4 schools, 1 home: Inside the new $70M building officials say will turn Camden into a biomedical hub
It's not often competing universities take the big step of moving in together, officials said. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 23, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Michelle Caffrey Source Type: news

WSU part of $66M research effort to cut drug deaths
Wright State University is among a group of Ohio universities to receive federal funding in an effort to reduce the rate of drug overdose deaths. The WSU money will be part of a $65.9 million grant to Ohio research universities funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which is part of the National Institutes of Health's HEALing Communities Study. The goal is to "reduce overdose deaths by 40 percent over three years in selected commu nities by testing a set of proven prevention and treatment… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: DBJ Staff Source Type: news

Universities Crack Down on Love in the Lab
In a controversial first, Princeton University bans relationships between faculty and grad students campus-wide. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 19, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Universities lead effort to help Appalachians trapped by opioid epidemic
(Virginia Tech) With a new grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, universities led by Virginia Tech will unite scientists, a range of health-care and service providers, and communities, including individuals in recovery, to confront the opioid problem, directly in the epicenter of the epidemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

OSU researcher to help lead $10.7 million push toward gonorrhea vaccine
(Oregon State University) The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $10.7 grant to researchers from seven universities to work toward developing a vaccine for gonorrhea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

James Cook University professor Peter Ridd's sacking ruled unlawful
Physics head dismissed after criticising scientific research about climate change impact on the Great Barrier ReefJames Cook University is considering its legal options after the federal circuit court ruled it had unlawfully sacked a professor who had criticised scientific research about the climate change impact on the Great Barrier Reef.Peter Ridd, who was the head of the physics department at the institution from 2009 until 2016, took legal action against his dismissal.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lisa Martin Tags: Great Barrier Reef Australia news Australian universities Climate change Environment Australian education Science Source Type: news

The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation announces 2019 Graduate Fellows
( Fannie and John Hertz Foundation) The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation has announced the 2019 recipients of the prestigious Hertz Fellowship. Drawing from nine of the country's most prestigious research universities, 11 young researchers were selected to receive up to five years of academic support valued at up to $250,000. Along with the funding, Fellows will also be free of many constraints typical of other fellowships, providing them the freedom to pursue innovative research wherever it may lead. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New algorithm allows for faster, animal-free chemical toxicity testing
(Rutgers University) The use of animals to test the toxicity of chemicals may one day become outdated thanks to a low-cost, high-speed algorithm developed by researchers at Rutgers and other universities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Action Alert: Ask Your Members of Congress to Support NSF
Congress has begun its work to set funding levels for federal programs for fiscal year (FY) 2020. Scientists interested in the National Science Foundation (NSF) should consider contacting their U.S. Representative and Senators to ask that they provide NSF with $9 billion in FY 2020. NSF is the primary federal funding source for discovery-driven biological research at our nation’s universities and colleges. The agency provides approximately 69% of extramural federal support for non-medical biological and environmental research at academic institutions. The President’s budget request for FY 2020 proposes a 12.5...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 16, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NOAA Facing Deep Cuts in FY 2020
Under the President’s budget request for fiscal year (FY) 2020, funding for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) would be cut by nearly 18 percent to $4.5 billion. The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) would receive $335.1 million (- 41 percent), with funding for climate research activities slashed by 45 percent. Competitive grants for climate-change research, which received $60 million in FY 2019, would be terminated. The plan calls for eliminating NOAA’s Air Resources Laboratory in College Park, Maryland (-$4.8 million), which studies air chemistry and atmospheric transp...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 16, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study, led by the universities of Bristol and Oxford and published today [Monday 15 April] in the journal PNAS, found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

University employers improve offer at latest pay talks
Unions representing workers across the UK higher education sector met employers yesterday for the second round of pay talks, and received an improved offer over that made at the first meeting on 26 March. UNISON head of education Jon Richards (above) said: “While the employers made an increase to their opening offer, this still falls far short of the fair claim made by unions. “As negotiations continue, the unions will push for an improved deal at the next meeting later this month.” In March, the university employers said they had “an initial envelop...
Source: UNISON Health care news - April 12, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article education services higher ed higher education industrial relations Pay negotiation and bargaining universities Source Type: news

Ships slide in an air envelope
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Friction, corrosion, and biofilms are three major problems in shipping. The research project 'Air-retaining Surfaces' (ARES) -- a collaboration project of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the universities of Bonn and Rostock -- studies new types of ship coatings that permanently retain an air layer under water and, thus, help considerably reduce the three problems. ARES has now been granted the Validation Award by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to Attract AI Talent for Your Medical Device
Artificial intelligence may still be in its infancy, but the demand for AI talent is already growing at warp speed, according to a recent report from jobs site Indeed Inc. Posts for AI-related roles on Indeed nearly doubled between June 2015 and June 2018. Meanwhile, during the same time period, the percent of searches on Indeed using "AI" or "machine learning" increased by 182%. In the medical device and diagnostics industries, we've already seen how artificial intelligence technology can impact medtech. But how can companies differentiate themselves to snag the best AI engineers for their device? &quo...
Source: MDDI - April 10, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Software Source Type: news

National Academies and Academic Institutions Launch Action Collaborative on Preventing Sexual Harassment in Higher Education
National Academies have joined with over 40 colleges, universities, and research institutions to launch an Action Collaborative on Preventing Sexual Harassment in Higher Education. The purpose of the action collaborative is to bring together academic leaders and key stakeholders to prevent sexual harassment across all disciplines and among all people in higher education. The action collaborative is designed to be an active space where colleges, universities, and research and training organizations can research and develop efforts that move beyond basic legal compliance to evidence-based policies and practices for addressin...
Source: News from the National Academies - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Uganda: Doctors Shun Hospitals for Lecturing Over Poor Pay
[Monitor] Kampala -Doctors have abandoned hospitals to teach in universities where their remuneration is double what they earn. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 9, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Uganda: Cancer-Causing Agents Found in City Groundwater
[Monitor] Researchers from IHE Delft Institute for Water Education together with their counterparts from universities in Uganda and Tanzania have found traces of 25 harmful viruses in surface water in the slums of Kampala and Dar es Salaam. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 9, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Tanzania: Cancer Causing Pathogens Found in Kampala, Arusha Slum Groundwater
[East African] Researchers from IHE Delft Institute for Water Education alongside their peers from local universities in Uganda and Tanzania have found traces of 25 harmful viruses in surface water in the slums of Kampala and Arusha. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 9, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Using artificial intelligence to understand collective behavior
(University of Konstanz) A machine learning model can reproduce the swarming behaviour of locusts -- collaborative research project between the Universities of Konstanz and Innsbruck (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

College campus sexual assault and female students with disabilities - Campe MI.
College campus sexual assault is well-documented as a pervasive problem among U.S. colleges and universities, with female college students at the greatest risk. Although more than 30 years of research has been dedicated to uncovering college campus sexual ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

UCL staff say: ‘ Bring them in! ’
UNISON held a noisy and good-humoured protest at University College London (UCL) today, as the first part of a campaign to persuade the university to bring outsourced staff back in house. Shouts of “End outsourcing – in house now!” and “UCL – bring them in!” rang around the courtyard, as members, reps and organisers gathered in front of the university’s art gallery, bringing a burst of purple to the grey day. Organiser Madeline Taylor explained that the university “currently outsources its cleaning and catering and security services.” The cleaning and catering staff are...
Source: UNISON Health care news - April 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News Bring them in higher education outsourcing Source Type: news

Speaking out against psychological child abuse will get you fired by the P.C. police who run America's universities
(Natural News) Board-certified psychiatrist Dr. Allan M. Josephson was terminated from the University of Louisville because he spoke out about the dangers of using puberty-blocking drugs and cross-sex hormones on children with gender dysphoria. Josephson’s views are not shared by the LGBT community; therefore, he became their target. American universities strive to be politically correct... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What do you get if you don't teach stats properly? Farage and Trump | Robert de Vries
The modern world runs on numbers. We need to give university students a framework for understanding themDid you know that Sweden has the second highest rate of rape in the world, behind only Botswana? According to official statistics from the UN Organisation on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), in 2015 Sweden recorded 57 occurrences of rape per 100,000 people, compared to 39 in the USA and just 3 in India. Sweden ’s rape rate has shot up in recent years, during the same period that the country has been accepting large numbers of non-European migrants and asylum seekers.This is an extremely convenient fact for critics of immig...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Robert de Vries Tags: Universities Education Higher education Science Social sciences Students Source Type: news

The brain's auto-complete function
(University of Bonn) When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new collaborative study between the Universities of Birmingham and Bonn now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function. It is now published in the journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$20 million from W.M. Keck Foundation to UCLA will enhance patient experience, spur medical research
A $20 million gift from the W.M. Keck Foundation will fund competitive biomedical research grants at UCLA and support the renovation of the UCLA Medical Plaza, one of Southern California ’s busiest outpatient care centers. The gift brings the W.M. Keck Foundation’s total giving to UCLA to $55 million, and its giving to University of California campuses to more than $165 million.“UCLA is proud to continue its decades-long partnership with the Keck Foundation,” said UCLA Chancellor Gene Block. “Its visionary investments have helped accelerate groundbreaking discoveries that have improved countle...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

If Wounds Could Talk
Medical technology has made inroads in collecting data about health status that were considered impossible just a few short years ago. Automatic recording of data from things such as heart rate to glucose levels can be determined, stored, and transmitted with nearly seamless ease. One of the medical industry's most vexing problems, however – the monitoring and care of wounds – has remained stuck in practices that go back to antiquity. Wounds must be treated and dressed at regular intervals. Those dressings must be checked visually and treatment plans altered as necessary. Studies on the ...
Source: MDDI - April 1, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Greg Goth Tags: Electronics Source Type: news

Skyrmions could provide next generation data storage
Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham, Bristol and Colorado, Boulder have moved a step closer to developing the next generation of data storage and processing devices, using an emerging science called skyrmionics. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Physics; Press Release Source Type: news

Marine heatwave proves devastating to Shark Bay and dolphins, study finds
Dolphin survival and reproductive rates suffered a significant decline following a 2011 marine heatwave affecting around 1,000km of Western Australia ’ s coastline. The findings, published in Current Biology and representing an international collaboration of researchers and universities, including Zurich and Bristol, have important implications for marine conservation and mitigating the effects of climate change. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

According to the Left, it's WRONG to cheat to get into college, but fine to cheat to get into our country
(Natural News) Recently, we’ve seen how ultra-rich, entitled celebrities in America illegally “buy” their teenage children’s way into college when the kid’s academics don’t meet the ultra-high “par” demanded by top notch, prestigious American Universities. Yes, the FBI actually indicted a couple of famous actresses paying off some test proctors and bribing coaches to pave the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Paywalls block scientific progress. Research should be open to everyone | Jason Schmitt
To democratise scholarly publishing, individual academics need to take actionAcademic and scientific research needs to be accessible to all. The world ’s most pressing problems like clean water or food security deserve to have as many people as possible solving their complexities. Yet our current academic research system has no interest in harnessing our collective intelligence. Scientific progress is currently thwarted by one thing: paywalls.Related:It's time for academics to take back control of research journalsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jason Schmitt Tags: Universities Education Higher education Research Science Academics Open access scientific publishing Media Peer review and scientific publishing Newspapers & magazines Source Type: news

Breast cancer: The promises of old recipes
(Universit é de Gen è ve) Of the three major subtypes of breast cancer, the « triple negative » is the most lethal and unlike other breast cancers, it is resistant to most existing therapies. By studying the properties of clofazimine, a 70-year-old antibiotic, scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Lausanne demonstrate its effectiveness in stopping the progression of the disease in in vivo tests. These results highlight the need to re-examine with a fresh eye the drugs already on the market. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bristol part of new National Centre of Excellence for IoT Systems Cybersecurity
The University of Bristol is to work alongside other leading universities and industry partners as part of a new government initiative to position the nation as a world leader in tackling cyber threats. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 28, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards, Business and Enterprise, Research; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical Source Type: news

Bipolar disorder and the college student: a review and implications for universities - Pedersen DE.
OBJECTIVE: This brief report provides a review of the prevalence and expression of bipolar disorder in the college student population. Implications for college teachers and universities working with students with bipolar disorder are presented. MET... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Cochrane in the Workplace - Research
Cochrane does not make clinical recommendations, instead it provides unbiased and high-quality health evidence so that health decisions, policies, and clinical guidelines can be informed by the best available evidence. ‘Cochrane in the workplace’ series collects stories about how Cochrane evidence is being used in non-clinical settings - in universities, by researchers, by guideline makers, and by policy makers.User story:Name: Ellen KooPosition: Research CoordinatorLocation: Toronto, Canada"I completed my Masters of Science, Physiology at the University of Toronto.   I have over 6 years of experience...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - March 26, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

XSurgical Touts MTEC Membership and Future in Surgical Robotics
XSurgical, a firm that is developing a remote-controlled surgical robot technology, has been accepted for membership into the Medical Technology Enterprise Consortium (MTEC). MTEC operates as a biomedical technology consortium that collaborates with multiple government agencies to foster integrated research partnerships in an effort to speed up the development of medical technology solutions for military, veterans, and the civilian population. “The consortium will allow us to collaborate with biomedical technology colleagues at different companies, as well as with multiple government agencies ...
Source: MDDI - March 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: Business Source Type: news

Mumps outbreak at Nottingham universities
Public Health England confirms there are 223 suspected cases at two Nottingham universities. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - March 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medtronic launches Shanghai-based medtech incubator
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said yesterday that it launched a new incubator and accelerator in Shanghai, China looking to support early-stage medtech companies both in the region and globally. The newly launched incubator, dubbed the Medtronic MedTech Innovation Accelerator, resides in the Pujiang International Science and TechnologyCity in Shanghai’s Minhang District, the Fridley, Minn.-based company said. “For nearly 70 years, Medtronic has been focusing on developing transformative medical technologies that improve lives. We promote meaningful innovation by continually investing in internal R&D, as well as...
Source: Mass Device - March 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Research & Development Medtronic Source Type: news

Duke University to Pay $112.5 Million to Settle Claims of Research Misconduct
The university submitted falsified data in connection with 30 grants obtained from the N.I.H. and E.P.A., according to a whistle-blower lawsuit. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SHEILA KAPLAN Tags: your-feed-science Duke University Colleges and Universities Falsification of Data Ethics and Official Misconduct Suits and Litigation (Civil) Frauds and Swindling National Institutes of Health Environmental Protection Agency Source Type: news

Cochrane in the Workplace - Round Up
Cochrane does not make clinical recommendations, instead it provides unbiased and high-quality health evidence so that health decisions, policies, and clinical guidelines can be informed by the best available evidence. ‘Cochrane in the workplace’ series collects stories about how Cochrane evidence is being used in non-clinical settings - in universities, by researcher, by guideline makers, and by policy makers. Each piece in the series collects stories around how Cochrane Reviews are being used in one type of workplace or area of work.Would you like to add your story about using Cochrane evidence in your workpl...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - March 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Ambitious plans for digital technologies awarded seed funding
Plans for a world-leading cyber innovation network and a new creative media hub are one step closer to reality after a successful funding bid led by the University of Bristol in partnership with the region ’ s universities, businesses and community organisations. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Business and Enterprise, Announcements; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths Source Type: news

Controversial testosterone rule for female athletes could be 'unscientific', experts warn
Experts from the universities of Bath and Montreal said the International Association of Athletics Federations's new testosterone limit could overlook other possible advantages. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Active substance from plant slows down aggressive eye cancer
(University of Bonn) An active substance that has been known for 30 years could unexpectedly turn into a ray of hope against eye tumors. This is shown by a study conducted by researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Magdeburg together with US colleagues. The results are published in the renowned journal 'Science Signaling'. The plant leaves of which contain the tested substance is anything but rare: At Christmas time you can find it in every well-assorted garden center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Climate Change Also Affects Mental Health in Mexico
Tourists cool off from high temperatures on the beach at the archaeological site of Tulum, in the southeastern Yucatan peninsula, an area of Mexico highly vulnerable to climate change. Powerful hurricanes, storms, drought, heat waves and rising sea levels are climate change effects that impact the mental health of the country's population. Credit: Emilio Godoy/IPSBy Emilio GodoyMEXICO CITY, Mar 19 2019 (IPS) Minerva Montes lost her home on Holbox Island in 2005 when Hurricane Wilma hit the Yucatan Peninsula in southeastern Mexico. Rebuilding her home was quicker and easier than overcoming the psychological aftermath of the...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emilio Godoy Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Editors' Choice Environment Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Population Regional Categories Source Type: news

New report: Using march-in authority would jeopardize U.S. innovation
In 1980, Congress passed the Small Business Patent Procedures Act, better known as the Bayh-Dole Act, which created a uniform framework for transferring government-funded research into useful commercial products. The law allows and encourages universities that receive government funding for basic research to patent their discoveries and then license them to others to help fuel the development of innovative products. The law ’s impact has been far reaching — bolstering the economy and positioning the U.S. as a leader in technology transfer, that other countries now seek to emulate. Between 1996 and 2015 alone, t...
Source: The Catalyst - March 19, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tom Wilbur Tags: Research and Development Intellectual Property Source Type: news

Federal Science and Engineering Obligations to Academic Institutions Increase 2%; Support to HBCUs Declines 17%
In FY 2017, federal agencies obligated $32.4 billion to institutions of higher education in support of science and engineering (S&E), up 2% from the $31.6 billion obligated in FY 2016. Funding for research and development to universities and colleges increased 4% to $29.8 billion. Meanwhile, total S&E support to historically black colleges and universities declined for the third year in a row, to $308 million, down 17% from FY 2016. Data are from the FY 2017 Survey of Federal Science and Engineering Support to Universities, Colleges, and Nonprofit Institutions, conducted by the National Center for Science and Engin...
Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources - March 19, 2019 Category: Statistics Source Type: news

Federal Science and Engineering Support to Universities, Colleges, and Nonprofit Institutions: Fiscal Year 2017
Tables present FY 2017 data on federal obligations to academic and nonprofit institutions for science and engineering research and development. Data include type of activity and trends, as well as ranking by state, agency, and individual institution. Data are from the Survey of Federal Science and Engineering Support to Universities, Colleges, and Nonprofit Institutions by the National Center for Science and Engineering within the National Science Foundation. (Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources)
Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources - March 19, 2019 Category: Statistics Source Type: news

USGS Slated for Restructuring, 16 percent Budget Cut
Under President Trump’s budget plan for fiscal year (FY) 2020, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) would be funded at $983.5 million, a 17 percent cut from the FY 2019 level. The budget proposes to consolidate the agency’s seven mission areas into five new mission areas to reflect “stakeholder-focused realignment of program priorities.” The five new mission areas would be: Ecosystems, Energy and Mineral Resources, Natural Hazards, Water Resources, and Core Science Systems. Programs formerly under the Environmental Health area would be moved into the Ecosystems and Water Resources areas and p...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Securing a future for humanities: the clue is in the name| Letters
Prof Joe Smith, director of the Royal Geographical Society,Prof Sir David Cannadine, president of the British Academy, andProf Norman Gowar respond to a Guardian editorialYoureditorial in defence of the humanities (13 March) is well timed and well argued. The UK needs the contribution of Stem graduates and that made by graduates with knowledge, skills and understanding gained through study of the humanities and wider social sciences. And geography, a subject that is a humanity, a social science and has part Stem designation in higher education, is well placed to make such a contribution.For example, the cabinet office &rsq...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Humanities Education Geography Science Geography and environment studies Mathematics Physics Ordnance Survey UK news Climate change Universities Higher education Fees Students Source Type: news

GlycoNet awards $1.45 million to eight projects to improve the health of Canadians
(Canadian Glycomics Network) The Canadian Glycomics Network (GlycoNet) awarded $1.45 million in grants to support eight research projects, to be carried out at seven universities or research centers across Canada. Funding was allocated in the last quarter of 2018. Whether at the data gathering stage, in clinical trial or ready for market, these innovative projects share a common goal: improving the health of people from coast to coast, while generating positive economic outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

BU medical students win national award for eliminating transportation barriers for patients
(Boston University School of Medicine) Two medical students from Boston University School of Medicine have received the Lancet Global Health Award for Best Student Poster for their presentation, 'Uber Health: A Novel Method of Eliminating Transportation Barriers To Care Among Urban OBGYN Refugee Women.' The award was presented at the Consortium of Universities for Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news