The Relationship Between Turkish Nursing Students' Perceptions of Spiritual Care and their Attitudes Towards Death
This study aimed to examine the relationship between nursing students' perception of spiritual care and their attitudes towards death. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Turkey between March and April 2021 with 601 nursing students using the Google Forms questionnaire. The “Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS)” and “Attitude towards Death Scale (ATDS)” were utilised to assist with data collection and analysis. While there was no relationship between the students' total SSCRS and total ATDS scores, there was a positive relationship between the t otal SSCRS and the Neutral Acc...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Treatment of Moral Injury in U.S. Veterans with PTSD Using a Structured Chaplain Intervention
We report on two Veterans who completed the intervention and demonstrated significant improvement in moral injury and PTSD symptoms. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 20, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Servant Leadership and Spirituality Among Undergraduate and Graduate Nursing Students
AbstractNursing students represent the future of nursing. In today ’s increasingly complex health care environment nurse leaders must develop a distinct leadership style based on methodologically sound research to shape tomorrow’s clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between spirituality and servant leadership characteri stics in undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Although the relationship between these two concepts has been studied in the workplace, less is known about the links of servant leadership and spirituality among nursing students. Data from 66 studen...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 20, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Taking the Divinity from the Divine: The Interaction Between Death Concerns and Religiosity on the Evaluation of a Human Jesus
AbstractQuest religiosity is characterized by an openness toward religious doubt and uncertainty as a way to grow existentially. The current paper examines how death awareness contributes to quest (vs low quest) Christians ’ reactions toward a Jesus depicted as doing biologically human actions (e.g., vomiting, bleeding). Study 1 evaluated quest persons’ reactions to either a humanistic Christ or a neutral Jesus passage. Essay evaluations were examined in Study 2 as a function of quest and mortality salience. Study 3 measured death-thought accessibility following a creaturely Jesus prime for quest individuals. P...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 19, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Harmony Between Humanity and Nature: Natural Vs. Synthetic Drug Preference in Chinese Atheists and Taoists
AbstractA commonplace observation across many cultures is that humans show a strong preference for natural items on drug choice in the medical domain. Despite an emerging line of psychological research on individual differences in the naturalness-is-better bias, few studies have focused on the role of religious beliefs. According to the core idea of Taoism, people should free themselves from selfishness and desire and behave in concert with the alternating cycles of Nature. Based on the findings regarding the positive relationship between connectedness to nature and naturalness preference, we predict that Taoists, who emph...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 19, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“The Awesomeness and the Vastness of Who You Really Are:” A Culturally Distinct Framework for Understanding the Link Between Spirituality and Health for Black Sexual Minority Men
AbstractDespite health inequities, many Black sexual minority men are resilient and often utilize spirituality as a culturally distinct self-protective and self-enhancing resource to maintain their health. However, little is known about how spirituality impacts health within a cultural framework that is specific to Black sexual minority men. We conducted 10 individual in-depth interviews, reaching code saturation, with Black sexual minority men across the USA. Our study was guided by grounded theory and a Black psychology theoretical framework. Seven themes were discovered and revealed that participants ’ level of sp...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 17, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Care in Hospitalized Patients  in Iran: An Action Research Study
AbstractReligious practices can  raise the sense of merit and hope through overcoming the feeling of isolation. Studies conducted in this area have indicated that patients may desire to have their spiritual needs met. Nonetheless, sufficient attention has not been paid to these special needs. Therefore, this study aimed to ide ntify the barriers to the provision of spiritual care for hospitalized patients. This is an action research study in which a total of 11 nurses and 76 hospitalized patients were recruited using purposive and convenience sampling, respectively. Data were collected using a combinati...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 16, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Correction to: Relationship between Compassion and Spiritual Care among Nurses in Turkey
A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-021-01308-4 (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 16, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Queer Faith Tensions: A Poetic Inquiry into the Privacy of the ‘Inner Worlds’ of African Closeted Queer Clergy
This article argues that poetic inquiry is a valuable method for unmasking the interior religious experiences of African closeted queer clergy. It demonstrates how poetic inquiry could function as analytic tool for the decolonisation, reclamation, reinsertion and reconstitution of the closeted queer cleric ’s belonging in African religio-cultural spaces in which their sexualities are been exorcised and alienated. It also makes visible the ongoing complexities of closeted queer clergy and the processes of interrogating their faith tensions through negotiating and subverting ecclesiastical and cultura l alienations. Fi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 14, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Christian Churches and the Prevention of Preadolescent Aggression and Violence in Puerto Rico: Regional Leaders ’ Perspective
AbstractPreadolescents ’ involvement in religious congregations may serve as a distal protective factor against aggression. Interviews were conducted to explore Puerto Rico (PR) Christian church and faith-based organization (FBO) leaders' knowledge and perceptions about preadolescent violence, and the role of congregat ions in its prevention. Bullying was perceived as the most common type of aggression among PR preadolescents. Education, positive role modeling, and relationships with pro-social adults are considered important in its prevention. While willing to engage in violence prevention efforts, congregation...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 14, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Closed but Not Protected: Excess Deaths Among the Amish and Mennonites During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Abstract“Excess deaths” is a means to estimate the lethality of COVID-19 (directly and indirectly). Assessing “excess death” in closed religious communities provides information on how COVID-19 impacted these communities. We use obituary information published in an Amish/Mennonite newspaper to exami ne excess death among the Amish/Mennonites in 2020. Our results indicate the Amish/Mennonite excess death rates are similar to the national trends in the USA. The excess death rate for Amish/Mennonites spiked with a 125% increase in November 2020. The impact of COVID-19 on this closed religious comm unit...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 11, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“An Unchanging God in a Changing World”: Sexual Practice and Decision-Making among Christian Women in South Africa
This study explored the relationship between sexual health and religion among young, Pentecostal Christian women navigating the transition to adulthood in Khayelitsha township,  in the City of Capetown, South Africa. Between February and August 2019, eleven semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions were conducted. Thematic analysis and discourse analysis were used to analyse the data collected. The study found that the relationship between sexual healt h and religion was complex and multifaceted, shaped by the religious dichotomisation of “right” and “wrong”, socio-econo...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 11, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Experiences and Perceived Effects of Rosary Praying: A Qualitative Study
AbstractThe aim of this study is to explore experiences and perceived effects of the Rosary on issues around health and well-being, as well as on spirituality and religiosity. A qualitative study was conducted interviewing ten Roman Catholic German adults who regularly practiced the Rosary prayer. As a result of using a tangible prayer cord and from the rhythmic repetition of prayers, the participants described experiencing stability, peace and a contemplative connection with the Divine, with Mary as a guide and mediator before God. Praying the Rosary was described as helpful in coping with critical life events and in fost...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 9, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

COVID-19 Medical-Religious Partnerships: Implementation of a Just-In-Time COVID-19 Training in Catholic Schools
AbstractThe concept of Just-In-Time Training (JITT) is to provide critical information specific to a public health crisis, allowing individuals to understand and respond to an  urgent situation. The design of the JITT curriculum appropriate for school-aged children during the COVID-19 pandemic is vital, as every individual has a role to play in mitigating the spread of SARS-CoV-2. When working with various communities, considering culture and religion is essential, as al igning values and beliefs with the JITT curriculum’s objectives may significantly change the community’s behavior toward a public health ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 8, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effects of Sexual Behaviour, Intercourse, Satisfaction-Related Myths and Perceived Spirituality on Sexual Dysfunctions in Muslim Pregnant Women
AbstractThe aim of this study was to examine the effects of sexual behaviour, intercourse, satisfaction-related myths and spirituality on sexual dysfunctions in Muslim pregnant women. The study had a descriptive, cross-sectional and correlational design and was performed with 215 Muslim pregnant women. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses were utilized for data analysis. As a result of the multiple regression analyses, sexual dysfunctions were most affected by sexual behaviour myths and least affected by perceived spirituality. It can be suggested that sexuality should be incorporated into prenatal care ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 5, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Exploring the Impact of Religion, Superstition, and Professional Cultural Competence on Access to HIV and Mental Health Treatment Among Black Sub-Sahara African Communities in the English City of Birmingham
This study explored the impact of religion, superstition, and professional cultural competence on access to HIV and mental health services among BSSA communities in the English city of Birmingham. Researchers utilised explorative qualitative methods. Specifically, 12 focus groups were conducted followed by a semi-structured interview with a member from each focus group. Data were analysed using a thematic approach guided by the four phases of the silences framework. Results suggest that religion, superstition, and professional cultural competence affect access to HIV and mental health services among BSSA communities. Findi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 3, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship between Alexithymia, Psychological Well-Being and Religious Coping in Fibromyalgia Patients in Turkey
This study aimed to investigate the relationship between alexithymia, psychological well-being, and religious coping in fibromyalgia patients. This study was planned as a descriptive and cross-sectional research design. The sample consisted of 175 fibromyalgia patients. Data were collected using the  Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20, the Psychological Well-being Scale, and the Religious Coping Scale. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation test and Multiple Linear Regression analysis. A negative correlation was found between alexithymia and negative religious coping (r = − 0.377,p ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 3, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Assessing Spirituality in a Diverse World
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 3, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

S ákit Pighati and Pag-asa : A Pastoral Reflection on Suffering During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Philippines
This article explores the concept of suffering as experienced by Filipinos during the COVID-19 pandemic. It draws inspiration from their narratives about how they faced, managed, and struggled during this tragic event. Their experiences were interpreted and analyzed concerning Filipino culture and tradition using a modified form of thematic analysis. Findings revealed three contextualized themes: s ákit (pain), pighati (grief), and pag-asa (hope). These themes are then discussed in the light of John Paul II'sSalvifici Doloris. A meaningful pastoral reflection on the basic realities of suffering is formulated to clar...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Pornography Debate: Religiosity and Support for Censorship
AbstractPornography has become an increasingly salient topic in public discourse. We sought to better understand the role of religiosity in shaping people ’s support of policy stances against pornography, in the form of censorship, using nationally representative data from the 2014 General Social Survey (n = 1676). Results from logistic regression indicate that high religiosity significantly increases odds of supporting censorship. Holding control variables at their sample means, the least religious persons had a predicted probability of 0.09 of supporting censorship, compared to 0.57 for the mos t reli...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Evaluation of Religious Coping in Tunisian Muslim Women with Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer
AbstractStudies evaluating religious coping in Arab-Muslim populations are few. We aimed to evaluate religiosity and religious coping in a sample of breast cancer women, and to analyze the association between religiosity, religious coping, depression, anxiety, cancer clinical data, and sociodemographic data in our patients. A cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted over a 4-month period in 61 newly diagnosed breast cancer women. We used the following scales: The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21), the Arabic-Brief Religious Coping Scale (A-BRCS) and the Arabic Religiosity Scale. The majority of particip...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Smoking Behaviors and Viewpoints of Smoking by Erciyes University, Faculty of Theology Students
This study was conducted to evaluate smoking situations and views on cigarette use by Erciyes University, Faculty of Theology students. In this cross-sectional descriptive research, a questionnaire was conducted with the first and last year students studying in the Faculty of Theology (305). 88.2% of the students (97.0% of the women and 69.6% of the men) have never smoked; 6.9% of them (3.0% freshmen/16.0% senior students) still smoke and 4.9% of them have quit smoking. 81.0% of the smokers have thought of quitting smoking and 47.6% of them have tried to quit smoking. 70.6% of those thinking of quitting smoking stated that...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion and the Risks of Sexually Transmissible Infections: Evidence from Britain
AbstractAlthough a growing body of literature has explored the association between religion and the prevalence of sexually transmissible infections (STIs), the focus has mainly been on HIV/AIDS and developing countries. Using data from the British National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal), we examine the direct association between religion and the prevalence of STIs including individual perception of exposure and risk of STIs. We focus on the importance of religion to respondents, religious affiliation as well as frequency of attendance to religious meetings. Our analyses suggest that being religious and...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Combating Contagion and Injustice: The Shared Work for Public Health and Faith Communities During COVID-19
AbstractFaith communities are uniquely positioned for essential public health work to combat the COVID-19 pandemic and address the chronic pre-existing health disparities that have been exacerbated by COVID-19. Specifically, faith communities can (1) dialogue with public health  communities, developing internal policies and meeting guidelines consistent with evidence-based recommendations and their own faith traditions, (2) bolster religious daycare and parochial school immunization policies, and (3) partner with faith-based organizations through financial support and vol unteer hours. This essential work will complem...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effectiveness of Spiritual Counseling on the Enhancement of Hope in Iranian Muslim Patients with Myocardial Infarction: A Two-Month Follow-Up
This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of spiritual counseling on hope in patients with myocardial infarction over a two-month period. Fifty-six Iranian Muslim patients with myocardial infarction participated; participants were randomly allocated to either the intervention group (n = 28) or the control group (n = 28). The experiment group received three sessions of group spiritual counseling. The patients' hope was measured before intervention and immediately, one month, and two months after the intervention. The results indicated that no significant difference in hope was present betwe...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 20, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Correction to: Mental Health and Religiosity in the Sardinian Blue Zone: Life Satisfaction and Optimism for Aging Well
A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-021-01288-5 (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 19, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Contending with Spiritual Reductionism: Demons, Shame, and Dividualising Experiences Among Evangelical Christians with Mental Distress
AbstractThe belief that mental distress is caused by demons, sin, or generational curses is commonplace among many  evangelical Christian communities. These beliefs may have positive or negative effects for individuals and groups. Phenomenological descriptions of these experiences and the subjective meanings associated with them, however, remain somewhat neglected in the literature. The current study employed s emi-structured interviews with eight evangelical Christians in order to idiographically explore their experiences of mental distress in relation to their faith and wider communities. Through an interpretative p...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 15, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Complementary, Traditional and Spiritual Practices Used by Cancer Patients in Turkey When Coping with Pain: An Exploratory Case Study
This study was conducted to determine the complementary and traditional-spiritual practices applied by individuals diagnosed with cancer when experiencing significant pain. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted with 110 patients who were receiving chemotherapy treatment in a university hospital outpatient treatment unit (Chemotherapy Unit) between 1st March and 30th June 2019. The study sample size was calculated using the ‘unknown-population sample selection formula’ (n = t2·p·q·/d2). Study data were collected using a patient information form comprising 13 ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 14, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Benefits of Spiritual Diaries: A Mixed-Method Study in Korea
AbstractThis mixed study examined the benefits of spiritual diaries in Korea. Quantitatively, differences in spiritual growth and psychological well-being were examined in relation to the frequency of writing spiritual diaries among 385 participating adults. The group who wrote spiritual diaries ‘5–7 times a week’ had significantly higher scores relating to spiritual growth and psychological wellbeing than other groups across the outcome variables. Qualitatively, the study also explored the benefits of writing spiritual diaries among 37 adults. Three major themes using four focus grou p interviews, were i...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 12, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Correction to: Spiritual Support During COVID-19 in England: A Scoping Study of Online Sources
A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-021-01274-x (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 12, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Eliciting the Concept of Cancer in Nursing Students in Turkey: an Exploratory Metaphor Analysis
This study was conducted with 166 nursing students at a nursing faculty in Turkey. It was a mixed method study using qualitative and quantitative methods.Methods and VariablesTo capture the picture in a human mind of the complexity of feelings for cancer, writing a description and elicitation interviews were employed. Moreover, to reach ontological and epistemological level thoughts in the deepest layers of elicited metaphors, the data were analyzed in an analytical framework.ResultsThe study provides a conceptualization of"Cancer." The students produced 92 valid metaphors. The most commonly used metaphors were f...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Denominational Differences in US Synagogues' Promotion of Youth Physical Activity Programming
AbstractLess than 25% of US children 6 –17 years of age are sufficiently active. Faith-based settings are one of the nine societal sectors tasked with promoting physical activity (PA). Religious organizations frequently use diverse media, including websites, bulletins/newsletters, and calendars to inform current/potential members of ev ents. These could be used to inform youth congregants about PA programs and/or various programs (e.g., worship, social group) with a PA component. We aimed to identify types of PA offerings available to youth and detect disparities by denomination. We performed a systematic line-by-lin...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Sad Eyes, Crooked Crosses: Religious Struggles, Psychological Distress and the Mediating Role of Psychosocial Resources
AbstractIn this paper, we employed data from the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to formally test whether the association between religious struggles and psychological distress is mediated by psychosocial resources. We found that religious struggles were associated withlower levels of social support, self-esteem, the sense of control, and self-control. We also observed that religious struggles were associated withhigher levels of non-specific emotional distress, depression, and anxiety, but not somatization. Our mediation analyses revealed significant indirect effects of religious struggles on emotion...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 10, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Faith Communities ’ Improvements in Readiness to Engage in Addictions Resilience and Recovery Support Programming
AbstractSpirituality and religion are well-documented components of prevention, treatment and recovery of substance use disorders. Faith communities are in a distinct position to support recovery and resilience regarding substance use disorders —not only in times of crisis, but every day. We conducted an exploratory study of congregational (i.e., organizational) “levers” that can drive change readiness in implementing recovery and resilience programming for substance use disorders within faith communities. Findings point to enhanced effectiveness post-intervention and the importance of developing awarenes...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 8, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

COVID-19, Sex, Addictions, Women's Health, Care of the Elderly, and Medical Education
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 6, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Family Planning Attitudes, Religious Orientation and Fatalistic Tendency Levels: A Descriptive-Correlational Study in Turkey
AbstractThis research was conducted to examine the relationship between family planning attitudes, religious orientation, and fatalistic tendency levels of individuals aged 15 –49 in Igdir, Turkey. This descriptive-correlational research was conducted on individuals living in Igdir between March-July 2020. The sample size of our study is 384 participants. It was found that there was a significant negative correlation between family planning attitude scale scores and rel igious orientation scale behavior subscale scores, fatalistic tendency scale total scores and all subscale scores, age, and number of children (p 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 4, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Needs of the Muslim Elderly Living in Nursing Homes: A Qualitative Study
This study aimed to examine the spiritual needs of the Muslim elderly living in nursing homes. A qualitative study was conducted using conven tional content analysis. Seventeen elderly people (nine women and eight men) were selected from four nursing homes in Iran using purposive sampling. The subjects were asked to participate in semi-structured interviews. The interview transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. First, semantic u nits were identified and then related codes were extracted and classified into categories and subcategories based on their similarities. Finally, themes were extracted from the data....
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 29, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Nursing Students ’ Perception Levels of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Turkey
AbstractThe present study was conducted to determine nursing students ’ perception levels of spirituality and spiritual care and the factors affecting these levels. The study was carried out in the nursing faculty of a university located in eastern Turkey between April and June 2019. The study population was made up of students studying within a department of nursi ng (n = 1250), and involved a sample size of 420 students, determined by power analysis. Data were obtained from an ‘Introductory Information Form’ that included students’ sociodemographic characteristics and ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 28, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity is Associated with Motivation to Start and Stop Smoking Among Adolescent Students in Brazil
This study aimed to estimate associations between adolescents ’ religiosity and their motivation to start and stop smoking. A school survey was carried out in Midwestern Brazil. Participants were never-smokers (n = 2073) and smokers (n = 116) aged 13–19 who answered a questionnaire. Religiosity was measured with the Duke Religion Index, and motivation with questions based on the Prime Theory of Motivation. Organizational, non-organizational, and intrinsic religiosity were associated with motivation to start smoking among ne ver-smokers. Intrinsic religiosity was associated with smoke...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 28, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Saint Roch and Social Distancing During Pandemics: Lessons to be Remembered
AbstractSurprisingly, Catholic hagiography can teach us a lot about medicine. As an example, we present here the history of Saint Roch who is considered, along with Saint Sebastian, one of the two main Saints who act as protectors against plagues and  have often been invoked by Catholic people during the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Whereas Saint Sebastian is associated with plagues only symbolically, Catholic tradition considers Saint Roch to have had real contact with the bubonic plague. Indeed, during his pilgrimage to Rome, Saint Roch help ed people suffering from the plague and was, subsequently,...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 28, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Dungaw: Re-imagined Religious Expression in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic
AbstractExpressions of religious piety have been practiced in the Catholic Church as a response to plagues and pandemics. The faithful seek comfort in prayer and appeal to God and the saints for mercy and protection from illness and loss of life. In the Philippines, the veneration of sacred images and placing them outside the window of a house or a church is a religious expression known as"dungaw ” (to look out). This paper discusses “dungaw” as a faith-response of Filipino Catholics during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study is an empirical phenomenology that consists of a literary review and interview...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 27, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“It Would be Harder Without Faith”: An Exploratory Study of Low-Income Families’ Experiences of Early Childhood Inclusive Education in New Zealand
AbstractNew Zealand has a reputation for having one of the most inclusive education systems in the world. However, research and anecdotal evidence show that many parents of young children with disabilities have difficulties accessing intervention and health-care services and may be less satisfied when they do receive services. In addition, though a plethora of research has been done on inclusive education, little attention has been given by researchers to low-income parents ’ perspectives on early childhood inclusion in New Zealand. This paper draws on findings from a qualitative study on 30 parents’ experience...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 27, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Effect of Religious Coping on Disease Acceptance and Management Among Patients with Diabetes in Turkey
This study was conducted to determine the relationship between religious coping and disease acceptance and management among patients with diabetes. A total of 504 individuals with type 2 diabetes were included in this descriptive-correlational study. In this study, individuals who did not use their medications regularly, those who did not pay attention to their diet and those who did not exercise regularly had higher levels of positive religious coping. No significant relationship was found between the level of acceptance of illness and religious coping styles among participants with diabetes. However, it was found out tha...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 27, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Mental Health and Religiosity in the Sardinian Blue Zone: Life Satisfaction and Optimism for Aging Well
In conclusion, optimism and hedonic well-being favor optimal aging in the Blue Zone. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Meaning and Role of Spirituality for Older Adults: A Qualitative Study
This study is designed to identify the meaning and effects perceived by a person concerning religion and spirituality as that person grows old. A total of nineteen adults aged 65 –88, five of whom were male and fourteen of whom were female, participated in semistructured interviews. As per the results of the thematic analysis, four main themes emerged: the meaning of spirituality, spiritual practices, the effect of spirituality and the meaning of growing old for the person . The results indicate that the participants view the entrance into old-age adulthood as a process that enhances interactions with others and inte...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Support During COVID-19 in England: A Scoping Study of Online Sources
This study points to the importance of developing centralized strategies to prepare healthcare systems and professionals in relation to spiritual support provision, both routinely and during health disasters and emergencies. Further research will have to explore innovative practices, in particular the role of digital technologies, in spiritual support provision. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 19, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious and Spiritual Practices Used by Children and Adolescents to Cope with Cancer
This study consists of an integrative review of the scientific literature that aimed to know the religious and spiritual practices used by children and adolescents to cope with cancer. From searches in the databases/libraries CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs (2009 –2019), the final sample consisted of 20 articles. Prayers were the most widely used practices, followed by sacred books and objects, going to sacred places and the use of music. Improvements in well-being, physical and emotional health have been reported. It is concluded that such practices shoul d be recognized as important resources in coping ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 19, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Theophrastus Bombastus Von Hohenheim: Theological Reformer, Philosopher and Physician
AbstractTheophrastus Bombastus Von Hohenheim (1493 –1541), known as Paracelsus, was a German-Swiss Renaissance man. His interests included alchemy and medicine. During the early 1500s, he worked as a physician, introducing mineral-based therapies to treat ailments. He is credited with developing the first recipe for laudanum, a powerful opium-base d pain medication. He had radical beliefs, claiming that supreme knowledge could be reached by observing nature, not by reading books. He expressed rebellious opinions on religious topics and, though devoted Christian, criticized the Catholic Church, preaching that the spir...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 19, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Meanings of “the existential” in a Secular Country: A Survey Study
Abstract“The existential” is a concept that many people use albeit associated with different meanings. In order to increase research-based insight into the meaning of “the existential,” we conducted a questionnaire study in Denmark in 2018 in which we asked 1.106 Danes of various age, gender, educat ional and geographical background about personal associations linked to “the existential.” Factor analysis of the answers resulted in three different groups of meaning: (1) essential meanings of life, (2) spirituality/religiosity and (3) existential thinking. The findings show that “the...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 18, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Mental Health Clinician Community Clergy Collaboration to Address Moral Injury Symptoms: A Feasibility Study
AbstractMoral injury (MI) symptoms (guilt, shame, isolation) can be associated with military experiences. While a degree of overlap is recognized between MI and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, MI symptoms do not always respond to evidence-based treatments for PTSD. Mental Health Clinician Community Chaplain Collaboration (MC4) was delivered by community clergy to address MI symptoms through facilitation of forgiveness and community reintegration. Thirteen veterans participated and the results suggested that MC4 was generally feasible and acceptable. However, it is unlikely community clergy time could keep up...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research