Engaging with Faith Councils to Develop Stoma-specific Fatawās : A Novel Approach to the Healthcare Needs of Muslim Colorectal Patients
Abstract Intestinal stomas are common. Muslims report significantly lower quality of life following stoma surgery compared to non-Muslims. A fatwā is a ruling on a point of Islamic law according to a recognised religious authority. The use of fatawās to guide health-related decision-making has becoming an increasingly popular practice amongst Muslims, regardless of geographic location. This project aimed to improve the quality of life of Muslim ostomates by addressing faith-specific stoma concerns. Through close collaboration with Muslim ostomates, a series of 10 faith-related questions were generated, which we...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Nutritional Concepts and Frequency of Foodstuffs Mentioned in the Holy Quran
Abstract The Holy Quran is a religious book of Muslims. In many verses of Quran, various foods are discussed. It seems that limited studies were performed on identification the nutritional verses and their frequencies in the Holy Quran. Therefore, the aims of present study were to establish a numerical model system for studying nutritional verses of Quran, determination of verses with nutritional concepts and frequency of foodstuffs in the Holy Quran. In this descriptive analytical study, “Ghamoos e Quran” and “Vazheyab” online softwares were used to determine the nutritional keywords in Q...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Experience of the Spiritist Hospital Chaplaincy Service: A Retrospective Study
The objective of this study is to present a retrospective analysis of records made by chaplains, guided by the Spiritist Medical Association of Piracicaba, through 7419 calls to 2191 patients admitted at Unimed Hospital of Piracicaba in 2014. The results contributed to the production of scientific documentation about this new holistic model that still lies in acceptance phase in the country. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Predictors of Physician Recommendation for Ethically Controversial Medical Procedures: Findings from an Exploratory National Survey of American Muslim Physicians
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 31, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Exploring the Relationship of Religiosity, Religious Support, and Social Support Among African American Women in a Physical Activity Intervention Program
Abstract Religious belief has been linked to a variety of positive mental and physical health outcomes. This exploratory study will address the relationship between religious involvement and social connectedness among African American women. Results from a physical activity intervention research project (N = 465) found that total religious support and social support were significantly negatively correlated with total religiosity, while total general social support was significantly positively correlated with total religious support. Overall, the study indicates that more research is needed on ways to en...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Do Self-efficacy Expectation and Spirituality Provide a Buffer Against Stress-Associated Impairment of Health? A Comprehensive Analysis of the German Pastoral Ministry Study
Abstract We aimed to analyse stress perception, psychosomatic health and life satisfaction in pastoral professionals, paying particular attention to their individual and shared resources. Enrolling 8574 German pastoral professionals (48 % priests, 22 % parish expert workers, 18 % pastoral assistants, 12 % deacons), we found that pastoral professionals’ stress perception is associated with psychosomatic health impairment. General self-efficacy was a beneficial resource to protect against stress perceptions, while perception of the transcendent had a further yet weakly positive inf...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Fatalism, Diabetes Management Outcomes, and the Role of Religiosity
This study aimed to determine whether fatalistic beliefs were associated with elevated levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and to establish the role of religiosity in this relationship. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a sample of 183 Jewish adults with diabetes visiting a large medical center in northern Israel. Self-administered questionnaires assessed level of religiosity, fatalistic beliefs, diabetes management behaviors, and demographic/personal characteristics; laboratory tests were used to measure HbA1c. Multivariate regression indicated that fatalism was significantly associated with HbA1c (β =...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Twelve-Step-Related Spirituality in Addiction Recovery
Abstract This paper reviews empirical studies conducted on the role of spirituality and religiosity (S/R) characteristics in 12-step recovery among program members followed up after substance abuse treatment and those assessed independent of formal treatment. Aspects of spiritual functioning that change in relation to program participation and those S/R characteristics that were found to mediate the association between program involvement and drinking-related outcomes are discussed. In addition, a review is provided of 12-step program studies investigating S/R-related predictors of clinical outcomes relevant to r...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Predicting Relationship of Smoking Behavior Among Male Saudi Arabian College Students Related to Their Religious Practice
This study describes the relationships of smoking behavior among a sample of male college students in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) to their religious practice, parents’ smoking behaviors and attitudes, peers’ smoking behaviors and attitudes, and knowledge about the dangers of smoking. A 49-item questionnaire was developed and pilot tested in KSA. This questionnaire was completed during the academic year 2013 by 715 undergraduate male students at the King Saud University in Riyadh. 29.8 % of the students were smokers (13.8 % cigarette smokers, 7.3 % sheesha smokers, and 27 % cigarette and sh...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Indigenous Adoption of Novaco’s Model of Anger Management Among Individuals with Psychiatric Problems in Pakistan
Abstract The present study was designed to indigenously adopt Novaco’s model of anger management and examine its efficacy among individuals with psychiatric problems in Pakistan. For the assessment of anger and psychiatric problems, Urdu-translated versions of Novaco Anger Inventory (NAI), Anger Self-Report Questionnaire (ASR) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were used. A sample of 100 individuals was divided into two groups: a treatment group (received the indigenously adopted model of anger management) and a control group (received general counseling). Results of mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Impact of Mood Spectrum Spirituality and Mysticism Symptoms on Suicidality in Earthquake Survivors with PTSD
Abstract The aim of the present study was to explore the correlations between Spirituality/Mysticism/Psychoticism symptoms and suicidality in young adult survivors of the L’Aquila earthquake. The sample included 475 subjects recruited among high school seniors who had experienced the April 6, 2009, earthquake. Assessments included: Trauma and Loss Spectrum–Self Report and Mood Spectrum–Self Report (MOODS-SR). Mysticism/Spirituality dimension and suicidality were evaluated by means of some specific items of the MOOD-SR. The Spirituality/Mysticism/Psychoticism MOODS-SR factor score was significant...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Frequency of Faith and Spirituality Discussion in Health Care
This study was performed to determine whether faith and spirituality are active part of the healthcare field and patients’ receipt of these sometimes delicate topics. The nuances of the concepts of faith, spirituality, and religion and their implications in the healthcare setting are discussed. Benefits and detriments of faith and spirituality are reviewed in terms of how they relate to the health of the patient and to the healthcare field. With the focus of healthcare shifting to holistic care, this conversation may be more necessary than ever in practice, yet it seems many providers are not discussing these matters...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Chaplains on the Medical Team: A Qualitative Analysis of an Interprofessional Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents and Chaplain Interns
Abstract Improved collaboration between physicians and chaplains has the potential to improve patient experiences. To better understand the benefits and challenges of learning together, the authors conducted several focus groups with participants in an interprofessional curriculum that partnered internal medicine residents with chaplain interns in the clinical setting. The authors derived four major qualitative themes from the transcripts: (1) physician learners became aware of effective communication skills for addressing spirituality. (2) Chaplain interns enhanced the delivery of team-based patient-centered car...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Readiness to Implement HIV Testing in African-American Church Settings
Abstract HIV and AIDS continue to impact Black Americans at disproportionately high rates. Promotion of HIV testing and linkage to care is a national health imperative for this population. As a pillar in the Black community, the Black Church could have a significant impact on the promotion of HIV testing within their churches and surrounding communities. Churches, however, have varied levels of involvement in testing. Furthermore, little is known about how to assess a church’s readiness to integrate HIV testing strategies into its mission, much less how to promote this practice among churches. This qualitat...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Pedagogy and Purpose: Moral Imagination and the Teaching of Medical Ethics
Abstract This essay is an exploration of the development of moral imagination as an important outcome in the teaching of medial ethics. It is contextualized within the growth of professionalism and pays attention to the formation of character of physicians in their formal training and in the first phase of their careers. Issues around formation as it is understood historically in the vocation of the clergy are also considered. Finally, there is discussion of the place rites of passage as they figure in the lives of those who teach medical ethics. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Barriers to Health for Members of the Bronx Ghanaian Immigrant Muslim Community in New York City
Abstract This research investigated the influence of religious beliefs, as well as education, immigration status, and health insurance status, on the perceived access and willingness to use healthcare services by the Bronx Ghanaian Immigrant Muslim Community (BGIMC) in New York City. A survey was administered to 156 male and female BGIMC members. Members with insurance were nine times more likely to report access to health care and almost seven times more likely to use healthcare services in the past 12 months. Immigration status, health insurance status, and education did not predict willingness to use heal...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Brief Historical Review of Specific Religious Denominations: How History Influences Current Medical–Religious Partnerships
Abstract Improving health care in the twenty-first century will require new and creative approaches, with special attention given to health literacy and patient engagement since these two variables play a significant role in chronic health issues and their management. In order to better improve these key variables, strong partnerships between patients, their communities, and medical institutions must be developed. One way of facilitating these relationships is through medical–religious partnerships. Religious leaders are in regular contact with people who need education about and support with health issues....
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Mental Health and Self-Esteem of Institutionalized Adolescents Affected by Armed Conflict
In this study, 27 adolescents from a charitable Muslim seminary and 30 adolescents from a regular school were recruited. Self-report measures and clinical interview were used to measure mental health and self-esteem. The findings indicate that adolescents in institution setting may not be having mental health and self-esteem-related issues when compared to adolescents living in intact by parent homes. While the authors acknowledge the limitations of the study, these findings need further research to examine the causes for these differences. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Opinions on the Legitimacy of Brain Death Among Sunni and Shi’a Scholars
Abstract The concept of brain death poses a great challenge to clinicians who may be required to bridge the interface of culture, religion, law, and medicine. This review discusses and applies Islamic jurisprudence to the question of whether brain death is accepted as true death under Islamic law. Among the five sources of Islamic law, the Qur’an and Sunnah do not directly address brain death. Scholarly consensus (Ijmā’) does not exist, and Qiya does not apply. When applying Ijtihad, the identified collection of non-binding fatwā offer conflicting results. Debate continues as to the validity of ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Islam, Assisted Reproduction, and the Bioethical Aftermath
Abstract Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), including in vitro fertilization to overcome infertility, are now widely available across the Middle East. Islamic fatwas emerging from the Sunni Islamic countries have permitted many ARTs, while prohibiting others. However, recent religious rulings emanating from Shia Muslim-dominant Iran have created unique avenues for infertile Muslim couples to obtain donor gametes through third-party reproductive assistance. The opening of Iran to gamete donation has had major impacts in Shia-dominant Lebanon and has led to so-called reproductive tourism of Sunni Muslim cou...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Slowing Down Time: An Exploration of Personal Life Extension Desirability as it Relates to Religiosity and Specific Religious Beliefs
This study examines attitudes toward extending the human life span within a student population at a Christian university. Religious factors were hypothesized to affect life extension desirability. Scores on measures of willingness to defer to God’s will, meaning derived from religion, positive afterlife beliefs, and intrinsic religiosity were significantly and inversely related to life extension desirability. Implications of these findings are discussed, including encouraging medical practitioners to respect decision-making processes of religious persons who may find life extension interventions undesirable. (Source:...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 4, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Influence of Religion on Attitude Towards Suicide: An Indian Perspective
Abstract This cross-sectional survey was aimed to compare attitudes towards suicide and suicidal behaviour among randomly selected sample (N = 172) belonged to Hindu and Muslim religions. Data were collected through face-to-face interview. Hindus differed from Muslims regarding suicidal attempts among family (χ 2 = 12.356, p 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 4, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Technology in Muslim Moral Philosophy
Abstract The article explores the place, role and status of technology in Muslim moral philosophy. Invoking early Muslim encounters with technology the author makes the case why technology is already deeply embedded in contemporary Muslim bioethical thinking. Due to an absence of the philosophical grounding there remains some ambivalence as to why technology is essential to Muslim ethical thinking. Countering the techno-pessimists, the author makes a case in favor of compositional thinking, namely that our thinking itself is altered by our tools and our environment. Compositional thinking opposes the representatio...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 2, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Understanding the Relationship Between State Forgiveness and Psychological Wellbeing: A Qualitative Study
Abstract Over the last 20 years, increasing attention has been given to associations between dispositional forgiveness and specific mental health problems. However, few studies have assessed whether forgiving real-life interpersonal hurts may be related to diverse psychological health outcomes. The present study addresses this gap by investigating, in depth, relationships between perceptions about state forgiveness and a variety of mental wellbeing outcomes as well as exploring perceptions about the factors that may modify such effects. Developing an understanding of a forgiveness wellbeing relationship is of...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Alcohol Use in College: The Relationship Between Religion, Spirituality, and Proscriptive Attitudes Toward Alcohol
This study found that religious singing/chanting and reading sacred text were the best predictors of lower alcohol consumption. Furthermore, participants who perceive their religious tradition to be proscriptive reported less alcohol consumption and higher religious/spiritual profiles. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - March 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Challenges of Conscientious Objection in Health care
Abstract Conscientious objection (CO) is the refusal to perform a legal role or responsibility because of personal beliefs. In health care, conscientious objection involves practitioners not providing certain treatments to their patients, based on reasons of morality or “conscience.” The development of conscientious objection among providers is complex and challenging. While there may exist good reasons to accommodate COs of clinical providers, the exercise of rights and beliefs of the provider has an impact on a patient’s health and/ or their access to care. For this reason, it is incumbent ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 29, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Turkish Imams’ Experience with and Their Attitudes Toward Suicide and Suicidal Persons
This study investigated the experience with and attitudes toward suicide and suicidality in 70 consenting imams serving in mosques in the province of Aydin which is located at the southwest part of Turkey. A self-report questionnaire was used to collect the data. Attitudes of imams to suicide and suicidality were compared with attitudes of male university students. Only 4 imams (5.7 %) reported having had suicidal thoughts in past, and none reported having attempted suicide. Almost 50 % said that someone in communities they serve has commited suicide and nearly 40 % reported leading funeral ceremony for some...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 29, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Can Religious Beliefs be a Protective Factor for Suicidal Behavior? A Decision Tree Analysis in a Mid-Sized City in Iran, 2013
This study aimed to assess using tree-based models the impact of different dimensions of religion and other risk factors on suicide attempts in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Three hundred patients who attempted suicide and 300 age- and sex-matched patient attendants with other types of disease who referred to Kerman Afzalipour Hospital were recruited for this study following a convenience sampling. Religiosity was assessed by the Duke University Religion Index. A tree-based model was constructed using the Gini Index as the homogeneity criterion. A complementary discrimination analysis was also applied. Variables contributi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 29, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Does a Therapist’s World View Matter?
In this study, approximately 50 therapists completed surveys that assessed self-identification in relation to spirituality, religion, and/or world view; how relevant they considered their patients’ and their own world views; and responses to clinical vignettes involving issues arising in treatment. While a minority considered themselves religious, a majority indicated that they considered themselves moderately or very spiritual. When asked how they would respond to a series of clinical vignettes involving topics such as assisted suicide and encouraging the use of spiritual resources, responses varied significantly by...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life
Abstract The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener’s Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes’ models showed that b...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 27, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spirituality in Indian University Students and its Associations with Socioeconomic Status, Religious Background, Social Support, and Mental Health
Abstract The present study aimed to understand spirituality and its relationships with socioeconomic status (SES), religious background, social support, and mental health among Indian university students. It was hypothesized that (1) female university students will be more spiritual than male university students, (2) four domains of spirituality will differ significantly across socioeconomic and religious background of the university students in addition to social support, and (3) there will be a positive relationship between spirituality and mental health of university students, irrespective of gender. A group of...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 26, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Longitudinal Case Study: The Development of Exceptional Human Experiences of Senior Ecclesiastical Professionals in the Catholic Church
Abstract Exceptional human experiences (EHEs) impact on health and well-being and can contribute to enhanced intercultural and interreligious awareness and understanding. The aim of this longitudinal study was to explore the development of EHEs in a group of senior professionals in the German Catholic Church. Exceptional human experiences were measured through the EEQ in pre- and post-test questionnaires which were qualitatively analysed. The results of this study reflect an increase in the frequency of positive spiritual experiences and visionary dream encounters, as well as a more positive evaluation of these sp...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 25, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Assessing Whether Religious Behaviors and Positive and Negative Affect are Associated with Alcohol Use and Abuse Among a Sample of College Students Living in the Midwest
This study examined the role religious behaviors and positive and negative affect had on drinking (alcohol use and alcohol to intoxication). College students (765) completed an online survey. The results showed that college students who attended religious services were less likely to use alcohol than those who did not attend religious services. The results have important implications for college administrators and policy makers. Limitations and future research will be discussed. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 25, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Meditation, Health and Scientific Investigations: Review of the Literature
Abstract A growing number of people are seeking health recovery treatments with a holistic approach to the human being. Meditation is a mental training capable of producing connection between the mind, body and spirit. Its practice helps people to achieve balance, relaxation and self-control, in addition to the development of consciousness. At present, meditation is classified as a complementary and integrative technique in the area of health. The purpose of this review of the literature was to describe what meditation is, its practices and effects on health, demonstrated by consistent scientific investigations. R...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 25, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Leveraging the Deliverance Phenomenon: Penteco/Charismatic Vista
This article reflects on the deliverance concept within Classical Pentecostalism and Neo-Pentecostalism against historical and contemporary considerations. The research design combined ethnography and case study. Participant observation and in-depth interviews were used for data collection. Findings include: overstretched demonic mentality; the notion that the Penteco/Charismatic believer cannot be possessed but could be harassed by demons; and dehumanizing situations inherent in deliverance practice. It is recommended that sanity, care and collaboration be established amongst deliverance practitioners, psychologists, psyc...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 24, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Focused Attention Meditation Practice Habits, Psychological Symptoms, and Quality of Life
This study examined the relationship between focused attention meditation practice habits, psychological symptoms, and quality of life. The participants were 30 adults from New York, NY, practicing Ananda Marga spirituality. They were administered the Symptom Check List-90-R and the Quality of Life Index. The findings pointed out while Ananda Marga meditation practice habits were not associated with improvements in psychological symptoms, longer years in meditation practice was associated with improvements in overall, social and psychological/spiritual quality of life. Longer periods of meditation practice per session were...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 22, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Health Promotion in the Community: Impact of Faith-Based Lay Health Educators in Urban Neighborhoods
Abstract Promoting wellness and providing reliable health information in the community present serious challenges. Lay health educators, also known as community health workers, may offer a cost-effective solution to such challenges. This is a retrospective observational study of graduates from the Lay Health Educator Program (LHEP) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center from 2013 to 2014. Students were enrolled from the surrounding community congregations and from the hospital’s accredited clinical pastoral education program. There were 50 events implemented by the lay health educators during the 2014&ndash...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 22, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Wholistic Health Care: Evolutionary Conceptual Analysis
Abstract While performing a data search to define “wholistic health care”, it was evident that a definite gap existed in published literature. In addition, there are different definitions and several similar terms (whole person care, wholistic health, whole person health, wholism, etc.), which may cause confusion. The purpose of this paper was to present the analysis of “wholistic health care” using Rodgers’ Evolutionary Method. The method allows for the historical and social nature of “wholistic health care” and how it changes over time. Attributes, antecedents, and conse...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 19, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

What Mediates the Relationship Between Religious Service Attendance and Aspects of Well-Being?
Abstract Religious service attendance predicts increased well-being across a number of studies. It is not clear, however, whether this relationship is due to religious factors such as intrinsic religiosity or due to nonreligious factors such as social support or socially desirable responding. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between religious service attendance and well-being while simultaneously examining intrinsic religiosity, social support, and socially desirable responding as potential mediators of the relationship. A sample of 855 participants (71 % female, average age 19...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 19, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Embracing Ritual Healing: The Case of Sazuke in Tenrikyo in Contemporary Taiwan
Abstract This paper will explore how the practice of ritual healing (sazuke) has played a prominent part in the propagation of a Japanese new religious movement (Tenrikyo) in Taiwan. The author firstly unravels the mystery of Tenrikyo’s healing ritual (sazuke) and its role in enabling Taiwanese followers’ potential to re-establish their relationship with the world. The author points out that sazuke is similar to Taiwanese folk therapy and fits into Taiwan’s multi-medical systems. The author also examines the features of Tenrikyo’s healing practice in Taiwan and discusses the evolution of sa...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 18, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“Wake Up! HIV is at Your Door”: African American Faith Leaders in the Rural South and HIV Perceptions: A Qualitative Analysis
Abstract In Alabama, 70 % of new HIV cases are among African Americans. Because the Black Church plays an important role for many African Americans in the south, we conducted qualitative interviews with 10 African American pastors recruited for an HIV intervention study in rural Alabama. Two main themes emerged: (1) HIV stigma is prevalent and (2) the role of the Black Church in addressing HIV in the African American community. Our data suggest that pastors in rural Alabama are willing to be engaged in HIV prevention solutions; more formalized training is needed to decrease stigma, strengthen HIV prevention a...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 16, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Locating the Social Origins of Mental Illness: The Explanatory Models of Mental Illness Among Clergy from Different Ethnic and Faith Backgrounds
Abstract Clergy have historically provided ‘healing’ through various spiritual and medical modalities and even in modern, developed welfare economies they may still be an important help-seeking resource. Partnerships between religion and psychiatry are regularly advocated, but there is scant research on clergy explanatory models of illness. This paper aimed to explore their relationship with psychiatry and to examine how clergy in various faith groups conceptualised mental health problems. In this qualitative study using in-depth interviews, these issues were explored with 32 practising clergy in t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 13, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Editor’s Introduction to the Special Section “Re-centering and Re-entering: Positioning Islam in the Bioethical Discourse”
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 13, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Protective Role of Religious Involvement Against Depression and Suicidal Ideation Among Youth with Interpersonal Problems
This study examined religious involvement—private religious practices (PRP), organizational religiousness (OR), and religious support (RS)—in relation to depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation (SI) and its protective role, considering youths’ school and parent-family connectedness. Youth, ages 12–15 (n = 161), were screened for peer victimization, bullying perpetration, and low social connectedness, and assessed for depressive symptoms, SI, school connectedness, parent-family connectedness, and religious involvement. Results indicated PRP and RS were associated with lower levels of depr...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“It’s Like Backing up Science with Scripture”: Lessons Learned from the Implementation of HeartSmarts, a Faith-Based Cardiovascular Disease Health Education Program
Abstract African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by cardiovascular disease (CVD). Faith-based institutions provide a non-traditional route for health education targeted at African-Americans. This paper describes HeartSmarts, a faith-based CVD education program. Evidence-based literature was used to develop a curriculum, which was tailored by integrating biblical scripture representing aspects of health behaviors. Eighteen church peer-educators were recruited to participate in a 12-week training. They then disseminated the faith-based curriculum to members of their congregations. There were 199 participan...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 8, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Doctors Who Integrate Spirituality and CAM in the Clinic: The Puerto Rican Case
This article describes Puerto Rican physicians’ personal and clinical utilization of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), its effects, and use as they identified as either Spiritist, spiritual or religious. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 74 doctors in Puerto Rico. Major themes and relationships among them were charted using the qualitative data analysis program MAXQDA, open coding and grounded theory. Thirty-one doctors spoke of CAM and its use as related to their spiritual or religious perspectives. Spiritual or Spiritist doctors were more inclined than religious doctors to utilize CAM. See...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 6, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Effect of a Single Session of a Yogic Meditation Technique on Cognitive Performance in Medical Students: A Randomized Crossover Trial
Abstract Medical students confront enormous academic, psychosocial, and existential stress throughout their training, leading to a cascade of consequences both physically and psychologically. The declined cognitive function of these students interferes in their academic performance and excellence. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a yogic meditation technique, mind sound resonance technique (MSRT), on cognitive functions of University Medical students in a randomized, two-way crossover study. In total, 42 healthy volunteers of both genders (5 males and 37 females) with mean age of 19.44...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 5, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Muslims and Medical Ethics: Time to Move Forward by Going Back
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 4, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Suicide Paradigm: Insights from Ancient Hindu Scriptures
Abstract The world religions in general promote peace and happiness. They strongly discourage all sorts of violence in society including suicide. Religious commitments toward life-saving value are known to prevent suicide attempts since all world religions promote unity, reducing interpersonal hostilities. Therefore, understanding the basics on what religious scriptures narrate on life and death including suicide is essential. This paper highlights the seldom discussed topic on the concept and consequences of suicide portrayed in the ancient Hindu religious scriptures. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - February 2, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Influence of Religion and Ethnicity on Family Planning Approval: A Case for Women in Rural Western Kenya
Abstract The role of sociocultural factors such as religion and ethnicity in aiding or hampering family planning (FP) uptake in rural Western Kenya, a region with persistently high fertility rates, is not well established. We explored whether attitudes towards FP can be attributed to religious affiliation and/or ethnicity among women in the region. Findings show that religion and ethnicity have no impact; the most significant factors are level of education and knowledge about the benefits of FP for the mother. FP interventions ought to include strategies aimed at enhancing women’s knowledge about the positi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 14, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research