Is Physical Alteration a Sufficient Reason to Prohibit Ritual Infant Circumcision?
This article takes issue with that conclusion. Furthermore, even if one were to grant this conclusion, the offense is not of sufficient magnitude to warrant government action to halt the practice. On the other hand, suppression of ritual child circumcision may represent an attack against cultures and societies in which circumcision is practiced. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 3, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Implications of Islamic Governance towards Psychosocial Work Stressors and Work Productivity
AbstractThis is a cross-sectional study, using multivariate regression analysis, to explore the relationship of Islamic governance on psychosocial work stressors and work productivity in healthcare settings. The results revealed that Islamic governing components that are culturally assimilating were significantly related to positive aspects of psychosocial work stressors and increased productivity. Organisational goals that are re-directed towards the Maqas īd, i.e. higher order of objectives in Islam, had direct benefits in reducing work–family conflict, promoting general health, increasing job satisfaction and imp...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Jerusalem Synagogue Coping During the Coronavirus Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities
AbstractA diverse Modern Orthodox synagogue in Jerusalem continued to serve its congregants and maintain community despite closures and restrictions during the coronavirus pandemic. Members were surveyed in April 2020. There were minorities of members who were experiencing mental health issues, especially those less acculturated and no one surveyed received any professional mental health help. About a quarter of the members said that regular check-ins were important but some said they were not receiving enough of them. Synagogues can potentially serve as coping resources for congregants both during periods of crisis as wel...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Association Between Positive Religious Coping, Perceived Stress, and Depressive Symptoms During the Spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19) Among a Sample of Adults in Palestine: Across Sectional Study
AbstractObjectivesThe current study was designed to investigate the relationship between positive religious coping, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms among Palestinian adults in response to the emergence of coronavirus (COVID-19), and the quarantine system implemented in the city of Tulkarem, Palestine.MethodsA correlational study was conducted to examine the relationship between study variables. Participants were 400 Palestinian adults, involving 172 males and 228 females, living in the city of Tulkarem, Palestine, during the spread of coronavirus. Participants were selected using convenience and snowball sampling...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors by Key Demographic Variables Among Mid-South Church Leaders from 2012 to 2017
AbstractCardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors were examined among church leaders (n  =  2309) who attended Mid-South United Methodist Church annual meetings between 2012 and 2017 using repeated cross-sectional data. There was a significant increase in body mass index (BMI) (b = 0.24,p = 0.001) and significant decreases in blood pressure (systolic:b = − 1.08,p 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Perceived Parameters of Christian Pharmacy Students ’ Faith-Sharing in Clinical Settings
AbstractOur interdisciplinary team (which included professionals from nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and psychology) conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with pharmacy students (n = 14) who were presently in a clinical rotation. When conducting the phenomenological, qualitative research study, we explored how students framed their respective experiences of incorporating spirituality into their clinical work. Three themes emerged from the interviews: (1) The students repo rtedly viewed their main role as being more of a support person than an evangelist, (2) They framed their influence from the pe...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“I Took the Trouble to Make Inquiries, So I Refuse to Accept Your Instructions”: Religious Authority and Vaccine Hesitancy Among Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Mothers in Israel
AbstractVoluminous scholarship has shown that religious leaders play an important role in helping patients cope with health issues. There is, however, little research on the impact of religious leaders on parents' decision-making processes pertaining to childhood vaccination. Ultra-orthodox Jewish religious leaders (rabbis) are considered authorities on health issues, and most of them encourage parents to vaccinate their children. Yet, there have been several recent outbreaks of measles in the ultra-orthodox population in Israel, as well as in other countries. The aim is to study the role played by rabbis in the decision-m...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Frequency of Attendance at Religious Services and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke
AbstractExposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is associated with increased risk of disease and death. Reports on ETS and religion are lacking. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used to test this association. In 4,712 nonsmokers, serum cotinine level of 0.05 –3.99 ng/mL indicated ETS exposure. Frequency of attendance at religious services was categorized as >   = weekly or less. In bivariate analysis, ETS exposure occurred in 28.6% of those with >   = weekly attendance but 36.4% of less frequent attenders (p&th...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Medicine Versus Religion: A Religio-Cultural Study of Death and Dying in Contemporary Kashian Society
AbstractThe religious context of death has deep implications in shaping the phenomenon of death for the denizens of Kashi. The present paper argues that religious understanding of death confronts the medical issue(s) in the contemporary scenario. To explore the abysmal religio-cultural underpinning(s) of the episteme of death and dying in the era of  hegemonic medical technologies is the purpose of this study. Further, it will discuss the enigma of death and dying and will represent some insights into it from the vantage point of religion. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity/Spirituality and Mental Health and Quality of Life of Early Pregnant Women
AbstractThe present study aims to investigate how religious/spiritual (R/S) beliefs are associated with depressive, anxious and stress symptoms and quality of life (QOL) of 160 Brazilian women in early pregnancy. In this cross-sectional study, religiosity/spirituality (DUREL, Daily Spiritual Experiences, Brief-RCOPE), mental health (DASS-21) and quality of life (WHOQOL-Bref) were assessed. Negative R/S coping was associated with higher levels of depressive, anxious and stress symptoms and worse physical and psychological QOL. On the other hand, positive R/S coping, intrinsic religiosity, and spirituality were associated wi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Religion in Physician Outlook on Death, Dying, and End of Life Care
AbstractOne of the many roles a physician provides to their patients is compassion and comfort, which includes tending to any psychological, spiritual, and religious needs the patient has. The goal of this pilot study was to explore whether religious or spiritual values of physicians at an urban  academic hospital affect how physicians care for and communicate with their patients, especially when dealing with death, dying, and end-of-life matters. After surveying 111 inpatient physicians at an academic hospital, we found that 92% of physicians are extremely or somewhat comfortable having e nd-of-life discussions. We a...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relationship Between Compassion Fatigue in Nurses, and Work-Related Stress and the Meaning of Life
AbstractThis research was conducted in order to examine the correlation between work-related stress and meaning of life in association with compassion fatigue of nurses, as well as to determine the factors that affect compassion fatigue. The research is cross-sectional. The population of the research is comprised of nurses working at a university hospital in the east of Turkey. The research was carried out with 336 nurses. “Introductory information form,” “Work-related strain inventory,” “Professional quality of life scale and compassion fatigue subscale” and “Life attitude profile...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity and Suicide: A Large-Scale International and Individual Analysis Considering the Effects of Different Religious Beliefs
AbstractIn a cohort of 82,898 participants from 60 countries, this study examined attitudes towards suicide among five religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and other non-specific religions), while simultaneously considering two different dimensions of religiosity: subjective religiosity and religious practices. At the national level, religiosity was an important negative predictor variable for suicide rates and an important positive predictor variable for negative attitudes towards suicide. At the individual level, however, attitudes towards suicide were found to vary significantly across the different relig...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Study of Some Important Issues for a Muslim in the Month of Ramadan
AbstractThe month of Ramadan is associated with many worships that might exhaust the weak body. The most important worships in Ramadan are fasting and prayer. Some prayers require the length of sitting and standing, in addition to prayer movements. Many Muslims are spending a long time in the mosque; sitting on the ground for reading or standing for prayer. The questionnaire is focused on those who spend a long time in the mosque. Seven attributes were considered for the understanding of what affects the worshiper's health, especially those who with chronic diseases. We found that there is a strong relationship between age...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Conflicting Advice between Spiritual Leaders, Friends and Family, and Mental Health Providers: Impacts on Mental Health Treatment-Seeking Behaviors
This study aimed to examine the effects of advice from religious/spiritual leaders and friends/family of a religious/spiritual person with mental health struggles on treatment-seeking. A survey was administered to adult patients of a university-affiliated psychiatric clinic in the Midwest. Participants whose friends/family members ’ advice conflicted with their psychiatrist’s advice were six times more likely to delay seeking mental health treatment (OR: 6.09, 95% CI: 1.37, 27.01). Conflict between religious/spiritual leader’s advice and psychiatrist’s advice had a significant effect on delay in see...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 1, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Association of Death Anxiety with Spiritual Well-Being and Religious Coping in Older Adults During the COVID-19 Pandemic
AbstractThis descriptive study aimed to examine the association of death anxiety with religious coping and spiritual well-being among 248 community-dwelling older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. The brief Arab religious coping scale, the Arabic version of the spiritual well-being Scale, and the Arabic Scale of death anxiety were used to measure religious coping, spiritual well-being, and death anxiety, respectively. The majority of the participating older adults were found to have low levels of religious coping and spiritual well-being and high levels of death anxiety. Further, in comparison to male older adults, fema...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Views of Catholic Priests Regarding Causes, Treatments and Psychosocial Consequences of Schizophrenia and Depression: A Comparative Study in Italy
This study explored views of Catholic priests about schizophrenia and depression in Italy. Participants completed a questionnaire on their views about either schizophrenia (N = 282) or depression (N = 277). The depression group was surer than the schizophrenia group that: the disorder was due to psychosocial causes; curable; non-requiring long-term pharmacotherapy; the persons with depression could participate in religious activities. The older priests were more convinced than the younger priests that: the prayer and long-term pharmacotherapy are useful; the persons with mental disorders had aff...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Socio-religious Prognosticators of Psychosocial Burden of Beta Thalassemia Major
AbstractThe study investigates the socio-religious factors in the propagation of genetically inherited disease of Beta thalassemia. The disorder which reportedly has a significant protraction through repeated cousin marriages results in the social maladjustment of the parents of the sick children due to constant depression, anxiety, and weak social interaction and may lead to social isolation as well. This research aims to find out the significant effect of socio-religious trends on psychosocial burden of beta thalassemia major among cousin and non-cousin couples in the province of Punjab in Pakistan. It takes a sample of ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Women in Christian Substance Abuse Treatment; Forgiveness, Attachment Styles, and Improvements in Co-occurring Mental Health Symptoms
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy of The Recovery Center at Shalom House Ministries and examine the relationship(s) between forgiveness, attachment styles, drug and alcohol abuse, self-reported mental health symptoms, and cognitive functioning. Participants (N = 118 women) attended Shalom Recovery (2016–2018). Statistically significant improvement was found between entrance and the 3-month mark on all measures, with 67.9% completing the program. Findings indicated that the revenge motivations correlated with depression, self-esteem, anxiety, and av oidance of intimacy with Go...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Associations Between Religious/Spiritual Practices and Well-Being in Indian Elderly Rural Women
AbstractReligion and spirituality (R/S) are embedded in all aspects of life in India, a predominantly rural economy. The aim of this mixed methods study was to assess the associations between a culturally tailored intervention and preexisting religious/spiritual (R/S) practices with indicators of well-being and factors which contribute to happiness among elderly rural women from Haryana state, India. The study consisted of three groups: field experimental group (FEG;n = 24); practitioners of preexisting R/S practices for at least 6 weeksSatsang (SG,n = 54),Brahma Kumaris (BKG,n =&thi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Assessment of Somatic Support Process for Pregnant Brain Death Patients Occurring in a Transition Country Between Asia and Europe from Medical, Ethical, Legal and Religious Aspects
AbstractIn spite of the fact that brain death during pregnancy is not a common occurrence, it is an important ethical problem for all cultures and religions can have a significant influence on the donation decision after brain death. Therefore, this study aimed to present the case of a pregnant patient developing brain death which occurred in our intensive care unit and to compare the medical, ethical and legal problems relating to pregnant cases developing brain death with 24 cases in the literature. A 21-year-old 19-week pregnant case with gestational diabetes was monitored in the anesthesia intensive care unit and devel...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

An Offering of Hope During COVID-19: A Personal Reflection
AbstractThis essay offers a philosophical and spiritual exploration of some of the language that has become part of daily life amidst the COVID-19 crisis. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

RETRACTED ARTICLE: Women ’s Narratives of Marital and Divorce Issues and Impact on their Health
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

COVID-19, Aged Care, Cancer, Medical Research and Mental Health
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Tribal Folklore to Aesthetic and Religious Painting: Transition of Oral Narratives to Visual Art
AbstractGond painting, an integral part of the Gond cultural identity of central India, has emerged as highly appreciated and recognised tribal art form worldwide in the recent times. These traditional paintings are believed to have started with the transformation of Gond oral folklores. ThePradhan Gond, a subgroup of the Gonds, who were traditionally assigned to sing songs of the glorification of the gods, goddesses and nature with aBana, a traditional single-stringed musical instrument, was assumed to initiate the paintings of Gond folktales. They narrated the collective beliefs, values and legends of the Gond tribe on t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Hail and Farewell
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

John XXI, the Pope Philosopher and Physician –Scientist of Portuguese Origins Died of Crush Syndrome in 1277
AbstractThe aim of this work is to refer on the death due to crush syndrome in 1277 of Pope John XXI, philosopher, logician, anatomist, physician scientist, university professor of medicine at the university of Siena and author of books adopted for nearly 4  centuries in universities in the Middle Ages. The Pope died crushed by the ceiling of his office which had been built in rush to meet his need for a quiet and warm place, his need of light and nature. There he attended to his duties of governing the church, studied fine theological questions, insp ected the stars, made experiments and discussed with the renowned o...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Moroccan Arabic Version of the Muslim Belief into Action (BIAC) Scale
This study was conducted in two stages. First, the original version of Muslim BIAC was translated from English to Arabic using a standard forward –backward translation procedure. Second, the Moroccan Arabic version of the Muslim BIAC was administered to a sample of 132 students at Ibn Zohr University, Agadir, Morocco (mean age 22.2 years). The average score on the BIAC was 46.1 (SD = 17.2). The Cronbach’s alpha for internal reliabili ty was 0.81, with alphas for removed items ranging from 0.77 to 0.82. Test–retest reliability by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.87 (95% CI&...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Islam and Mental Disorders of the Older Adults: Religious Text, Belief System and Caregiving Practices
AbstractThis paper illustrates the impact of Islamic religious texts on dementia care in the Middle East. It examines how old age and older adults mental disorders are framed in the Quran and Hadith, and how these texts are transformed to belief ideologies and caregiving practices. The study uses a qualitative research methods, which include a review of all Islamic holy texts  that address mental and cognitive changes associated with ageing, along with interviews with eight Sharia scholars and 37-Arab-Muslim families living in Qatar. Islamic texts command compassion and honouring of elderly parents and give care instr...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

New Zealand Religious Community Responses to COVID-19 While Under Level 4 Lockdown
AbstractSocial scientific research into the impact of COVID-19 on religious communities is emergent. This research combines interview data (n = 12) collected, as New Zealand moved into Level 3—Restrict and then Level 4—Lockdown, with Facebook and online news media analysis to understand how religious leaders and their communities responded to COVID-19. Our data found four challenges: (1) The requirement to reassess worship practi ces, (2) the need to mitigate any potential for community transmission, (3) significant difficulties related to social distancing for communal religious practices, and la...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Intrapsychic Conflicts Arising While Meeting Ultraorthodox Patients
AbstractThe article addressed the key psychological issues that arise in encounters between the world of analytical psychotherapy and the inner world of patients belonging to the ultraorthodox (Haredi) community in Israel. The ultraorthodox community is characterized by isolationism and withdrawal, whether as a means of protecting itself from the influence of unacceptable lifestyles or as an ideal that eschews mingling with secular or semi-secular communities. Thus, the community maintains itself apart from the mainstream Israeli public in terms of its religious beliefs and independent culture. Ultraorthodox leadership has...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship Between the Stress Perceived by the Intensive Care Patient ’s Relatives with Their Religious Attitudes and Behaviors: Turkey Sample
This study was carried out in a university hospital located in the southeastern region of Turkey to determine the relationship between the perceived stress with the religious attitude and behavior of the intensive care patient ’s relatives; 150 patient’s relatives participated in this descriptive and relation-seeking study between the dates of January and April 2019. The Personal Data Form, Perceived Stress Scale, and Religious Attitude and Behavior Inventory that were designed by their own researchers as a result of the literature review were used in this study. As a result of this study, it was found that the...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Experience of Spiritual Dryness and Acedia Symptoms in Seventh-Day Adventists
AbstractIn a cross-sectional survey among 626 Adventists, we investigated their perception of spiritual dryness, and its association with indicators of Acedia, well-being and emotional exhaustion. Women, younger persons and those without a specific duty within the church had significantly higher spiritual dryness scores. Spiritual dryness was predicted best by perceivedExcessive Spiritual Demands (indicating spiritual exhaustion) and low perception of the sacred. Further predictors are Acedia ’sDifficulties in Prayer Life, reduced well-being and emotional exhaustion. The underlying causes might be complex and thus to...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Nurses and Patients ’ Perspectives on Spiritual Health Assessment
AbstractNurses conduct physical and psychosocial assessments during admissions to healthcare facilities. Patients rely upon nurses to provide support and education during their journey, from periods of health decline to states of optimal wellness. Therefore, nurses are an ideal population to assess spiritual health. The value and necessity of spiritual assessment were explored on an inpatient unit providing medical and palliative care to patients. Two spiritual assessment tools, comprised each of five items, were evaluated by nursing staff and patients. Spiritual Assessment Tool 1 used language that was unaffiliated with r...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Second Victims: Aftermath of Gun Violence and Faith-Based Responses
We describe information and insights presented during a symposium uniting medical-religious partners to discuss actions and programs to address trauma from gun violence. Faith-based persons from various Abrahamic religions, ranging from imams to reverends to hospital-based chaplains, discussed key strategies to allocate resources to second victims. These strategies included religious rituals meant to cope with trauma, memorials, and providing insight into resiliency for difficult times. Resources were identified for both within the hospital and community. Such medical-religious resources should be considered for future int...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Investigation of the Spiritual Care Effects on Anxiety, Depression, Psychological Distress and Spiritual Levels of Turkish Muslim Radiotherapy Patients
In conclusion, it was determined that the support for Islamic spiritual care had positive effects on hospitalized radiotherapy patients. According to the results obtained, it is recommended to examine in larger sample groups in different treatment programs in order to reveal the effect of spiritual care support. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Strategies to Cope with Phases of Spiritual Dryness in Seventh-Day Adventists
AbstractIn Adventists (n = 603) 45% were less effective and 55% more effective in coping with phases of spiritual dryness, particularly those with leading roles in the church. Strategies such as devotion/trust in God, private prayer/meditation/scripture reading, openness, talks with close others, and self-care were mos t often utilized. Their ability to cope was predicted best by low Acedia, Living from the Faith, low emotional exhaustion, well-being and having a duty in the church (R2 = .24). When these phases were overcome, several perceived spiritual depth and were able to help others all the...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

In Doubt and Disbelief: How Mrdjenovich 2018 Misunderstands the (Non)Religion –Health Relationship
AbstractThe article, “Religiously/Spiritually Involved, but in Doubt or Disbelief—Why? Healthy?” (Mrdjenovich in J Relig Health.https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-018-0711-2, 2018) addressed why subsets of Nones would engage in religious activities. While the subject matter of Mrdjenovich ’s work is important and understudied, several problematic conclusions about the nonreligion-health field were drawn. We provide constructive criticisms of Mrdjenovich’s methodologies, conclusions, and characterizations of the nonreligion-health field, and offer several solutions to the problems identified. (Sour...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Religious and Spiritual Needs of Patients in the Hospital Setting Do Not Depend on Patient Level of Religious/Spiritual Observance and Should be Initiated by Healthcare Providers
AbstractAccording to many studies, addressing the religious and spiritual (R/S) needs of patient's increase patient satisfaction. One area of interest is how patient self-perceived level of religiosity and spirituality (R/S) influences hospital needs. In this cross-sectional study, 195 inpatients at a non-faith-based academic hospital in Toledo, OH, USA completed surveys examining self-perceived R/S levels, as well as how those R/S levels impacted preferred services, conversations, and experiences in the hospital. Patients with no religious identity (self-identified as atheist, agnostic, or no religion) were less likely to...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Covid-19 and the Apocalypse: Religious and Secular Perspectives
AbstractThe current Covid-19 pandemic has led to existential crises. One way of finding meaning in this is through apocalyptic narratives. We differentiate between religious (based upon eschatology) and secular apocalypticism (based upon radical political and economic change) and argue that both are to be found in the wake of Covid-19 infection. For religious believers, the apocalypse signifies the rapture of the faithful into heaven while those on earth will undergo the tribulations. For secular believers, the apocalypse signifies sociopolitical change. The paper ends by speculating upon the socio-political and economic c...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Nurses ’ Ethical Sensitivity Levels and Their Attitudes Toward Principles About Die with Dignity
This study was conducted to determine the relationship between nurses ’ ethical sensitivity levels and their attitudes toward principles about die with dignity. The study was descriptive and correlational in design. The data were obtained from 226 nurses. The results of the correlation analysis conducted to determine whether there is a relationship between the nurse s’ ethical sensitivity level and their attitudes toward principles about die with dignity are among the autonomy, meaning and relation showed a significant, negative and low-level relationship between. As a result of the research, it was found that ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Core Cultural Formulation Interview in Yielding Religious Content Among Patients Suffering from a Current Major Depressive Episode
AbstractTaken up in the DSM-5, the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) is a guide for assessing cultural context of an individual ’s mental health problem. Unreported before, the extent to which the cultural focus of the CFI yields religious content was explored qualitatively among patients with a current major depressive episode. Qualitative data were generated by applying the standard version of the CFI first and then reap plied it by phrasing its items in religious terms. Audio-recorded narratives so derived were typologically extracted for religious content and analysed thematically. Although only one of its que...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Disclosure to God as a Mediator Between Private Prayer and Psychological Well-Being in a Christian Sample
This study examined whether disclosure to God as a mediator can be upheld with Laird et al.’s (Int J Psychol Relig 14(4):251–272, 2004) prayer model. The study included 285 Polish adults (50.2% of women) , aged between 18 and 60 years. The Multidimensional Prayer Inventory, the Revised Distress Disclosure Index, and the Psychological Well-Being Scale were applied to the research. The results showed that the prayer of thanksgiving correlated positively and the prayer of supplication negatively with well-being. Two indirect effects were significant, indicating disclosure to God as a mediator of the confessio...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Intention to Vaccinate Against the Novel 2019 Coronavirus Disease: The Role of Health Locus of Control and Religiosity
The objective of this study was to examine the role of health locus of control (HLOC) in the relationship between religiosity and COVID-19 vaccination intention. In a cross-sectional survey (N  = 501), we found a significantly negative association between religiosity and COVID-19 vaccination intention. This relationship was partially mediated by external HLOC. Collaborative efforts with religious institutions may influence COVID-19 vaccine uptake. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Determination of Breast Cancer Fatalism in Women and the Investigation of the Relationship Between Women's Cervical Cancer and Pap Smear Test Health Beliefs with Religious Orientation and Fatalism
This study aims to determine breast cancer fatalism in women and investigate the relationship between women ’s cervical cancer and pap smear test health beliefs with religious orientation and fatalism. The study, which was conducted as a descriptive and relational screening one, was conducted in the eastern part of Turkey between July and August 2019. The study was conducted with 357 women who were not diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer, and who were not pregnant. A positive, significant relationship was found between the Religious Orientation Scale total mean score and Health Motivation and Pap smear Benefit P...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity Level and Mammography Performance Among Arab and Jewish Women in Israel
This study compared mammography performance by religiosity level among Arab (weightedn = 103,347) and Jewish women (weightedn = 757,956) in Israel aged 50–74, using data from the 2017 National Social Survey of the Central Bureau of Statistics. In the Survey, women were asked regarding mammogram performance in the 2 years prior. Mammography performance was 78.2% among Jewish women and 64.8% among Arab women. Among J ewish women, self-identifying as “Very religious” and “Somewhat religious” was associated with lower mammography performance compared to being &lsqu...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How Giving Birth Makes Sense: A Questionnaire Study on Existential Meaning-Making Among Mothers Giving Birth Preterm or at Term
ConclusionsFindings suggest that not only traumatic birth events accentuate existential reflections, but that even normal childbirth to most mothers is an existential event. However, the quality of existential reflections differs when comparing normal and traumatic birth. The study points towards change in education and organization of maternity care to better care for existential needs and reflections specific to every new mother and birthing woman. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Coping with the Practice of Medicine: Religion, Spirituality, and Other Personal Strategies
AbstractWith the increasing demands on the practice of medicine, this qualitative study asked residents and their faculty (n = 44) to reflect on how they cope with their work. They provided written reflections to questions about successful and disappointing patient experiences, as well as describing their personal, religious, or spiritual practices. Key themes included connecting with family and friends, learning fro m their mistakes, using cognitive behavioral tools, and engaging with their spirituality and religiosity. One third specifically mentioned they used prayer and/or meditation. We contextualized se...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Development of Guidelines for the Inclusion of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Unani Tibb Practice in South Africa: A Study Protocol
AbstractUnani Tibb is a holistic form of medicine, which highlights the interconnectedness of mind, body and soul. Despite this, there is very little evidence of spiritual care practices by Unani Tibb practitioners in South Africa. This protocol outlines a proposed process for developing guidelines to integrate spirituality and spiritual care in Unani Tibb practice. In phase one, a document review will be conducted on spirituality and spiritual care in complementary and alternative medicine and Unani Tibb. A series of quantitative and qualitative enquiries will follow to obtain the perspectives of various stakeholders in t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Demand for Space: Elderly Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People, Healthcare, and Theological Ethics
AbstractVisibility for transgender and gender nonconforming people and the elderly is growing; however, thus far the overlap of the two groups has rarely been considered. Trans persons therefore remain largely invisible in the context of older people ’s care and medicine. The discrimination faced by this group is at least twofold: they are the targets of aggression incited by transphobia, and also by ageism. Although older trans and gender nonconforming people exist as a greatly marginalized group within another already marginalized group, eve n the field of theological ethics has neglected to grant them ethical atte...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research