Determination of Breast Cancer Fatalism in Women and the Investigation of the Relationship Between Women's Cervical Cancer and Pap Smear Test Health Beliefs with Religious Orientation and Fatalism
This study aims to determine breast cancer fatalism in women and investigate the relationship between women ’s cervical cancer and pap smear test health beliefs with religious orientation and fatalism. The study, which was conducted as a descriptive and relational screening one, was conducted in the eastern part of Turkey between July and August 2019. The study was conducted with 357 women who were not diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer, and who were not pregnant. A positive, significant relationship was found between the Religious Orientation Scale total mean score and Health Motivation and Pap smear Benefit P...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity Level and Mammography Performance Among Arab and Jewish Women in Israel
This study compared mammography performance by religiosity level among Arab (weightedn = 103,347) and Jewish women (weightedn = 757,956) in Israel aged 50–74, using data from the 2017 National Social Survey of the Central Bureau of Statistics. In the Survey, women were asked regarding mammogram performance in the 2 years prior. Mammography performance was 78.2% among Jewish women and 64.8% among Arab women. Among J ewish women, self-identifying as “Very religious” and “Somewhat religious” was associated with lower mammography performance compared to being &lsqu...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How Giving Birth Makes Sense: A Questionnaire Study on Existential Meaning-Making Among Mothers Giving Birth Preterm or at Term
ConclusionsFindings suggest that not only traumatic birth events accentuate existential reflections, but that even normal childbirth to most mothers is an existential event. However, the quality of existential reflections differs when comparing normal and traumatic birth. The study points towards change in education and organization of maternity care to better care for existential needs and reflections specific to every new mother and birthing woman. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Coping with the Practice of Medicine: Religion, Spirituality, and Other Personal Strategies
AbstractWith the increasing demands on the practice of medicine, this qualitative study asked residents and their faculty (n = 44) to reflect on how they cope with their work. They provided written reflections to questions about successful and disappointing patient experiences, as well as describing their personal, religious, or spiritual practices. Key themes included connecting with family and friends, learning fro m their mistakes, using cognitive behavioral tools, and engaging with their spirituality and religiosity. One third specifically mentioned they used prayer and/or meditation. We contextualized se...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Development of Guidelines for the Inclusion of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Unani Tibb Practice in South Africa: A Study Protocol
AbstractUnani Tibb is a holistic form of medicine, which highlights the interconnectedness of mind, body and soul. Despite this, there is very little evidence of spiritual care practices by Unani Tibb practitioners in South Africa. This protocol outlines a proposed process for developing guidelines to integrate spirituality and spiritual care in Unani Tibb practice. In phase one, a document review will be conducted on spirituality and spiritual care in complementary and alternative medicine and Unani Tibb. A series of quantitative and qualitative enquiries will follow to obtain the perspectives of various stakeholders in t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Demand for Space: Elderly Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People, Healthcare, and Theological Ethics
AbstractVisibility for transgender and gender nonconforming people and the elderly is growing; however, thus far the overlap of the two groups has rarely been considered. Trans persons therefore remain largely invisible in the context of older people ’s care and medicine. The discrimination faced by this group is at least twofold: they are the targets of aggression incited by transphobia, and also by ageism. Although older trans and gender nonconforming people exist as a greatly marginalized group within another already marginalized group, eve n the field of theological ethics has neglected to grant them ethical atte...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion and Faith Perception in a Pandemic of COVID-19
AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has impacted religion and faith in different ways. Numerous restrictions have been implemented worldwide. Believers are in conflict with authorities ’ warnings that gatherings must be limited to combat the spread of the virus. Religion has always played a role of the balm for the soul, and the regular religious participation is associated with better emotional health outcomes. In our study, we examined whether the exposure to COVID-19 enhances the faith. The instrument used was a survey verifying the power of spirituality in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Components of Successful Spiritual Care
AbstractThe quantifiable health benefits of spiritual practice and religious community have inspired a movement toward addressing religion within health care and medical education, yet biomedical professionals still often avoid this topic (Giordano and Engebretson in Explore 2(3):216--225, 2006; Post et al. in Ann Intern Med 132(7):578, 2000). This is largely due to a lack of clarity on how to ethically engage with diverse spiritual practices and maintain professional boundaries regarding spiritual care. However, a majority of patients desire increased incorporation of spirituality in medical discussions, indicating a defi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Influence of Knowledge and Attitude on Lifestyle Practices Among Seventh-Day Adventists in Metro Manila, Philippines
AbstractThis cross-sectional study examined the influence of knowledge and attitude on lifestyle practices (KAP) of the five dimensions of the Adventist Health Message (AHM5D). A sample of 1442 respondents was drawn from seven Seventh-day Adventist Churches in Metro Manila, Philippines. Hierarchical multiple regression showed that the social dimension of knowledge and the physical, spiritual, and social dimensions of attitude, significantly influenced the practices of AHM5D (β = − .056,p = .037;β = .236,p 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Moderating Effects of Personality Traits in Relationship Between Religious Practices and Mental Health of University Students
This study focused on examining the effects of personality traits in moderating relationship between religiosity and mental health of university students. It was conducted on a sample of (N = 372) university students aged between 20 and 26 years equated to gender: 186 male and 186 female students at Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan. The religiosity, mental health and personality traits were measured by using the scale of Religiosity of Islam, Inventory of Mental Health and Bi g Five Inventory, respectively. The correlation analyses showed the significant relationship of religiosity with behavioral co...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spirituality, Anxiety and Depression Among People Receiving Hemodialysis Treatment in Jordan: A Cross-Sectional Study
AbstractSpirituality is an important factor that may mediate the detrimental impacts of hemodialysis on mental health. Lack of research examining spirituality and mental health in the Arab world in general and Jordan in particular encouraged this research. The study examined levels of spirituality, depression and anxiety and explored the association between them among patients receiving hemodialysis treatment in Jordan. A cross-sectional design was used to recruit 202 patients receiving hemodialysis treatment. Self-administered questionnaires including spiritual well-being scale, depression and anxiety and a demographic da...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Reviewing the Common Barriers to the Mental Healthcare Delivery in Africa
AbstractThe current paper sought to thematically present common challenges associated with mental healthcare services in Africa. We largely limited our search for literature materials to studies published from 2003 to 2019 in African countries from which the findings showed that there are common challenges confronting mental healthcare services in Africa. The challenges include: inadequate mental healthcare facilities, funding constraints, shortage of professional healthcare workers, inadequate training and development scheme for mental health workers and weak mental healthcare policies. Implications for policy and practic...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Association Between Danish Physicians ’ Religiosity and Spirituality and Their Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Procedures
This study contributes to the knowledge of, and possible reflections upon, the impact of physicians ’ personal beliefs and values on their attitudes toward important decisions in their patients’ lives. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity and Adolescent Major Depressive Episodes Among 12 –17-Year-Olds
This study examined whether age plays a role in the relationship between religiosity and adolescent major depressive episodes (MDEs). The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data was examined. Odds ratios were computed to determine if the association between religiosity and MDE differed based on age of adolescent among 12 –13-year-olds, 14–15-year-olds, and 16–17-year-olds. Results indicated that 9.7% of adolescents reported having an MDE within the past year. Past-year MDE did not differ based on religious attendance for any of the three age groups. However, 12–13- and 14–15-year-olds...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

COVID-19, Mental Health, and Religious Coping Among American Orthodox Jews
AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic presents potential mental health challenges, and the American Orthodox Jewish population has been particularly affected by the virus. The current study assessed the impact of the pandemic and explored the relationships between exposure, religiosity, and distress in a sample ofn = 419 American Orthodox Jews. Results indicated high levels of exposure, concern, and compliance with medical guidelines; however stress was generally low and we found evidence for positive impact. Direct exposure correlated with higher religiosity. Positive religious coping, intrinsic religios ity and tru...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

We Can Do Better: Why Pastoral Care Visitation to Hospitals is Essential, Especially in Times of Crisis
AbstractFrom his perspective as a general surgeon, Episcopal priest and Medical Director for High Risk Populations and Outcomes at a large health-care system, the author identifies an unrecognized problem that clergy were banned from visiting parishioners in most hospitals across the country during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic —a situation that persists in many contexts. The author explains why pastoral visitation should be considered essential care—especially at a time of crisis—and encourages hospital administrators across the country to clarify policies to welcome community clergy as essential p...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relationship Between Fear of Childbirth and Psychological and Spiritual Well-Being in Pregnant Women
AbstractThe aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between fear of childbirth (FOC) and psychological (PWB) and spiritual well-being (SWB) in pregnant women. Descriptive and relational study was conducted with 338 pregnant women in Turkey. Information form, Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire-A, Spiritual Well-Being Scale and Psychological Well-Being Scale were used for data collection. There was a negative correlation between SWB and PWB and FOC in pregnant women. SWB explained 18% of the variance related to FOC which increased to 24% with PWB. SWB was a partial mediating variable in PWB and F...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Salvation Expectations of Patients of Medicine, Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Religion
AbstractHealth and holistic quality of life, physical and emotional needs, somatic and spiritual aspects contain a comprehensive promise of healing. The aim of the current study is to measure the expectations of patients of medicine, alternative medicine and religion related to health and illness. The survey was carried out among 103 patients of a rural general practitioner from May to June 2013 and among 103 patients of the outpatient department for endocrinology and metabolic disease of the Jena University Hospital in 2013. All patients were asked by one interviewer (HM) on fears in relation to health/illness and expecta...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Justifications for Medical Quarantine in Jewish Ethics
AbstractThe current Corona epidemic broke out at the end of 2019 and by early in the year 2020 was spreading all around the world from China to the USA. Among the moves in the fight against the proliferation of the illness, international borders were closed to prevent travel among countries. In the next stage in the fight, many countries imposed quarantines on carriers of the disease as well as on those around them and even on entire civilian populations. Herein, I offer the religious justifications in Judaism for preserving the public ’s health in general and particularly in the face of disease, especially during of...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Some Rest for the Weary? A Qualitative Analysis of Clergy Methods for Managing Demands
AbstractIn many ways, clergy (i.e., religious leaders including pastors, ministers) are a high-risk population. In their efforts to ensure the spiritual well-being of their congregations, clergy may neglect their own well-being and be unaware of the potentially detrimental effects that their work has on their health. The purpose of this study was to add to the growing knowledge base about how clergy perceive the relationship between their work and their well-being, the strategies they use to recover from their work, and the ways they balance work and nonwork areas of their lives. This qualitative study explores these areas...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Special Section: Religion and Health Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Struggle and Life Satisfaction Among Adult Christians: Self-esteem as a Mediator
AbstractThe religious dimension of life represents an important source of human strength, meaning, and coping for many people. However, the religious life is not always “smooth and easy” and can be associated with weak personal adjustment, poorer psychological well-being, and lower satisfaction. Yet, besides the direct relationship between these variables, some researchers postulate the existence of an indirect association that has not been fully explained by v arious psychosocial mediators. The aim of the present study was to verify whether self-esteem could be a potential mediator between religious strain and...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Psychological Analysis of Religious Experience: The Construction of the Intensity of Religious Experience Scale (IRES)
AbstractThe aim of this article is to present the issues of religious experience, and the associated experience of God ’s presence and God’s absence, and then its operationalization, as well as to construct the Intensity of Religious Experience Scale, IRES (Skala Intensywności Doświadczenia Religijnego, SIDR). The value of psychometric tool, the reliability and validity, were assessed. The study was conducted in three steps. Study 1 concerned the generalization of statements related to conception of Catholic religious experience; i.e., the subjective feeling whether one experiences God’s presence and Go...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Influence of Spiritual Coping and Social Support on the Mental Health and Quality of Life of the Saudi Informal Caregivers of Patients with Stroke
AbstractThe research explored the influence of spiritual coping and social support on mental health and quality of life (QOL) of informal caregivers of stroke survivors in Saudi Arabia. The respondents were frequently using religious coping strategies than existential coping strategies. The respondents received higher support from significant others and lowest support from friends. The majority of the respondents had mild to moderate depression, while more than one-third had mild to severe anxiety. Psychological health received the highest QOL, while physical health received  the poorest QOL. Spiritual coping and...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relationships Between Religiosity and Naturally Occurring Social Interaction
AbstractFor 2  weeks, participants (282 US collegians) used a diary technique to describe the social interactions they had each day. These descriptions included how enjoyable the interaction was, how confident they felt, and how intimate the interaction was. They also completed a measure of Allport’s Intrinsic –Extrinsic religious orientation, the Christian Orthodoxy scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory. A series of multilevel modeling analyses found that enjoyment and confidence in social interaction were positively related to the Extrinsic Personal factor of the IE scale, whereas intimacy of inter ac...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

An Indecent Society, Sick Souls, and the Weak Messianic Force of God: A Reflection on Religious Health in the Anthropocene Era
This article posits that the dire realities associated with the Anthropocene Era will increase the presence of indecent societies that humiliate Others while securing the well-being of privileged groups. Within the society, humiliation, which is carried out by various political, social, and economic apparatuses, leads to civic carelessness and perfidy that accompanies both the foreclosure of the space of appearances, wherein people speak and act together, and the diminution of Others ’ self-esteem, self-confidence, and self-respect. It is argued that indecent societies depend on sick souls who seek to retain social, ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Dead with No Wake, Grieving with No Closure: Illness and Death in the Days of Coronavirus in Spain
This article investigates the situation and the social and cultural impact it has provoked. The method used takes the line of critical dialogue analysis (CDA) applied to information contained in the mass media, employing qualitative material from a related small-scale study. The results show that in countries like Spain where there is a strong Roman Catholic tradition the importance of these rituals is unquestionable. Although the country has become laicized over recent years, many traditions around death are still maintained. Hence, the impossibility of holding funerals is triggering a large number of social and personal ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Use of Spiritual and Religious Interventions for the Treatment for Insomnia: A Scoping Review
AbstractInsomnia is a common problem, affecting individuals ’ health and quality of life. Among several therapies used to treat this condition, spiritual interventions are suggested to have beneficial outcomes on sleep disturbances. Nevertheless, a systematic compilation of the evidence available is still needed in the literature in order to scientifically investigate the topic. To examine the most common spiritual interventions proposed to treat sleep disorders and to assess the scientific evidence of these interventions. This is a scoping literature review conducted by independent researchers on the following datab...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Impact of Bhagavad Gita Course on College Students: A Study Based on Students Feedback
AbstractSrimad Bhagavad Gita, one of the most authentic scriptures of India, is being taught as an elective or regular course in various universities around the world. I have been teaching Gita in Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Hyderabad campus (BPHC) since 2012. This paper presents some feedback given by the students revealing the impact of the course on them and possible improvements in its pedagogy. Twelve batches of students (a little over 2000) have studied this course between January 2012 and May 2019. From these, 300 students volunteered in giving individual written feedback. In this elaborate write-up, ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Development and Validation of the Ethicotherapy Quality of Life Questionnaire
AbstractAt present, no standardized tool to measure therapeutic outcomes of a central European traditional healing system called Ethicotherapy exists. Ethicotherapy focuses on the relationship between physical health and moral health. The aim was to develop and validate the Ethicotherapy quality of life questionnaire (EQLQ) using a sequential exploratory mixed-method study design. An EQLQ with good psychometric properties was developed. An exploratory factor analysis identified eight domains consisting of 30 items. Future research investigating a relationship between EQLQ, health, and physical illness in different populati...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The International NERSH Data Pool of Health Professionals ’ Attitudes Toward Religiosity and Spirituality in 12 Countries
AbstractThe amount of research concerned with the values of health professionals (HPs) is steadily growing. Around the world HPs face similar challenges when patients express their existential and spiritual views. How HPs engage these views, and the degree of embedment into consultations, differ across cultures. Today, more than ever before, researchers in this field need to share experiences and build new knowledge upon local findings. To meet this demand, we founded the international collaboration “Network for Research on Spirituality and Health” (https://NERSH.org). One of the central projects of our network...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Internal Dialogue as a Mediator of the Relationship Between Prayer and Well-Being
AbstractWhen people are praying, they are not only communicating with God (upward prayer), but also they are exploring their relationships with themselves (inward prayer) and with other people (outward prayer). Internal dialogical activity includes areas which correspond to upward, inward, and outward prayer. Therefore, the aim of this article is to examine whether and how internal dialogues can be mediators in the relationship between these three types of prayer and well-being. Data from 193 respondents (143 females) were analyzed in the study. We used: the Prayer Thoughts Scale, the Internal Dialogical Activity Scale, an...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effect of Spiritist “Passe” on Preoperative Anxiety of Surgical Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Double-Blind
The objective of this study was to evaluate the preoperative anxiety of hospitalized patients exposed to Spiritist “passe,” laying on of hand with the intention of healing (Sham) and without laying on of hand. Other variables as depression, pain, physiological parameters, muscle tension, and well-being were assessed. Patients in the Spiritist “passe” intervention group showed greater reductions in anxiet y (p 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Believing in Psychiatry
AbstractBelieving always plays a role in psychiatry and in mental healthcare in general not only in patients but also in psychiatrists. It is part of how they relate to the illness, as far as the patients are concerned, and to the profession, as far as the psychiatrists are concerned. Both are driven by stories that not just are helpful in meaningmaking, but that wield also power for better or for worse. This contribution is no more and no less intended as a wake-up call to get a dialogue ongoing. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Autopsy of the Prophet Muhammad in Dante ’s Inferno
AbstractDante places the sinners who promoted scandals, schism, and discord in the ninth Ditch of the Inferno. Among those is also the Prophet Muhammad. Describing the Prophet ’s punishment, Dante resorts to technical terms and vulgar expressions. This poetic representation highlights Dante’s medical and anatomical knowledge and reflects 14th c. Christian religious beliefs. At that time, autopsies were performed only on prisoners, prostitutes and people without identi ty. By comparing the Prophet to an autopsied corpse, Dante associates Muhammad with those bearing the badge of shame. Moreover, this description ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion and Recovery Among Individuals Experiencing Homelessness
This study used qualitative interviews to explore the role of religion in recovery from addiction in a sample of 14 adults with a history of homelessness. Analysis of emergent themes revealed that religion provided participants with a range of personal and social benefits, many which addressed personal, social, and tangible losses and crises associated with substance use and homelessness. Understanding the specific benefits religion may provide during recovery can guide research and help providers improve programs for this vulnerable population. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Look at the First Quarantined Community in the USA: Response of Religious Communal Organizations and Implications for Public Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic
AbstractThe current study examined anxiety and distress among members of the first community to be quarantined in the USA due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to being historically significant, the current sample was unusual in that those quarantined were all members of a Modern Orthodox Jewish community and were connected via religious institutions at which exposure may have occurred. We sought to explore the community and religious factors unique to this sample, as they relate to the psychological and public health impact of quarantine. Community organizations were trusted more than any other source of COVID-19-rela...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Cultural Viewpoints of Nursing Students on Patient Privacy: A Qualitative Study
This study was conducted as a qualitative descriptive design. The homogeneous sampling method, purposive sampling method for qualitative research samples, was used to determine the study group. Data were collected from 17 nursing students at a state university in Turkey. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted, and content analysis was used to analyze data. Three main themes emerged from the data: perception of privacy, factors affecting patient privacy and suggested solutions. Four sub-categories emerged: religion, gender, culture and reassuring communication. The perceptions of many of the students relating ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Do Catholics Listen to Sermons?
AbstractThe article discusses the issue of listening to sermons in Catholic churches, in Poland. In the first part, it presents the author ’s CKSK method, measuring whether and how Catholics listen to sermons from a theological and psychological point of view. The study was conducted on 130 people aged 16–92 years, in three Roman Catholic churches, in natural conditions, non-experimental. The research on the audience of sermons sh ows that Catholics usually listen to sermons in a fragmentary, medium-attentive way. The results indicate that the listenability of sermons is gender independent. It does not dep...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Clich é and Stigma: A Brief Response to Overlooked Barriers in COVID-19 Management
AbstractFor decades, religion has provided explanations and answers to existential questions and queries that can emerge during a pandemic. This characteristic of religion has helped communities in finding answers and meanings to their confusions. During a pandemic, healthcare professionals are often unprepared in answering the patients ’ religious beliefs regarding the diseases. Moreover, patients are faced with religious clichés and stigma that results because of religious beliefs and practices. To overcome the religious stigma, a deeper understanding of religious beliefs and values is required so that a per...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Blood of Christ Compels Them: State Religiosity and State Population Mobility During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic
AbstractThis paper examines the association between state religiosity and population mobility during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We use first-party geo-behavioral data collected through mobile phone operating systems, global positioning systems, and Wi-Fi signals to assess changes in the average median distance traveled by approximately 15,000,000  devices over eight weeks (February 24–April 13) in the contiguous United States. Robust regression results show that more religious states tend to exhibithigher average mobility scores andslower average declines in mobility. Findings  also suggest t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Community Calls: Lessons and Insights Gained from a Medical –Religious Community Engagement During the COVID-19 Pandemic
AbstractDuring the pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, public health instructions were issued with the hope of curbing the virus ’ spread. In an effort to assure accordance with these instructions, equitable strategies for at-risk and vulnerable populations and communities are warranted. One such strategy was our community conference calls, implemented to disseminate information on the pandemic and allow community leaders t o discuss struggles and successes. Over the first 6 weeks, we held 12 calls, averaging 125 (standard deviation 41) participants. Participants were primarily fro...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Image of Disease in Religious, Medical –Astrological and Social Discourses: Old Polish Literature as an Example of Early Modern European Mentality
AbstractToday, the world is struggling with a coronavirus epidemic. People explain differently the causes and sense of this disease. Old Polish literature about diseases is representative for European thought in the modern era. The problem of the disease appears in old Polish literature in various discourses. The three most important are religious, medical –astrological and social discourse. In this article, I discuss basic paradigms of thinking connected with these discourses and the relationship between them. In the religious discourse, it is God who decides about health and illness. The pathological state of the o...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Beliefs of Jordanian Adult Patients Receiving Palliative Care
This study aimed to explore spiritual beliefs held by Jordanian patients receiving palliative care. In order to accomplish this aim, three objectives were specified: 1) identify the spiritual beliefs of adult patients receiving palliative care, 2) to develop an Arabic version of the beliefs and values scale, and 3) to identify the perception of spirituality of adult patients receiving palliative care. Cross-sectional  descriptive research design was used to describe the spiritual beliefs. The response rate was 70%; non-probability convenience sampling method was used for (N = 119) adult palliative patien...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion as a Health Promoter During the 2019/2020 COVID Outbreak: View from Detroit
AbstractThe 2019/2020 COVID outbreak has surfaced as a global pandemic. The news has carried stories of the heroic efforts of medical and other health practitioners, with public health officials charting the course of spread. In an urban center like Detroit, the generosity of everyday citizens and church organizations has also played an important role. This inspection of the pandemic from the view of Detroit will examine the epidemiology of the coronavirus, translation of professional practice into people ’s awareness of the chronic disease risk factors which are prevalent in Detroit, moral and ethical views on the d...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Wellbeing of Cancer Patients: What Health-Related Factors Matter?
This study aimed to determine the predictors of spiritual wellbeing of non-terminal stage cancer patients hospitalized in oncology units in Lithuania. An exploratory cross-sectional study design was employed. During structured face-to-face interviews, 226 cancer patients hospitalized in oncology units responded about their spiritual wellbeing, perception of happiness, satisfaction with life, pain intensity, levels of education and physical functioning, and length of inpatient stay. A set of standardized tools were used: spiritual wellbeing scale SHALOM, brief multidimensional life satisfaction scale, Oxford Happiness Quest...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Sexual Orientation in the Associations Between Religiousness and Hypertension
This study assessed the cross-sectional associations between organizational religious activity (ORA), intrinsic religiosity (IR), and hypertension in a US nationally representative sample. Data were from Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, collected in 2008. The sample (N = 5115,Mage = 28.96 years, 54% female) was divided into three sexual orientation categories: heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, and sexual minority. Dependent variables were systolic and diastolic blood pressure and binary cut-scores of clinical hypertension. ORA and IR were independen...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Belief Salience, Religious Activities, Frequency of Prayer Offering, Religious Offering Preference and Mental Health: A Study of Religiosity Among Muslim Students
AbstractTo investigate role of belief salience, participation in religious activities, religious offering preference and prayer offering positively predicts mental health among university students. It is a cross-sectional research design carried out in International Islamic University Islamabad, February 2018 to August 2018. Demographic variables were assessed by collecting information about age, education, marital status, family income and socioeconomic status. Mental Health Inventory-38 was used to measure mental health of the students, and in order to measure religiosity, Religiosity Measure Scale tapping belief salienc...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Health and Chinese Beliefs: A Scientometric Analysis of Health Literature Related to Taoism and Confucianism
AbstractTaoism and Confucianism both exited simultaneously as philosophies of living in dynastic China. Although there has been an increasing popularity in scientometric studies, religion and health (R&H) literature lacks a holistic evaluation investigating articles relevant to Taoism and Confucianism. All publications produced in Taoism and Confucianism literature and indexed in Web of Science (WoS) databases between 1975 and 2018 were included in this study. Database search on health and Taoism literature retrieved 199 documents from WoS databases. Main research areas were Psychology, Religion and Behavioral Sciences...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Health Help-Seeking Behaviour in Spiritual Healing Practice: Records from the Panacea Society ’s Healing Department, 1924–1997
This article shows convergence between health help-seeking behaviours in spiritual healing and secular professional health services. It does so by drawing on the archival records from the Panacea Society in Bedford, England, which began an international healing ministry by post-amassing over 120,000 correspondents from 93 different countries. Archives from the Panacea Society ’s Healing Department containing records of the self-reported effects of the prescribed water-taking healing ritual were used to investigate variables related to help-seeking for health problems through spiritual healing. A sample of over 10% of...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research