Fainting after air travel could be a sign of pulmonary embolism European advice launched on heart failure Safety questions over adrenaline for cardiac arrest CPR training drive for public to focus on youth (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - June 5, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Acute heart failure: What you need to know
In this article learn about acute heart failure. We look at the causes, symptoms, how it is diagnosed, and the treatments available. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Progressive Dyspnea
Medic 15 is called to a residential address for an 81-year-old female with shortness of breath. You and your partner arrive on scene at a single-story house. The patient is with her daughter, and both are able to provide you with a history-recurrent breast cancer, currently on chemotherapy and congestive heart failure. The patient notes she's developed worsening shortness of breath over the past 2-3 days. She denies having chest pain, upper back pain, cough, upper respiratory symptoms, fevers, chills or lower extremity swelling. You place the patient on the monitor and find her to be in sinus tachycardia with a pulse of 12...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elizabeth K. Powell, MD Tags: Airway & Respiratory Columns Source Type: news

News: Heart Failure Scale Offers Clues on Who to Admit
No abstract available (Source: Emergency Medicine News)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - June 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Source Type: news

High-Tech Platform Might Allow Home Assessment of Heart Failure High-Tech Platform Might Allow Home Assessment of Heart Failure
A new high-tech platform might someday allow home assessment of heart failure using a tiny blood sample, researchers from China report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Hormone receptor protein that promotes chronic heart failure discovered
A new study, published in theJournal of Experimental Medicine, reports that corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 exacerbates chronic cardiac dysfunction.News Medical (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 31, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

GPs worry over long-term use of NSAIDs
GPs aware of NSAID risks but unclear of their scale Related items fromOnMedica Taking antidepressants with painkillers could increase risk of haemorrhage GP prescribing intervention cuts emergency admissions Fresh study links prescribed NSAIDs with heart attacks NSAID use linked with increased risk of cardiac arrest NSAIDs and COX 2s linked to heart failure admission (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - May 31, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Beta-blockers 'useless' for many heart attack patients, study reports
Conclusion This study aimed to see whether beta blockers reduce mortality in people who've had a heart attack but who don't have heart failure or systolic dysfunction. It found no difference between those who were and those who were not given beta-blockers on discharge from hospital. The authors say this adds to the evidence that routine prescription of beta blockers might not be needed for patients without heart failure following a heart attack. Current UK guidelines recommend all people who have had a heart attack take beta blockers for at least one year to reduce risk of recurrent events. Only people with heart failure ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

Quitting Meth Is Necessary to Improve Related Cardiac Symptoms, Study Suggests (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH Methamphetamine users who develop cardiomyopathy see symptom improvement only when they stop using the drug, according to a JACC: Heart Failure study.Researchers in Germany studied 30 … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 30, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Beta-Blockers Might Not Improve Survival in Some Heart Attack Patients (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH Use of beta-blockers after myocardial infarction might not improve 1-year survival in patients who don't have heart failure or left ventricular systolic dysfunction, suggests an observational study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. U.S. guidelines currently recommend … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 30, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

The importance of tackling iron deficiency in heart failure patients
Nick Hartshorne-Evans explains how failing to address iron deficiency in heart failure patients increases the risk of hospitalisation Related items fromOnMedica Daily iron supplement during pregnancy improves birthweight Higher iron levels linked to gestational diabetes Iron deficiency anaemia: how far should we investigate? (Source: OnMedica Views)
Source: OnMedica Views - May 30, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Beta blockers may not help many heart attack victims, research claims
Study finds 95% of patients who had heart attack but not heart failure saw no benefit, suggesting drugs are overprescribedMany patients given beta blockers after aheart attack may not benefit from being on the drugs, suggesting they may be being overprescribed, researchers have said.UK medical guidelines recommend all people who have had a heart attack should be put on beta blockers, medicines that reduce the activity of the heart and lower blood pressure.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Heart attack Medical research Health Society UK news Science Source Type: news

Heart failure breakthrough: Scientists identify protein that promotes chronic condition
Scientists have discovered a protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure - meaning they are one step closer to stopping it. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Some heart attack patients may not benefit from beta blockers
New research challenges established medical practice that all heart attack patients should be on beta blockers. The study - by a research team at the University of Leeds - looked at patients who had a heart attack but did not suffer heart failure - a complication of a heart attack where the heart muscle is damaged and ceases to function properly. It found that heart attack patients who did not have heart failure did not live any longer after being given beta blockers - yet around 95% of patients who fall into this category end up on the medication. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - May 29, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Remote Monitoring and Long-Term Prognosis in HF Patients Remote Monitoring and Long-Term Prognosis in HF Patients
Can remote monitoring of implantable ICDs and CRT-Ds improve long-term prognosis in heart failure patients under real-world clinical conditions?Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Stopping drug abuse can reverse related heart damage
(American College of Cardiology) Quitting methamphetamine use can reverse the damage the drug causes to the heart and improve heart function in abusers when combined with appropriate medical treatment, potentially preventing future drug-related cases of heart failure or other worse outcomes, according to a study published today in JACC: Heart Failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists identify protein linked to chronic heart failure
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers in Japan have identified a receptor protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure. The study, 'Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 exacerbates chronic cardiac dysfunction,' which will be published May 26 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this protein could help treat a disease that affects more than 20 million people worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for May 25, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Artificial pancreas: These companies are racing to make one Medical device companies are close to achieving the holy grail of diabetes treatment: a combined glucose sensor, control algorithm and insulin infusion device that eff...
Source: Mass Device - May 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Ultrasound-drug combo treats pulmonary embolism in less time with fewer drugs
When venous clots break off and travel through a patient’s circulatory system, they can become trapped in the lung and block blood flow. This strains the heart’s ability to pump blood through the lungs and can ultimately lead to heart failure. Traditionally, patients with pulmonary embolisms are treated overnight with systemic infusions of tissue plasminogen activator. But, according to Dr. Victor Tapson at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, large doses of tPA are associated with side effects including intracranial bleeding and smaller doses can be safer and just as effective as the larger, c...
Source: Mass Device - May 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Vascular Wall Street Beat BTG Source Type: news

Medtronic beats The Street with fiscal Q4, 2017 results
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) posted sales and earnings that topped Wall Street’s estimates for its fiscal 4th quarter and 2017, as its full-year bottom line grew nearly 14% on sales growth of 3%. The world’s largest medical device company reported profits of $1.16 billion, or 84¢ per share, on sales of $7.92 billion for the 3 months ended April 28, amounting to profit growth of 5.3% and sales growth of 4.6% compared with Q4 2016. Adjusted to exclude 1-time items, earnings per share were $1.33, 2¢ ahead of The Street, where analysts were looking for sales of $7.86 billion. Full-year profits were $4.03 billion,...
Source: Mass Device - May 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: MassDevice Earnings Roundup Wall Street Beat Medtronic Source Type: news