Researchers solve decades old mitochondrial mystery that could lead to new disease treatments
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine researchers have solved a decades old mystery around a key molecule fueling the power plant of cells that could be exploited to find new ways to treat diseases, from neurodegenerative disorders to cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 9, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Single-cell analysis provides new insights into mitochondrial diseases
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have made discoveries at the single cell level to uncover new details concerning mitochondrial diseases-- inherited disorders that interfere with energy production in the body and currently have no cure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Are Common Fatty Acid Oxidation Metabolic Disorders?
Discussion All cells and particularly their mitochondria need an energy source. Glucose is one of the most common ones, but also fatty acids, lactate, pyruvate, ketones, and amino acids. Fatty acids are formed with a carboxylic acid with a long aliphatic carbon chain usually with even numbers of carbon atoms (usually 4-28 most commonly). Most are unbranched and in foods are usually found in the form of esters. Fatty acids are important energy sources for the heart (50-70%) but also skeletal muscle where resting muscle uses both glucose and fatty acids. During fasting or increased stress fatty acids become a major source o...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 27, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Neural vulnerability in Huntington's disease tied to release of mitochondrial RNA
(Picower Institute at MIT) A uniquely comprehensive survey of gene expression by cell type in humans and mice revealed several deficits affecting the most vulnerable neurons in Huntigton's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New connections: Flux and distance in Ca2+ signaling
Understanding ER-to-mitochondrial Ca2+ flux may provide ways to correct mitochondrial dysfunction in various diseases. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wong, W. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Scientists pinpoint surprising new function for histones
FINDINGSUCLA scientists have identified a new function for histones, the spool-shaped proteins that regulate gene expression and help pack long strands of DNA into cells. The resulting matrix, called chromatin, provides the structural foundation for chromosomes.In a surprising finding thatreceived more than 1,400 “likes” and more than 600 shares on Twitter within the first several days after the study was published, the researchers discovered that histones also function asenzymes that convertcopper into a form that can be used by the body ’s cells.Scientists had assumed that copper spontaneously converted...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 9, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

First successful delivery of mitochondria to liver cells in animals
(University of Connecticut) This experiment marks the first time researchers have ever successfully introduced mitochondria into specific cells in living animals. The study lays the groundwork to address a serious gap in treatment for liver diseases and may even eventually be used to treat other maladies throughout the body affected by mitochondrial malfunction or damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Quantifying the building blocks of DNA is now easier thanks to a novel technique
(University of Helsinki) A highly sensitive and easy-to-use technique applicable for tissue samples can be useful, for example, to researchers specialised in mitochondrial diseases and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New technique allows scientists to measure mitochondrial respiration in frozen tissue
FINDINGSScientists led by Dr. Orian Shirihai, director of themetabolism theme at theDavidGeffen School of Medicine at UCLA,have developed a method for restoring oxygen-consumption activity to previously frozen mitochondria samples, even years after they have been collected. The process of freezing and thawing mitochondria depresses their oxygen consumption and, until now, has hindered researchers ’ ability to accurately carry out large-scale studies examining the crucial role of mitochondria in both health and disease.BACKGROUNDThe mitochondria in our cells consume 90% of the oxygen we breathe and use that oxygen to ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 22, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

T cells with dysfunctional mitochondria induce multimorbidity and premature senescence
The effect of immunometabolism on age-associated diseases remains uncertain. In this work, we show that T cells with dysfunctional mitochondria owing to mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) deficiency act as accelerators of senescence. In mice, these cells instigate multiple aging-related features, including metabolic, cognitive, physical, and cardiovascular alterations, which together result in premature death. T cell metabolic failure induces the accumulation of circulating cytokines, which resembles the chronic inflammation that is characteristic of aging ("inflammaging"). This cytokine storm itself act...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Desdin-Mico, G., Soto-Heredero, G., Aranda, J. F., Oller, J., Carrasco, E., Gabande-Rodriguez, E., Blanco, E. M., Alfranca, A., Cusso, L., Desco, M., Ibanez, B., Gortazar, A. R., Fernandez-Marcos, P., Navarro, M. N., Hernaez, B., Alcami, A., Baixauli, F., Tags: Immunology, Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Study reveals importance of mitochondrial small proteins in energy production
(Duke-NUS Medical School) A small mitochondrial protein is necessary for energy production and its malfunction could be behind a range of degenerative diseases, according to study by Duke-NUS Medical School and their collaborators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Neurons' energy organelle protected from damage linked to ALS, Alzheimer's
(Scripps Research Institute) Mitochondrial damage is increasingly recognized as a key factor underlying neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and ALS. A new screening platform has identified a set of drug-like compounds that may protect them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stealth Bio's neuromuscular disorder drug fails trial; shares plummet
Stealth BioTherapeutics Corp's shares crashed on Friday after its lead neuromuscular disorder drug candidate failed to help patients walk better and reduce fatigue, a major setback to the company's wide mitochondrial diseases pipeline. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

VDAC oligomers form mitochondrial pores to release mtDNA fragments and promote lupus-like disease
Mitochondrial stress releases mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the cytosol, thereby triggering the type I interferon (IFN) response. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, which is required for mtDNA release, has been extensively studied in apoptotic cells, but little is known about its role in live cells. We found that oxidatively stressed mitochondria release short mtDNA fragments via pores formed by the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) oligomers in the mitochondrial outer membrane. Furthermore, the positively charged residues in the N-terminal domain of VDAC1 interact with mtDNA, promoting VDAC1 oligomerizat...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kim, J., Gupta, R., Blanco, L. P., Yang, S., Shteinfer-Kuzmine, A., Wang, K., Zhu, J., Yoon, H. E., Wang, X., Kerkhofs, M., Kang, H., Brown, A. L., Park, S.-J., Xu, X., Zandee van Rilland, E., Kim, M. K., Cohen, J. I., Kaplan, M. J., Shoshan-Barmatz, V., Tags: Cell Biology, Immunology reports Source Type: news

Geffen School of Medicine honors doctor for his groundbreaking research on immune response
In recognition of his groundbreaking work on the mechanisms underlying the cellular response to infection, Dr. Zhijian “James” Chen of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas has received the 2019 Switzer Prize awarded by the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.At the prize ceremony on the UCLA campus, during which Chen delivered a lecture about his research focused on the role of DNA in triggering immune defense and autoimmune diseases, the scientist said he was honored to receive the award and then joked that “to this day, I still don’t know who nominated me.”C...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mitocellular communication: Shaping health and disease
Throughout the animal kingdom, mitochondria are the only organelles that retain their own genome and the transcription and translation machineries that are all essential for energy harvesting. Mitochondria have developed a complex communication network, allowing them to stay in tune with cellular needs and nuclear transcriptional programs and to alleviate mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we review recent findings on the wide array of mechanisms that contribute to these mitocellular communication networks, spanning from well-studied messenger molecules to mitonuclear genetic interactions. Based on these observations and dev...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mottis, A., Herzig, S., Auwerx, J. Tags: Cell Biology special/review Source Type: news

Keeping a cell's powerhouse in shape
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) A German-Swiss team around Professor Oliver Daumke from the MDC has investigated how a protein of the dynamin family deforms the inner mitochondrial membrane. The results, which also shed light on a hereditary disease of the optic nerve, have been published in Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Host mitochondria influence gut microbiome diversity: A role for ROS
Changes in the gut microbiota and the mitochondrial genome are both linked with the development of disease. To investigate why, we examined the gut microbiota of mice harboring various mutations in genes that alter mitochondrial function. These studies revealed that mitochondrial genetic variations altered the composition of the gut microbiota community. In cross-fostering studies, we found that although the initial microbiota community of newborn mice was that obtained from the nursing mother, the microbiota community progressed toward that characteristic of the microbiome of unfostered pups of the same genotype within 2 ...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yardeni, T., Tanes, C. E., Bittinger, K., Mattei, L. M., Schaefer, P. M., Singh, L. N., Wu, G. D., Murdock, D. G., Wallace, D. C. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine names 2019 winner of Switzer Prize
Dr. Zhijian (James) Chen of the UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas will be the 2019 recipient of the Switzer Prize, awarded by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Chen has performed groundbreaking work on the mechanisms underlying the cellular response to infection.Chen ’s group has been instrumental in the identification of immune response pathways that have significantly added to scientists’ understanding of how these pathways work in microbial infections and autoimmune diseases.Most significantly, his team at UT Southwestern discovered the DNA-sensing enzyme cGAS, which helps launch the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Reneo Pharmaceuticals Raises $50 Million to Develop Therapeutics to Treat Genetic Mitochondrial Diseases
SAN DIEGO, May 20, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Reneo Pharmaceuticals, a clinical stage pharmaceutical company, today announced that it has completed a $50 million Series A financing to develop therapies for diseases associated with d... Biopharmaceuticals, Venture Capital Reneo Pharmaceuticals, mitochondrial diseases (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Miro2 is a Parkin receptor for selective removal of damaged mitochondria
(Science China Press) Defects in mitophagy are linked to a variety of human diseases including Parkinson's and cardiac disorders. At present, how the damaged mitochondria are selectively recognized and targeted by Parkin is not fully understood. Miro2, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, has been identified as a platform for Parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria. Miro2 senses both the depolarization and the Ca2+ release from mitochondria to ensure that only damaged mitochondria are targeted by Parkin for mitophagic clearance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biomarker may help identify men with prostate cancer at greater risk of tumor metastasis
(Elsevier) Ten percent of patients with prostate cancer develop locally invasive and metastatic disease, which increases the severity of the disease and likelihood of death and limits treatment options. A report in The American Journal of Pathology indicates that a significantly lower presence of syntaphilin (SNPH) -- a mitochondrial protein -- within the tumor's central core versus at the tumor's invasive outer edge, may identify patients at increased risk of metastasis. These patients may require more rigorous testing, surveillance, and treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Polycystin 2 regulates mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling, bioenergetics, and dynamics through mitofusin 2
Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have an intimate functional relationship due to tethering proteins that bring their membranes in close (~30 nm) apposition. One function of this interorganellar junction is to increase the efficiency of Ca2+ transfer into mitochondria, thus stimulating mitochondrial respiration. Here, we showed that the ER cation-permeant channel polycystin 2 (PC2) functions to reduce mitochondria-ER contacts. In cell culture models, PC2 knockdown led to a 50% increase in mitofusin 2 (MFN2) expression, an outer mitochondrial membrane GTPase. Live-cell super-resolution and electron microscopy ...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - May 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kuo, I. Y., Brill, A. L., Lemos, F. O., Jiang, J. Y., Falcone, J. L., Kimmerling, E. P., Cai, Y., Dong, K., Kaplan, D. L., Wallace, D. P., Hofer, A. M., Ehrlich, B. E. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging
(American Chemical Society) Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. But can accelerated aging be detected at the cellular level in healthy people exposed to pollutants? Now, researchers in the ACS journal Environmental Science& Technology report that although pollutant exposure can affect two hallmarks of aging in people (mitochondrial DNA content and telomere length), the results are not so clear-cut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Baby Was Born With DNA from 3 People. Here ’s How That’s Possible
Researchers at the Institute of Life in Athens, Greece announced that a healthy baby boy was born on Tuesday morning to a 32-year-old woman who had experienced several failed cycles of IVF. The six-pound boy, who the doctors say in a statement is healthy, was born using a technique called maternal spindle transfer. In the procedure, the grouped-together DNA from a mother’s egg was removed and placed inside a donor egg from another woman, which had been emptied of its DNA. The donor’s egg with the mother’s genes was then fertilized and developed into an embryo that was transferred for pregnancy. The techn...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Genetics Reproductive Health Source Type: news

Baby born with three-person DNA
Doctors used a donor egg to combat mother's mitochondrial disease Related items fromOnMedica Embryology proposals approved by MPs Charity asks Government to pay for NI abortions Women complain of 'confusing and contradictory' fertility advice MHRA tightens licence restrictions on valproate for women Colleges urge GPs to take on maternity care (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 11, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Visual defects and ageing - Sacc à SC, Cutolo CA, Rossi T.
Many diseases are related to age, among these neurodegeneration is particularly important. Alzheimer's disease Parkinson's and Glaucoma have many common pathogenic events including oxidative damage, Mitochondrial dysfunction, endothelial alterations and ch... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Gene behind long-recognized mitochondrial disease has highly varied effects
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Mutations in the mitochondrial gene mt-ATP6, which encodes an essential part of the mitochondrial motor known as ATP synthase that generates cellular energy, are much more variable than previously thought. This prompts the need to develop more precise clinical tests that can better determine the course of treatment for patients affected by mitochondrial disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An existing drug may have therapeutic potential in mitochondrial disease
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) New preclinical findings from extensive cell and animal studies suggest that a drug already used for a rare kidney disease could benefit patients with some mitochondrial disorders -- complex conditions with severe energy deficiency for which no proven effective treatments exist. Future clinical research is needed to explore whether the drug, cysteamine bitartrate, will meaningfully benefit patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Is the Most Common Type of Cardiomyopathy?
Discussion Barth syndrome is characterized by a dilated cardiomyopathy, proximal skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia and short stature that usually presents at birth or soon after. It is a rare X-linked recessive disease process caused by mutations in the TAZ gene. The TAZ gene codes for tafazzin which alters cardiolipin in mitochondria. Characteristic facies can be seen especially in infancy including a tall and broad forehead, prominent chin and full cheeks, larger ears, and deep-set eyes. Most patients present at birth or soon afterwards but some may not until later in life. Life expectancy is reduced with many childr...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 25, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Sea slug study illuminates how mitochondria move
(Scripps Research Institute) Defects in the transport of cells' energy organelles are a suspected cause of diseases including Alzheimer's, ALS, Huntington's and Parkinson's. A new study reveals the genetics behind mitochondrial shifts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Manganese activates NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and propagates exosomal release of ASC in microglial cells
In this study, we examined whether Mn2+ activates the multiprotein NLRP3 inflammasome complex to promote neuroinflammation. Exposing activated mouse microglial cells to Mn2+ substantially augmented NLRP3 abundance, caspase-1 cleavage, and maturation of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Exposure of mice to Mn2+ had similar effects in brain microglial cells. Furthermore, Mn2+ impaired mitochondrial ATP generation, basal respiratory rate, and spare capacity in microglial cells. These data suggest that Mn-induced mitochondrial defects drove the inflammasome signal amplification. We found that Mn induc...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - January 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarkar, S., Rokad, D., Malovic, E., Luo, J., Harischandra, D. S., Jin, H., Anantharam, V., Huang, X., Lewis, M., Kanthasamy, A., Kanthasamy, A. G. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

The road to a healthier heart: Study suggests using TCM to repair mitochondrial dysfunction
(Natural News) Ischemic heart disease, which is also called coronary heart disease, is the most prevalent and the deadliest heart problem in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this disease causes more than 370,000 deaths yearly. Moreover, ischemic heart disease also increases the risk of heart attacks. These cause further damage to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Experimental Procedure Could Help More Families Have Healthy Babies. But It ’s Not Allowed in the U.S.
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

An Experimental Procedure Could Help More Families Have Healthy Babies. But It ’s Not Allowed in the U.S.
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Health - January 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

Autophagy and mitochondria: Targets in neurodegenerative disorders
(Bentham Science Publishers) Cellular homeostasis depends on the timely clearance of damaged cellular organelles and proteins via pathways including autophagy. Mitochondria and mitochondrial autophagy play a vital role in cellular health and failure of these pathways can have a devastating effect on cellular homeostasis. Here, the researchers review the involvement of mitochondrial and autophagy dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders specifically focusing on Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ohio State biotech spinoff Entrada raises $59M to tackle deadly disease with no other treatment
An Ohio State University spinoff developing a treatment for a deadly mitochondrial disease launched Tuesday in Boston with a $59 million round of venture capital investment. Entrada Therapeutics is using science developed by Ohio State University professor and company co-founder Dehua Pei to deliver treatment to previously un-druggable targets in the power center of a cell. The Series A investment announced Tuesday is the largest ever for an OSU spinoff, the school said. “Our commitment to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Ohio State biotech spinoff Entrada raises $59M to tackle deadly disease with no other treatment
An Ohio State University spinoff developing a treatment for a deadly mitochondrial disease launched Tuesday in Boston with a $59 million round of venture capital investment. Entrada Therapeutics is using science developed by Ohio State University professor and company co-founder Dehua Pei to deliver treatment to previously un-druggable targets in the power center of a cell. The Series A investment announced Tuesday is the largest ever for an OSU spinoff, the school said. “Our commitment to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 19, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutation identified for Leigh Syndrome
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Decades after two brothers died in childhood of a mitochondrial disease, researchers pinpointed the exact cause in a founder mutation among Ashkenazi Jews. The discoverers say the mutation should be added to prenatal carrier screening programs for prospective parents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Grad Studies Student Awarded National Institute on Aging Grant
Liam Coyne, a fifth-year Upstate Medical University student in the MD/PhD program, has been awarded a four-year National Institute on Aging fellowship grant to study how mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to diseases such as Alzheimer ¿s, Parkinson¿s and ALS. (Source: SUNY Upstate Medical)
Source: SUNY Upstate Medical - October 31, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: News Source Type: news

Mount Sinai recognized for excellence in mitochondrial care
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has been recognized as a certified Mitochondrial Medicine Center by the Mitochondrial Care Network, a newly established collaborative founded by four national mitochondrial disease advocacy groups. The certification recognizes centers for dedication to mitochondrial medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ER-mitochondria cross-talk is regulated by the Ca2+ sensor NCS1 and is impaired in Wolfram syndrome
Communication between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria plays a pivotal role in Ca2+ signaling, energy metabolism, and cell survival. Dysfunction in this cross-talk leads to metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Wolfram syndrome is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the ER-resident protein WFS1. Here, we showed that WFS1 formed a complex with neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS1) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) to promote Ca2+ transfer between the ER and mitochondria. In addition, we found that NCS1 abundance was reduced in WFS1-null patient fibroblasts, which showed redu...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - October 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Angebault, C., Fauconnier, J., Patergnani, S., Rieusset, J., Danese, A., Affortit, C. A., Jagodzinska, J., Megy, C., Quiles, M., Cazevieille, C., Korchagina, J., Bonnet-Wersinger, D., Milea, D., Hamel, C., Pinton, P., Thiry, M., Lacampagne, A., Delprat, B Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Advanced sequencing technology provides new insights into human mitochondrial diseases
(University of Helsinki) Researchers have for the first time been able to investigate the abundance and methyl modifications of all mitochondrial tRNAs in patients suffering from one of the most common inherited mitochondrial tRNA mutations. The analysis pipeline revealed quantitative changes that had dramatic effects on protein synthesis within mitochondria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic causes of mitochondrial disease identified in study
Researchers have identified previously unknown genetic causes of mitochondrial disease. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemotherapy may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle
(American Physiological Society) Chemotherapy drugs to treat breast cancer may promote muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, according to new research. Dysfunctional mitochondria, the energy centers of the cells, may contribute to fatigue and weakness that some people with breast cancer experience through the course of disease treatment. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Cell Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mitochondrial diseases could be treated with gene therapy
Researchers have developed a genome editing tool for the potential treatment of mitochondrial diseases. The study applied an experimental gene therapy treatment in mice and successfully targeted and eliminated the damaged DNA in mitochondria. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 25, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Gene therapy may be effective against mitochondrial diseases
A newly developed gene editing tool can potentially treat mitochondrial diseases, which occur when the energy-producing structures malfunction. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New research reveals a mitochondrial gene that protects against Alzheimer's disease
(University of Southern California) New research from USC has uncovered a previously unknown genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The study provides insights on how these conditions, and other diseases of aging, might one day be treated and prevented. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research reveals a mitochondrial gene that protects against dementia and other diseases of aging
(University of Southern California) New research from USC has uncovered a previously unknown genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The study provides insights on how these conditions, and other diseases of aging, might one day be treated and prevented. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify a new cause of childhood mitochondrial disease
(Newcastle University) A rapid genetic test developed by Newcastle researchers has identified the first four patients with inherited mutations in a new disease gene, a building block of complex I called NDUFA6. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news