Donald Eric Capps (1939–2015)
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Religious Attitudes, Fear of Death and Dying with General Health Condition: A Survey in College Students
This study aims to assess the relationship between religious attitudes of Ilam universities students (west of Iran), their perspectives about the fear of self and other’s death and dying, with their general health. This paper is an analytic survey in which 351 college students, who were selected by multistage sampling, participated. To measure interested variables, Persian format of standardized self-administered questionnaires was employed. Religious attitudes with odds ratio (OR) of 0.94 (95 % CI 0.91–0.97) and fear of self dying with 0.88 (95 % CI 0.81–0.96) were identified as a protective fa...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Orientation, Endorser Credibility, and the Portrayal of Female Nurses by the Media
This study aims to probe female imagery in eastern and western Taiwan and explores whether religious culture and practice influences people’s cognition of female nurses in advertising. The constructs are analyzed through structural equation modeling. Results reveal that religious followers do not necessarily trust female nurses more just because they are portrayed as professional medical specialists. Most consumers reflect this negative cognition through purchase intentions of products. For example, in comparing portrayals of attractiveness with portrayals of professionalism, attractiveness results in a better advert...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity and Proactive Coping with Social Difficulties in Romanian Adolescents
Abstract Even though medical and psychological sciences and services evolved so much, in many cases, the healing process has its mystery, and some recoveries seem to be entirely magical. Especially in such cases, religion seems to play an important role, as it helps people face the “mystery” of the healing process and integrate it. Religion has helped people face potentially traumatic events with minimum consequences for their health, or, moreover, to use these experiences for personal development, making them more prepared for life challenges. Adolescents with developed proactive coping skills are le...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion, Sexuality, and Internalized Homonegativity: Confronting Cognitive Dissonance in the Abrahamic Religions
Abstract This research was aimed at investigating how religious beliefs and internalized shame predicted homonegativity. An online survey, which consisted of a self-report questionnaire assessing religious orientation, internalized shame, and internalized homonegativity, was completed by 133 Caucasian and Asian gay men. The respondents also were asked to write a short answer in which they had to explain how they integrated their religion and sexual practices. The quantitative analyses of data demonstrated no significant difference in internalized homonegativity among the two cultural groups. Internalized homonega...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role and Influence of Faith Leaders on Health-Related Issues and Programs in their Congregation
Abstract This qualitative study explored the influence of faith leaders on health-related issues within their congregation. Semi-structured interviewers with 24 faith leaders found that chronic conditions and poor health behaviors were the top health challenges facing their congregation. A majority mentioned health-related activities taking place at their church. Most believed they had influence on their congregation for issues related to health/wellness, most commonly in the form of increasing awareness. A majority talked about the importance of being a role model. It is important to understand how to most effec...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Delusions in a Xhosa Schizophrenia Population
Abstract Here, we assessed for the first time the frequency of religious delusions and the effect of treatment on religiosity and the phenomena of religious delusions in a Xhosa schizophrenia population. Religious delusions were present in 42 (70 %) participants, and treatment significantly reduced religiosity (p = 0.02) as well as mean scores for certain phenomena associated with the delusions including changes in both thinking (p = 0.0001) and behaviour (p = 0.0001), as well as affective response to the delusion (p = 0.0001) The high frequency of religious delusions ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Henry Marsh in His World
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Schizophrenia or Possession? A Reply to Kemal Irmak and Nuray Karanci
Abstract A recent paper in this journal argues that some cases of schizophrenia should be seen as cases of demon possession and treated by faith healers. A reply, also published in this journal, responds by raising concerns about the intellectual credibility and potentially harmful practical implications of demon possession beliefs. My paper contributes to the discussion, arguing that a critique of demon possession beliefs in the context of schizophrenia is needed, but suggesting an alternative basis for it. It also reflects on important differences between demonic and other forms of spirit possession and conside...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Family Functionality and Coping Attitudes of Patients with Bipolar Disorder
The objective of this study was to determine the family functionality and coping attitudes of bipolar disorder patients. The study planned as a descriptive one was carried with 81 bipolar disorder patients. Personal description form, family assessment device and Coping Attitudes Scale were used as data acquisition tools. It was determined that the adaptive coping attitudes used most frequently by the patients were religious coping, positive reinterpretation, active coping, problem-focused coping and emotional focused coping, beneficial social support use, emotional social support use, planning, suppression of competing act...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Concept of Collaboration from the Islamic Perspective: The View Points for Health Providers
This study is a report of knowledge synthesis based on qualitative systematic review by content analysis. The study surveys the concept of collaboration from the Islamic point of view and intends to answer the question, ‘Does the Quran deal with the use of collaboration in human activities?’ This study was conducted using electronic documents from websites related to Islamic and Quran sciences, such as Howzah.net, Nashriat.ir, Tebyan.net and Google Scholar from 1950 until 2013 by focusing on the keywords, collaboration and Islam, and then retrieving the Islamic document (Quran and Hadith). The language in which...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pilot Study of Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking Among US Muslim College Students
Abstract Waterpipe smoking is common among the young in Muslim-majority countries despite recent Islamic rulings on tobacco. US Muslim college students, especially immigrants, may be at high risk for smoking, but information is lacking. In this pilot study, respondent-driven sampling was used to sample 156 Muslim college students. Waterpipe smoking was common (44.3 %). Leading motivations to smoke were social and perceived low tobacco harm. Independent risk factors among the Muslim students were perception that friends and other students smoked, and ever drank alcohol. Personal belief that waterpipe smoking ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Well-Being for Increasing Life Expectancy in Palliative Radiotherapy Patients: A Questionnaire-Based Study
Abstract Spiritual well-being in patients with an advanced cancer has been found to positively correlate with subjective well-being, lower pain levels, hope and positive mood states, high self-esteem, social competence, purpose in life, and overall quality of life. In this regard, Quran recitation is stated to be an efficient way to increase patient spirituality and also to handle life’s everyday challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of listening, reading, and watching the text of the Holy Quran, called (in this study) Quran recitation, for increasing life expectancy (LE) in palli...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Deviating from Religious Norms and the Mental Health of Conservative Protestants
Abstract Although numerous studies show that religious involvement is associated with favorable mental health outcomes, research also suggests that religious struggles can be psychologically distressing. Building on previous research, this study examines the psychological consequences of deviating from religious norms among Conservative Protestants. Using data from a statewide probability sample of Texas adults (n = 463), this study tests the hypothesis that Conservative Protestants who fall short of religious norms for attending religious services, reading scripture, and praying will suffer more ps...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Effect of Religious Belief on the Mental Health Status and Suicide Probability of Women Exposed to Violence
In conclusion, a negative relationship was determined between the religious belief levels of women exposed to violence in Turkey and their moods and suicide probabilities. Hence, nurses who can stay alone with women for long periods of time can provide advancement in the determination and prevention of suicides decreasing depression via specific methods and overcoming hopelessness. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Coping and Locus of Control in Normal Pregnancy: Moderating Effects Between Pregnancy Worries and Mental Health
Abstract Most studies about coping in pregnancy focus on risk pregnancies where it has generally been found that the use of religious coping has a positive effect, although to our knowledge there are no studies that associate religious coping to locus of control. We analyzed, in a sample of 285 Spanish women with normal pregnancies, the effect of both variables on psychiatric symptoms and on the relationship between psychiatric symptoms and pregnancy worries. The results show no association between locus of control and religious coping. Locus of control has a significant influence on the pregnant women’s me...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Voices in the band: a doctor, her patients, and how the outlook on aids changed from doomed to hopeful
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Schizophrenia Patient or Spiritually Advanced Personality? A Qualitative Case Analysis
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 18, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Being Thankful: Examining the Relationship Between Young Adult Religiosity and Gratitude
Abstract Studies show that religious people tend to be more grateful, yet existing research tends to rely on small, non-representative samples and limited measures of religiosity. Therefore, we use a national sample (the National Study of Youth and Religion) and multiple measures of religiosity to examine the extent to which religion is associated with feelings of gratitude. We find that religious efficacy and having religious friends positively predict the extent to which young adults feel grateful. In contrast, religious affiliation, participation in organized religion, private devotion, religious salience, oth...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Community-Level Interventions for Reconciling Conflicting Religious and Sexual Domains in Identity Incongruity
Abstract Two of the most unstable domains involved in identity formation, the religious and sexual domains, come into conflict when vulnerable populations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community experience oppression from the indoctrination of religious beliefs that persecute their sexual orientation. This conflict, aptly termed identity incongruity in this article’s discourse, results in a schism that adversely affects these vulnerable populations. This paper investigates the roles of religion, spirituality and available institutional solutions to propose customized, culturally adapted, con...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Engaging African American Faith-Based Organizations in Adolescent HIV Prevention
Abstract To reduce current HIV disparities among African American youth, it is imperative to find effective ways to extend the reach of evidence-based HIV prevention. One promising community resource to support this effort is faith-based organizations (FBOs), a credible and respected resource in the African American community. This paper describes the experiences, perceptions, and challenges that African American FBOs and faith leaders face in engaging in adolescent HIV prevention and highlights facilitators and barriers to implementing HIV prevention in African American FBOs. The findings suggest that African Am...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Moral Beliefs Inversely Related to Trauma Experiences Severity and Presented Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Bosnia and Herzegovina War Veterans
Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the correlation of the level of religious moral beliefs (RMB) with trauma experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity in war veterans of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The sample consists of 120 Bosnian war veterans divided into two equal groups—one with and one without PTSD. We used the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and the RMB belief scale. We then correlated the severity of trauma experiences and PTSD symptoms with veterans’ scores on the RMB scale. The score on the RMB scale was negatively correlated to severity of trauma experiences an...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Stress Symptoms Among Adolescent: A Study from Islamic Perspective
Abstract Rapid social changes in current times which can be quite abrupt present a challenge to adolescent life. Adolescents who are unable to adapt themselves experience stress which may affect their health. Psychological issues of adolescents require attention because the long-term consequence is worse than the short-term effects, namely, there will be a group of people within society who live under stress. Stressed people show symptoms such as being aggressive, prone to rebel, uncontrollable anger, depression, mental disorders and health problems. Early recognition of adolescent stress symptoms is vital. Pursu...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Toward the Concept of ‘Spiritist Chaplaincy’
This article describes the future development of a ‘Spiritist Chaplaincy,’ exploring its concept, design, precepts, and challenges, based upon the first results of a Spiritist religious assistance program for hospitalized patients. This proposed model seems feasible to be replicated, aiming to develop in the near future a structure compatible with a proper ‘Spiritist Chaplaincy’ instead of religious hospital visits. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Validity and Reliability Analysis of the ‘SayangKU’ (MyLove) in Intervention for Addressing Adolescents Involved in Free Sex
Abstract A module entitled ‘SayangKU’ (MyLove), based on the Islamic perspective, was developed as an instrument to assist adolescents that involved in premarital sexual activity. The module comprises four phases: Love of God (Allah), Love of the Prophet, Love of Oneself, and Love of the Ummah (world). From analysis of Rasch, the value of item reliability was .80 and an individual reliability was .95. Dimensionality value was more than 40 % variance explained by measures, and level of agreement among experts was 86.88 %. The posttest shows the better result from pretest and proves the e...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Influence of God and Providence on Happiness and the Quality of Life of Patients Benefiting from Aesthetic Medicine Treatments in Poland
Abstract The research reveals the impact of a belief in god and god’s Providence on the happiness and quality of life of patients benefiting from aesthetic medicine treatments in Poland (country where over 90 % of society declare to be deeply devout). The work also examines age and sex of the patients benefiting from beauty treatments (botulinum toxin, fillers, medical peels and needle mesotherapy), their quality of life and also the impact of various factors, including God and Divine Providence on their happiness. The research shows the analysis of factors influencing the successes or failures in the ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Religion in the Recovery from Alcohol and Substance Abuse Among Jordanian Adults
Abstract The purpose of this study is to understand religious factors role during recovery period among Jordanian receiving treatment for alcohol and substances abuse. Participants were asked to answer open-ended questions related to role of religion on their recovery from alcohol and substances abuse. Content analysis was used to explore the role of religion on their recovery process. One hundred and forty-six clients from two treatment centers participated with two main themes that emerged from the analysis: role of religion and role of religious men. Religion not only helps during the recovery process, but als...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Exploring Latino College Students’ Sexual Behaviors in Relation to Their Sexual Attitudes, Religiousness, and Spirituality
Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between religiosity, spirituality, sexual attitudes, and sexual behaviors among Latino and non-Latino college students. The sample included 230 undergraduate college students enrolled at a mid-sized University in the western USA. Sexual behaviors among Latinos were significantly correlated with sexual attitudes and spiritual disclosure in close relationships. However, sexual behaviors for non-Latino respondents were only significantly related to sexual attitudes, not indices of religiousness or spirituality. Sexual educators, health educators, col...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Depressed Affect and Dimensions of Religiosity in Family Caregivers of Individuals with Dementia
Abstract Religiosity and mood have long been recognized as associated, but some patterns of associations suggest complex relationships. Using a multidimensional measure of religiosity, we explored the possibility that dimensions of religiosity may have (1) different strengths of association and (2) directions of association with depressed mood. We measured five dimensions of religiosity in 1227 family caregivers of persons with dementia, testing associations of each dimension to caregivers’ depressive symptoms. In zero-order associations, higher scores on each religiosity dimension were associated with lowe...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Rescue of the Aesthetic Character of Existence in Kierkegaard Philosophy
Abstract The intention of this article is to develop considerations regarding the unity in all that constitutes the multifaceted work of Soren Kierkegaard. The guides to the subject of this investigation are the stages of existence. His work is devoted to considering the unity of all spheres in their original place, which is concrete existence. To search for this unity, Kierkegaard resumes the aesthetic element of existence, which had been abandoned since the Greeks, passing by Christianity and radicalizing itself since philosophers of subjectivity, to show that this abandon provokes the suppression of the aesthe...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Evangelical Doctors Belief and Practice: A Case Study of the Wellington Christian Medical Fellowship, New Zealand 1971–1980
Abstract This paper presents a critical analysis of the proceedings of the Wellington Christian Medical Fellowship (CMF) during the 1970s. Formation of the CMF, contemporaneous and historical influences, new traditions, and key events are discussed as they arise in the narrative of the case study. Interaction between cultural and religious influences on medical practice is a recurring theme relevant to other bicultural or multicultural nations with significant health inequalities. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effects of Religious Behavior on Health-Related Lifestyles of Muslims in Malaysia
Abstract Religion has become more prominent in shaping attitudes and behavior, but little empirical information is available on the impact of religious behavior in shaping individual Muslims’ health-related lifestyle behaviors in developing countries. The present study explores the relationship between religious behavior and the health-related practices of Malaysian Muslims. A convenience sample of 176 Malaysian Muslims was collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to develop the model. Result shows that health-related actions are strongly influenced, both di...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Nature as the Most Important Coping Strategy Among Cancer Patients: A Swedish Survey
In this study, questionnaires were distributed among persons diagnosed with cancer; 2,355 people responded. The results show that nature has been the most important coping method among cancer patients in Sweden. The highest mean value (2.9) is the factor ‘nature has been an important resource to you so that you could deal with your illnesses’. Two out of three respondents (68 %) affirm that this method helped them feel significantly better during or after illness. The second highest average (2.8) is the factor ‘listening to ‘natural music’ (birdsong and the wind)’. Two out of three ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Was Religiousness/Spirituality Divided into Typologies or Strata?
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Development of a Short-Form of the RCOPE for Use with Bereaved College Students
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: The Influence of God and Providence on Happiness and the Quality of Life of Patients Benefiting from Aesthetic Medicine Treatments in Poland
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual and Non-spiritual Needs Among German Soldiers and Their Relation to Stress Perception, PTDS Symptoms, and Life Satisfaction: Results from a Structural Equation Modeling Approach
Abstract In an anonym cross-sectional survey (using standardized questionnaires) among 1092 German soldiers, we found that 21 % regard their faith as a “strong hold in difficult times.” Only a few had specific religious needs. Rather, a consistent theme from the participants was the need to communicate their own fears, worries and desire to attain states of inner peace. “Soldiers” stress perception and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms were associated particularly with existential and Inner Peace Needs. Structural equation modeling indicated that stress perception has a negati...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 9, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Bridge to healing: finding strength to cope with illness
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 4, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

My Body is a Temple: Eating Disturbances, Religious Involvement, and Mental Health Among Young Adult Women
Abstract A growing body of the literature outlines the undesirable mental health consequences of eating disturbances. However, little attention has been given to the possible mitigating effects of cultural institutions, such as religion, in the lives of women suffering from such pathologies. Our work contributes to the literature by (a) outlining a series of arguments linking eating disturbances, religion, and mental health; (b) specifying two conceptual models of these relationships; and (c) testing relevant hypotheses using data on a large nationwide sample of young women. Results indicate that religious involv...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Measuring Religiosity and Its Effects on Personal Well-Being: A Case Study of Muslim Female Academicians in Malaysia
This study seeks to measure religiosity in an Islamic context and to assess its effects on the personal well-being of Muslims. The determinants of religiosity included under this research are prayer, beliefs, and worship. This research also attempts to examine the coping strategies Muslims use to deal with life problems and changes such as prayer, supplication, trust and reliance on God, remembrance of death, and concept of life after death. Today, many scales of religiosity are being put into use among Muslims. This study measures religiosity and its effects on the well-being of Muslim academicians. The researchers used 3...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Participation in Church or Religious Groups and Its Association with Health. Part 2: A Qualitative, Canadian Study
Abstract As part of a mixed-methods study, this qualitative inquiry determined how adolescent participation in church or religious groups related to their health. We used grounded theory with a phenomenological approach to inquiry. Consistent with the quantitative findings, children (n = 12) involved in religious groups reported lower participation in risk behaviors, higher pro-social behaviors, but poorer levels of emotional well-being and physical health. Findings raise theological and practical questions about the practices and teaching of the church with respect to children’s ministry. The...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Sacred Rivers: Their Spiritual Significance in Hindu Religion
This article discusses the sacred significance of rivers in the ancient and contemporary Indian culture with examples from popular Hindu scriptures. It also presents the ancient model of an eco-friendly check dam and its modern application with potential to mitigate future water-related problems across the drylands of India and elsewhere. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Lay Health Educator Program: Evaluating the Impact of this Community Health Initiative on the Medical Education of Resident Physicians
Abstract Resident physicians receive little training designed to help them develop an understanding of the health literacy and health concerns of laypersons. The purpose of this study was to assess whether residents improve their understanding of health concerns of community members after participating in the Lay Health Educator Program, a health education program provided through a medical–religious community partnership. The impact was evaluated via pre-post surveys and open-ended responses. There was a statistically significant change in the residents’ (n = 15) understanding of what the p...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Test–Retest Reliability of the Muslim Religiosity Scale: Follow-Up to “Religious Involvement and Health Among Dialysis Patients in Saudi Arabia”
Abstract The intra-class correlation coefficient for the scale was 0.961, 95 % CI 0.912–0.983. We conclude that the MRS is a highly reliable measure of Muslim religiosity over time. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Are Religiously Affiliated Hospitals More Than Just Nonprofits? A Study on Stereotypical Patient Perceptions and Preferences
Abstract Recent research on patients’ perceptions of different hospitals predominantly concentrates on whether hospitals are nonprofit or for-profit. Nonprofit hospitals can be subdivided into hospitals that are affiliated with a religious denomination and those that are not. Referring to the stereotypic content model, this study analyzes patients’ perceptions of religious hospitals based on the factors of warmth, competence, trustworthiness and Christianity. Using a survey of German citizens (N = 300) with a one-factorial between-subject design (for-profit vs. nonprofit vs. religious nonpro...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effect of Religion on End-of-Life Care Among Trauma Patients
This study examines the association of religious affiliation and request for chaplain visit with aggressive EOL care among critically injured trauma patients. We conducted a retrospective review of all trauma patients surviving at least 2 days but dying within 30 days of injury over a 3-year period at a major academic trauma center. Time until death was used as a proxy for intensity of life-prolonging therapy. Controlling for social factors, severity of injury, and medical comorbidities, religious affiliation was associated with a 43 % increase in days until death. Controlling for these same variables, chapl...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Religious Commitment with Meta-Cognitive Skills and Philosophical Mindedness of the Graduate Students of Kerman City Universities in the Academic Year 2011–2012
Abstract Religious commitment is one of the many factors that affect individual’s characteristics, including perceptions affections, emotions, interpersonal relationships, and aspirations. The purpose of the present study was to examine for the possible relationship between religious commitment with meta-cognitive skills and philosophical mindedness among the graduate students. The target population was graduate students of Kerman universities during the academic year 2011–2012. The sample includes 394 graduate students who were selected using stratified random sampling with proportional allocation. S...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Dissociation: Adjustment or Distress? Dissociative Phenomena, Absorption and Quality of Life Among Israeli Women Who Practice Channeling Compared to Women with Similar Traumatic History
This study aimed to explore the relationship between traumatic history, dissociative phenomena, absorption and quality of life among a population of channelers, in comparison with a population of non-channelers with similar traumatic history. The study sample included 150 women. The measures included Traumatic Experiences Scale, Dissociative Experience Scale, Absorption Scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and Quality of Life (QOL) Assessment. Channelers presented significantly higher levels of dissociation, absorption and psychological health compared to the other group. Dissociation and absorption were trauma-related only amon...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion as an Empowerment Context in the Narrative of Women with Breast Cancer
Abstact This paper aims at exploring women’s meaningful perception, semantic understanding, and their experiences of breast cancer in a religion context. Accordingly, eight women who had one of their breasts completely removed by surgery (mastectomy) were studied by narrative interviews. In this narrative interview, participants told their life stories since the beginning of disease. Findings showed that religious concepts have a heightened role in the interpretation and understanding of disease, coping strategies, and gaining new concepts for life and death. Two main themes discovered in this research were...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Which Cheek did the Resurrected Jesus Turn?
Abstract Secular portraits are likely to show more of the left than right side of the face (hemiface). Prior research has shown that emotions are more strongly expressed by the left hemiface. In addition, the valence theory of emotion proposes that the right hemisphere is dominant for mediating negative emotions, and the left hemisphere for positive emotions. Since religious art depicting a scene such as the Resurrection of Jesus is more likely to be associated with positive emotions, we postulated that there would be a significant smaller percentage number of artistic works of the Resurrection that reveal the le...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research