Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

The Most Promising Cancer-Fighter In Years

For a while now, I’ve been recommending a powerful antioxidant with the unpronounceable name, pyrroloquinoline quinine – or PQQ for short. And although I recommend this compound to almost everyone who comes to see me at my wellness clinic in South Florida because of its energy-giving qualities, I’ve also observed its extraordinary power to fight cancer. For years, I’ve seen PQQ work wonders with my older patients, because it keeps you feeling young by giving your cells extra energy. PQQ was first discovered back in 1979 by a team of Japanese scientists, who knew little about the substance, except that it seemed to play some role in ensuring the propagation of our species. Then further research revealed the impact of PQQ on the output of energy from mitochondria, the microscopic power plants inside each of your cells. Since, researchers have discovered many important roles of PQQ on the body’s cellular processes – but the understanding is not yet complete. PQQ has even been discovered in interstellar stardust, which has led some scientists to theorize about its role in the evolution of life on Earth. In one study, PQQ prevented a significant number of heart cells from self-destructing when scientists deprived them of oxygen and glucose.1 In another study, researchers applied toxic hydrogen peroxide to cells taken from the jelly-like core of the spine. And a significant number of cells were saved by doses of PQQ.2 In yet another study, resear...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging antioxidants Cancer energy Source Type: news

Related Links:

Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This test is a cheaper and less invasive alternative to an upper endoscopy.
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
In this study, chitosan was used to coat the adsorbent for preventing the leakage of Zn2+ loaded. Meanwhile, freeze-drying method was used to enhance adsorption capacity of Zn2+-loaded cellulose beads for testosterone. The results indicate that after the adsorbent was coated by 0.02% chitosan solution, the highest adsorption percentage reached 48%, during adsorption, the Zn2+ concentration in plasma did not increase; the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent can be significantly enhanced by freeze-drying. The results may be caused by porosity of the adsorbent enlarged via freeze-drying and improved stability by coating with...
Source: Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Tags: Artif Cells Nanomed Biotechnol Source Type: research
A modern blend of yoga, Zen Buddhism, hypnosis and psychology, it ’s huge on the continent and it’s on its way hereMindfulness is the tried-and-tested tool of our times for anxiety, depression, chronic pain, addiction and more, but what if it ’s not your thing? For those too twitchy to sit still and focus on breathing, the ubiquitous mindfulness apps, self-help sheets and courses in schools and workplaces are little more than totems of uselessness. But you wouldn’t have this problem if you lived in France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland o r Portugal, because you’d be doing sophrology instead. It&rs...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news
BOWEL cancer symptoms include stomach pain, a change in bowel habits, and finding blood in your stool. You could reveal your risk of the cancer by checking your poo after using the toilet. Should a healthy poo sink or float?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This is a fishy recommendation from the AHA. And here's the type of fish that's better for your heart.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 19 May 2018 Source:Seminars in Cancer Biology Author(s): George Cyriac, Leena Gandhi Immune checkpoint inhibition with anti-PD-1 therapy has been notably successful in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and changed standard practice in multiple settings. However, despite some durable benefits seen, the majority of unselected patients with NSCLC fail to respond to checkpoint inhibitors. Patient selection is crucial and will become even more important in the development of combination therapies with immune checkpoint inhibitors. PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) has emerged as...
Source: Seminars in Cancer Biology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In conclusion, the analyses do not permit us to predict the trajectory that maximum lifespans will follow in the future, and hence provide no support for their central claim that the maximum lifespan of humans is "fixed and subject to natural constraints". This is largely a product of the limited data available for analysis, owing to the challenges inherent in collecting and verifying the lifespans of extremely long-lived individuals. A reply from Jan Vijg's research group The authors of the accompanying comment disagree with our finding of a limit to human lifespan. Although we thank them for a...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study is the first to show that downregulation of PAPP-A expression in adult mice can significantly extend life span. Importantly, this beneficial longevity phenotype is distinct from the dwarfism of long-lived PAPP-A KO, Ames dwarf, Snell dwarf and growth hormone receptor (GHR) KO mice with germ-line mutations. Thus, downregulation of PAPP-A expression joins other treatment regimens, such as resveratrol, rapamycin and dietary restriction, which can extend life span when started in mice as adults. In a recent study, inducible knockdown of the GHR in young adult female mice increased maximal, but not median, lif...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study assessed the prevalence of grey hair in patients with coronary artery disease and whether it was an independent risk marker of disease. This was a prospective, observational study which included 545 adult men who underwent multi-slice computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography for suspected coronary artery disease. Patients were divided into subgroups according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease, and the amount of grey/white hair. The amount of grey hair was graded using the hair whitening score: 1 = pure black hair, 2 = black more than white, 3 = black equals white, 4 = white more t...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
More News: Alzheimer's | Biochemistry | Brain | Brain Cancers | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer Therapy | Cardiology | Complementary Medicine | Depression | Genetics | Health | Heart | Heart Attack | Kiwi | Learning | Mitochondria | Mitochondrial Disease | Neurology | Neurosurgery | Nutrition | Parkinson's Disease | Peppers | Plastic Surgery | Soya | Stroke | Study | Suicide | Toxicology | Universities & Medical Training | Vitamins