Developing a Culturally Competent Faith-Based Framework to Promote Breast Cancer Screening Among Afghan Immigrant Women
Abstract For the tens of thousands of Afghan immigrant women currently living in the USA, religious and cultural beliefs can act as a barrier to health care access. Islamic frameworks and men’s gatekeeping roles often control women’s decision-making power about their health care needs. Gatekeepers, however, can be reconceived as facilitators empowered to protect the well-being of the family, and positive messages within Islam can foster collaborative investment in women’s health. Drawing upon a pilot study utilizing community-based participatory research involving the largest Afghan community in...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 13, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion and Health: Anxiety, Religiosity, Meaning of Life and Mental Health
We examined the association among anxiety, religiosity, meaning of life and mental health in a nonclinical sample from a Chinese society. Four hundred fifty-one Taiwanese adults (150 males and 300 females) ranging in age from 17 to 73 years (M = 28.9, SD = 11.53) completed measures of Beck Anxiety Inventory, Medical Outcomes Study Health Survey, Perceived Stress Scale, Social Support Scale, and Personal Religiosity Scale (measuring religiosity and meaning of life). Meaning of life has a significant negative correlation with anxiety and a significant positive correlation with mental health and relig...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 13, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious, Ethical and Legal Considerations in End-of-Life Issues: Fundamental Requisites for Medical Decision Making
Abstract Religion and spirituality have always played a major and intervening role in a person’s life and health matters. With the influential development of patient autonomy and the right to self-determination, a patient’s religious affiliation constitutes a key component in medical decision making. This is particularly pertinent in issues involving end-of-life decisions such as withdrawing and withholding treatment, medical futility, nutritional feeding and do-not-resuscitate orders. These issues affect not only the patient’s values and beliefs, but also the family unit and members of the medic...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 10, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Differences in Self-Rated Health Among US Jews: Findings from Five Urban Population Surveys
In this study, data are analyzed from five urban surveys of Jews conducted since 2000: two surveys from New York (N = 4,533; N = 5,993) and one apiece from Chicago (N = 1,993), Philadelphia (N = 1,217), and Boston (N = 1,766). A strategy of two-way ANCOVA with interaction was used to test for differences in self-rated health across five categories of Jewish religious affiliation (secular, Reform, Reconstructionist, Conservative, Orthodox) and four categories of synagogue attendance (from never to at least weekly). Findings, adjusted for age and effects of other covariates, ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 9, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Effect of Holy Qur’an Recitation on Anxiety in Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial
Abstract Kidney disease and its related psychological costs have significantly increased in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Qur’an recitation on anxiety in hemodialysis patients. Sixty hemodialysis patients were randomized to either Qur’an recitation or a control group. Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was completed by patients at baseline and 1 month afterward. The intervention involved listening to the recitation of the Qur’an in traditional cantillation voice. The control group received no intervention. The data were analyzed us...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 6, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Soul of Medicine—Spiritual Perspectives and Clinical Practice John Peteet and Michael D’Ambra (eds); ISBN-10 1421402998, $47.50, Hardback
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - January 3, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity, Meaning in Life and Suicidal Tendency Among Jews
Abstract The study examines the impact that meaning in life, or lack thereof, has on suicidal tendencies among youth, as well as the nexus between level of religiosity, meaning in life and suicidal tendencies. Subjects were 450 students from both Jewish religious and Jewish secular schools aged 15–18. Findings: a significant and negative correlation was found between a sense of meaning in life and suicidal tendencies, beyond gender or level of religiosity. In addition, no difference was found in level of suicidal tendency between Jewish religious and Jewish secular youth; however, among Jewish religious teen...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 31, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Schizophrenia Patient or Spiritually Advanced Personality? A Qualitative Case Analysis
Abstract Many aspects of spiritual experience are similar in form and content to symptoms of psychosis. Both spiritually advanced people and patients suffering from psychopathology experience alterations in their sense of ‘self.’ Psychotic experiences originate from derangement of the personality, whereas spiritual experiences involve systematic thinning out of the selfish ego, allowing individual consciousness to merge into universal consciousness. Documented instances and case studies suggest possible confusion between the spiritually advanced and schizophrenia patients. Clinical practice contains no...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 28, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Clergy Wellness: An Assessment of Perceived Barriers to Achieving Healthier Lifestyles
This study sought to obtain a better understanding of how clergy view their health and to investigate their self-reported health status. Additionally, this study sought to explore personal and professional barriers among clergy to living a healthier life. An electronic 32-item survey was sent to all practicing clergy in Kansas East and West conferences of United Methodist church by the Kansas Area Office of the United Methodist Church. Survey items included participants’ demographic information and health conditions (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol). The self-reported general heal...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 25, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Living on the Societal Edge: India’s Transgender Realities
This article explores their past glories, present struggles and future ambitions in the world’s largest democracy. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 24, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The New Year
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 22, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: The Association of Religious Affiliation and Body Mass Index (BMI): An Analysis from the Health Survey for England
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 22, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Nutritional Concepts and Frequency of Foodstuffs Mentioned in the Holy Quran
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 22, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Role of Meaning in Life Within the Relations of Religious Coping and Psychological Well-Being
Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine whether meaning in life understood in terms of presence, search, and personal meaning is a mediator in the relationships between religious coping and psychological well-being. Associations of religiousness and psychological well-being are complex and suggest the existence of meaning and purpose in their internal structures. Two studies were conducted. In Study 1, presence of meaning in life was a mediator between negative coping and psychological well-being in the scope of a total score and all its dimensions. Search for meaning in life did not mediate the above re...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 19, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How Organ Donors are Different from Non-donors: Responsibility, Barriers, and Religious Involvement
Abstract To see if religious involvement, previously linked to various health behaviors, was linked to organ donation, 143 ethnically diverse undergraduates stated whether they were registered donors (53 % were), and completed measures of organ donation attitudes and religious involvement. Compared with non-donors, donors reported fewer barriers, more family responsibility, and more willingness to receive donor organs, but were not different in religious involvement. Even in 2014, when being a “good Samaritan” by agreeing to organ donation is as easy as checking one box on a driver’s license...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 19, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Embracing a Broad Spirituality in End of Life Discussions and Advance Care Planning
Abstract Advance care planning for end of life typically focuses on the mechanics of completing living wills and durable power of attorney documents. Even when spiritual aspects of end of life care are discussed, the dominant assumptions are those of traditional religious systems. A broad view of spirituality is needed, one that may involve traditional religious beliefs but also includes personal understandings of what is holy or sacred. Embracing this broad practice of spirituality will help both familial and professional caregivers honor an essential aspect of end of life discussions and promote greater discernm...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 18, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Physicians in the USA: Attendance, Beliefs and Patient Interactions
Abstract While much religion–health research depends on social support explanations, little is known about whether religious support is also a part of clinical interactions. How many physicians include religious/spiritual topics in clinical conversations? What characteristics are related to inclusion or avoidance? Using a national sample (n = 1,144), this study provides an overview of religious beliefs and practices of physicians in the USA and their patient interactions. Physician attendance rates are related to the inclusion of religious/spiritual topics, but the religious/spiritual orientati...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 17, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Lower Cancer Rates Among Druze Compared to Arab and Jewish Populations in Israel, 1999–2009
Abstract The Druze are a small ethnic minority in Israel amounting to about 130,000 residents (or 1.7 % of the total population of the country). Unlike other population groups, the Druze strive to keep their own traditions and marry mainly inside their own community. During the last decade, cancer morbidity among both Jews and Arabs in Israel has been increasing, while data on the Druze are little known and have not been analyzed and compared to other population groups to date. To compare cancer morbidity rates among Druze, Arabs and Jews in Israel during 1999–2009, gender-specific and age-standardized ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 17, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Faith Unravels: A Rabbi’s Struggle with Grief and God
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 17, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Doubt, Helping Others, and Psychological Well-Being
Abstract A growing body of research reveals that religious doubt may have a deleterious effect on well-being. However, relatively less is known about how people try to cope with doubt. The purpose of this study is to see whether providing tangible help to others offsets the effects of religious doubt on well-being. Findings from a nationwide survey of middle-aged and older adults indicate that helping strangers reduces the negative relationship between religious doubt and three indicators of well-being: self-esteem, life satisfaction, and optimism. But in contrast, similar dissonance reduction benefits were not pr...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 10, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relationship Between Sleep Quality and Spiritual Well-Being/Religious Activities in Muslim Women with Breast Cancer
Abstract For determining relationship between quality of sleep and spiritual well-being/religious activities in Muslim women with breast cancer (WBC), we conducted a cross-sectional study on 80 WBC who presented at all chemotherapy clinics in Qom, Iran, in 2012. We used Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), spiritual well-being scale (SWBS), and religious activities (RA) questionnaire. Global PSQI score and its seven components score were not significantly correlated with total score of SWBS and its two subscales. Global PSQI score was not significantly correlated with total score of RA questionnaire (P =&nb...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 9, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Prayer Attendance and General Health in the Iranian Adult Urban Population
In conclusion, the findings show that increasing the degree of people’s belief in prayer can lead to improve general health. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 9, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Critical Comprehensive Review of Religiosity and Anxiety Disorders in Adults
Abstract Over the past three decades, there has been increasing research with respect to the relation of religion and mental health disorders. Consequently, the current article aims to first provide a comprehensive literature review of the interplay between different domains of religiosity and a wide variety of categorical anxiety disorders in adults, and secondly, to uncover the major methodological flaws often yielding mixed, contradictory and unreliable results. The search was conducted using the PubMed/Medline database and included papers published between 1970 and 2012, under a rigorous set of inclusion/exclu...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - December 6, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Evolutionary Conceptual Analysis: Faith Community Nursing
Abstract The aim of the study was to report an evolutionary concept analysis of faith community nursing (FCN). FCN is a source of healthcare delivery in the USA which has grown in comprehensiveness and complexity. With increasing healthcare cost and a focus on access and prevention, FCN has extended beyond the physical walls of the faith community building. Faith communities and healthcare organizations invest in FCN and standardized training programs exist. Using Rodgers’ evolutionary analysis, the literature was examined for antecedents, attributes, and consequences of the concept. This design allows for ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Near-Death Experiences and Spiritual Well-Being
In this study, we examined spiritual well-being, using Paloutzian and Ellison’s Spiritual Well-Being Scale, among 224 persons who had come close to death. Participants who reported having near-death experiences reported greater spiritual well-being than those who did not, and depth of spiritual well-being was positively correlated with depth of near-death experience. We discussed the implications of these findings in light of other reported aftereffects of near-death experiences and of spiritual well-being among other populations. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Agency and the Annunciation
Abstract Prior research has revealed that when healthy participants, who are not artists, are asked to draw a person who is performing an action, they are more likely to position the agent on the left and the person or object receiving this action, the patient, on the right. Thus, the goal of this study was to learn whether in works of art, such as those portraying the Annunciation of the angel Gabriel to the Blessed Virgin Mary, artists would be more likely to place the angel, who is the agent, on the left of Mary, who is the patient. We found that in our sample of 604 paintings of the Annunciation by different ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity/Spirituality of German Doctors in Private Practice and Likelihood of Addressing R/S Issues with Patients
This study examined the self-assessed religiosity and spirituality (R/S) of a representative sample of German physicians in private practice (n = 414) and how this related to their addressing R/S issues with patients. The majority of physicians (49.3 %) reported a Protestant denomination, with the remainder indicating mainly either Catholic (12.5 %) or none (31.9 %). A significant proportion perceived themselves as either religious (42.8 %) or spiritual (29.0 %). Women were more likely to rate themselves R/S than did men. Women (compared to men) were also somewhat more likely to attend re...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Impact of Breast Cancer Knowledge and Attitudes on Screening and Early Detection Among an Immigrant Iranian Population in Southern California
Abstract Few studies explored factors influencing breast cancer screening and early detection behaviors among immigrant Iranian women residing in the USA. Using a cross-sectional survey, a convenience sample of 319 Iranian American women was selected to investigate the impact of breast cancer knowledge and attitude on screening. A self-administered questionnaire assessed breast cancer screening knowledge, attitude, and mammography use (ever, previous year, and future intention). 79 % of the women in the study reported ever receiving at least one mammogram and 74 % received a mammogram in the past year. ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion Benefiting Brain Tumour Patients: A Qualitative Study
This study aimed to determine whether religion as a coping mechanism was beneficial for patients before, during and after craniotomy. Qualitative case study methodology was used. Interviews were conducted with randomly selected 36 adult patients who underwent surgery for a benign or malignant brain tumour. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed, and the data subjected to thematic analysis. Four overarching themes emerged from the data: (1) religion significantly benefited neurosurgical patients; (2) neurosurgical patients did not require a dedicated religious room in the hospital; (3) neurosurgical patients require...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Impact of Religiosity and Individual Prayer Activities on Advanced Cancer Patients’ Health: Is There Any Difference in Function of Whether or Not Receiving Palliative Anti-neoplastic Therapy?
Abstract Consecutive patients (n = 221) presenting for initial consultation at a palliative care outpatient clinic were prospectively interviewed and then followed until death. Individual prayer activity (IPA) and global religion scores were associated with quality of life, symptoms, inflammatory markers, and survival. Analyses were adjusted for whether patients were still receiving anti-neoplastic therapies (ANTs) or not. Higher religion scores were associated with lower levels of inflammation in advanced cancer patients still undergoing ANTs. Additionally, higher IPA was an independent good prognostic...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“Trust in the Lord”: Religious and Spiritual Practices of African American Breast Cancer Survivors
This study explored how African American women cope with breast cancer through religious and spiritual practices. Forty-seven African American women who had completed treatment for breast cancer participated in in-depth interviews about their experiences. The majority of the women mentioned using both individual and communal religious and spiritual practices to cope with their breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. The main themes that emerged in terms of the types of religious and spiritual practices included: (1) attendance at religious services, (2) comfort through prayers of others, and (3) encouragement through readin...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

An Assessment of the Dynamic of Religious Ritualism in Sporting Environments
Abstract The main focus of this study is the analysis of the link between sport, leisure and the behavior, and phenomenon of religion. From the qualitative point of view of social anthropology, fieldwork has been carried out with different informers from different sporting environments. Rather than directly show the fieldwork itself, we have decided to present an interpretation of it through an analysis of the environments, behaviors, attitudes, the discourse of leisure and sport and its relationship with market forces, advertising and the media. In this regard, we point out a reality which for some people is the...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity and Religious Coping in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease: Change over Time and Associations with Illness Adjustment
Abstract Little is known about the longitudinal relationship between religiosity/spirituality (R/S) and patient physical and mental health in patients with cardiovascular disease. Forty-three patients with a first-time myocardial infarction or coronary artery revascularization bypass surgery completed measures of religiosity, religious coping, quality of life (QOL), and weight prior to a cardiac rehabilitation program and 1 and 2 years later. R/S changed over time; the direction of the change varied by type of R/S. Increases in religiosity were associated with increases in weight and QOL; increases in religi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (SCSORF): A Validation Study on Iranian Muslim Patients Undergoing Dialysis
Abstract The Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (SCSORF) is an often used and validated scale that is uncommonly utilized in culturally diverse populations. The purpose of this research investigation was to adapt the SCSORF for use among Iranian Muslim patients undergoing dialysis and to examine the reliability and validity of the scale among this population. A total of 428 patients (228 females, 200 males, M age = 52.2 years, SD = 10) were selected from five dialysis center in Tehran and Qazvin, Iran. A comprehensive forward–backward translation system was used f...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spirituality and Health Care in Iran: Time to Reconsider
This article investigates the role of spirituality in Iranian health care system and provides some guidelines to integrate spirituality in routine health care practice in Iran. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Babies Born Dying: Just Bad Karma? A Discussion Paper
Abstract The paper examines the notion of being born dying and karma. Karma is a belief upheld by Buddhists and non-Buddhists: That is, karma follows people from their previous lives into their current lives. This raises a difficult question: Does karma mean that a baby’s death is its own fault? While great peace can be found from a belief in karma, the notion of a baby’s karma returning in some sort of retributive, universal justice can be de-emphasized and is considered “un-Buddhist.” Having an understanding of karma is intrinsic to the spiritual care for the dying baby, not only from th...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Harvey Cushing, M.D., in His World
Abstract Harvey Cushing, M.D. (1869–1939), is the acknowledged father of the discipline of neurosurgery who inspired others to join him in this new field. He was a prolific researcher in the area of human growth disturbances. And he was among the most literary of doctors having won the Pulitzer Prize for his two-volume biography of his mentor and teacher William Osler, M.D. A driven man, he both inspired and intimidated others. This essay explores Cushing’s character and background along with his relationship to Osler. It seeks to understand why and how he may be considered a great figure in spite and...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Concerns About Schizophrenia or Possession?
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Poems in memoriam
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Pathologist’s Identity: An Insight
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: Evolutionary Conceptual Analysis: Faith Community Nursing
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Clerical Students with Respect to HIV/AIDS in Iran, 2011
In this study, knowledge and attitude of Iranian clerical students toward HIV and AIDS was assessed. Through a cross-sectional study, 367 clerical students were surveyed, in convenience sampling method, in the Qom seminary in 2011, utilizing a self-administered structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was piloted on 20 clerical student volunteers, internal consistency measured with Cronbach’s alpha was 0.89. Participants’ scores of knowledge and attitude were calculated out of 100. The level of knowledge in 37.33 % of participants was good (scores>80), whereas 46.05 and 16.62 % had moderate (40 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 26, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual and Religious Attitudes in Dealing with Illness in Polish Patients with Chronic Diseases: Validation of the Polish Version of the SpREUK Questionnaire
Abstract Although providing religious/spiritual (SpR) support to sick has received in Poland growing attention in the scientific literature, little has been written about how to measure whether patients are in search for SpR or may already have trust in such a resource helpful to cope with disease. The Polish version of the SpREUK questionnaire was validated in a sample of 275 patients with chronic diseases. Both explorative and confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the already established three subscales, i.e., Search, Trust, and Reflection, with good internal consistency coefficients (Cronbach’s α b...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 25, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Influence of Religious Coping and Religious Social Support on Health Behaviour, Health Status and Health Attitudes in a British Christian Sample
Abstract Previous research has established a relationship between religion and health. However, the specific aspects of religion which may influence health are not fully understood. The present study investigates the effect of religious social support and religious coping on health behaviours, health status and attitudes to health whilst controlling for age and non-religious social support. The results indicate religious coping and religious social support positively impact on self-reported current health status, depression, health outlook and resistance susceptibility. However, negative religious coping was predi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 25, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spirituality, Religion, and Health: The Role of Communication, Appraisals, and Coping for Individuals Living with Chronic Illness
Abstract Currently, 10 % of Americans are living with a chronic illness. One coping mechanism for individuals living with chronic illness is religion and/or spiritual (R/S). To better explicate the relationship among R/S and psychological well-being, we conceptualize R/S as an interpersonal process involving conversations that may facilitate positive reappraisals. We use a mixed-method approach from data collected from 106 participants, involving a content analysis of R/S conversations and test Burleson and Goldsmith’s (Handbook of communication and emotion: research, theory, applications, and contexts,...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 24, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Cross-Cultural Validation and Psychometric Properties of the Arabic Brief Religious Coping Scale (A-BRCS)
Abstract The aim of this study was to translate and validate the psychometric properties of an Arabic Brief Religious Coping Scale. A descriptive correlational design was used to conduct the study among participants of 403 Iraqi secondary school students. The A-BRCS and both the subscales, positive and negative, had Cronbach’s alphas of .70, .86 and .82, respectively. All inter-item and item-to-total correlations for each subscale were above the recommended criteria of .30. Factor loadings of the positive subscale using oblique (oblimin) and orthogonal (varimax) rotations ranged from .72 to .86 and from .71 ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 23, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

“Big Momma Had Sugar, Imma Have It Too” Medical Fatalism and the Language of Faith Among African–American Women in Memphis
Abstract This essay offers a theological exploration of the relationship between medical fatalism and religious belonging among African–American women in Memphis. Drawing on the work of black and womanist theologians and on conversations with participants in a diabetes intervention program administered by a faith-based community health provider, I argue that how we narrate the meanings of our bodies is irreducibly religious. The language we use to interpret and communicate the meaning of our bodily existence emerges from a set of assumptions, often unarticulated, about what is of ultimate value to us. The es...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 22, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion, Spirituality, or Existentiality in Bad News Interactions: The Perspectives and Practices of Physicians in India
Abstract A qualitative study was conducted to identify the role of religion, spirituality, or existentiality in clinical interactions. Grounded theory design was used to generate narrative data from 27 physicians working in four teaching hospitals in Karnataka, India, using a semi-structured interview schedule. Physicians reported that they explored religious, spiritual, and existential beliefs and practices of patients, along with other psychosocial and disease aspects, to assess their tolerance to bad news, to make decisions about delivering it, and to address the distress that might emerge from receiving bad ne...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 15, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Mediational Role of Psychological Basic Needs in the Relation Between Conception of God and Psychological Outcomes
Abstract Relatively few studies have examined the relationship between conception of God and psychological outcomes in a self-determination theory (SDT) framework. The aim of this study was to examine the role of basic psychological needs as a mediator of the association between conception of God and psychological outcomes. In a sample of 210 religious young adults, we found that the concept of a controlling God was positively associated with feelings of need frustration and depression, whilst the concept of an autonomy-supporting God was positively associated with feelings of need satisfaction and vitality. I...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 15, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Involvement and Health in Dialysis Patients in Saudi Arabia
We describe here the religious activities of dialysis patients in Saudi Arabia and determined demographic, psychosocial, and physical health correlates. We administered an in-person questionnaire to 310 dialysis patients (99.4 % Muslim) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, that included the Muslim Religiosity Scale, Structured Clinical Interview for Depression, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Global Assessment of Functioning scale, and other established measures of psychosocial and physical health. Bivariate and multivariate analyses identified characteristics of patients who were more religiously involved. Religious practices ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - October 15, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research