Response to “Masturbation: Scientific Evidence and Islam’s View”
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Repetition Compulsion Revisited in Relational Family Therapy: The Discovery of Old in Order to Develop Something New
AbstractPsychoanalysis has always been full of diversity and controversy, in the theoretical field and especially in the plasticity and variety of its modalities and approaches. Yet all these theories are based on the premise that individuals compulsively repeat their old psycho-organic content, both in their personal lives and in analysis; the premise of Relational Family Therapy is that old emotional, behavioral and bodily complications must first be repeated before being fully processed so that something new can be created. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spirituality in African-American Breast Cancer Patients: Implications for Clinical and Psychosocial Care
AbstractSpirituality has been shown to be important to many individuals dealing with a cancer diagnosis. While African-American breast cancer survivors have been reported to have higher levels of spirituality compared to White women, little is known about how levels of spirituality may vary among African-American breast cancer survivors. The aims of this study were to examine factors associated with spirituality among African-American survivors and test whether spirituality levels were associated with women ’s attitudes about treatment or health care. The primary outcome, spirituality, was nine-item scale (Cronbach&r...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Fundamentalism, Satisfaction with Life and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Intensity in a Polish Sample of People Living with HIV/AIDS
AbstractWe investigated the relationship between religious fundamentalism, satisfaction with life and the intensity of posttraumatic stress symptoms in people living with HIV/AIDS. The study was conducted on 283 adults, including 242 HIV-positive patients and 41 individuals with AIDS, aged from 20 to 74. Religious fundamentalism was positively correlated with age and posttraumatic stress symptoms intensity. Negative correlation between satisfaction with life and posttraumatic stress intensity was also found. Religious fundamentalism and satisfaction with life accounted for 34% of the variance in posttraumatic stress sympto...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Roman Catholic Priests as Referral Sources and Treatment Aides for Hispanics with Substance Misuse/Abuse Problems
AbstractThis self-administered mail survey study, conducted along the USA –Mexico border, examines Roman Catholic Priests’ involvement in aiding Hispanic individuals with substance abuse problems. The Priests were found to be highly involved or willing to be involved in: (1) participating injuramentos (pledge usually to Virgin of Guadalupe, with Priest as witness, to temporarily abstain from substance use), (2) providing referrals, and (3) working with family and/or treatment resources in the community in order to help the person seeking their help. Fluency in Spanish, regardless of Hispanic ethnicity, was foun...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Confirming the Tripartite Structure of the Duke University Religion Index: A Methodological Approach
This study concluded that the DUREL is a multidimensional measurement of religion for use in English-speaking university students, and it provided a broad methodological note regarding future investigations of measures of religion or spirituality that possess an existing theoretical model. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Explorations in the Aesthetic Pastoral Theology of Donald E. Capps
AbstractThis paper will examine the curative effects of art and the reorienting perspective of poetry in the aesthetic pastoral theology of Donald E. Capps by exploring two key volumes,The Poet ’s Gift andAt Home in the World. The paper identifies some of the key contributions of Capps ’s exploration of art and poetry including the recovery of perception, the advancement of reframing perspective, the notion of embodied pastoral conversation and the roots of religious sensibility. The therapeutic effect of the imaginative aesthetic pastoral theology in these two volumes is furthe r developed by integrating three...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

From “The Depleted Self” to “The Will to Believe”: Excavating the Hermeneutics of Donald Capps
This article focuses on the legacy of Johann Gottfried von Herder, Friedrich Schleiermacher, William James and Paul Ricoeur. It explores the differences and commonalities between William James and Friedrich Schleiermacher’s understanding of religious experience as well as Paul Ricoeur’s understanding of narrativity and traces these strains to Capps’ pastoral psychology. As illustration of his pastoral approach to healing and wholeness the problem of “the depleted self,” so prevalent in “our narcissistic age,” encounters the healing narrative of Jesus that appeals to “the will...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Son ’s Fault: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Search for and Recovery of Sonship
This article examines the role of sonship in the psychological and spiritual development of men. In using the methodology of psychobiography, I explore the life history of Martin Luther King, Jr. to analyze his search for and recovery of sonship. I propose that sonship helps men rebel against and, in the end, overcome the feelings of inadequacy that are experienced in their struggles to achieve manhood, particularly within the father –son dyad. The scholarship of pastoral theologian Donald Capps is instructive in this regard, in that he suggests that sons should be allowed to search for a male figure, a father-substi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Humor as Wisdom for Reframing Life
This article views humor as a characteristic disposition of older adults —their humor signifying a sense of integrity and wisdom that often accompanies the aging process. Humor binds together feelings of despair and joy and contributes to a faithful reframing of faith and life. This article proposes that individuals acquire humor by perceiving the world as if on a jour ney to an exotic new place, seeing with new eyes even the most mundane of everyday objects and events. This capacity to perceive beauty in the ordinary world reflects a wisdom of older adults potentially available even to the young. (Source: Journal of...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Closer Look at Transcendence and Its Relationship to Mental Health
AbstractExperiences of transcendence can promote growth, creativity and altruism, but often exist in tension with critical thought and can feature problematically in certain mental disorders. Identification of the core elements in the experience of transcendence-suspending disbelief, being moved or inspired, surrendering oneself and identifying within a larger context, can clarify its relationship to psychopathology, and the basis for a clinician ’s role. To help individuals engage transcendent resources well, clinicians can help patients recognize how depression and trauma may interfere with engagement, masochistic ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Jesus the Healer: A Sermon in Honor of the Memory of Donald Eric Capps (1939 –2015)
Abstract The article below is a sermon preached in 2008. It was inspired by Donald Capps ’s book,Jesus the Village Psychiatrist. I offer this sermon in honor of his memory as a creative contributor to the work of the Journal as well as his distinguished career as Professor of Pastoral Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary. Many of us have been blessed by his profound psychological and theological insights into the human psyche, his scholarly explorations of the relationship of psychology and religion, and his remarkable sense of humor. We are diminished by his absence. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Perception of Spirituality and Spiritual Care among Muslim Nurses in Indonesia
Abstract This cross-sectional study was conducted to examine 256 Muslim nurses ’ perception of spirituality and spiritual care in Indonesia. The Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS) was translated and culturally adapted. Moderately high degrees in five domains and total SSCRS were found. Specialty, education level, clinical seniority, having spiritual trainin g, and previous spiritual caring experience could impact on the SSCRS. Most nurses have cared for patients with spiritual needs, but denied having any formal training in providing spiritual care. Providing adequate curriculum and on-job training ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Jesus the Healer: A Sermon in Honor of the Memory of Donald Eric Capps (1939 –2015)
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spirituality and Post-Stroke Aphasia Recovery
AbstractThe role of spirituality in post-stroke aphasia recovery has been ignored despite its potential contribution to positive health outcomes, particularly stroke recovery. The present study examines the spiritual experience of adults with aphasia in an effort to better understand the role of one ’s spirituality in the aphasia recovery process. Thirteen adults with aphasia completed a modified spirituality questionnaire and participated in semi-structured interviews. All participants considered themselves spiritual and reported improvements in communication during post-stroke recovery. Two themes related to spirit...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Growth or Decline and Meaning-Making as Mediators of Anxiety and Satisfaction with Life During Religious Struggle
AbstractA number of studies have demonstrated links between spiritual struggles and health problems. As yet, however, only a few studies have investigated what makes religious struggle a source of mental problems or a source of well-being. We determined whether spiritual growth, spiritual decline, and meaning-making mediated the relationship between religious struggle and anxiety and satisfaction with life. Of the 180 respondents, 92 were women, and mean (SD) age was 24 (8.2) years. Each respondent completed the Religious and Spiritual Struggles Scale, the Meaning-Making Scale, the Spiritual Transformation Scale, the State...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 14, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Effect of Hajj Pilgrimage on Treatment Compliance in Individuals with Chronic Diseases
This study was performed in order to determine the effect of Hajj pilgrimage on treatment compliance in individuals with chronic diseases. A total of 168 individuals were included in the prospective and descriptive study. Data were collected in three interviews using a patient identification form and the Religiousness Inclination Scale. When the medicine compliances of the individuals before and after Hajj pilgrimage were compared, a statistically meaningful difference between their regular uses of medicine statuses was found (p = 0.011). However, no difference was detected in the 3-month follow-up (p ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 14, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Complimentary Care: When Our Patients Request to Pray
AbstractPrayer is viewed in modern medicine as a complimentary alternative treatment. However, to many patients, it is a source of hope and comfort. Patients, when facing illness, advanced disease, disability or death, can benefit from prayer. For healthcare providers, comfort with praying with patients can be deemed as unprofessional conduct or blurred therapeutic boundaries, particularly, when prayer is offered to patients ’ unsolicited by the patient or their family member(s). Therefore, it is imperative that healthcare providers await the request of prayer by the patient before prayer is initiated. (Source: Journ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 14, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Fitness for Military Veterans: A Curriculum Review and Impact Evaluation Using the Duke Religion Index (DUREL)
AbstractSuicide rates among military veterans exceed those found in the general population. While the exact reasons for these high rates are unknown, contributing factors may include the military ’s perceived rejection of patient identities, creating barriers to mental health care within the clinical sector and a mandate for prevention programs. Spiritual fitness has emerged over the last decade as an important concept in human performance optimization and is included among holistic approa ches to developing and maintaining mentally fit fighting forces. In attempts to better understand the role that spiritual fitness...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 13, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Mental Footnotes. Knowledge Constructivism From Logical Thinking and Personal Beliefs to Social Rationality and Spiritual Freedom
AbstractCognition is an efficient but limited system that deals with mundane tasks. Daily life demands the system to save energy in order to be able to solve other more relevant tasks. Reasoning out every single problem would immeasurably increase our mental load and fatigue. Our minds avoid this waste of resources by taking shortcuts when reasoning. Outputs from previous episodes of reasoning turn into pieces of implicit information. These outputs go on to constitute the meanings that we give to things or circumstances, which in turn become the general framework where other reasonings occur. These implicit meanings determ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 10, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Personal Transformation Process of Mental Health Relief Workers in Sichuan Earthquake
AbstractAfter Sichuan earthquake, a few dedicated teams of psychological volunteers have been committed to helping the survivors of the disaster for a long period. Their personal transformation experiences were absent in the literatures. The purpose of this qualitative research was to adopt a qualitative research to examine individuals ’ lived experiences of personal transformation after long-term disaster mental health services. The study interviewed 10 psychological counselors, 3 psychiatric nurses, 4 psychiatrist, and 6 social workers. We built an explorative model to understand disaster relief workers personal tr...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 10, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Helping Carers Care: An Exploratory Study of Factors Impacting Informal Family Carers and Their Use of Aged Care Services
AbstractThis exploratory study considered the role of informal carers and their decision-making regarding various aged care services that supposedly support their ageing relatives. Consideration was given to the stressors and overall well-being of informal carers and the support services they did or did not receive during their time of caregiving. A questionnaire was utilised to gain exploratory quantitative and qualitative data plus basic demographic information from informal carers who connected with a single caregiver association based in Victoria, Australia. Several themes emerged from the analysis of data regarding ca...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 9, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Psychometric Evaluation of the Turkish Form of the Spiritual Care Competence Scale
AbstractThe methodological study was aimed to assess the psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the Spiritual Care Competence Scale (SCCS-T). The research was conducted on final-year Turkish nursing students (n = 297) in the faculties of nursing and health science in two cities in the western part of Turkey. Exploratory factor analysis revealed that three factors accounted for 75.18% of the explained variance. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the SCCS-T was .97. The three-factor model of the SCC S-T was found to be a reliable and valid scale for evaluating spiritual care competencies of T...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 9, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Body Language in Relational Family Therapy
AbstractThe mechanism of projective and introjective identification has been re-evaluated in modern analysis. It is no longer just about the transference of mental content to an other, rather it addresses also the deepest psycho-organic sensations and vibrations, which in turn become the basis for interpersonal and family dialogues. The goal of this article is also to lay out the fundamental dynamics of body language as understood by the relational family paradigm. It is a novel analytical perspective on the individual, who is always part of any relational family configuration. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

On the Couch: A Repressed History of the Analytic Couch from Plato to Freud
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

What Can Be Learned from Health-Related Tensions and Disparities in Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Families?
This study aims to reveal key cultural-religious aspects of attitudes and behaviors regarding lifestyle in one such closed community —the ultra-orthodox Jewish community. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 participants: religious leaders, educational figures, psycho-medical professionals from two major ultra-orthodox communities in Israel. A thematic analysis was used to reveal key themes in the interviews. We found ten sions between conflicting themes in the parenting, nutrition and physical activity domains, while the sleep domain illustrated cultural solution for a tension. By illuminating the perceptional...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Education Moderates the Relationship Between Spirituality with Quality of Life and Stress Among Malay Muslim Women with Breast Cancer
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between spirituality with quality of life and stress of Malay Muslim breast cancer patients in Malaysia. In addition, the moderating role of education on this relationship was examined. Participants consisted of 145 conveniently selected Malay breast cancer patients. The results indicated that the more spiritual respondents reported a higher level of quality of life and lower level of stress. Moreover, education weakened the relationship between spirituality with quality of life and stress. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

An Investigation of Islamic Well-Being and Mental Health
In this study, four sub-studies were performed to create the one-factor Islamic Well-Being Scale, perform a confirmatory factor analysis and validate the Islamic Well-Being Scale, differentially predict ill-being and well-being outcomes using the Islamic Well-Being Scale, and compare individuals with different Islamic belief levels using the Islamic Well-Being Scale. In total, 170 adults, 209 adults, 216 theological faculty students and 152 undergraduate educational faculty students participated in each sub-study. Several scales related to well-being and ill-being were used in this study. The Islamic Well-Being Scale was f...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Recruitment of African American Churches to Participate in Cancer Early Detection Interventions: A Community Perspective
This article describes the process used to engage and recruit African American churches to serve as participants in two multi-year behavioural cancer research interventions from a community perspective. Community-based organizations used purposive sampling in engaging and recruiting advisory panel members and churches to participate in these interventions. Trust, respect, open dialogue with participants, and commitment to address community health needs contributed to successful engagement and recruitment of African American churches to serve as participants in these cancer research projects. Our results may help others eng...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 27, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Impact of Quran in Treatment of the Psychological Disorder and Spiritual Illness
This study aimed to measure the effectiveness and responsiveness of patients to receive treatment through Quran. This study highlighted the employment of a quantitative research, which achieved its objective through validity and reliability. The results of the effectiveness factor came after ability and willingness and gave a result of 92.6% for those who support the contention that the Quran has a significant healing influence. Also, some of the patients who regularly attended Quranic therapy sessions have been successfully cured, 81.8% of the sample believe that Quranic therapy sessions support their health needs. This s...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 26, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Care in General Practice: Rushing in or Fearing to Tread? An Integrative Review of Qualitative Literature
AbstractGuidance for medical staff reminds employees of the responsibility to deliver spiritual care in its broadest sense, respecting the dignity, humanity, individuality and diversity of the people whose cultures, faiths and beliefs coexist in society. This is no small or simple task, and although GPs (family practitioners) have been encouraged to deliver spiritual care, we suggest this is proving to be challenging and needs further careful debate. This literature review critiques and analyses existing studies and points to four categories of attitude to spiritual care, and two related but distinct concepts of spirituali...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Body Covering and Body Image: A Comparison of Veiled and Unveiled Muslim Women, Christian Women, and Atheist Women Regarding Body Checking, Body Dissatisfaction, and Eating Disorder Symptoms
AbstractAlthough Islam is the fastest growing religion worldwide, only few studies have investigated body image in Muslim women, and no study has investigated body checking. Therefore, the present study examined whether body image, body checking, and disordered eating differ between veiled and unveiled Muslim women, Christian women, and atheist women. While the groups did not differ regarding body dissatisfaction, unveiled Muslim women reported more checking than veiled Muslim and Christian women, and higher bulimia scores than Christian. Thus, prevention against eating disorders should integrate all women, irrespective of...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 21, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Existential Meaning of Patients with Chronic Facial Pain
The objective of this study was to discuss the relevance of the meaning of life in coping with refractory chronic neuropathic facial pain according to singular cases. Each patient is unique and needs a singular approach to understand and treat the pain phenomenon. Self-transcendence, existential issues and philosophical values are central concepts to assess chronic conditions and should be highlighted in medical practice these days. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Coping Mechanisms for Psychosomatic Symptoms among Aging Roman Catholic German priests
AbstractTo identify and investigate coping mechanisms and other factors which may impact upon the psychosomatic symptoms of aging German Roman Catholic priests. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 499 aging German Roman Catholic priests with standardized questionnaires: Brief Symptom Inventory, Coping Inventory Stressful Situations, and Religious Coping Scale. Task-Oriented Coping exhibited a significant difference between the two groups. Multiple regression analyses indicated that psychosomatic symptoms could be best predicted by means of Task-Oriented Coping mechanisms, identification with priesthood, and by a lo...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Revisiting The Depleted Self
This article revisits Donald Capps ’s bookThe Depleted Self (The depleted self: sin in a narcissistic age. Fortress Press, Minneapolis,1993), which grew out of his 1990 Schaff Lectures at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. In these lectures Capps proposed that the theology of guilt had dominated much of post-Reformation discourse. But with the growing prevalence of the narcissistic personality in the late twentieth century, the theology of guilt no longer adequately expressed humanity ’s sense of “wrongness” before God. Late twentieth-century persons sense this disjunction between God and self through...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Addressing Moderate Interpersonal Hatred Before Addressing Forgiveness in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Proposed Model
AbstractThis paper addresses the problem of pressure on a person to forgive that often makes forgiveness impossible or superficial. It proposes that clients who are unwilling or unable to forgive can still be encouraged to let go of interpersonal hatred because it is psychologically harmful to them. The issue of forgiving the person toward whom the hatred is directed can be treated more easily later, after the hatred has been removed or at least much reduced. The present theoretical approach distinguishes between anger and hatred; it provides a brief understanding of the origin of hatred from an object relations perspectiv...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 9, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Inverse U-Shaped Religion –Health Connection Among Israeli Jews
AbstractA growing body of evidence indicates an association between religion and health. However, few have studied the connection between the extent of an individual ’s religiosity and his health. Analysis of the 2004 Israel National Health Survey was performed. Religiosity was self-identified using five continuous categories, distinctive to Israeli Jews. Bivariate and multivariate analyses examined the relationship between the extent of Religious commitment a nd several health outcomes. The relationship took the shape of an inverse U function: Israeli Jews in the middle religiously have the worst physical and mental...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Moral Objections and Fear of Hell: An Important Barrier to Suicidality
AbstractThis review explores the literature to test the hypothesis that ‘moral objections to suicide (MOS), especially the conviction of going to hell after committing suicide, exert a restraining effect on suicide and suicidality.’ Medline and PsycInfo were searched using all relevant search terms; all relevant articles were selected, rated and reviewed. Fifteen cr oss-sectional studies were available on this topic, and raise sufficient evidence to confirm a restraining effect of MOS, and sparse data on fear of hell. MOS seem to counteract especially the development of suicidal intent and attempts, and possibl...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Rehabilitation and Re-socialization of Criminals in Iranian Criminal Law
AbstractOne of the concerns that always remain for the repentant criminal is the condition for his return to society. This concern may be so strong and effective that the criminal may seclude from the society due to the fear of its consequences and may return to crime. Therefore, paying attention to eliminating the social effect of the criminal conviction of criminals can return security to society and return the repentant criminals to normal life. So, all military and social institutions are effective in the re-socialization, in such a way that the re-socialization of criminals requires the provision of social platforms t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Growing down
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Black Male Mental Health and the Black Church: Advancing a Collaborative Partnership and Research Agenda
This article explores the role the Black Church could play in facilitating spiritually sensitive, culturally relevant and gender-specific services to address the mental health and well-being of Black males. The help-seeking behaviors of Black men are examined as the authors offer two theories: the body, mind, spirit, environment, social, transcendent, and health, illness, men, and masculinities that may assist the Black Church in functioning as an effective support networks for healthy Black male mental health. Next, the authors discuss implications for practice, research, and education, and lastly, eight recommendations f...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Islamic Considerations on the Application of Patient ’s Autonomy in End-of-Life Decision
AbstractIn end-of-life situation, the need for patient ’s preference comes into the picture with the intention of guiding physicians in the direction of patient care. Preference in medical directive is made by a person with full mental capacity outlining what actions should be taken for his health should he loses his competency. This is based on the r eality of universal paradigm in medical practice that emphasises patient’s autonomy. A specific directive is produced according to a patient’s wish that might include some ethically and religiously controversial directives such as mercy killing, physician-as...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Applying Attention Restoration Theory to Understand and Address Clergy ’s Need to Restore Cognitive Capacity
AbstractAttention Restoration Theory is applied to explore the causes and consequences of mental fatigue in clergy and suggest practical interventions to restore cognitive wellbeing. Previous research has investigated the physical and emotional health and wellbeing of clergy, but has largely neglected clergy cognitive wellbeing. Due to the demanding nature of their work, clergy are particularly susceptible to mental fatigue and depletion of their capacity to maintain attention. Symptoms include inability to focus attention, inhibit distractions, make decisions or solve problems. Mental fatigue can be overcome, and cognitiv...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Church-Based Social Support ’s Impact on African-Americans’ Physical Activity and Diet Varies by Support Type and Source
The objective of this study was to examine sources (friends, family, church members, and pastors) and type (positive or negative) of social support and their association with eating and physical activity behaviors. Study participants consisted of 41 African-American adults (78% female), with an average age of 43.5  years (standard deviation = 15.7). Participants were recruited from churches in southwest, Ohio. Mean comparisons showed family members, and friends had the highest positive and negative social support scores for healthy eating and physical activity. Pastors and church members received the lowes t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Humility, Relational Spirituality, and Well-being among Religious Leaders: A Moderated Mediation Model
AbstractPrior research has demonstrated positive associations between general humility and well-being, and posited a protective effect for intellectual humility against maladjustment among religious leaders. We tested a model that extended findings on general humility to include intellectual humility among religious leaders (N = 258;M age  = 42.31; 43% female; 63.7% White; 91.9% Christian affiliation). We observed a positive general humility–well-being association. Contrary to expectations, we observed risk effects for religion-specific intellectual humility. Our findings also point to the possibi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Systematic Comparison of African American and Non-African American Patients on Psychosocial Aspects of Hepatitis C Infection
This study’s findings are a basis for encouragement of public health efforts and programs to seek partnerships with African American faith and religious communities to identify and tre at undiagnosed cases of HCV and promote HCV awareness. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Editor ’s Note: Special Issue on the Life and Work of Donald Capps (1939–2015)
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Special Issue on the Life and Work of Donald Capps (1939 –2015)
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Investigating the Relationship Between Religiosity and Psychological Distress Among Surgical Inpatients: A Pilot Study
AbstractPsychological distress may hinder recovery following surgery. Studies examining the relationship between psychological distress and religiosity in the acute post-operative setting are lacking. The present study investigated this relationship, evaluated protocol design, and explored coping mechanisms. Psychological distress of surgical inpatients was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL). Religiosity was assessed using the Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire. Correlations were obtained using Minitab software. Qualitative analysis iden...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Including the ‘Spiritual’ Within Mental Health Care in the UK, from the Experiences of People with Mental Health Problems
AbstractSpirituality as a dimension of quality of life and well-being has recently begun to be more valued within person-centred treatment approaches to mental health in the UK. The aim of this paper is to provide indicators of the extent to which accessing a spiritual support group may be useful within mental health recovery from the view point of those in receipt of it. The study design was a small-scale exploratory study utilising mixed methods. Quantitative methods were used to map the mental health, general well-being and social networks of the group. These were complimented by a semi-structured open-ended interview w...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research