Why Write?
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 11, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Wellness and Religious Coping Among Thai Individuals Living with Chronic Kidney Disease in Southern California
Abstract This qualitative research is based on eight Thai participants living with chronic kidney disease living in Southern California. Four emerging themes are (a) wellness, (b) self-care, (c) impact of illness on life, and (d) religious coping. Family relations, social support, and religious coping affected self-care and how they managed their everyday activities. Knowledge about the disease and its mechanism were crucial to the decision-making process in relation to self-care. Good self-care and appropriate self-management led to wellness and improved quality of life. Religion provided a belief system focusing...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 10, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Health care as a social good: religious values and american democracy
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 9, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Occupational Therapy Students’ Perceptions of Spirituality in Training
This study used qualitative exploratory, descriptive design to explore the occupational therapy students’ perceptions about spirituality in training. Using purposive sampling, four semi-structured interviews were conducted with two students, a lecturer and an occupational therapist. In addition, two focus groups were conducted with students in order to collect data. Data collected were audio-taped; transcribed and thematic analysis was used to identify themes. The analysis resulted in emergence of four themes: “Unique to every individual,” “Spirituality in occupational therapy,” “To be o...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 8, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Convictions in Patients with Epilepsy-Associated Affective Disorders: A Controlled Study from a Psychiatric Acute Department
Abstract Patients with epilepsy often have different mood symptoms and behavioral trait characteristics compared to the non-epileptic population. In the present prospective study, we aimed to assess differences in behavioral trait characteristics between acutely admitted, psychiatric in-patients with epilepsy-associated depressive symptoms and gender/age-matched patients with major depression. Patients with epilepsy-associated depression had significantly higher scores for “religious convictions,” “philosophical and intellectual interests” and “sense of personal destiny.” These ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 8, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Parental Participation in Religious Services and Parent and Child Well-Being: Findings from the National Survey of America’s Families
Abstract Using data from the 1999 and 2002 National Survey of America’s Families, a large-scale nationally representative sample, this study finds that parental religious attendance is positively associated with parent self-rated health, parent mental well-being, positive parenting attitudes, child health, and child school engagement. Although the strength of these associations varies to some extent according to socio-demographic factors, the interactive patterns are not consistently predictable. Moreover, parental health and well-being and positive attitudes toward parenting appear to be important pathways...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship between Medicine, Spirituality and Religion: Three Models for Integration
Abstract The integration of medicine and religion is challenging for historical, ethical, practical and conceptual reasons. In order to make more explicit the bases and goals of relating spirituality and medicine, we distinguish here three complementary perspectives: a whole-person care model that emphasizes teamwork among generalists and spiritual professionals; an existential functioning view that identifies a role for the clinician in promoting full health, including spiritual well-being; and an open pluralism view, which highlights the importance of differing spiritual and cultural traditions in shaping the r...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pain Control and Chaplaincy in Aotearoa New Zealand
Abstract This paper summarizes the results of 100 New Zealand health care chaplains with regard to their involvement in issues concerning pain control within the New Zealand health care context. Both quantitative (via survey) and qualitative methods (in-depth interviewing) were utilized. The findings of this study indicated that approximately 52 % of surveyed hospital chaplains had provided some form of pastoral intervention directly to patients and/or their families dealing with issues concerning pain and that approximately 30 % of hospital chaplains had assisted clinical staff with issues concerning p...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Editorial
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Religion in the Work Lives and Coping Strategies of Ugandan Nurses
This study explored the ways in which religion influences the work lives and coping strategies of Ugandan nurses who thrive despite job stress. Participants were 15 female nurses working in faith-based and non-faith-based facilities in Uganda. The nurses were all actively religious people, a fact not known at the time they were recruited. All the nurses revealed that religious values affected their performance positively, enabling them to find meaning even in the face of adversity. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Beneficial Role of Spiritual Counseling in Heart Failure Patients
Abstract To ascertain the beneficial role of spiritual counseling in patients with chronic heart failure. This is a pilot study evaluating the effects of adjunct spiritual counseling on quality of life (QoL) outcomes in patients with heart failure. Patients were assigned to “religious” or “non-religious” counseling services based strictly on their personal preferences and subsequently administered standardized QoL questionnaires. A member of the chaplaincy or in-house volunteer organization visited the patient either daily or once every 2 days throughout the duration of their hospital...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Effects of Religiosity on Psychopathology in Emerging Adults: Intrinsic Versus Extrinsic Religiosity
Abstract Recent research has suggested that religion may play an important role in determining mental health. Although research has examined the effects of religiosity on specific types of psychopathology, less research has examined psychopathology broadly in the context of particular aspects of religion. Thus, the current study examined intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity and a range of psychopathology in 486 emerging adult college students. Results of a MANOVA indicated a main effect for intrinsic religiosity on a range of psychopathology and an interaction effect between intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity on ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Medicine as Practice: Notes on Keeping the Mind of a Beginner Despite Becoming an Expert
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Beliefs About God and Mental Health Among American Adults
This study examines the association between beliefs about God and psychiatric symptoms in the context of Evolutionary Threat Assessment System Theory, using data from the 2010 Baylor Religion Survey of US Adults (N = 1,426). Three beliefs about God were tested separately in ordinary least squares regression models to predict five classes of psychiatric symptoms: general anxiety, social anxiety, paranoia, obsession, and compulsion. Belief in a punitive God was positively associated with four psychiatric symptoms, while belief in a benevolent God was negatively associated with four psychiatric symptoms, controlling...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

If billy sunday comes to town: delusion as a religious experience? the biography of anton boisen from the perspective of foundational theology
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Self-Beliefs and Coping Among Vending Adolescent in Harare
Abstract The present study sought to explore the relationship between vending childhood and adolescent religious self-beliefs and religious coping among vending children in Harare, Zimbabwe. The research objectives were to investigate the nature of religious self-beliefs and religious coping among vending children in Harare. A psychoethnographic research design was employed in this study. This involved collection of data for a sustained period in the context within which the participants live. A total of 20 participants took part in this study. Key informant interviews, focus group discussions, in-depth interview...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Attitudes of Muslim Physicians and Nurses Toward Religious Issues
Abstract There is a growing body of evidence that suggests a positive role for religious involvement in physical and mental health. Studies have shown that attitudes of physicians toward religion affect their relationship with patients and their medical decisions, and in this way may ultimately affect treatment outcomes. Attitudes of nurses toward religion could also influence whether or not they address patients’ unmet spiritual needs. To assess attitudes of physicians and nurses toward religion and how these attitudes vary by education level and demographic characteristics, a total of 800 physicians, medi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research