Effects on Daily Spiritual Experiences of Religious Versus Conventional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression
Abstract We compared religiously integrated cognitive behavioral therapy (RCBT) versus conventional CBT (CCBT) on increasing daily spiritual experiences (DSE) in major depressive disorder and chronic medical illness. A total of 132 participants aged 18 –85 were randomized to either RCBT ( n  = 65) or CCBT ( n  = 67). Participants received ten 50-min sessions (primarily by telephone) over 12 weeks. DSE was assessed using the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES). Mixed-effects growth curve models compared the effects of treatment group on trajectory of change in DSE. Baseline DSE and chang...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Contemporary Bioethics: Islamic Perspective
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Caloric Intake on the Sabbath: A Pilot Study of Contributing Factors to Obesity in the Orthodox Jewish Community
This study aimed to look at caloric intake on the Sabbath and its contribution to overweight and obesity. Twelve married or previously married women who identify themselves as Orthodox Jews were recruited to do 24-h food recalls over the phone. The participants were divided into three weight groups (normal, overweight, and obese) based on their BMI. The overweight and obese participants ’ data were combined into one group for the purposes of statistical testing. Paired t tests looking at the data for all participants showed significantly great caloric intake during an average Sabbath day than an average weekday [ t ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Integration Between Mental Health-Care Providers and Traditional Spiritual Healers: Contextualising Islam in the Twenty-First Century
Abstract In the United Arab Emirates, neuropsychiatric disorders are estimated to contribute to one-fifth of the global burden of disease. Studies show that the UAE citizens ’ apathy towards seeking professional mental health services is associated with the ‘religious viewpoints’ on the issue, societal stigma, lack of awareness of mental health and lack of confidence in mental health-care providers. Mental health expenditures by the UAE government health ministry are not available exclusively. The majority of primary health-care doctors and nurses have not received official in-service training on mental ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

US Physicians ’ Opinions about Distinctions between Withdrawing and Withholding Life-Sustaining Treatment
Abstract Decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment (LST) precede the majority of ICU deaths. Although professional guidelines generally treat the two as ethically equivalent, evidence suggests withdrawing LST is often more psychologically difficult than withholding it. The aim of the experiment was to investigate whether physicians are more supportive of withholding LST than withdrawing it and to assess how physicians ’ opinions are shaped by their religious characteristics, specialty, and experience caring for dying patients. In 2010, a survey was mailed to 2016 practicing US physicians. Physician...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Why Cancer Patients Seek Islamic Healing
Abstract Islamic healing is frequently referred to as the treatment of choice by many Muslim cancer patients in Malaysia. Despite its widespread use, there is limited information relating to patients ’ healing preferences. With rising cancer rates in the country, this issue has become a concern to public health policy makers. The purpose of this study was to understand why cancer patients seek Islamic healing. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 18 cancer patients. The fin dings indicate three main reasons: (1) recommendations from family, friends and doctors; (2) belief in Islamic healing a...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Patient Autonomy in Talmudic Context: The Patient ’s “I Must Eat” on Yom Kippur in the Light of Contemporary Bioethics
Abstract In contemporary bioethics, the autonomy of the patient has assumed considerable importance. Progressing from a more limited notion of informed consent, shared decision making calls upon patients to voice the desires and preferences of their authentic self, engaging in choice among alternatives as a way to exercise deeply held values. One influential opinion in Jewish bioethics holds that Jewish law, in contradistinction to secular bioethics, limits the patient ’s exercise of autonomy only in those instances in which treatment choices are sensitive to preferences. Here, we analyze a discussion in the Mishna,...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Tzu Chi Silent Mentor Program: Application of Buddhist Ethics to Teach Student Physicians Empathy, Compassion, and Self-Sacrifice
Abstract The Buddhist Tzu Chi Silent Mentor Program promotes the donation of one ’s body to science as a selfless act by appealing to the Buddhist ethics of compassion and self-sacrifice. Together, faculty, families, and donors help medical students to learn the technical, spiritual, emotional, and psychological aspects of medicine. Students assigned to each “Silent Mentor” visit the family to learn about the donor’s life. They see photos and hear family members’ stories. Afterwards, students write a brief biography of the donor which is posted on the program website, in the medical school, a...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Religiousness/Spirituality in Health-Related Quality of Life Among Adolescents with HIV: A Latent Profile Analysis
Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine whether distinct latent profiles of religiousness/spirituality exist for ALWH, and if so, are latent profile memberships associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Latent profile analysis of religiosity identified four profiles/groups. Compared to the other three groups, higher levels of emotional well-being were found among young perinatally infected adolescents who attended religious services, but who did not pray privately, feel God ’s presence or identify as religious or spiritual. Social HRQoL was significantly higher among the highest overall rel...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Place of Faith for Consultant Obstetricians Following Stillbirth: A Qualitative Exploratory Study
This study highlights a gap in how obstetricians see their own faith and feeling able to respond to the faith needs of bereaved parents. Participating obstetricians did not demonstrate that spirituality was an integrated part of their professional life. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Novel Religious/Spiritual Group Psychotherapy Reduces Depressive Symptoms in a Randomized Clinical Trial
In conclusion, this group psychotherapy might be of benefit in treating depressive symptoms. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Similarities and Differences Between Yoruba Traditional Healers (YTH) and Native American and Canadian Healers (NACH)
Abstract Indigenous people of the world have used the services of medicine men and traditional healers from time immemorial. According to the World Health Organization, 80  % of the world’s populations consult traditional healers. With an emerging globalization of health services in the world, there is a need for western mental health practitioners to learn and understand the practices of indigenous healers across the globe. This paper will not only highlight the s imilarities and differences between Yoruba traditional healers of Western Nigeria and Native American and First Nation Canadian traditional heal...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Christian Educators’ Use of Prayer to Cope with Stress
This study identified sources of stress for an international sample of 916 Christian educators, and the use of religious practices such as prayer, to determine whether prayer served as a coping strategy for their work-related stress. A mixed methods approach was used to measure three key variables: sources of stress, spiritual practices, and job satisfaction. Qualitative findings were used to analyze participants’ sources of stress, and quantitative findings were used to measure their practice of spiritual disciplines and job satisfaction. A statistically significant relationship was found between frequency of prayer...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Evaluation of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale in a Sample of Korean Adults
This study explored the psychometric qualities and construct validity of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS; Ellison in J Psychol Theol 11:330–340, 1983) using a sample of 470 Korean adults. Two factor analyses, exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, were conducted in order to test the validity of the SWBS. The results of the factor analyses supported the original two-dimensional structure of the SWBS—religious well-being (RWB) and existential well-being (EWB) with method effects associated with negatively worded items. By controlling for method effects, the evaluation of the two-factor...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Source and Impact of Specific Parameters that Enhance Well-Being in Daily Life
This study suggests that these parameters may improve either one of general well-being, pro-social and positive relational behavior and demonstrate positive health effects. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Mass Gathering Medicine New discipline to Deal with Epidemic and Infectious Diseases in the Hajj Among Muslim Pilgrimage: A Mini Review Article
Abstract Mass Gathering Medicine is one of the new disciplines in Medicine which deal with all health aspects in overcrowded areas. Mass Gathering Medicine is an important new challenging discipline which needs to be supported by all concern experts such as the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ministries of health from all countries, universities, research centers, and all other experts in this field. Scientist and academic staffs from all countries should be encouraged to participate in narrowing the gap of knowledge for Mass Gathering Medicine. Postgraduate board or fel...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Response to the Legitimacy of Brain Death in Islam
Abstract Brain death is a novel construct of death for the procurement of transplantable organs. Many authoritative Islamic organizations and governments have endorsed brain death as true death for organ donation. Many commentators have reiterated the misconception that the Quranic text does not define death. We respond by clarifying: (1) the Quran does define death as biologic disintegration and clearly distinguishes it from the dying process, (2) brain death belongs scientifically within the spectrum of neurologic disorders of consciousness and should not be confused with death, and (3) religious and legal disc...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Disability in Islamic Law
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Participation is Associated with Increases in Religious Social Support in a National Longitudinal Study of African Americans
This study reports on the association between religious beliefs and behaviors and the change in both general and religious social support using two waves of data from a national sample of African Americans. The Religion and Health in African Americans (RHIAA) study is a longitudinal telephone survey designed to examine relationships between various aspects of religious involvement and psychosocial factors over time. RHIAA participants were 3173 African American men (1281) and women (1892). A total of 1251 men (456) and women (795) participated in wave 2 of data collection. Baseline religious behaviors were associated with ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity as a Moderator of Self-Efficacy and Social Support in Predicting Traumatic Stress Among Combat Soldiers
Abstract Based on a sample of 54 Israeli soldiers (51 % non-religious, 49 % religious) surveyed upon their return from combat, this study investigates the moderating role of religiosity as a factor that may strengthen cognitive processing tied to the belief in oneself to persevere (i.e., self-efficacy) after trauma and/or as a factor tied to enhanced external social support that religious individuals in particular may benefit from by their involvement in a religious community. Findings revealed (1) social support was tied to greater resilience within the general sample; (2) religious soldiers were less ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How Involved are Non-VA Chaplains in Supporting Veterans?
Abstract In terms of supporting veteran populations, little is known of the experiences of chaplains professionally active outside of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare settings. The present study looks to examine how involved non-VA chaplains are in supporting veterans as well as their familiarity with the VA. An online survey was distributed in a convenience sample of chaplains, of which n = 39 met the inclusion criterion for this study (i.e., no past or present VA affiliation). The results find that most of the non-VA chaplains encounter veteran service users either on a weekly or monthly...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion and Subjective Well-Being: Western and Eastern Religious Groups Achieved Subjective Well-Being in Different Ways
This study is among the first to investigate this issue. The present study compared Buddhists, Taoists, Christians, and atheists. In addition to demographic items, 451 Chinese adults completed Chinese version of the Socially Oriented Cultural Conception of SWB Scale. Religious belief was distributed as follows: 10 % Christian, 20 % Buddhist, 25 % Taoist, and 43 % atheists. As predicted, the socially oriented cultural conception of SWB was found to be highest among Buddhists, followed in order by Taoists, atheists, and Christians. It was concluded that the various religious groups achieved SWB in differe...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Gaming and Religion: The Impact of Spirituality and Denomination
Abstract A previous investigation from Korea indicated that religion might modulate gaming behavior (Kim and Kim in J Korean Acad Nurs 40:378–388, 2010). Our present study aimed to investigate whether a belief in God, practicing religious behavior and religious denomination affected gaming behavior. Data were derived from a Western cohort of young men (Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors, n = 5990). The results showed that a stronger belief in God was associated with lower gaming frequency and smaller game addiction scale scores. In addition, practicing religiosity was related to less frequ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Simple and Multivariate Relationships Between Spiritual Intelligence with General Health and Happiness
Abstract The present study examined simple and multivariate relationships of spiritual intelligence with general health and happiness. The employed method was descriptive and correlational. King’s Spiritual Quotient scales, GHQ-28 and Oxford Happiness Inventory, are filled out by a sample consisted of 384 students, which were selected using stratified random sampling from the students of Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman. Data are subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics including correlations and multivariate regressions. Bivariate correlations support positive and significant predictive value...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Medical Ethics in Qiṣāṣ (Eye-for-an-Eye) Punishment: An Islamic View; an Examination of Acid Throwing
Abstract Physicians in Islamic countries might be requested to participate in the Islamic legal code of qiṣāṣ, in which the victim or family has the right to an eye-for-an-eye retaliation. Qiṣāṣ is only used as a punishment in the case of murder or intentional physical injury. In situations such as throwing acid, the national legal system of some Islamic countries asks for assistance from physicians, because the punishment should be identical to the crime. The perpetrator could not be punished without a physician’s participation, because there is no way to guarantee that the sentence would be carr...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pain Perception in Buddhism Perspective
Abstract Dhamma, which Lord Buddha has presented to people after his enlightenment, analyzes every phenomenon and objects into their ultimate elements. The explanation of sensory system is also found in a part of Dhamma named Abhidhammapitaka, the Book of the Higher Doctrine in Buddhism. To find out the relationship between explanation of pain in the present neuroscience and the explanation of pain in Abhidhamma, the study was carried out by the use of a comprehensive review. The comparisons were in terms of peripheral stimulation, signal transmission, modulation, perception, suffering, determination and decision...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Perspectives of Islamic Jurists on the Brain Death as Legal Death in Islam
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Prevalence and Religious Predictors of Healing Prayer Use in the USA: Findings from the Baylor Religion Survey
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Beholden: religion, global health, and human rights
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - May 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

US Religious Congregations’ Programming to Support Veterans: A Mixed Methods Study
Abstract Religious congregations may be well equipped to address veterans’ reintegration needs, but little is known about the prevalence and nature of such support. We conducted a mixed methods study using nationally representative congregational survey data and in-depth interviews with congregational leaders. Overall, 28 % of congregations nationally reported having programming to support veterans and positive, independent predictors included: community context (county veteran presence, high-poverty census tract, rural compared to urban location); congregational resources (more adult attendees, having...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care
Abstract Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical pr...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Learning from Listening: Helping Healthcare Students to Understand Spiritual Assessment in Clinical Practice
Abstract We aim to evaluate the perceptions of healthcare students while taking a spiritual history (SH). Fifty students were trained on how to take a SH, interviewed inpatients and answered a questionnaire concerning their perceptions. A total of 362 patients were interviewed: 60.1 % of students felt comfortable taking a SH, 85.1 % believed the patient liked the approach, and 72.1 % believed more benefits could come with a follow-up. When students felt more comfortable, they tended to believe the patient: liked the approach (p 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

March of the Living, a Holocaust Educational Tour: An Assessment of Anxiety and Depression
Abstract March of the Living (MOTL) is a 2-week international educational tour for high school seniors to learn about the Holocaust by visiting concentration/deaths camps and other Jewish historical sites in Poland, culminating in a week-long excursion in Israel. Although the trip is primarily educational, there is recent research evidence to suggest that attendees may suffer from a variety of mental health sequelae. To determine symptoms of anxiety and depression, 196 Los Angeles delegation participants voluntarily completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, composed of a trait anxiety scale (i.e., STAI-T) and ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Health-Promoting Verses as mentioned in the Holy Quran
Abstract The Quran is regarded as both the spiritual and behavioral guidance for all Muslims. This narrative study was designed at examining relevant health-promoting verses in the Quran and to identify the chapters and verses where keywords and phrases are mentioned relevant to health promotion and behavior. Twenty-eight verses were identified, with a focus on diet and nutrition, personal hygiene, alcohol abstention, and the importance of a healthy lifestyle. These results suggest that the Quran could serve as an influential medium for culturally competent public health practitioners in diverse populations, part...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Factors Influencing Black Churches’ Readiness to Address HIV
This study employed a community-based participatory research approach to understand factors that influence church readiness to engage in HIV prevention and treatment activities. A convenience sample of twenty-six Black faith leaders participated in four focus groups. Data analysis was done through qualitative content analysis. Three themes emerged. First, the pastor’s blessing and authority as the church’s decision-maker determines readiness to engage in HIV prevention. Second, the church’s purview of sexual health as part of a holistic ministry facilitates faith leader’s readiness. Lastly, securing...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Involvement and Perceptions of Control: Evidence from the Miami-Dade Health Survey
This study uses data collected through the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to test whether religious involvement is associated with three distinct control beliefs. Regression results suggest that people who exhibit high levels of religious involvement tend to report higher levels of the sense of control, self-control, and the health locus of control than respondents who exhibit low levels of religious involvement. Although this study suggests that religious involvement can promote perceptions of control over one’s own life, this pattern is apparently concentrated at the high end of the distribution ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion, Purpose in Life, Social Support, and Psychological Distress in Chinese University Students
We examined the relationship between religious involvement and psychological distress and explored the mediating effects of social support and purpose in life in university students in western, mid-western, and eastern China. Cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of 1812 university students was conducted. The Purpose in Life scale, Duke Social Support Index, and Religious Commitment Inventory-10 were administered, along with Kessler’s Psychological Distress Scale. Structural equation modeling was used to test two models of the mediation hypothesis, examining direct, indirect, and total effects. Model 1 (w...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Peripheral Facial Palsy: Does Patients’ Religiousness Matter for the Otorhinolaryngologist?
Abstract In order to deal with the suffering, a frequent strategy employed by patients is the use of religious beliefs and behaviors. Nevertheless, few studies in otorhinolaryngology have investigated this dimension. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the role of religiousness on quality of life, mental health, self-esteem and appearance in 116 patients with peripheral facial palsy (PFP). A cross-sectional, single-center study was carried out between 2010 and 2012 in PFP outpatients. We assessed socio-demographic data, PFP characteristics, depression, anxiety, quality of life, self-esteem, appearanc...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Engaging with Faith Councils to Develop Stoma-specific Fatawās : A Novel Approach to the Healthcare Needs of Muslim Colorectal Patients
Abstract Intestinal stomas are common. Muslims report significantly lower quality of life following stoma surgery compared to non-Muslims. A fatwā is a ruling on a point of Islamic law according to a recognised religious authority. The use of fatawās to guide health-related decision-making has becoming an increasingly popular practice amongst Muslims, regardless of geographic location. This project aimed to improve the quality of life of Muslim ostomates by addressing faith-specific stoma concerns. Through close collaboration with Muslim ostomates, a series of 10 faith-related questions were generated, which we...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Nutritional Concepts and Frequency of Foodstuffs Mentioned in the Holy Quran
Abstract The Holy Quran is a religious book of Muslims. In many verses of Quran, various foods are discussed. It seems that limited studies were performed on identification the nutritional verses and their frequencies in the Holy Quran. Therefore, the aims of present study were to establish a numerical model system for studying nutritional verses of Quran, determination of verses with nutritional concepts and frequency of foodstuffs in the Holy Quran. In this descriptive analytical study, “Ghamoos e Quran” and “Vazheyab” online softwares were used to determine the nutritional keywords in Q...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Experience of the Spiritist Hospital Chaplaincy Service: A Retrospective Study
The objective of this study is to present a retrospective analysis of records made by chaplains, guided by the Spiritist Medical Association of Piracicaba, through 7419 calls to 2191 patients admitted at Unimed Hospital of Piracicaba in 2014. The results contributed to the production of scientific documentation about this new holistic model that still lies in acceptance phase in the country. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Predictors of Physician Recommendation for Ethically Controversial Medical Procedures: Findings from an Exploratory National Survey of American Muslim Physicians
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Exploring the Relationship of Religiosity, Religious Support, and Social Support Among African American Women in a Physical Activity Intervention Program
Abstract Religious belief has been linked to a variety of positive mental and physical health outcomes. This exploratory study will address the relationship between religious involvement and social connectedness among African American women. Results from a physical activity intervention research project (N = 465) found that total religious support and social support were significantly negatively correlated with total religiosity, while total general social support was significantly positively correlated with total religious support. Overall, the study indicates that more research is needed on ways to en...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Do Self-efficacy Expectation and Spirituality Provide a Buffer Against Stress-Associated Impairment of Health? A Comprehensive Analysis of the German Pastoral Ministry Study
Abstract We aimed to analyse stress perception, psychosomatic health and life satisfaction in pastoral professionals, paying particular attention to their individual and shared resources. Enrolling 8574 German pastoral professionals (48 % priests, 22 % parish expert workers, 18 % pastoral assistants, 12 % deacons), we found that pastoral professionals’ stress perception is associated with psychosomatic health impairment. General self-efficacy was a beneficial resource to protect against stress perceptions, while perception of the transcendent had a further yet weakly positive inf...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Fatalism, Diabetes Management Outcomes, and the Role of Religiosity
This study aimed to determine whether fatalistic beliefs were associated with elevated levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and to establish the role of religiosity in this relationship. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a sample of 183 Jewish adults with diabetes visiting a large medical center in northern Israel. Self-administered questionnaires assessed level of religiosity, fatalistic beliefs, diabetes management behaviors, and demographic/personal characteristics; laboratory tests were used to measure HbA1c. Multivariate regression indicated that fatalism was significantly associated with HbA1c (β =...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Twelve-Step-Related Spirituality in Addiction Recovery
Abstract This paper reviews empirical studies conducted on the role of spirituality and religiosity (S/R) characteristics in 12-step recovery among program members followed up after substance abuse treatment and those assessed independent of formal treatment. Aspects of spiritual functioning that change in relation to program participation and those S/R characteristics that were found to mediate the association between program involvement and drinking-related outcomes are discussed. In addition, a review is provided of 12-step program studies investigating S/R-related predictors of clinical outcomes relevant to r...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Predicting Relationship of Smoking Behavior Among Male Saudi Arabian College Students Related to Their Religious Practice
This study describes the relationships of smoking behavior among a sample of male college students in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) to their religious practice, parents’ smoking behaviors and attitudes, peers’ smoking behaviors and attitudes, and knowledge about the dangers of smoking. A 49-item questionnaire was developed and pilot tested in KSA. This questionnaire was completed during the academic year 2013 by 715 undergraduate male students at the King Saud University in Riyadh. 29.8 % of the students were smokers (13.8 % cigarette smokers, 7.3 % sheesha smokers, and 27 % cigarette and sh...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Indigenous Adoption of Novaco’s Model of Anger Management Among Individuals with Psychiatric Problems in Pakistan
Abstract The present study was designed to indigenously adopt Novaco’s model of anger management and examine its efficacy among individuals with psychiatric problems in Pakistan. For the assessment of anger and psychiatric problems, Urdu-translated versions of Novaco Anger Inventory (NAI), Anger Self-Report Questionnaire (ASR) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were used. A sample of 100 individuals was divided into two groups: a treatment group (received the indigenously adopted model of anger management) and a control group (received general counseling). Results of mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Impact of Mood Spectrum Spirituality and Mysticism Symptoms on Suicidality in Earthquake Survivors with PTSD
Abstract The aim of the present study was to explore the correlations between Spirituality/Mysticism/Psychoticism symptoms and suicidality in young adult survivors of the L’Aquila earthquake. The sample included 475 subjects recruited among high school seniors who had experienced the April 6, 2009, earthquake. Assessments included: Trauma and Loss Spectrum–Self Report and Mood Spectrum–Self Report (MOODS-SR). Mysticism/Spirituality dimension and suicidality were evaluated by means of some specific items of the MOOD-SR. The Spirituality/Mysticism/Psychoticism MOODS-SR factor score was significant...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Frequency of Faith and Spirituality Discussion in Health Care
This study was performed to determine whether faith and spirituality are active part of the healthcare field and patients’ receipt of these sometimes delicate topics. The nuances of the concepts of faith, spirituality, and religion and their implications in the healthcare setting are discussed. Benefits and detriments of faith and spirituality are reviewed in terms of how they relate to the health of the patient and to the healthcare field. With the focus of healthcare shifting to holistic care, this conversation may be more necessary than ever in practice, yet it seems many providers are not discussing these matters...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research