Muslims and Medical Ethics: Time to Move Forward by Going Back
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 4, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Suicide Paradigm: Insights from Ancient Hindu Scriptures
Abstract The world religions in general promote peace and happiness. They strongly discourage all sorts of violence in society including suicide. Religious commitments toward life-saving value are known to prevent suicide attempts since all world religions promote unity, reducing interpersonal hostilities. Therefore, understanding the basics on what religious scriptures narrate on life and death including suicide is essential. This paper highlights the seldom discussed topic on the concept and consequences of suicide portrayed in the ancient Hindu religious scriptures. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 2, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Influence of Religion and Ethnicity on Family Planning Approval: A Case for Women in Rural Western Kenya
Abstract The role of sociocultural factors such as religion and ethnicity in aiding or hampering family planning (FP) uptake in rural Western Kenya, a region with persistently high fertility rates, is not well established. We explored whether attitudes towards FP can be attributed to religious affiliation and/or ethnicity among women in the region. Findings show that religion and ethnicity have no impact; the most significant factors are level of education and knowledge about the benefits of FP for the mother. FP interventions ought to include strategies aimed at enhancing women’s knowledge about the positi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Jews, Creativity and the Genius of Disobedience
Abstract Jews comprise less than one percent of the world’s population; however, in the second half of the twentieth century and in the twenty-first century Jews have been awarded more than 25 % of the Nobel Prizes. Why are Jews so creative? Some have claimed, they are genetically more intelligent as determined by IQ tests. Whereas there is an intelligence threshold people must reach before being highly creative after this threshold is reached there is no strong relationship between creativity and intelligence. Creative innovation is heavily dependent upon disengagement and divergent thinking as well a...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effect of Dynamic Meditation on Mental Health
Abstract Although traditional meditation has been found to be effective in improving physical and mental health of subjects, there was a paucity of research of the effect of active or dynamic meditation on these variables. Therefore, the present study was aimed at studying the effect of dynamic meditation on mental health of the subjects. Total sample of the present study comprised 60 subjects, 30 each in experimental and control group. Subjects in experimental group were given 21-day training in dynamic meditation. Mental health of the experimental and control group subjects was measured in pre- and post-conditi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Promoting Health and Wellness in Congregations Through Lay Health Educators: A Case Study of Two Churches
We describe health efforts made in an African-American Methodist church and in a Latino Spanish-speaking Catholic church. We review the intricacies in establishing trust with the community, the training of lay health educators, and the implementation strategies and outcomes of health initiatives for these communities. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The “Endura” of The Cathars’ Heresy: Medieval Concept of Ritual Euthanasia or Suicide?
Abstract The aim of the study is to explore the medieval concepts on the voluntary death of severely sick people, as they emerge through the endura (endurance) of the heresy of the Cathars in France (twelfth to fourteenth centuries). The endura was the prerequisite act of repentance that would allow the fallen soul to return to heaven. The endura was a necessary act of repentance, after the performance of a ceremonial purification of the soul (consolamentum), and consisted of the patients’ voluntary abstention from vital food. The consolamentum and endura could be performed in the final stage of a disease w...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Forgotten Asclepieion of Peparithos and the Islander Worshippers of the Snake God
Abstract The ancient Asclepieion of the island of Peparithos, modern Skopelos, had been build in an ideal position, one kilometer from the ancient city of Peparithos. The angry north Aegean Sea brought in the surface its north wall at the beginning of the 60s decade. The monument was identified as an Asclepieion from one partially saved ceramic inscription “ASCL…” (Greek: ΑΣΚΛ…). The sanctuary was surrounded by covered walkway (Greek: στοά) and it is dated at the early years of the fourth century BC. It is possible that god Apollo and goddess A...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Incorporating Spirituality into Health Sciences Education
Abstract Researchers are beginning to collect empiric data about coping mechanisms of health science students. Yet, there is an important aspect of coping with stress that is only partially addressed in health sciences curricula: students’ spiritual well-being. In this essay, we describe a course in spirituality and health care that we offered to fourth-year medical students, as well as a small empirical study we conducted to assess students’ spiritual needs and practices. We then offer reflections on the broad applicability of this work to students in the health sciences more generally, including...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship of Religiosity, Spirituality, Substance Abuse, and Depression Among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM)
This study did just that and found a relationship between religiosity, spirituality, and risk behavior. These relationships suggest that future HIV prevention models might incorporate religiosity and spirituality to increase the efficacy of risk reduction interventions for Black MSM. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Moral Injury: Unseen Wounds in an Age of Barbarism
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The ‘Parent Circle’ Peace Education Program: Does it Make Any Change?
This study evaluated a peace education program facilitated by the ‘parents circle family forum.’ The program aims to expose Jewish and Palestinian-Arab adolescents to personal stories of bereavement as a result of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. One hundred and sixty-four Jewish twelfth-grade adolescents from schools throughout Israel filled out questionnaires before the start of the educational program, and 135 Jewish adolescents filled out the same questionnaire up to a week after it ended. Questionnaires included empathy, anger, and legitimacy toward ‘self’ and ‘others’ narratives. ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Under the strain of color harlem’s lafargue clinic and the promise of an antiracist psychiatry
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Intensive OutPatient Therapy for Clergy Burnout: How Much Difference Can a Week Make?
Abstract A pre-test and post-test quasi-experimental matched pairs design was used to assess the effectiveness of a week-long multi-therapist intensive outpatient intervention process with clergy suffering from depression and burnout. Participants (n = 23) in the “Clergy in Kairos” program of the Pastoral Institute (Muse in J Pastor Care Couns 61(3):183–195, 2007) constituted the experimental variable. Clergy surveyed from United Methodist and Presbyterian denominations (n = 121) provided a control group from which 23 respondents were selected whose pre-test scores in depress...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

African women, religion, and health: essays in honor of mercy amba ewudziwa oduyoye
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Effect of Holy Quran Voice on Mental Health
This study was designed to determine the effect of Quran listening without its musical tone (Tartil) on the mental health of personnel in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, southeast of Iran. The results showed significant differences between the test and control groups in their mean mental health scores after Quran listening (P = 0.037). No significant gender differences in the test group before and after intervention were found (P = 0.806). These results suggest that Quran listening could be recommended by psychologists for improving mental health and achieving greater calm. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Health and Well-Being Among the Non-religious: Atheists, Agnostics, and No Preference Compared with Religious Group Members
This study uses data from a large representative survey study of religion and health in the adult US population (N = 3010) to examine group differences among religious group members (N = 2401) and three categories of non-religious individuals: atheists (N = 83), agnostics (N = 189), and those stating no religious preference (N = 329). MANCOVA was used to analyze group differences on five outcome dimensions, incorporating 27 outcome variables. Religious non-affiliates did not differ overall from affiliates in terms of physical health outcomes (although atheists and agnostics...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Research on Intercessory Prayer: Theoretical and Methodological Considerations
Abstract Belief in the healing power of prayer is found in various religious traditions. Spiritually grounded clinical interventions, such as intercessory prayer (IP), need to be understood in a broader sense. This essay features the IP trials, observing the controversial relationship between inconsistent results and allegedly inadequate methods and theoretical hypothesis. A survey of the literature was conducted including publications indexed until September 2013, focusing on the trials developed in the field and on the critics about the methodological design. Recent meta-analyses and multicenter studies found in...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 7, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Impact of Education on Views of Homosexuality in the Senior Clergy of Hidalgo County, Texas
This study explores clergy perspectives on homosexuality and mental health. Interviews were conducted with 245 senior clergy of faith-based organizations in Hidalgo County, Texas. Analyses revealed that the less education the individual had, the more likely he or she viewed homosexuals as being more psychologically disturbed than heterosexuals. Clergy also expressed uncertainty in their views and actions regarding referral practices. A need for clergy education on views of homosexuality is documented. Suggestions are made for future research and education. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 5, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Just Add a Verse from the Quran: Effects of Religious Rhetoric in Gain- and Loss-Framed Anti-Alcohol Messages with a Palestinian Sample
Abstract This experiment investigated the effects of message framing (gain vs. loss) and religious rhetoric (religious vs. non-religious) on the expression of anti-alcohol civic intentions with a sample (N = 80) of Palestinian young adults. Results showed that the main effects of message framing (gain > loss) and religious rhetoric (non-religious > religious) on anti-alcohol civic intentions were significant. Furthermore, the study showed that viral behavioral intentions were strongly and significantly associated with expressing anti-alcohol civic intentions, with larger explana...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 4, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

US Physicians’ Opinions about Distinctions between Withdrawing and Withholding Life-Sustaining Treatment
Abstract Decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment (LST) precede the majority of ICU deaths. Although professional guidelines generally treat the two as ethically equivalent, evidence suggests withdrawing LST is often more psychologically difficult than withholding it. The aim of the experiment was to investigate whether physicians are more supportive of withholding LST than withdrawing it and to assess how physicians’ opinions are shaped by their religious characteristics, specialty, and experience caring for dying patients. In 2010, a survey was mailed to 2016 practicing US physicians. Ph...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 2, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Emotional Well-Being Following Religious Conversion Among Women in Northeast Thailand
Abstract Religious conversion can have a profound impact on individual mental health and emotional well-being. These changes may need specific nursing care. In this article, we describe the lived experiences of 21 women who converted from Buddhism to Islam and who live in Isan, the northeast region of Thailand. The data derive from in-depth interviews, natural conversations, and observations. Thematic analysis revealed two dominant themes: women’s sense of happiness in their new faith, and their suffering following from and as a result of their conversion. To provide appropriate care to and prevent mental he...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 31, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Faith-Based Hospitals and Variation in Psychiatric Inpatient Length of Stay in California, 2002–2011
We examined current treatment patterns at faith-based hospitals. Psychiatric discharges from all community-based hospitals in California were obtained for 2002–2011 and a Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization approach used to study hospital religious affiliation and length of stay (LOS). During 10 years there were 1,976,893 psychiatric inpatient discharges, of which 14.3 % were from faith-based nonprofit hospitals (eighteen Catholic, seven Seventh-day Adventist, and one Jewish hospital). Modest differences in patient characteristics and shorter LOS (7.5 vs. 8.3 days) were observed between fai...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 30, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Factor Structure of the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality in US and Indian Samples with Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract The aim of this paper was to determine the factor structure of the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality (BMMRS) based on a sample of individuals from diverse cultures (i.e., USA, India), ethnicities (i.e., Caucasian, African-American, South Asian), and religions (i.e., Christian, Muslim, Hindu). A total of 109 individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) were included. Participants completed the BMMRS as part of a broader study on spirituality, religion, prosocial behaviors, and neuropsychological function. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser no...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 26, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Gender Differences in the Association Between Religion/Spirituality and Simultaneous Polysubstance Use (SPU)
Abstract While religion/spirituality strongly protects against drug use (Cheney et al. in J Drug Issues 44(1):94–113, 2014), little is known about gender differences in the association of religion/spirituality on simultaneous polysubstance use (SPU) among those who use prescription opioids. Data come from a community-based study that recruited community members from the St Louis area (N = 632). Participants were asked whether they used prescription opioids when not prescribed for them or in ways other than prescribed in the past 12 months. Religion/spirituality was categorized as high, med...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 22, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Coping and Substance Use: The Moderating Role of Sex
This study utilized a cross-sectional design and examined 349 undergraduate students (103 males and 246 females) at a midsize southeastern university. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the Brief RCOPE, and the Drinking and Drug Habits Questionnaire. Results revealed a positive association between negative religious coping and substance use only for males. While positive religious coping was significantly negatively associated with substance use, sex did not moderate this association. These results suggest that males may be especially vulnerable to engaging in substance use when utilizing negative religiou...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 22, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Jesus the Healer: A Sermon in Honor of the Memory of Donald Eric Capps (1939–2015)
Abstract The article below is a sermon preached in 2008. It was inspired by Donald Capps’s book, Jesus the Village Psychiatrist. I offer this sermon in honor of his memory as a creative contributor to the work of the Journal as well as his distinguished career as Professor of Pastoral Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary. Many of us have been blessed by his profound psychological and theological insights into the human psyche, his scholarly explorations of the relationship of psychology and religion, and his remarkable sense of humor. We are diminished by his absence. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 17, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Supporting Healthy Dementia Culture: An Exploratory Study of the Church
Abstract This research used the church as an exemplar to identify how community institutions provide opportunities for individuals living with dementia to continue living in meaningful ways. Study results from this exploratory study indicated churches are moving towards dementia-friendly spaces, but additional assistance is required. Namely, support with the costs of physical infrastructure improvements, dementia education, adequate transportation, and social supports were identified. Due to the significant presence that the church has in lives touched by dementia, policy that acknowledges its contributions to hea...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 12, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Does Religiosity Mediate Suicidal Tendencies? A South African Study of Muslim Tertiary Students
Abstract Despite international studies into religion’s protective mechanism against suicidal tendencies, within South Africa there is a paucity of research investigating this relationship. This quantitative study investigates the relationship between religiosity and suicidal tendencies in a sample of Muslim students (N = 111). Two scales were used to test the hypothesis that religion mediates suicidal tendency: the Religious Orientation Test and the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency Scale. The findings confirmed this hypothesis but disconfirmed our second hypothesis that there would be gender dif...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 12, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Fatalism Revisited: Further Psychometric Testing Across Two Studies
We examined the psychometrics of the modified Powe Fatalism Inventory in sample of AA women with BrCa from two studies. Only the predetermination and God’s will items satisfy the conditions to be classified as a strong subscale. Our analysis identified that five items had strong psychometric properties for measuring fatalism for AA women with BrCa. However, these items do not include all the defining attributes of fatalism. A strong measure of fatalism strengthens our understanding of how this concept influences AA patient outcomes. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 12, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Beyond Mindfulness: Buddha Nature and the Four Postures in Psychotherapy
Abstract We propose to incorporate the contextual view of the Buddhist teachings of the Three Turnings into applications of mindfulness in psychotherapy; specifically by applying the teaching of the Four Postures, which are expressions of innate health in ordinary life activities. This practice may expand understanding of the core mechanisms of different modalities of mindfulness and psychotherapy, thereby supporting clinicians in guiding clients on a healing path that is in natural alignment with each individual. By its allegiance to inherent wakefulness (Buddha Nature), this teaching supports clients in apprecia...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 12, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Religious Coping is Associated with Quality of Life in Institutionalized Older Adults
Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between spiritual/religious coping (SRCOPE) strategies and quality of life (QoL) in institutionalized older adults. This is a cross-sectional, correlational study, with a sample of 77 older adults in Brazil. The present study found long-term care patients use religious and spiritual coping strategies to deal with their chronic health conditions. Positive SRCOPE and Total SRCOPE have positive correlations with most QoL domains from the WHOQOL-OLD and WHOQOL-BREF. On the other hand, Negative SRCOPE strategies correlated negatively with the facets...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 9, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“We Hide Under the Scriptures”: Conceptualization of Health Among United Methodist Church Clergy in Kenya
This study has implications for health promotion among Kenyan clergy and offers the first study of health conceptualization among clergy in Africa. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relationship Between Religiosity and Psychological Symptoms in Female University Students
This study intended to examine the role of three religious orientations (Allport and Ross 1967) in students demonstrating these psychological symptoms. A sample comprising 502 Pakistani girls studying at university level was randomly selected. Age Universal I–E Scale and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale were used to collect data. Findings reveal an inverse relationship between extrinsic personal religious orientation and symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress among the respondents. Results support the integration of religious orientations in mental health care of young adults in Pakistan. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - November 20, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Association of Religious Affiliation and Body Mass Index (BMI): An Analysis from the Health Survey for England
Abstract Obesity and obesity-related morbidity and mortality are an ongoing concern in developed countries. Religion is associated with reduced premature mortality and morbidity. However, the association between religion and obesity is unclear and unexplored in the general English population. This cross-sectional study uses Health Survey for England 2012 data to investigate the association of religious affiliation and BMI. A representative sample of 7,414 adults (16 years or older) was included. Waist-to-hip ratio was measured in a smaller sample and was explored as a secondary outcome. Interviews were admin...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Development and Initial Validation of a Spiritual Support Subscale for the MOS Social Support Survey
Abstract While spirituality and religious practices are important in coping with illness or other crises, there are few ways of assessing support that people receive from members of their spiritual communities. The goal of this study was to validate a new spiritual support subscale for the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale (MOS-SSS). Questions for the subscale were formed based on responses of 135 breast cancer survivors who were interviewed about their cancer experience. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in four specific factors for the MOS-SSS: emotional/informational, tangible, affectionate, and s...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Confession and Symptom Severity: A Prospective Comparative Study
Abstract Little research has been done on comparing confessions regarding mental health. In the present study, 320 people (78 Buddhists, 77 Catholics, 89 Protestants and 79 Muslims) were compared in terms of their symptom severity. Buddhists and Protestants had lower scores than Catholics and Muslims for obsessive–compulsive behavior and hostility. Muslim group had the highest comparative scores for psychoticism. Buddhists and Protestants had comparatively low scores for paranoid ideation and overall symptom severity, with Catholics and Muslims having high ones. Results reveal that confession should be ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The View of Religious Officials on Organ Donation and Transplantation in the Zeytinburnu District of Istanbul
Abstract One of the obstacles to organ donation and transplantation in Turkey is that of religious beliefs and, at this point, religious officials constitute a key aspect of this problem. Positive or negative viewpoints held by religious officials regarding organ donation and transplantation are influential in guiding the public. This descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of describing religious officials’ viewpoints on this subject. To determine the opinions of 40 religious officials from among the imams and muezzins working in Zeytinburnu District Mufti (Religious Officials Superior) Station who...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Impact of Sexual Media on Second Language Vocabulary Retrieval
Abstract Both Islam and Christianity warn their adherents not to view or to display obscene matter. Aside from religious consequences in the afterlife for such behavior, this study was conducted to determine if viewing sexual media has a detrimental effect in earthly life. Adolescents (n = 64) 17–22 years were exposed to two types of visual stimuli containing sexual or neutral content for 30 min. The participants, seated in rooms with comfortable chairs and provided with snacks, were shown a selection of 18 German words via a PowerPoint slideshow, which included a picture, an audio recording, and the w...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Help for Heroes: PTSD, Warrior Recovery, and the Liturgy
This article will consider the ancient rituals for the purification of warriors after battle to demonstrate the responsibility of the church toward returning warriors and explore how the liturgy can function as a place for recovery. I will demonstrate how the sacraments of Reconciliation, the Eucharist, and the Anointing of the Sick function as sites of re-integration into the world the warriors have fought for, recovery from trauma, and purification after battle. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Association of Religious Commitment and Tobacco Use Among Muslim Adolescents
Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between religious observance and tobacco use among a sample of Jordanian youth. Using multistage, random sampling, a cross-sectional survey of middle and high school students was conducted. Of the 950 Muslim students in the study, 32 % were daily tobacco users and 72 % prayed regularly. Frequency of praying was negatively associated with tobacco smoking. Religious observance was found to be strongly associated with tobacco smoking among Jordanian youth. Our results indicate that religion can be a culturally important tool in health profe...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Medical Vestment and Surgical Instruments of Saint Cosmas and Damian on Sinai Icons From the Seventh to the Eighteenth Century
Abstract The iconography of the doctor saints Cosmas and Damian and the artistic representations of their miracles are important sources for the history of medicine. Within the sphere of physician-saints, Cosmas and Damian have the greatest number of iconographic depictions in Byzantine and Post-Byzantine art. In most of their representations, they wear long robes as a sort of professional mantles and carry surgical instruments and boxes indicating their status as doctors. The progress of Byzantine surgery could be attested by these objects, some of them mentioned in collections of miracle stories and documented ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

An Exploration of the Relationship Between Spirituality and State and Trait Anger Among Medical Students
This study was conducted to assess spiritual attitudes and their relationship with anger in a set of medical students in southern India. In this cross-sectional observational study, medical students who were undergoing clinical rotations were offered participation. Selected demographic data were obtained. The participants were rated using the Spiritual Attitudes Inventory [SAI, which comprises of Duke Religiosity Index, Existential Well-Being Scale (EWBS), Negative Religious Coping and Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale] and State and Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2. Out of 98 students approached, 82 partici...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Can the Effects of Religion and Spirituality on Both Physical and Mental Health be Scientifically Measured? An Overview of the Key Sources, with Particular Reference to the Teachings of Said Nursi
Abstract Within Western secular societies, everything has to be substantiated by empirical evidence; this means it has to be quantifiable and measurable. Research, particularly quantitative research, then, is the criterion by which everything, including religion, is either accepted or rejected. The separation of religion from science began with the Renaissance, the Reformation and the advent of the Enlightenment. It was perceived that religion did not match the language of science and that there was no logical proof or empirical evidence for the existence of God. Religion therefore, due to its inability to be mea...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spirituality and Health Education: A National Survey of Academic Leaders UK
Abstract Whole person care is deemed important within UK medical practice and is therefore fundamental in education. However, spirituality is an aspect of this often neglected. Confusion and discomfort exists regarding how care relating to issues of spirituality and health (S&H) should be delivered. Different interpretations have even led to disciplinary action with professionals seeking to address these needs [http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/4409168/Nurse-suspended-for-offering-to-prayfor-patients-recovery.html]. Previous research shows 45 % of patients want spiritual needs to be addressed ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Gender, Religiosity, Sexual Activity, Sexual Knowledge, and Attitudes Toward Controversial Aspects of Sexuality
Abstract The purpose of this study is to examine the role of gender, religiosity, sexual activity, and sexual knowledge in predicting attitudes toward controversial aspects of sexuality among Turkish university students. Participants were 162 female and 135 male undergraduate students who were recruited on a volunteer basis from an urban state university in Turkey. The SKAT-A Attitude Scale along with background information form, sexual activities inventory, and sexual knowledge scale were administered to the participants. Simultaneous multiple regression analyses revealed that religiosity, particularly attendanc...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Empowerment, Leadership, and Sustainability in a Faith-Based Partnership to Improve Health
This article will apply empowerment theory and sustainability principles to an existing faith-based partnership. BRANCH Out is a partnership among 13 African American churches, the City of Milwaukee Health Department—Community Nutrition, and the Medical College of Wisconsin. The partnership goal was to change inaccurate perceptions, knowledge and negative attitudes, and behaviors about chronic disease and promote healthy youth leadership. Faith-based empowerment can occur at the individual, organizational, and community level. BRANCH Out demonstrates how partnerships can be sustained in multiple ways. The partnership...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Missed Opportunity: Spirituality as a Bridge to Resilience in Latinos with Cancer
Abstract Going through adverse life events can help a person learn how to cope with life’s challenges, overcome them, learn from the adverse experiences, grow, and be positively transformed by them. Spirituality is a resource that supports adaptation and resilience to improve quality of life in patients with cancer or other chronic illnesses. For Latinos, spirituality is an important core cultural value. As such, it is crucial to pay close attention to how cultural values play a role in health-related concerns when caring for Latino cancer patients, and to how spirituality, being an important aspect of Lati...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The spiritual child: the new science on parenting for health and lifelong thriving
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Understanding pastoral counseling
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - September 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research