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TALK-1 channels control {beta} cell endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ homeostasis
Ca2+ handling by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves critical roles in controlling pancreatic β cell function and becomes perturbed during the pathogenesis of diabetes. ER Ca2+ homeostasis is determined by ion movements across the ER membrane, including K+ flux through K+ channels. We demonstrated that K+ flux through ER-localized TALK-1 channels facilitated Ca2+ release from the ER in mouse and human β cells. We found that β cells from mice lacking TALK-1 exhibited reduced basal cytosolic Ca2+ and increased ER Ca2+ concentrations, suggesting reduced ER Ca2+ leak. These changes in Ca2+ homeostasis were pre...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Vierra, N. C., Dadi, P. K., Milian, S. C., Dickerson, M. T., Jordan, K. L., Gilon, P., Jacobson, D. A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Want to live longer and be stronger? Choose fat over carbs
(Natural News) An animal study published in Cell Metabolism revealed that following a high-fat diet or ketogenic diet may help promote longevity and improve physical strength. As part of the study, a team of researchers at the University of California Davis examined mice that were split into three groups. One group received a regular rodent high-carb... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diet to help you live longer - high fat diet food could boost memory and life expectancy
LIFE expectancy could be boosted by eating a diet high in fat - said to increase physical strength and longevity. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New insight into how excess belly fat may increase cancer risk
Conclusion This animal and laboratory study investigated the possible cellular relationship between excess body fat – specifically fat around the body organs – and cancer risk. It seems one key mechanism by which excess visceral fat could stimulate healthy cells to develop into cancerous ones could be through FGF2 levels. The researchers hope their study could pave the way for possible cancer prevention strategies by stopping FGF2 production in obese people with excess belly fat. They even go as far as suggesting that blocking FGF2 receptors could be one part of a treatment approach after a diagnosis of breas...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

HealthWatch: A New Gene Therapy For Leukemia; A Study On Carbohydrates
This study does not mean you can now eat a ton of butter and steak without worry, but you probably don’t need to feel guilty about eating some fat. In terms of carbohydrates, the study did not distinguish between refined carbs and complex carbs, so further study is needed. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Cancer Research Dr. Mallika Marshall Leukemia Source Type: news

Results of global fats and carbs study not very relevant for UK
Conclusion The results of the study have been presented in the media as if they overturn all current dietary guidelines. In the UK at least, that is completely misleading. The study results support the UK guidelines, having found that people who get around 50% of their calories from carbohydrates and 35% from fat, as recommended by Public Health England, were likely to live the longest. There are some limitations to the study, not least that observational studies cannot prove cause and effect. For example, the very low fat and high carbohydrate levels of diets found among some participants in the study might simply repres...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

High fat diet linked to lower risk of death than diet high in carbs
Current global dietary guidelines need to change emphasis, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica High-quality carbs and unsaturated fats lower heart risks Low-carb diets appear to be safe for short-term use Fibre-rich diet linked to lowered risk of painful knee osteoarthritis Diet, lifestyle and cardiovascular disease Plant-based diet not always best for heart health (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 30, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A high-fat diet can help you live longer - but carbohydrates linked to higher death risk
FOODS such as meat and cheese are good for you compared to carbohydrates, says a study. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PURE Shakes Up Nutritional Field: Finds High Fat Intake Beneficial PURE Shakes Up Nutritional Field: Finds High Fat Intake Beneficial
The new study of dietary habits in 135,000 people around the world found that high fat intake, including saturated fat, was associated with a reduced risk of mortalityMedscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Replacing High Fat with High Carbs Seems a Bad Tradeoff (FREE)
By Joe Elia Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD People with the highest carbohydrate intake fared worse in terms of mortality than those with high fat intakes, according to a Lancet … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - August 29, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Enzyme produced in the liver promotes obesity, fatty liver disease and insulin resistance
In mice given a high fat diet, an increased production of the enzyme DPP4 by the liver promotes an increase in body fat, the development of fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. According to the study, published in Molecular Metabolism, DPP4 production is therefore a cause rather than result of fatty liver and insulin resistance.Science Daily  (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - August 25, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Enzyme produced in the liver promotes obesity, fatty liver disease and insulin resistance
(Deutsches Zentrum fuer Diabetesforschung DZD) In mice that are given a high-fat diet, an increased production of the enzyme DPP4* by the liver promotes an increase in body fat, the development of fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. These were the findings of a current study by DZD-researchers in Potsdam and T ü bingen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Type 2 diabetes: Sponge implants may reduce blood sugar and weight gain
Scientists find that implanting a spongy material into fat tissue of type 2 diabetic mice reduces blood glucose and lessens weight gained on high-fat diet. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

4 Ways to Jazz Up Your Salad
THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 -- Salads are a diet staple for good reason -- they're low calorie and filling. But they can also become boring, and if you need high-fat dressings to jazz them up, you defeat their purpose. Here are four ways to rethink... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Why Elvis Presley ate his emotions
Research shows some are more susceptible than others to overeating high-fat, high-sugar foods. Colorado State University food scientist Melissa Wdowik explores what drove Elvis's obsession. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Elvis ate his emotions
Research shows some are more susceptible than others to overeating high-fat, high-sugar foods. Colorado State University food scientist Melissa Wdowik explores what drove Elvis's obsession. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Reports that antibacterials in pregnancy are 'harmful' unfounded
Conclusion This experimental study in mice demonstrates the ability of TCC, a substance found in some antibacterial soaps, to transfer from mother to baby across the placenta and through breast milk. Moreover, this had signs of developmental effects on new-born mice, reducing brain size. It also increased body weight, which was associated with poorer fat metabolism in the female mice. This research adds to the body of research suggesting that triclocarban, like the antiseptic triclosan, has potentially harmful effects and should not be used in consumer products. However, the study was carried out on mice and they are ...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling suppresses Scd1 transcription in hepatocytes and prevents diet-induced hepatic steatosis
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a spectrum of diseases that ranges in severity from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, the latter of which is a major predisposing factor for liver cirrhosis and cancer. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, which is critical for innate immunity, is generally believed to aggravate disease progression by inducing inflammation. Unexpectedly, we found that deficiency in TIR domain–containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), a cytosolic adaptor that transduces some TLR signals, worsened hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) and that such exacerbati...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - August 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Chen, J., Li, J., Yiu, J. H. C., Lam, J. K. W., Wong, C.-M., Dorweiler, B., Xu, A., Woo, C. W. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

High-fat Diet Linked to Lung Cancer Risk High-fat Diet Linked to Lung Cancer Risk
People who eat a lot of saturated fat are more likely to develop lung cancer than individuals on low-fat diets, a recent study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

High-Fat Diet Linked To Lung Cancer Risk
In addition to not smoking, a healthy diet can reduce lung cancer risk. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-fat diet linked to lung cancer risk
(Reuters Health) - People who eat a lot of saturated fat - the “bad” kind of fat that’s abundant in foods like butter and beef - are more likely to develop lung cancer than individuals on low-fat diets, a recent study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Of mice and cheeseburgers: Experimental drug reverses obesity-related liver disease
(University of Rochester Medical Center) An experimental drug protected mice from one of the many ills of our cheeseburger and milkshake-laden Western diet -- non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The drug reversed liver inflammation, injury and scarring in animals fed a high fat, sugar and cholesterol diet. The diet was designed to replicate the Western fast food diet and recreate the features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease found in people. The research team plans further testing to move it into human trials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exercising in early life may prevent future cancer
Researchers from the University of Auckland found that mice who are physically active before sexual maturation have 'turned down' genes for inflammation, even if they eat high-fat diets. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drinking THIS could protect against memory loss and reverse a high fat diet
GREEN tea could help protect against memory loss and a high-fat Western diet, scientists have revealed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Green tea ingredient may improve memory, obesity
New research with mice suggests an ingredient found in green tea may alleviate high-fat and high-fructose induced insulin resistance and cognitive impairment. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Green tea ingredient may ameliorate memory impairment, brain insulin resistance, and obesity
A study published online in The FASEB Journal, involving mice, suggests that EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate), the most abundant catechin and biologically active component in green tea, could alleviate high-fat and high-fructose (HFFD)-induced insulin resistance and cognitive impairment. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - July 28, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Green tea ingredient may ameliorate memory impairment, brain insulin resistance, and obesity
(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) A study published online in The FASEB Journal, involving mice, suggests that EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate), the most abundant catechin and biologically active component in green tea, could alleviate high-fat and high-fructose (HFFD)-induced insulin resistance and cognitive impairment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Enhancing natriuretic peptide signaling in adipose tissue, but not in muscle, protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance
In addition to controlling blood pressure, cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) can stimulate lipolysis in adipocytes and promote the "browning" of white adipose tissue. NPs may also increase the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle. To unravel the contribution of NP-stimulated metabolism in adipose tissue compared to that in muscle in vivo, we generated mice with tissue-specific deletion of the NP clearance receptor, NPRC, in adipose tissue (NprcAKO) or in skeletal muscle (NprcMKO). We showed that, similar to Nprc null mice, NprcAKO mice, but not NprcMKO mice, were resistant to obesity induced by a high-fat diet....
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wu, W., Shi, F., Liu, D., Ceddia, R. P., Gaffin, R., Wei, W., Fang, H., Lewandowski, E. D., Collins, S. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Science Signaling Podcast for 25 July 2017: Natriuretic peptide signaling in metabolism
Abstract This Podcast features a conversation with Shelia Collins, senior author of a Research Article that appears in the 25 July 2017 issue of Science Signaling, about how cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) exert their beneficial effects on whole-body metabolism. NPs control blood pressure by acting on the kidneys, but they also affect metabolism by stimulating adipose tissue and skeletal muscle to become more metabolically active. Obese individuals have less of these peptides circulating in their blood, suggesting a connection between NP signaling and obesity. NPs stimulate intracellular signaling by binding to and acti...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Collins, S., VanHook, A. M. Tags: STKE Podcasts Source Type: news

High-fat diet in pregnancy causes irreversible depression
A fatty diet during  pregnancy impairs the brain development of children, researchers from Oregon found. It lowers serotonin levels, resulting in mood disorders. The effect cannot be reversed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause mental health problems in offspring
(Oregon Health& Science University) New research in an animal model suggests a high-fat diet during pregnancy alters the development of the brain and endocrine system of offspring. The new study links an unhealthy diet during pregnancy to mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression in children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does exercise facilitate body weight control? The answer may depend on sex.
(Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior) Healthcare practitioners regularly prescribe diet and exercise as a method for patients to lose weight. But exercise might not be equally effective in males and females, according to new research conducted at the University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus.In a study conducted in rats, graduate student Rebecca Foright fed both male and female rats a high fat diet and then trained half of them to run on a treadmill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Replacing a palatable high-fat diet with low fat food causes withdrawal-like symptoms in mice
(Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior) Researchers have found that mice fed a palatable high-fat diet experience stress responses that resemble drug withdrawal when their food is switched to a low-fat diet. A study conducted by Dr. Steve Fordahl, currently at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and Dr. Sara Jones at Wake Forest School of Medicine, identified brain changes in the dopamine neurotransmitter system caused by stress when the palatable diet was removed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PI3K{gamma} activity in leukocytes promotes adipose tissue inflammation and early-onset insulin resistance during obesity
The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) plays a major role in leukocyte recruitment during acute inflammation and has been proposed to inhibit classical macrophage activation by driving immunosuppressive gene expression. PI3K plays an important role in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. In seeking to determine the underlying molecular mechanisms, we showed that PI3K action in high-fat diet–induced inflammation and insulin resistance depended largely on its role in the control of adiposity, which was due to PI3K activity in a nonhematopoietic cell type. However, PI3K activity in leukocytes was required for effi...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Breasson, L., Becattini, B., Sardi, C., Molinaro, A., Zani, F., Marone, R., Botindari, F., Bousquenaud, M., Ruegg, C., Wymann, M. P., Solinas, G. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Western diets could cause liver cancer  
Researchers from the University of California Davis Health found that mice fed a high-sugar, high-fat diet are more likely to develop liver tumors and not respond to treatment for their organ injury. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Binge eating could be a brain disorder
Immune cells that may cause people to gorge on high-fat foods have been identified by University of California, San Francisco, researchers after trials using an experimental drug on mice. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How does a high-fat diet raise colorectal cancer risk?
A high-fat diet is linked to a greater risk of colorectal cancer. Now, researchers believe they have found a molecular explanation for this association. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Colorectal Cancer Source Type: news

Is sense of smell linked to being fatter or thinner?
A study published inCell Metabolism found that mice genetically altered to remove their sense of smell did not gain weight on a high fat diet.CBS News (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 7, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Bowel cancer warning: Western high fat diet 'causes tumours to grow'
A HIGH fat Western diet rich in red and processed meats does cause bowel cancer tumours to grow, a study has found. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Gut microbes influence the body's response to high-fat diet
After switching to a high-fat diet, genetically similar mice showed differences in outcomes that could be predicted by gut microbe markers in their urine. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Researchers publish new findings on influence of high-fat diet on colorectal cancer
Poor diet is associated with 80% of colorectal cancer cases, but the exact pathways by which diet leads to cancer are not known. In a newly published study, Cleveland Clinic researchers have identified a specific molecular pathway that plays a key role in the link between a high-fat diet and tumor growth in the colon. In the July 6 issue of Stem Cell Reports, the team showed in pre-clinical models that cancer stem cell growth in the colon was enhanced by a high-fat, Western diet. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - July 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Could smelling our food lead to weight gain?
A new study finds that mice that lack a sense of smell do not gain weight and burn fat quicker, despite being fed a high-fat diet. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Researchers publish new findings on influence of high-fat diet on colorectal cancer
(Cleveland Clinic) In a newly published study, Cleveland Clinic researchers have identified a specific molecular pathway that plays a key role in the link between a high-fat diet and tumor growth in the colon.In the July 6 issue of Stem Cell Reports, the team showed in pre-clinical models that cancer stem cell growth in the colon was enhanced by a high-fat, Western diet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Lack of sense of smell may trigger fat burning in mice
A new study finds that mice that lack a sense of smell do not gain weight and burn fat quicker, despite being fed a high-fat diet. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Breast cancer: Maternal high-fat diet raises risk across generations
Exposure to a high-fat diet during pregnancy may increase the risk of breast cancer in daughters and great-granddaughters, new research suggests. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Smelling your food makes you fat
(University of California - Berkeley) UC Berkeley researchers developed ways to temporarily eliminate the sense of smell in adult mice, and discovered that those mice that lost smell could eat a high-fat diet and stay a normal weight, while littermates that retained the sense of smell ballooned to twice normal weight. Supersmellers gained more weight than did normal mice on the same high-fat diet. Smell-deficient mice burned excess fat instead of storing it, suggesting a link between smell and metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High-fat diet in pregnancy may cause breast cancer
Researchers from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington DC also found mice offspring had a lower response to cancer treatment and a worse prognosis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-fat diet in pregnancy may increase breast cancer risk
A recent study with mice at Georgetown University shows a high-fat diet during pregnancy can increase the risk of breast cancer over generations. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-fat diet in pregnancy increases breast cancer risk over generations in animal study
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Feeding pregnant female mice a diet high in fat derived from common corn oil resulted in genetic changes that substantially increased breast cancer susceptibility in three generations of female offspring, reports a team of researchers led by scientists at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news