Perceived Discrimination and Major Depression and Generalized Anxiety Symptoms: In Muslim American College Students
AbstractPrior research has found that Muslim Americans ’ discrimination experiences are associated with increased risk of mental health problems. However, few studies have included Muslim American college students or identified moderators of this relationship. Among a sample of Muslim American college students (N = 141), the current study found that perceived discrimination was positively associated with MD and GAD symptom severity. Having a strong Muslim American identity exacerbated the relationship between perceived discrimination and GAD symptoms. The findings support practices to reduce discriminat...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Psychiatry, Cultural Competency, and the Care of Ultra-Orthodox Jews: Achieving Secular and Theocentric Convergence Through Introspection
AbstractSeveral socio-cultural factors complicate mental health care in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish population. These include societal stigma, fear of the influence of secular ideas, the need for rabbinic approval of the method and provider, and the notion that excessive concern with the self is counter-productive to religious growth. Little is known about how the religious beliefs of this population might be employed in therapeutic contexts. One potential point of convergence is the Jewish philosophical tradition of introspection as a means toward personal, interpersonal, and spiritual growth. We reviewed Jewish religious-p...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 4, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

American Muslim Physician Attitudes Toward Organ Donation
AbstractReligious beliefs and values impact Muslim patients' attitudes toward a variety of healthcare decisions, including organ donation. Muslim physician attitudes toward organ donation, however, are less well studied. Utilizing a national survey of physician members of the Islamic Medical Association of North America, relationships between religiosity, patterns of bioethics resource utilization, and sociodemographic characteristics with attitudes toward organ donation were assessed. Of 255 respondents, 251 answered the target question, “in your understanding, does Islamic bioethics and law permit organ donation?.&...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 3, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of the Lived Experience of Spiritual Conversion in a Neo-Charismatic Evangelical Context
AbstractHermeneutic phenomenology was used to illuminate the lived experience of posttraumatic, born-again conversion among members of a Neo-Charismatic Evangelical church (n = 11). Data were analyzed using a six-step process that yielded six core constituents: (1) Catalysts for transformation; (2) Courses of spiritual conversion; (3) Relationship with God; (4) Receiving the love of God; (5) Transformed by the love of God; (6) Changes in relationships. The essence o f the phenomenon was confident knowing. Methodological rigor was maximized via maintenance of an audit trail and memo-writing. Findings highlight...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 3, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Determination of the Personal Values of the University Students in Different Departments
AbstractThis research aims to examine the personal values of the first-year university students studying in different departments. This is a descriptive cross-sectional survey study. Research population is composed of first-grade students approving to participate and studying in the Nursing Department in the School of Health, Biology Department in the Faculty of Science and Letters and the Department of Early Childhood Education in the Faculty of Education of Uluda ğ University. “Student Information Form” and “Schwartz Values Inventory” were used for data collection. When the values inventory is ex...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - August 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion and Life Satisfaction: A Correlational Study of Undergraduate Students in Trinidad
AbstractReligious behaviour tends to correlate positively with life satisfaction. The predictive power of this relationship is associated with various socio-demographic factors such as age, gender and religious affiliation. We investigated the relationship between religious involvement and life satisfaction in a multi-religious population of undergraduate medical students of the University of the West Indies. We used a cross-sectional design to assess 228 undergraduates (50 males and 178 females) on religiosity, religious well-being and life satisfaction using the Religious Orientation Test, Religious Well-Being subscale a...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Well-Being and Psychological Adjustment: Mediated by Interpersonal Needs?
This study provides the first examination of the role of thwarted interpersonal needs on the link between spiritual well-being and negative psychological outcomes. Spiritual well-being serves a protective role against feelings of social isolation, which may re duce one’s risk of negative psychological outcomes. Treatments that bolster a sense of spirituality and social connectedness may reduce suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Leading God ’s People: Perceptions of Influence Among African–American Pastors
AbstractReligious leaders, particularly African –American pastors, are believed to play a key role in addressing health disparities. Despite the role African–American pastors may play in improving health, there is limited research on pastoral influence. The purpose of this study was to examine African–American pastors’ perceptions of thei r influence in their churches and communities. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 African–American pastors and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Three themes emerged: the historical role of the church; influence as contextual, with pastors us...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Extending Awareness of Catholic Healthcare Ethics Among Junior Clinicians: A Qualitative Study
This study examined junior staff ’s understanding of Catholic ethics. Using a qualitative descriptive design, we recruited 22 medical and nursing staff to interviews/focus groups. Though Catholic ethics seldom informed ethical approaches, the principles were acknowledged as being useful to support development of confident and res pectful care approaches. Findings provide early insights into challenges faced in considering implementation of ethical codes across both secular and religious healthcare organizations, suggesting that a more creative and pastoral approach to dialoguing and implementing Catholic ethics is re...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Brand ’s PREACH Survey: A Capacity Assessment Tool for P redicting R eadiness to E ngage A frican American C hurches in H ealth
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to develop the Brand ’s PREACH (PredictingReadiness toEngageAfrican AmericanChurches inHealth) Survey, a capacity assessment tool based on the Brand ’s PREACH Model to predict the readiness of African American (AA) churches to engage in health promotion programming (HPP). The survey assessed church infrastructure (physical structure, personnel, funding, and cultural/social support), frequency of HPP and readiness to engage in HPP. The survey w as administered to 108 AA churches in Illinois and North Carolina. The study findings revealed that churches with more infrastructur...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Building Capacity Among Laity: A Faith-Based Health Ministry Initiative
AbstractA systematic review of topic-specific faith-based health programs determined that health outcomes can be improved though faith-based health interventions. A university research team, in partnership with the Kansas United Methodist Church and a United Methodist philanthropy, facilitated planning and development of a statewide initiative to increase the capacity of laity-led health ministry teams. The purpose of this paper is to describe the processes utilized to design and implement an initiative to increase capacity for laity-led comprehensive health ministry among Kansas United Methodist Church congregations and t...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Depressive Symptoms and Tobacco Use: Does Religious Orientation Play a Protective Role?
This study utilized a cross-sectional data collection strategy to examine the relationship among depressive symptoms, religious orientation, and tobacco use among undergraduate students (N = 349) at a midsize southeastern university. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Extrinsic/Intrinsic Religious Orientation Scale-Revised and the Drinking and Drug Habits Questionnaire. Analyses using hierarchical linear re gression indicate a significant interaction effect (depressive symptoms × extrinsic religious orientation) on tobacco...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Revalidation of the Sat - Chit - Ananda Scale
AbstractSat-Chit-Ananda is an indigenous construct that refers to absolute bliss and consciousness. The present study aimed to strengthen the psychometric properties of the newly developedSat-Chit-Ananda scale (Singh et al. in Int J Vedic Found Manag 1(2):54 –74,2014). A total of 398 students aged 17 –36 years (mean age = 21.33 years, SD = 2.2, 70% males) participated in this study. An exploratory as well as confirmatory factor analysis was computed for the 17-item scale. Its’ concurrent validity was established by assessing its correlation with other well-being measures, nam...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity as a Substance Use Protective Factor Among Female College Students
This study contributes to knowledge about religiosity and college student substance use, and it provides useful information for their mental health and well-being. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The System of Belief Inventory: A Validation Study in Turkish Cancer Patients
This study was conducted with the purpose of assessing validity and reliability of the System of belief inventory, which was developed to evaluate the System of belief inventory of cancer patients in Turkish society. In the present study, the result of the KMO test was determined to be 0.71, and that of Bartlett ’s test was 988.269; both tests were observed to be significant atp 
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Coping Mechanisms and Strategies of Hypertension Patients in Ghana: The Role of Religious Faith, Beliefs and Practices
AbstractThis qualitative study explored the role of religious faith, belief and practice systems in the coping mechanisms and strategies of essential hypertension patients in Accra, Ghana. Six participants were recruited for participation, of which five were Christians and one was a Muslim. Interviews were conducted and interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the data. Results showed that participants used their religious faith, beliefs and practices as coping resources. Participants used a deferring-collaborative style of religious coping, which seemed to have provided them with an avoidance strategy ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Sources of Care for Alcohol and Other Drug Problems: The Role of the African American Church
AbstractAfrican Americans experience significant disparities in treatment access, retention, and quality of care for alcohol and drug use (AOD) problems. Religious congregations, often the first point of contact for help with AOD problems, can play an integral role in improving access to treatment. However, little is known about the role of African American churches in addressing AOD problems. We administered a survey to a faith-based collaborative of 169 African American churches in Los Angeles to examine how AOD problems are identified in congregations, the types of support provided, barriers to providing treatment refer...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Correction to: The Impact of Religiosity on Substance Abuse and Obesity in African Americans
AbstractThe original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake in the author names. The co-author names should be David Meetze and Ronald Whicker Jr. instead of David Meetz and Ronald Wicker. The original article has been corrected. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Erratum to: The Brand ’s PREACH Survey: A Capacity Assessment Tool for P redicting R eadiness to E ngage A frican American C hurches in H ealth
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Correction to: Religiosity and Health-Related Quality of Life: A Cross-Sectional Study on Filipino Christian Hemodialysis Patients
The authors regret that the following error occurred in the original publication of the article. The corrected text has been presented with this erratum. In the Ethical Consideration section, the first statement, “The hospital’s research ethics committee granted permission to conduct the study” should read “The hospital’s administration granted permission to conduct the study.” (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiousness and Diseases in Europe: Findings from SHARE
AbstractRecent research in religiousness and health suggests that epidemiological forces can have opposed effects. Here we examine two forms of religiousness and their association with disease. We performed a cross-sectional study of 23,864 people aged 50+ included in wave 1 (2004 –2005) of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe and a longitudinal study including people from wave 1, who were followed up during 11 years. Results suggested that taking part in a religious organization was associated with lower odds of heart attack (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.60, 0.90), stroke (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.50, 0.95), and...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Putting the Spirit into Culturally Responsive Public Health: Explaining Mass Fainting in Cambodia
AbstractThe study explores the cultural and religious meaning behind episodes of mass fainting sweeping through garment factories in Cambodia. An ethnographic study was conducted at 20 garment factories in Kandal, Preah Sihanouk, Kampong Cham, Kampong Speu, Takeo, and Kampong Chhnang provinces. Informants were 50 women who fainted or possessed and their families, factory and clinic staff, and monks. Informants described their views on the causes of the mass fainting. Based on the informants ’ views, the seeds were sown when factories were built on former Khmer Rouge killing fields, when local guardian spirits were di...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity and Subjective Well-Being of the Central and Eastern European ’s Elderly Population
AbstractThe paper examines the relation between religiosity and cognitive appraisal of the subjective well-being of the Central and Eastern European ’s elderly population. The first part of the paper is dedicated to examining of the scientific literature. In the second part, the authors explore the data basis corresponding to the 6th wave of World Value Survey. The authors use the heterogeneous correlation and the multi-linear regression analy sis in order to explain the relation between religiosity and subjective well-being of the old aged. Our results suggest that in the case of the Central Eastern European elderly...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

How the Process of the CSR Activities Works on Private Hospitals and Pharmaceutical Firms: Multiple Case Study from Strategic Perspective
AbstractThe phenomenon of corporate social responsibility “CSR” has stimulated lots of debates and disagreement among the business scholars. One of the most howling sounds comes from strategy and CSR thinkers. Strategic thinkers of this debate believe that CSR is not only an accountability action but also it is countability action. Due to this countabi lity action heavily based on profit, the scholar of strategy field stated that strategic thinking lens should revise the phenomenon of CSR and the result of its activities. To this end in this study, we examine the CSR activities, especially philanthropy activiti...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 23, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Relationship Between Care Burden and Religious Beliefs Among Family Caregivers of Mentally Ill Patients
AbstractFamilies are considered as primary sources of care for individuals suffering from mental disorders. However, one of the major stresses in families is the infliction of a family member with mental illnesses causing dysfunction in health dimensions or generally their quality of life. Currently, most experts believe that religion can affect physical health and other aspects of human life. So, the aim of this study was to investigate “the relationship between care burden and religious beliefs among family caregivers of mentally ill patients.” This cross-sectional study was carried out in Iran on 152 familie...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 23, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Effects of Religion and Locus of Control on Perception of Mental Illness
AbstractThe study investigated the influence of religion and locus of control on perception of mental illness. Specifically, the study explored the relationship between religiosity and perception of mental illness, differences in perception by internals and externals, the effect of knowledge on perception of mental illness and the interactive effect of religiosity and locus of control on perception of mental illness. Data were collected from 200 participants in the Volta Region of Ghana. Three hypotheses were tested in the study using a battery of tests. It was observed that people with internal locus of control perceive m...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 23, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Neuroscience and Brain Death Controversies: The Elephant in the Room
AbstractThe conception and the determination of brain death continue to raise scientific, legal, philosophical, and religious controversies. While both the President ’s Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research in 1981 and the President’s Council on Bioethics in 2008 committed to a biological definition of death as the basis for the whole-brain death criteria, contemporary neuroscientific findings augment the concerns about the validity of this biological definition. Neuroscientific evidentiary findings, however, have not yet permeated discussions about brai...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Attitudes of Nurses in Turkey Toward Care of Dying Individual and the Associated Religious and Cultural Factors
AbstractThe aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of nurses working in two university hospitals located in the west and east of Turkey toward care of dying individual as well as religious and cultural factors that influence their attitudes. The descriptive and comparative study was conducted with a total of 189 nurses who were working in adult inpatient clinics of two university hospitals in western (101 nurses) and eastern (88 nurses) Turkey between July and November 2016. The data were obtained by using the questionnaire and Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying Scale. As a result of this study, it was d...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Editorial
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The African Indigenous Lens of Understanding Spirituality: Reflection on Key Emerging Concepts from a Reviewed Literature
AbstractIn this paper, we will present a reflection on reviewed literature on African indigenous understanding of spirituality, highlighting the influence of this concept on notions of the self, motivation and well-being. The indigenous understanding of spirituality is central to the understanding of the self as distinct, but positioned within the relational –collective self. This African indigenous perception of the self is grounded within the autonomous experience of the tenets of spirituality, which is explored in this paper through the lens of self-determination theory. The experience of autonomy, which is repres...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 16, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Toward a Framework for Islamic Psychology and Psychotherapy: An Islamic Model of the Soul
AbstractA uniquely Islamic theoretical framework for an Islamic psychology has yet to be established. To do so requires that we understand how human beings are conceptualized within the cosmology that characterizes the Islamic tradition. This paper presents a model of the soul from within an Islamic paradigm, generated through a grounded theory analysis of interviews with 18 key informants with relevant academic or religious expertise. The model elaborates aspects of a mechanism for the development of the soul that constitutes a potential foundation for an Islamic theory of human psychology and has particular relevance for...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 15, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion, Culture and Meaning-Making Coping: A Study Among Cancer Patients in Malaysia
AbstractThe present study aimed to explore the use of meaning-making coping mechanisms (existential, spiritual and religious coping) among ethnic Malay cancer patients in Malaysia and to investigate the impact of culture on their choice of coping methods. Twenty-nine participants with various kinds of cancer were interviewed. Four kinds of coping resources emerged from analyses of the interview transcripts: (1) relying on transcendent power, (2) supernatural or mystical beliefs, (3) finding oneself in relationships with others and (4) nature. In this article, the two first resources are in focus. The present findings sugge...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Impact of Hajj on Global Health Security
Abstract With the human society transfers from scattered pieces to a society as a whole and the advent of the aviation era, the occurrence of infectious diseases and their diffusion have led to international health security issues. As the world ’s largest and irrevocable annual transnational religious movement, the Hajj and its connection with health security concerns have caught attention since the ancient times, because a huge population from all over the world gathers in the holy city of Mecca, which has tropical arid climate. Current ly, the international community and international organizations are implementi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 12, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Islam and Motivation to Quit Smoking: Public Health Policy Implications
AbstractIn the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office some 14  years ago, a ‘religiously inspired approach’ was proposed to combat tobacco use. This promoted a useful debate in the region. The purpose of this paper is to argue the need to identify the role which Islamic beliefs and teachings play (1) in influencing individual motivation to quit smoking an d (2) in gaining support for public policies to reduce smoking. Ramadan andHajj are taken as key points. These, it is argued, are times when Muslim religious motivation to abstain from smoking is strongest. This paper concludes that there is an insuffi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 12, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Health Promotion Needs in Faith-Based Organizations: Perceptions of Religious Leaders in Bamako
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to explore imams ’ and pastors’ perspectives of the health promotion needs of congregants in Bamako, Mali and to examine the physical environment for health promotion in faith-based organizations’ (FBOs). In-depth one-on-one interviews were conducted with imams (n = 10) and pastors (n = 2) as well as observations of the physical environment in FBOs in Bamako, Mali. Data were analyzed using a content analysis approach guided by the social ecological model. Leaders frequently mentioned poverty and affordability as challenges perceived by cong...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 12, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Opinions and Expectations of Muslim Donors ’ Relatives Deciding Organ Donation: The Sample of Istanbul
AbstractThe low rate of consent by relatives of potential donors especially in Muslim majority countries is one of the basic limiting factors of the success of organ transplantation. Therefore, this study aimed to explore opinions and expectations of relatives after donating their beloved ones ’ organs on a Muslim sample in Istanbul Region. Descriptive method was used. Data were collected from 82 of 95 Muslim donor relatives who agreed to participate in the study between the March and July 2014 via telephone calls. It was found that most of the relatives had donated the organs of their relatives for “keeping al...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 9, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Self-Care in Iranian Cancer Patients: The Role of Religious Coping
This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between religious coping and self-care in a sample of Iranian cancer patients. In this cross-sectional study (October –December, 2015), 380 cancer patients were entered into the study using non random sampling (accessible sampling). Data were collected using socio-demographic, religious coping (R-COPE), and self-care questionnaires. Male patients (48.39 ± 13.39; 95% CI 46.41–50.38) were older than the fema les patients (45.33 ± 18.44; 95% CI 42.79–47.87). The findings indicated that there was a significant c...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Training Community Clergy in Serious Illness: Balancing Faith and Medicine
The objective of this study was used to identify best practices in an EOL training program for community clergy. As part of the National Clergy Project on End-of-Life Care, the project conducted key informant interviews and focus groups with active clergy in five US states (California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, and Texas). A diverse purposive sample of 35 active clergy representing pre-identified racial, educational, theological, and denominational categories hypothesized to be associated with more intensive utilization of medical care at the EOL. We assessed suggested curriculum structure and content for clergy E...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Influence of Physicians ’ Beliefs on Propensity to Include Religion/Spirituality in Patient Interactions
This study examines physicians ’ beliefs, their perceptions of whether religion impacts health outcomes, and their propensity to discuss religion/spirituality with patients. It is not uncommon for patients to want religious/spiritual conversations, but the occurrence is infrequent. This study adds to knowledge regarding which p hysicians include these topics. Using a nationally representative sample of physicians and a mediated bi-factor structural equation model, the author finds that “religious and spiritual” physicians connect religion and patient health more than other religious/spiritual orientations...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religion, Culture and Meaning-Making Coping: A Study Among Cancer Patients in Turkey
AbstractThe present paper looks at the influence of culture on Turkish cancer patients ’ use of meaning-making coping, paying particular attention to religious, spiritual, and existential coping methods. Data were collected using an interview study (n = 25, 18 women, age range 20–71). Individuals were recruited at an oncology center and a psychiatry clinic in Istanbul. The main focus of the study has been on existential meaning-making coping, which is characterized by finding power inside oneself, altruism, family love, a search for meanin g by contemplating philosophical issues, and having a posi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 5, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity and Coping: Racial Stigma and Psychological Well-Being among African American Girls
This study examined how having a relationship with God served as a protective factor between racial stigma beliefs and psychological well-being. A church sample of African American adolescent girls (N  =  117,Mage=  15) completed measures on racial stigma, psychological well-being, and reports on having a relationship with God. After controlling for adolescent age, family income, and church attendance, positive racial beliefs and having a relationship with God were associated with a healthier psychological w ell-being. Findings also revealed that having a relationship with God and internalizing healthi...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 2, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

The Relationship of Spirituality Development and Addiction Potential Among Students of Qom University of Medical Sciences
AbstractDrug abuse is one of the problems of the world which due to the specific characteristics of individual, social and personality causes irreparable difficult. The aim of this study was the investigation of the relationship between the spirituality development and addiction potential among students of Qom University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This cross-sectional study was performed in Qom University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from February 2015 to July 2016 which accommodates 250 subjects that were selected through systematic random sampling. Data collection tools were demographic, spiritual attitude and addiction po...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religious Affiliation Influences on the Health Status and Behaviours of Students Attending Seventh-Day Adventist Schools in Australia
AbstractStudents attending Seventh-day Adventist (Adventist) schools in Australia have been shown to have better health status and behaviours compared to secular norms, yet these schools cater for a high percentage of non-Adventist students. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of religious affiliation (Adventist/non-Adventist) on the health status and behaviours of students attending Adventist secondary schools in Australia. The sample included 1734 students who responded to a health and lifestyle survey that captured demographic details, self-reported height and weight, self-reported health status, ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritist Hospital Chaplaincy in Brazil: 5  Years of Documented Experience
This article describes the importance of historical interconnections from the advent of spiritism in the world and its introduction in Brazil to the emergence of Spiritist Hospital Chaplaincy in our country and presents the documented experience over 5 years of spiritist chaplain care, in the period from 2012 to 2016, guided by the SMA of Piracicaba at the Unimed Hospital of Piraci caba (São Paulo). We documented 41,914 visits to 13,983 inpatients and an analysis of these records allowed us to reflect on the importance of this service and confirm its expansion and acceptance by different contemporary religious ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Considering Weight Loss Programs and Public Health Partnerships in American Evangelical Protestant Churches
AbstractThe obesity epidemic is a critical public health threat facing the USA. With the advent of American Evangelical Protestant (AEP) weight loss guides and narratives, AEP churches could potentially aid public health agencies in combatting obesity, and some scholars have called for investment in partnerships between public health agencies and religious institutions. This paper examines the theological and social underpinnings of AEP weight loss programs and considers the potential benefits and risks of public health partnerships with AEP churches to combat obesity. While AEP churches may be successful at empowering peo...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spiritual Openness, Revisiting a Potentially Important Aspect of Spirituality: Scale Review and Revision
AbstractReligiousness and spirituality (R/S) exert important influences on individuals across a range of domains. Spiritual Openness is theoretically linked with the personality trait of Openness to Experience, suggesting promise for future research. Using responses from 366 undergraduates on the Spiritual Experience Index-Revised (SEI-R: subscales of Spiritual Openness and Spiritual Support), analyses evaluated and revised the SEI-R, deleting poor items and generating a 10-item measure. The new SEI-S exhibits better psychometric properties and reduced participant burden, and subscales displayed a curvilinear relationship ...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Exploring Relationship Between Spiritual Intelligence, Religiosity and Life Satisfaction Among Elderly Pakistani Muslims
This study is an effort to explore the relationship between spiritual intelligence, religiosity and life satisfaction in elderly Pakistani Muslims. A non-probability purposive sampling technique is utilized in order to recruit a sample of 100 elderly people (n = 50 men;n = 50 = women). Standardized questionnaires were used for collecting data. Data analysis was carried out using Pearson product–moment correlation analysis and independent samplet test. Findings revealed a significant correlation between spiritual intelligence, religiosity and life satisfaction among Pakistani elderly Musl...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Religiosity, Gender, and Natural Disasters: A Qualitative Study of Disaster-Stricken Regions in Iran
AbstractWhile religiosity is emerging as one of the more important subjects in disaster management, identifying gender differences in using religion as a coping method has attracted very little attention. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of religiosity on disaster-affected women and men in the setting of Iran. A field-based investigation using a qualitative approach was carried out to achieve the study ’s purpose. Data were collected using in-depth unstructured interviews with 25 participants who had been damaged by recent disasters. Two themes, negative and positive effects of religiosity, and five c...
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

Spirituality/Religiosity (SpR), Leisure-Time Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviour in Students at a Catholic University
This study explores whether SpR is linked to physical activity whilst young, which in turn is linked to long-term cardiovascular health. Students at a Catholic University in Australia completed a survey combining the SpREUK-P SF 17 SpR questionnaire with elements of the long-form 7-day recall International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Respondents who scored highly in the unconventional spiritual practices components of SpREUK-P engaged in moderate intensity physical activity more frequently. This finding may have implications for health promotion. (Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research

A forgotten freudian: the passion of karl stern
(Source: Journal of Religion and Health)
Source: Journal of Religion and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research