Suicidal Behavior in Iran: What Should Be Done?
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 22, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion, Alcohol Use and Risk Drinking Among Canadian Adults Living in Ontario
AbstractThis research examines (1) the association between risk drinking and religious affiliation and (2) differences between religions for risk drinking among adults living in Ontario, Canada, for Christians, Buddhists, Sikhs, Muslims, Hindus, Jews, other religious groups and the non-religious. Data are based on telephone interviews with 16,596 respondents and are derived from multiple cycles (2005 –2011) of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health’s (CAMH) Monitor survey, an ongoing cross-sectional survey of adults in Ontario, Canada, aged 18 years and older. Data were analysed using bivariate cross-t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 18, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Religion and Risky Behaviors Among Iranian University Students
This study found that students who engaged more often in organized religious activities and had higher intrinsic religiosity were less likely to engage in risky behaviors such as sexual risk taking, careless driving, violenc e, smoking, along with alcohol and drug abuse. Participants with higher involvement in private religious activities reported lower tendencies for the above-mentioned risky behaviors, except sexual risk taking. The findings of this study indicate that the different dimensions of religiousness are rel ated to students’ tendency to avoid risky behavior. Thus, it appears that religion may have a role...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 17, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Divine Emotions: On the Link Between Emotional Intelligence and Religious Belief
AbstractThere have been only few attempts to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and religiosity.  However, none of them included measures of ability EI. In two studies, we investigated the potential associations between various aspects of religious belief and ability and trait EI. In Study 1 (N = 240), we found that ability EI was positively associated with general level of religious belief. Study 2, conducted among Polish Christians (N = 159), replicated the previous result on the connection between ability EI and religion. Moreover, both trait and ability EI were negativ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relationship Between Religious Belief and Happiness: A Systematic Literature Review
This study analyses the studies conducted in last two decades toward understanding  the relationship between religiousness and happiness. These studies have been organised in terms of the religions, geographic locations, scales and significance. The study shows that the claim has proven to be true by a vast majority of the surveys irrespective of religion, gender, nationality or race. Although Muslims seems to be the happiest, it requires further verification. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 30, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Enhancing Sense of Coherence and Mindfulness in an Ecclesiastical, Intercultural Group Training Context
AbstractSense of coherence (SOC) and mindfulness (MI) are believed to promote the health and well-being of individuals and organisations. The aim of this longitudinal study was to contribute to the literature on the development of SOC through training and interventions and thereby explore the development of these constructs in a group of senior professionals in the German Catholic Church. A sample of eight participants voluntarily enrolled for a 12-day training programme spread over a period of nine months to develop intercultural and inter-religious competencies, SOC and MI. Quantitative scores of the pre- and post-test S...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Well-Being and Wellness in the Twenty-First Century: A Theanthropocosmic Approach
AbstractIn this paper, clarification and definition of the concept well-being of human beings are reflected upon from a faith perspective. The author will define well-being and wellness within the following conceptual definitions: firstly, well-being and wellness will be defined in term of African-Christian approach (the interconnectedness of God-human-and-world approach). Secondly, the author will focus on differentiation of well-being and wellness in a human being. Thirdly, the focal point will be on the mixing of holistic, dualist and triadic approaches to define well-being. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Opinions of Social Workers in Turkey About the Principles on Die with Dignity
This study is planned to learn the opinions of Social Workers in Turkey on “Principles of a good death.” The results of this study reveal that social workers in Turkey agree with principles of a good death in general. The degree of support for some specific principles changes by the sex and age of the participants. Despite the significant support given to principles by social workers, majority of them do not think that these principles are currently followed in medical and care institutions in Turkey. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Synthesis of Spiritual Intelligence Themes from Islamic and Western Philosophical Perspectives
Abstract Spiritual intelligence is an emerging term that is widely discussed and accepted as one of the main components that addresses and solves many life problems. Nonetheless there is no specific study being done to synthesize the spiritual intelligence themes from Western and Islamic philosophical perspectives. This research aimed to identify common spiritual intelligence themes from these two perspectives and elucidated its contents by the view of two well-known Islamic scholars; al-Ghazali and Hasan Langgulung. Seven spiritual intelligence themes were identified through thematic analysis; meaning/purpose of life, c...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Differential Associations of Religious Involvement with the Mental Health of Asian-American Subgroups: A Cultural Perspective
AbstractIn the USA, Asian-Americans (AA) constitute the fastest growing ethnic minority group, in which heterogeneous religious patterns and acculturation experiences can impose significant impacts on their mental health. Using national data, the present study examined the contributions of religious involvement and social support to self-rated mental health (SRMH) of Chinese, Vietnamese, and Filipinos. Findings demonstrated cross-group variations, with Filipinos reporting the highest levels of SRMH, acculturation, and discrimination. However, religious involvement was associated with better SRMH in the least religious Chin...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Temple or Prison: Religious Beliefs and Attitudes Toward the Body
This study examined how both radically dualistic and sanctified views of the body relate to attitudes people hold about their bodies including body appreciation and two components of body objectification: self-surveillance and body shame. To date, none of these attitudes have been examin ed in relation to specific, nuanced religious beliefs about the body. Participants were 243 adults from a variety of Protestant denominations. Using an online survey system and self-report measures, participants indicated the degree to which they hold radically dualistic and sanctified views about t heir bodies as well as their attitudes t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Exploring Existential Coping Resources: The Perspective of Koreans with Cancer
AbstractThe present study aimed to explore the use of meaning-making coping (existential, spiritual, and religious coping) among cancer patients in Korea and to investigate the impact of culture on their choice of coping methods. Thirty-three participants with various kinds of cancer were interviewed. Four different kinds of coping resources emerged from analyses of the interview transcripts: (1) belief in the healing power of nature; (2) mind –body connection; (3) relying on transcendent power; and (4) finding oneself in relationships with others. The findings of this study suggest the importance of investigating cu...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Soul in Medicine: Rabbinic and Scientific Controversies
AbstractThe practice of medicine relies on a combination of two very different sources, and requires two kinds of talents: a cognitive-instrumental, knowledge-based and disease-centered approach; and a psychological, expressive-relational and patient-centered approach. Throughout the centuries, the mix between the cognitive and expressive dimensions, and the relative emphasis given to each approach, has varied considerably. Current evidence-based medicine privileges the cognitive-performative dimension. The recent developments within medicine are indicative of the inherent and lasting tension between the cognitive and expr...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

When Brain Death Belies Belief
AbstractThe case of Jahi McMath has reignited a discussion concerning how society should define death. Despite pronouncing McMath brain dead based on the American Academy of Neurology criteria, the court ordered continued mechanical ventilation to accommodate the family ’s religious beliefs. Recent case law suggests that the potential for a successful challenge to the neurologic criteria of death provisions of the Uniform Determination of Death Act are greater than ever in the majority of states that have passed religious freedom legislation. As well, because sta ndard ethical claims regarding brain death are either ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Values as Predictors of Religious Experience in the Lives of Seminary Students of Philosophy and Students of Physics
AbstractThe aim of this study was to show the preferences of terminal values of personal and social character and the level of religious experience: God ’s presence and God’s absence, as well as to examine the relationship between the two variables in the groups of seminary students of philosophy and students of physics. The following methods were applied in the study: Rokeach Value Survey and Głaz’s Scale of Religious Experience. The study w as conducted amongst university students in Kraków (Poland). The results of 100 correctly completed sets of questionnaires were analysed. The results analysi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Depression and Dyspepsia: An Implication of Islamic Resources
In this study, related articles were retrieved from PubMed, Ovid, Proquest and Magiran databases by using the Medical Subject Heading keywords “depression,” “psychology,” “dyspepsia” and “gastrointestinal diseases.” In the next step, studies, which are exactly confirm the Islamic viewpoint, were selected from the retrieved articles. Only one prospective study in 2012 has stated that people with functional gastrointestinal d isorders and without elevated levels of anxiety and depression at baseline had significantly higher levels of anxiety and depression at 12-year follow-up....
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity and Health Risk Behaviour Among University Students in 26 Low, Middle and High Income Countries
AbstractThe aim of this study was to assess religiosity and health risk behaviours among university students from 26 low, middle and high income countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 20,222 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, SD  = 2. 8) from 27 universities in 26 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas. Among all students, 41.1 % engaged at least once a week in organized religious activity, 35.8 % practised a non-organized religious activity daily or more than once daily, and more or less two-thirds of the stude nts agreed to the three different statem...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effect of Religious Beliefs on the Smoking Behaviour of University Students: Quantitative Findings From Malaysia
AbstractThe Malaysian official Islamic authorities have issued a “fatwa” (Islamic ruling) regarding smoking practice which prohibits Muslims from smoking because of its potential harm to health. Since the prevalence of smoking among Malaysian students is high, this study was designed to explore the perceptions and opinions of Malaysian Muslim students towards smoking in International Islamic University of Malaysia. A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted among School of Science students in International Islamic University Malaysia. Convenience sampling approach was used to recruit 323 students based ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Positive Psychology Intervention in a Hindu Community: The Pilot Study of the Hero Lab Curriculum
AbstractIndia has high rates of mental health issues among its youth and low-income communities experience a disproportionate amount of depression and suicide. Positive psychology, the act of promoting well-being, could be used as a tool to promote wellness and help improve the mental health of youth living in slum areas of India. A pilot positively psychology program, “The Hero Lab”, was conducted in a migratory slum in Worli, Mumbai, with trained Hindu community leaders implementing the interventions toward at-risk Hindu youth. The curriculum’s impact showed statistical improvement (p 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Beliefs Against Smoking Among Black and White Urban Youth
This study explores the relation of religiosity to cigarette smoking in a sample of 4776 Black versus White adolescents. Findings show that Black adolescents have significantly stronger religious beliefs against smoking than do White students. Further, teens with strong or very strong religious beliefs are less likely to have smoked. The protective effect of religious beliefs against smoking was stronger for Whites than for Blacks. These findings suggest that efforts in the Black religious community to prevent cigarette smoking have been somewhat successful. Similar efforts in the White community might help stem the tide o...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiousness and Mental Health: Systematic Review Study
AbstractMany people use religious beliefs and practices to cope with stressful life events and derive peace of mind and purpose in life. The goal of this paper was to systematically review the recent psychological literature to assess the role of religion in mental health outcomes. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using medical and psychological databases on the relationship between religiosity and mental health. Seventy-four articles in the English and Arabic languages published between January 2000 and March 2012 were chosen. Despite the controversial relationship between religion and psychiatry, psycholog...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Physical Health Screenings Among African-American Church and Community Members
This study sought to identify characteristics, including religiosity, related to having received health screenings among persons who attend African-American churches or receive church-based community outreach services. A sample of 602 was recruited during two phases as part of a larger project. Blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose screenings were the most frequently reported screenings ever and in the last 12  months. Although religiosity was significantly related to several of the health screenings in bivariate analysis, it is not a predictor of health screenings in multivariate analyses. Innovative strateg...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Struggle Among Patients Seeking Treatment for Chronic Headaches: Anger and Protest Behaviors Toward God
This study examined anger and protest behaviors toward God among 80 US adults seeking treatment for chronic headaches (66 women, 14 men; 71 completed treatment). Measures were administered before and after an intensive 3-week outpatient treatment program. At both times, anger and protest toward God correlated with lower pain acceptance, more emotional distress, and greater perceived disability. However, when considered simultaneously, anger predicted sustained distress, whereas protest behaviors (e.g., complaining, questioning, arguing) predicted both reduced distress and an increased sense of meaning. These findings sugge...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Bioethics, Religion, and Public Policy: Intersections, Interactions, and Solutions
This article uses brain death in Jewish law, the case of Jahi McMath, and vaccination refusa l to observe how the religious system of ethics is presently excluded from bioethics and its implications. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study of Occupational Therapy Students ’ Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Occupational Therapy Education
Abstract Spirituality and spiritual care both have received increased attention over the course of this past decade from different disciplines. However, for many years, in the occupational therapy profession, the importance of spirituality and spiritual care seems to be controversial because it is unclear how these concepts are integrated in occupational therapy education. Although occupational therapy students are being educated to consider a holistic and client-centred approach, spirituality is not regarded within this framework which diminishes the integrity of holistic approach. In South African occupational therapy e...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effects on Daily Spiritual Experiences of Religious Versus Conventional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression
Abstract We compared religiously integrated cognitive behavioral therapy (RCBT) versus conventional CBT (CCBT) on increasing daily spiritual experiences (DSE) in major depressive disorder and chronic medical illness. A total of 132 participants aged 18 –85 were randomized to either RCBT ( n  = 65) or CCBT ( n  = 67). Participants received ten 50-min sessions (primarily by telephone) over 12 weeks. DSE was assessed using the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES). Mixed-effects growth curve models compared the effects of treatment group on trajectory of change in DSE. Baseline DSE and chang...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Contemporary Bioethics: Islamic Perspective
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Caloric Intake on the Sabbath: A Pilot Study of Contributing Factors to Obesity in the Orthodox Jewish Community
This study aimed to look at caloric intake on the Sabbath and its contribution to overweight and obesity. Twelve married or previously married women who identify themselves as Orthodox Jews were recruited to do 24-h food recalls over the phone. The participants were divided into three weight groups (normal, overweight, and obese) based on their BMI. The overweight and obese participants ’ data were combined into one group for the purposes of statistical testing. Paired t tests looking at the data for all participants showed significantly great caloric intake during an average Sabbath day than an average weekday [ t ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Integration Between Mental Health-Care Providers and Traditional Spiritual Healers: Contextualising Islam in the Twenty-First Century
Abstract In the United Arab Emirates, neuropsychiatric disorders are estimated to contribute to one-fifth of the global burden of disease. Studies show that the UAE citizens ’ apathy towards seeking professional mental health services is associated with the ‘religious viewpoints’ on the issue, societal stigma, lack of awareness of mental health and lack of confidence in mental health-care providers. Mental health expenditures by the UAE government health ministry are not available exclusively. The majority of primary health-care doctors and nurses have not received official in-service training on mental ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

US Physicians ’ Opinions about Distinctions between Withdrawing and Withholding Life-Sustaining Treatment
Abstract Decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment (LST) precede the majority of ICU deaths. Although professional guidelines generally treat the two as ethically equivalent, evidence suggests withdrawing LST is often more psychologically difficult than withholding it. The aim of the experiment was to investigate whether physicians are more supportive of withholding LST than withdrawing it and to assess how physicians ’ opinions are shaped by their religious characteristics, specialty, and experience caring for dying patients. In 2010, a survey was mailed to 2016 practicing US physicians. Physician...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Why Cancer Patients Seek Islamic Healing
Abstract Islamic healing is frequently referred to as the treatment of choice by many Muslim cancer patients in Malaysia. Despite its widespread use, there is limited information relating to patients ’ healing preferences. With rising cancer rates in the country, this issue has become a concern to public health policy makers. The purpose of this study was to understand why cancer patients seek Islamic healing. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 18 cancer patients. The fin dings indicate three main reasons: (1) recommendations from family, friends and doctors; (2) belief in Islamic healing a...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Patient Autonomy in Talmudic Context: The Patient ’s “I Must Eat” on Yom Kippur in the Light of Contemporary Bioethics
Abstract In contemporary bioethics, the autonomy of the patient has assumed considerable importance. Progressing from a more limited notion of informed consent, shared decision making calls upon patients to voice the desires and preferences of their authentic self, engaging in choice among alternatives as a way to exercise deeply held values. One influential opinion in Jewish bioethics holds that Jewish law, in contradistinction to secular bioethics, limits the patient ’s exercise of autonomy only in those instances in which treatment choices are sensitive to preferences. Here, we analyze a discussion in the Mishna,...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Tzu Chi Silent Mentor Program: Application of Buddhist Ethics to Teach Student Physicians Empathy, Compassion, and Self-Sacrifice
Abstract The Buddhist Tzu Chi Silent Mentor Program promotes the donation of one ’s body to science as a selfless act by appealing to the Buddhist ethics of compassion and self-sacrifice. Together, faculty, families, and donors help medical students to learn the technical, spiritual, emotional, and psychological aspects of medicine. Students assigned to each “Silent Mentor” visit the family to learn about the donor’s life. They see photos and hear family members’ stories. Afterwards, students write a brief biography of the donor which is posted on the program website, in the medical school, a...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Religiousness/Spirituality in Health-Related Quality of Life Among Adolescents with HIV: A Latent Profile Analysis
Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine whether distinct latent profiles of religiousness/spirituality exist for ALWH, and if so, are latent profile memberships associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Latent profile analysis of religiosity identified four profiles/groups. Compared to the other three groups, higher levels of emotional well-being were found among young perinatally infected adolescents who attended religious services, but who did not pray privately, feel God ’s presence or identify as religious or spiritual. Social HRQoL was significantly higher among the highest overall rel...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Place of Faith for Consultant Obstetricians Following Stillbirth: A Qualitative Exploratory Study
This study highlights a gap in how obstetricians see their own faith and feeling able to respond to the faith needs of bereaved parents. Participating obstetricians did not demonstrate that spirituality was an integrated part of their professional life. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Novel Religious/Spiritual Group Psychotherapy Reduces Depressive Symptoms in a Randomized Clinical Trial
In conclusion, this group psychotherapy might be of benefit in treating depressive symptoms. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Similarities and Differences Between Yoruba Traditional Healers (YTH) and Native American and Canadian Healers (NACH)
Abstract Indigenous people of the world have used the services of medicine men and traditional healers from time immemorial. According to the World Health Organization, 80  % of the world’s populations consult traditional healers. With an emerging globalization of health services in the world, there is a need for western mental health practitioners to learn and understand the practices of indigenous healers across the globe. This paper will not only highlight the s imilarities and differences between Yoruba traditional healers of Western Nigeria and Native American and First Nation Canadian traditional heal...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Christian Educators’ Use of Prayer to Cope with Stress
This study identified sources of stress for an international sample of 916 Christian educators, and the use of religious practices such as prayer, to determine whether prayer served as a coping strategy for their work-related stress. A mixed methods approach was used to measure three key variables: sources of stress, spiritual practices, and job satisfaction. Qualitative findings were used to analyze participants’ sources of stress, and quantitative findings were used to measure their practice of spiritual disciplines and job satisfaction. A statistically significant relationship was found between frequency of prayer...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Evaluation of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale in a Sample of Korean Adults
This study explored the psychometric qualities and construct validity of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS; Ellison in J Psychol Theol 11:330–340, 1983) using a sample of 470 Korean adults. Two factor analyses, exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, were conducted in order to test the validity of the SWBS. The results of the factor analyses supported the original two-dimensional structure of the SWBS—religious well-being (RWB) and existential well-being (EWB) with method effects associated with negatively worded items. By controlling for method effects, the evaluation of the two-factor...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Source and Impact of Specific Parameters that Enhance Well-Being in Daily Life
This study suggests that these parameters may improve either one of general well-being, pro-social and positive relational behavior and demonstrate positive health effects. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Mass Gathering Medicine New discipline to Deal with Epidemic and Infectious Diseases in the Hajj Among Muslim Pilgrimage: A Mini Review Article
Abstract Mass Gathering Medicine is one of the new disciplines in Medicine which deal with all health aspects in overcrowded areas. Mass Gathering Medicine is an important new challenging discipline which needs to be supported by all concern experts such as the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ministries of health from all countries, universities, research centers, and all other experts in this field. Scientist and academic staffs from all countries should be encouraged to participate in narrowing the gap of knowledge for Mass Gathering Medicine. Postgraduate board or fel...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Response to the Legitimacy of Brain Death in Islam
Abstract Brain death is a novel construct of death for the procurement of transplantable organs. Many authoritative Islamic organizations and governments have endorsed brain death as true death for organ donation. Many commentators have reiterated the misconception that the Quranic text does not define death. We respond by clarifying: (1) the Quran does define death as biologic disintegration and clearly distinguishes it from the dying process, (2) brain death belongs scientifically within the spectrum of neurologic disorders of consciousness and should not be confused with death, and (3) religious and legal disc...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Disability in Islamic Law
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Participation is Associated with Increases in Religious Social Support in a National Longitudinal Study of African Americans
This study reports on the association between religious beliefs and behaviors and the change in both general and religious social support using two waves of data from a national sample of African Americans. The Religion and Health in African Americans (RHIAA) study is a longitudinal telephone survey designed to examine relationships between various aspects of religious involvement and psychosocial factors over time. RHIAA participants were 3173 African American men (1281) and women (1892). A total of 1251 men (456) and women (795) participated in wave 2 of data collection. Baseline religious behaviors were associated with ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity as a Moderator of Self-Efficacy and Social Support in Predicting Traumatic Stress Among Combat Soldiers
Abstract Based on a sample of 54 Israeli soldiers (51 % non-religious, 49 % religious) surveyed upon their return from combat, this study investigates the moderating role of religiosity as a factor that may strengthen cognitive processing tied to the belief in oneself to persevere (i.e., self-efficacy) after trauma and/or as a factor tied to enhanced external social support that religious individuals in particular may benefit from by their involvement in a religious community. Findings revealed (1) social support was tied to greater resilience within the general sample; (2) religious soldiers were less ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How Involved are Non-VA Chaplains in Supporting Veterans?
Abstract In terms of supporting veteran populations, little is known of the experiences of chaplains professionally active outside of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare settings. The present study looks to examine how involved non-VA chaplains are in supporting veterans as well as their familiarity with the VA. An online survey was distributed in a convenience sample of chaplains, of which n = 39 met the inclusion criterion for this study (i.e., no past or present VA affiliation). The results find that most of the non-VA chaplains encounter veteran service users either on a weekly or monthly...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion and Subjective Well-Being: Western and Eastern Religious Groups Achieved Subjective Well-Being in Different Ways
This study is among the first to investigate this issue. The present study compared Buddhists, Taoists, Christians, and atheists. In addition to demographic items, 451 Chinese adults completed Chinese version of the Socially Oriented Cultural Conception of SWB Scale. Religious belief was distributed as follows: 10 % Christian, 20 % Buddhist, 25 % Taoist, and 43 % atheists. As predicted, the socially oriented cultural conception of SWB was found to be highest among Buddhists, followed in order by Taoists, atheists, and Christians. It was concluded that the various religious groups achieved SWB in differe...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Gaming and Religion: The Impact of Spirituality and Denomination
Abstract A previous investigation from Korea indicated that religion might modulate gaming behavior (Kim and Kim in J Korean Acad Nurs 40:378–388, 2010). Our present study aimed to investigate whether a belief in God, practicing religious behavior and religious denomination affected gaming behavior. Data were derived from a Western cohort of young men (Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors, n = 5990). The results showed that a stronger belief in God was associated with lower gaming frequency and smaller game addiction scale scores. In addition, practicing religiosity was related to less frequ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Simple and Multivariate Relationships Between Spiritual Intelligence with General Health and Happiness
Abstract The present study examined simple and multivariate relationships of spiritual intelligence with general health and happiness. The employed method was descriptive and correlational. King’s Spiritual Quotient scales, GHQ-28 and Oxford Happiness Inventory, are filled out by a sample consisted of 384 students, which were selected using stratified random sampling from the students of Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman. Data are subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics including correlations and multivariate regressions. Bivariate correlations support positive and significant predictive value...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Medical Ethics in Qiṣāṣ (Eye-for-an-Eye) Punishment: An Islamic View; an Examination of Acid Throwing
Abstract Physicians in Islamic countries might be requested to participate in the Islamic legal code of qiṣāṣ, in which the victim or family has the right to an eye-for-an-eye retaliation. Qiṣāṣ is only used as a punishment in the case of murder or intentional physical injury. In situations such as throwing acid, the national legal system of some Islamic countries asks for assistance from physicians, because the punishment should be identical to the crime. The perpetrator could not be punished without a physician’s participation, because there is no way to guarantee that the sentence would be carr...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research